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School Privatisation

ACADEMIES, TRUSTS, ‘FREE’ OR ‘NEW’ SCHOOLS: HOW FAR SHOULD SCHOOL PRIVATISATION GO?

Seminar organised by the TUC and the Anti Academies Alliance

Speakers:

Professor Stephen Ball, Institute of Education, University of London

Ann-Christin Larsson from Lararforbundet, Sweden’s largest teachers union

Alasdair Smith, Anti Academies Alliance

John Bangs, NUT assistant general secretary

Christina McAnea, UNISON head of education

Chaired by Tom Wilson, TUC

7pm, Wednesday 17th March

The Wilson Room, Portcullis House, Victoria Embankment, London, SW1A 2JH

School Privatisation

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blof.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Crisis Sublime

THE PHENOMENON OF OBAMA AND THE AGENDA FOR EDUCATION

CALL FOR CHAPTER PROPOSAL SUBMISSIONS

The phenomenon of Obama and the agenda for education: Can hope audaciously trump neoliberalism?

Under Contract with Information Age Publishing

Co-editors:

Dr. Paul R. Carr: Educational Foundations, Beeghly College of Education, Youngstown State University, Youngstown, OH, USA, 44555, prcarr@ysu.edu http://www.coe.ysu.edu/~paulcarr/

Dr. Brad J. Porfilio: Educational Leadership, School of Education, Lewis University, Chicago, IL, USA, porfilio16@aol.com

Paul R. Carr is originally from Toronto, and now resides in Montreal. He studied for two years in France in the early 1980s, and then undertook the rest of his university studies in Canada in the areas of political science, sociology and education. He completed his doctorate in the sociology of education at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education at the University of Toronto in 1996, with his thesis examining anti-racism and institutional culture in education. For the past few years, he has been a professor at Youngstown State University, where he teaches courses in multicultural education, the sociology of education, diversity and leadership, and qualitative methodology. His current research is broadly concerned with social justice, with specific threads related to critical pedagogy, democracy, media literacy, and intercultural education. In 2007, he co-edited The Great White North? Exploring Whiteness, Privilege and Identity in Education ( Rotterdam : Sense Publishers), and, in 2008, co-edited another book, entitled Doing Democracy: Striving for Political Literacy and Social Justice ( New York : Peter Lang). He is currently finalizing two other edited books dealing with intercultural education and youth culture, respectively, as well as a single-author book on critical pedagogy and democracy. Paul is the co-founder and co-director of the Global Doing Democracy Research Project, which aims to produce a range of studies on the international level, leading to critical, comparative analysis of how democracy and education can be more effectively connected. He has a blog on the Paulo and Nita Freire International Center for Critical Pedagogy on the theme of democracy. Lastly, he has been involved in a range of projects and initiatives in relation to solidarity with Latin America. His website is: http://www.coe.ysu.edu/~paulcarr/

Dr. Brad J. Porfilio is Assistant Professor of Education at Lewis University in Romeoville, IL. He teaches courses on critical pedagogy, qualitative research, globalization and education, multicultural education, foundations of education, and curriculum theory in the Educational Leadership for Teaching and Learning Doctoral Program. The Educational Leadership Program at Lewis University is unique in its critical and transformative focus where students are prepared to become transformative educational leaders who are deeply discerning, knowledgeable and approach the educational system as a potential avenue for challenging and transforming the status quo. Dr. Porfilio received his PhD in Sociology of Education in 2005 at the University at Buffalo. During his doctoral studies, he served as an Assistant Professor of Education at Medaille College and D’Youville College, where he taught courses across the teacher education spectrum and supervised pre-service and in-service teachers from Canada and the US. He has published numerous peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, edited volumes, and conference papers on the topics of urban education, critical social studies education, neoliberalism and schooling, transformative education, teacher education, gender and technology, and cultural studies.

Premise for the book:

Obama is, arguably, popular at home and (especially) abroad, especially among people of “color”. Expectations are high that he will transform the United States. His style, message and presence are extremely attractive, especially following eight years of problematic leadership in the White House.

Why is Obama popular? Does he provide hope, as he eloquently argued throughout the electoral campaign? Can he change society when the two-party system, combined with an overpowering neoliberal economic model, is infused into the cultural and political landscape of society? Will he challenge the military-industrial model, scaling back the 750 US military bases in a hundred countries and untold billions being spent on military purposes? Will he dismantle monopolistic, undemocratic business practices that supposedly underpin the marketplace? How will he promote meaningful critical engagement and change in relation to race, discrimination, marginalization and differential power relations?

The above questions are fundamental to framing a debate around what type of hope and change we are considering. To undertake an analysis of what this means in real terms of change, we are seeking progressive scholars to interrogate Obama’s education vision, agenda and policies, and, further, to assess how well the education agenda might address the broader call for change. While this is early in Obama’s first term, we consider education to be the lynchpin to promoting a paradigm of engagement that advances social justice while contextualizing neoliberalism. We have found only one book that addresses the Obama agenda but this work is not a critical diagnosis of the issues.

Globalization is not simply a concept that leads to prosperity for all, and continuing to consider education as a consumer-good, rather than a public good, can serve to reinforce social inequities. Moreover, the antipathy that many people around the world exemplify toward Americans, often focused on US foreign policy, will not be diminished if Americans themselves are not more engaged with “others”. Education is the key to critically understanding and challenging war, patriotism, inequities, injustices, and building a more robust, dynamic and meaningful democracy.

The challenges in education are enormous, given the effect of several years of No Child Left Behind. Obama’s early indications at changing education policy have left some believing that the substance is much more conservative than the style. Support for charter schools and merit pay for teachers have left some wondering if the US will further slide into decay internationally, where it traditionally does poorly on comparative assessments. Renowned cultural studies scholar Henry Giroux has commented that Obama’s plans for education will serve to further disenfranchise marginalized groups.

We are interested in examining the state of public education under Obama, and how education may or may not be used as a lever to transform society, to effectively build the socio-cultural and political architecture that can buttress a diminution of racial, ethnic, religious, gender and class cleavages. Thus, understanding and interrogating neoliberalism will be an integral focus of this book, seeking to determine if the change espoused from above (the Obama government) can find its way into the classroom, the community and workplace.

Our conceptual framework is inspired by the burgeoning critical pedagogical movement (Freire, Giroux, Kincheloe, Macedo, McLaren, Steinberg). As Freire has underscored, education is a political project, and our analysis will critically dissect and unravel the policy, curricular, pedagogical and socio-political contextual variables, manifestations and proposals framing the Obama educational agenda.

With trillions of dollars being spent on bailouts of banks, insurance companies and car manufacturers, in addition to the endless stream of funds being allocated for war, little attention has been paid to the importance of education. Yet, education is where society can be transformed or re-produced.

This book will not only provide a detailed, critical analysis of the Obama education agenda. It will also provide proposals and insight into an alternative vision for education, one that takes into consideration neoliberalism, and seeks to neutralize it through critical pedagogy.

Audience:

 This volume will be a valuable resource to instructors who teach in the fields of teacher education, social studies, educational leadership, social work, social, cultural and philosophical foundations of education, sociology, political science, and global studies as well as their students. It may also be of interest to researchers, scholars, and the broader education public as well as mainstream and media sources.

Time-frame:

1)      Proposals due by March 1, 2010;

2)      Confirmation of selected chapters by April 1, 2010;

3)      Contributors will have their first drafts completed by June 15, 2010.

4)      The editors will review these first drafts, and provide authors detailed comments and suggestions by July 15, 2010.

5)      The contributors will make all of the necessary edits, and send the final chapters to the editors by September 1, 2010.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Professor Dave Hill

JOURNAL FOR CRITICAL EDUCATION POLICY STUDIES: VOL.7 NO.2

The new edition of The Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies -JCEPS 7(2) is now published online at: http://www.jceps.com

The contents are:

1.Dave Hill (University of Northampton, England, and Middlesex University, London, England): Race and Class in Britain: a Critique of the statistical basis for Critical Race Theory in Britain

2.Tom G. Griffiths (University of Newcastle, Australia), Jo Williams (Victoria University, Australia): Mass schooling for socialist transformation in Cuba and Venezuela

3.Peter McLaren (University of California, Los Angeles, USA): Guided by a Red Star: the Cuban literacy campaign and the challenge of history

4.M. Wangeci Gatimu (Western Oregon University, Monmouth, Oregon, USA): Rationale for Critical Pedagogy of Decolonization: Kenya as a Unit of Analysis

5.Jennifer A. Sandlin (Arizona State University, USA), Richard Kahn (University of North Dakota, USA), David Darts (New York University, USA) and Kevin Tavin, (The Ohio State University, USA): To Find the Cost of Freedom: Theorizing and Practicing a Critical Pedagogy of Consumption

6.Brian Lack (Georgia State University, USA): No Excuses: A Critique of the Knowledge Is Power Program (KIPP) within Charter Schools in the USA

7. Sondra Cuban and Nelly Stromquist (Lancaster University, UK and University of Maryland, USA): It Is Difficult To Be A Woman With A Dream Of An Education: Challenging U.S. Adult Basic Education Policies to Support Women Immigrants’ Self-Determination

8.Bill Templer (University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia): A Two-Tier Model for a More Simplified and Sustainable English as an International Language

9.Prentice Chandler (Athens State University, United States) and Douglas McKnight (The University of Alabama, United States): The Failure of Social Education in the United States: A Critique of Teaching the National Story from “White” Colourblind Eyes

10.Seçkin Özsoy (Ankara University, Ankara, Turkey): A Utopian Educator from Turkey:Ýsmail Hakký Tonguç (1893-1960)

11.Domingos Leite Lima Filho (Federal Technological University of Paraná UTFPR, Brazil): Educational Policies and Globalization: elements for some criticism on the international organizations’ proposals for Latin America and the Caribbean Islands Countries

12.Andrea Beckmann (University of Lincoln, UK), Charlie Cooper (University of Hull, UK) and Dave Hill (University of Northampton, and Middlesex University, UK): Neoliberalization and managerialization of ‘education’ in England and Wales – a case for reconstructing education

13.Jane-Frances Lobnibe (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Illinois, USA): International Students and the Politics of Difference in US Higher Education

14.Magnus Dahlstedt (University of Linkoping, Sweden): Democratic Governmentality: National Imaginations, Popular Movements and Governing the Citizen

15.Torie L. Weiston-Serdan (Claremont Graduate University, California, USA): A Radical Redistribution of Capital

16.Brad Porfilio (Lewis University, Romeoville, Illinois, USA) and Greg Dimitriadis (University of Buffalo, New York, USA): Book Review: Marc Pruyn and Luis Huerta-Charles Eds. Teaching Peter McLaren: Paths of Dissent (New York: Peter Lang)

The Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies seeks and publishes articles that critique global, national, neo-liberal, neo-conservative, New Labour, Third Way, postmodernist and other analyses of policy developments, as well as those that attempt to report on, analyse and develop Socialist/ Marxist transformative policy for schooling and education from a number of Radical Left perspectives. JCEPS also addresses issues of social class, ‘race’, gender, sexual orientation, disability and capital/ism; critical pedagogies; new public managerialism and academic / non-academic labour, and empowerment/ disempowerment. JCEPS welcomes articles from academics and activists throughout the globe. It is a refereed / peer reviewed/ peer juried international journal.

Contact: dave.hill@ieps.org.uk and DAVE6@mdx.ac.uk.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk