Skip navigation

Tag Archives: Carbon Trading

Deadwing

THE ATMOSPHERE BUSINESS

ephemera: theory & politics in organization

volume 12, number 1/2

 

The atmosphere business
Issue editors: Steffen Böhm, Anna-Maria Murtola and Sverre Spoelstra 

The contributions collected in this special issue of ephemera question the underlying ideologies and assumptions of carbon markets, and bring to light many of the contradictions and antagonisms that are currently at the heart of ‘climate capitalism’. They offer a critical assessment of the political economy of carbon trading, and a detailed understanding of how these newly created markets are designed, how they (don’t) work, the various actors that are involved, and how these actors function together to create and contest the ‘atmosphere business’. In 5 notes, 6 articles, 1 interview and 3 book reviews, some of the most prominent critical voices in debates about the atmosphere business are brought together in this special issue. 

Table of Contents:
Editorial

The atmosphere business  
Steffen Böhm, Anna-Maria Murtola and Sverre Spoelstra 

Notes 

Privatising the atmosphere: A solution or dangerous con? 
Mike Childs 
 
Carbon markets after Durban 
Oscar Reyes 
 
A dark art: Field notes on carbon capture and storage policy negotiations at COP17 
Gökçe Günel 
 
Durban’s conference of polluters, market failure and critic failure 
Patrick Bond 
 
The people’s climate summit in Cochabamba: A tragedy in three acts 
Tadzio Mueller 

Interview  

Critiquing carbon markets: A conversation 
Larry Lohmann and Steffen Böhm 
 
Articles  

Capitalizing on chaos: Climate change and disaster capitalism 
Robert Fletcher 
 
The prey of uncertainty: Climate change as opportunity 
Jerome Whitington 
 
Carbon classified? Unpacking heterogeneous relations inscribed  into corporate carbon emissions 
Ingmar Lippert 
 
A colonial mechanism to enclose lands: A critical review of two  REDD+-focused special issues 
Joanna Cabello and Tamra Gilbertson 
 
Mapping REDD in the Asia-Pacific: Governance, marketisation  and contention 
Rebecca Pearse 
 
Planting trees through the Clean Development Mechanism:  A critical assessment 
Esteve Corbera and Charlotte Friedli 
 
Reviews
The ‘third way’ for climate action 
Siddhartha Dabhi 
 
Carbon trading in South Africa: Plus ça change?   
Peter Newell 
 
Can capitalism survive climate change?
David L. Levy

 

Ephemera: http://www.ephemeraweb.org

 

*****END*****

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Harvesting

NATURE INC? QUESTIONING THE MARKET PANACEA IN ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY AND CONSERVATION

The Second Call for Papers for a conference next year 30 June – 2 July on Nature™ Inc? Questioning the Market Panacea in Environmental Policy and Conservation.

Please consider sending in an abstract, and/or send it on to your networks

Second Call for Papers
Nature™ Inc? Questioning the Market Panacea in Environmental Policy and Conservation

International Conference
30 June – 2 July 2011
ISS, The Hague, The Netherlands

Special guests:  Amita Baviskar (IEG, Delhi University), Nancy Peluso (University of California, Berkeley), Fander Falconi (FLACSO, Former Foreign Minister, Ecuador) and Ton Dietz (University of Leiden)

Nature is dead. Long live Nature™ Inc.! This adagio inspires many environmental policies today. In order to respond to the many environmental problems the world is facing, new and innovative methods are necessary, or so it is argued, and markets are posited as the ideal vehicle to supply these. Indeed, market forces have been finding their way into environmental policy and conservation to a degree that seemed unimaginable only a decade ago. Payments for ecosystem services, biodiversity derivatives and new conservation finance mechanisms, species banking, carbon trade and conservation 2.0 are just some of the market mechanisms that have taken a massive flight in popularity in recent years, despite, or perhaps because of the recent ‘Great Financial Crisis’.

The conference seeks to critically engage with the market panacea in environmental policy and conservation in the context of histories and recent developments in neoliberal capitalism. The conference is steeped in traditions of political economy and political ecology, in order to arrive at a deeper understanding of where environmental policies and conservation in an age of late capitalism come from, are going and what effects they have on natures and peoples.

‘Nature™ Inc’ follows a successful recent conference in Lund, Sweden, in May 2010 and several earlier similar initiatives that have shown the topic to be of great interest to academics, policy-makers and civil society. The present conference is thus meant not only to deepen and share critical knowledge on market-based environmental policies and practices and nature-society relations more generally, but also to strengthen and widen the networks enabling this objective.

 Topics include but are not limited to:
   • General trends in market-based environmental policies and instruments
   • New forms of neoliberal conservation (including web 2.0, species banking, etc)
   • Agro-food systems, the meat-industrial complex, and aquaculture
   • Agro-fuels, energy and climate change
   • The relation between conservation and land (including protected areas, etc.)
   • Financialisation of the environment
   • New social, environmental and peasant movements and left alternatives
   • Accumulation by dispossession, property regimes, and the “new” enclosures
   • Ecological imperialisms, including the recent ‘land grabs’
   • Urban and rural political ecologies and the links between them
   • Theoretical advancements in nature-society relations

Paper proposals are due 15 December 2010. Please send a 250-300 word proposal, with title, contact information, and three keywords as a Word attachment to: nature2011@iss.nl. Proposals for complete panels are welcome.

Conference language is English. Authors will be notified by 15 January 2011. Complete papers are due by 1 April, 2011. More information on: http://www.iss.nl/nature2011 and http://www.worldecologyresearch.org  
 
Organization
The conference is organized by the Institute of Social Studies, Erasmus University Rotterdam, together with the University of Manchester and the University of Queensland.

Conference organizing committee (OC): Bram Büscher, Murat Arsel, Lorenzo Pellegrini, Max Spoor (ISS, Erasmus University, the Netherlands) Wolfram Dressler (University of Queensland, Australia) Dan Brockington (SERG, Manchester University, UK)

Conference advisory committee (AC): Ben White (ISS, Erasmus University) Patrick Bond (University of KwaZulu Natal) Sian Sullivan (Birkbeck College) Jason W. Moore (Umeå University) Blessing J Karumbidza (Socio-Economic Rights Institute, South Africa) Eric Swyngedouw (SERG, Manchester University) Noel Castree (SERG, Manchester University) Rosaleen Duffy (SERG, Manchester University) Holly Buck (Lund University) Scott Prudham (University of Toronto) Jun Borras (ISS, Erasmus University) Dean Bavington (Nipissing University) Mark Hudson (University of Manitoba)
Jim Igoe (Dartmouth College) Dhoya Snijders (VU University Amsterdam) Caroline Seagle (VU University Amsterdam) Diana C. Gildea (Lund University) Christian Alarcon Ferrari (Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences) Katja Neves (Concordia University) Roldan Muradian (Nijmegen University)

 ———————————————
Dr. Bram Büscher
Lecturer in Environment & Sustainable Development
International Institute of Social Studies
Erasmus University
Kortenaerkade 12
2518 AX The Hague
The Netherlands
T +31 (0)70 4260 596
buscher@iss.nl
http://www.iss.nl/buscher

END

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

All that is Solid for Glenn Rikowski: https://rikowski.wordpress.com

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com
Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Dharma Initiative

THE RISE AND FALL OF NEOLIBERALISM

The Rise and Fall of Neoliberalism: The Collapse of an Economic Order?
London and New York: Zed Books, 2010
Edited by Kean Birch and Vlad Mykhnenko

Hardback: £70.00   ISBN: 9781848133488
Paperback: £18.99  ISBN: 9781848133495

Book website: http://www.zedbooks.co.uk/book.asp?bookdetail=4351 

About the Book

The recent, devastating and ongoing economic crisis has exposed the faultlines in the dominant neoliberal economic order, opening debate for the first time in years on alternative visions that do not subscribe to a ‘free’ market ethic. In particular, the core contradiction at the heart of neoliberalism – that states are necessary for the functioning of free markets – provides us with the opportunity to think again about how we want to organise our economies and societies. The Rise and Fall of Neoliberalism presents critical perspectives of neoliberal policies, questions the ideas underpinning neoliberalism, and explores diverse response to it from around the world.

In bringing together the work of distinguished scholars and dedicated activists to question neoliberal hegemony, the book exposes the often fractured and multifarious manifestations of neoliberalism which will have to be challenged to bring about meaningful social change.

What People Have Said About the Book

‘Since the 1970s, the politics of “neoliberalism,” based on the purported concern to minimize state interference in the economy and thus to unleash “free” markets, have been mobilized at various sites and scales across the world economy. This book provides useful intellectual tools for deciphering the ideological, social and institutional foundations of neoliberalism and its wide-ranging implications for the still ongoing regulatory reorganization of capitalism.’ – Neil Brenner, New York University 

‘This is an outstanding book not only because of the sophisticated critiques offered by some of the most highly regarded thinkers on the topic of the destruction and misery wrought through neoliberal capitalism, but also because its forward looking emphasis on a more egalitarian and hopeful future offers insights about the work that needs to be done by activists and scholars alike. Moreover, this book helps us recognize that the emergence of any talk of a post-neoliberal era is premature beyond helping to construct a road map for ways citizens of the world can collectively, and deliberately, move forward.’ – Nik Heynen, University of Georgia

‘This timely and wide ranging book traces the changing contours of neoliberalism, demonstrating how market-oriented policies gave rise to a globally hegemonic political-economic project. The emphasis is on identifying the different forms neoliberalism takes and the diverse responses to it. At a juncture when this political-economic project is under increasing scrutiny from supporters and opponents alike, the book challenges existing conceptions of neoliberalism and makes an important contribution to the reinvigorated search for political alternatives.’ – Wendy Larner, Professor of Human Geography and Sociology, University of Bristol

‘A timely volume on the nature, varied manifestations, and above all limitations of a an economic order that is failing so spectacularly with the financial crisis. Highly recommended for academics, students, or for that matter anyone interested in the politics of our times.’ – Magnus Ryner, Professor of International Relations, Oxford Brookes University.

Table of Contents:
1. Introduction: A World Turned Right-Way Up – Kean Birch and Vlad Mykhnenko

Part 1: The Rise of Neoliberalism

2. How Neoliberalism Got Where It Is: Elite Planning, Corporate Lobbying and the Release of the Free Market – David Miller

3. Making Neoliberal Order in the United States – Kean Birch and Adam Tickell

4. Neoliberalism, Intellectual Property and the Global Knowledge Economy – David Tyfield

5. Neoliberalism and the Calculable World: The Rise of Carbon Trading – Larry Lohmann

6. Tightening the Web: The World Bank and Enforced Policy Reform – Elisa van Waeyenberge

7. The Corruption Industry and Transition: Neoliberalising Post-Soviet Space? – Adam Swain, Vlad Mykhnenko and Shaun French

8. Remaking the Welfare State: From Safety Net to Trampoline – Julie MacLeavy
Part 2: The Fall of Neoliberalism

9. Zombieconomics: The Living Death of the Dismal Science – Ben Fine

10. From Hegemony to Crisis? The Continuing Ecological Dominance of Neo-Liberalism – Bob Jessop

11. Do It Yourself: A Politics for Changing Our World – Paul Chatterton

12. Dreaming the Real: A Politics of Ethical Spectacles – Paul Routledge

13. Transnational Companies and Transnational Civil Society – Leonith Hinojosa and Anthony Bebbington

14. Defeating Neo-liberalism: A Marxist Internationalist Perspective and Programme – Jean Shaoul

15. Conclusion: The End of an Economic Order? – Vlad Mykhnenko and Kean Birch

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon Profile: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Crisis Theory

FINANCIALISATION AND ENVIRONMENT

 Hallsworth Conference on Financialisation and Environment 
The Implications for Environmental Governance of the Global Financial Crisis
15-16 April, 2010, University of Manchester
Board Room, Arthur Lewis Building, 2nd floor

Please register at: http://www.socialsciences.manchester.ac.uk/disciplines/politics/events/hallsworth/booking/

Program

Thursday, 15 April 2010

10:30: Welcome and Registration

11:00: Introduction – Erik Swyngedouw, University of Manchester

11:30: Debates on Economic Valuation and Payment for Environmental Services – Joan Martinez Allier, Autonomous University of Barcelona

12:30: Lunch

13:30 Carbon trading, new enclosures and eco-social contestation – Patrick Bond, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban

14:30: The Financialisation of the ‘Good Environment’ and ‘Good Environmental Citizen’ – Samuel Randalls, University College London

15:30: Coffee

16:00: The Domination of Finance capital over Nature – Claude Serfati, University of Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines

17:00: Discussion 

17:30: Close
Friday, 16 April 2010

10:00: The Role of Finance in the Ambiguous Post-Neoliberalising of Nature: A Research Program for the Agro-fuels Project – Ulrich Brand, University of Vienna

11:00: Sugarcane in Brazil: Finance capital, Slave Labour and Deforestation – Leonardo Sakamoto, Brazilian Comission for the Eradication of Slave Labour and NGO Repórter Brasil

12:00: Carbon Markets and Climate Change – Larry Lohman, The Corner House

13:00: Lunch

13:30: Carbon Emissions as New Fields for (Finance) Capital – Christian Zeller, University of Salzburg

14:30:  Processes of Exchange in the Carbon Credit Industry – John Broderick, University of Manchester

15:30: Coffee

15.45: Round Table: Financialisation of the Environment: What Governance?

17:00: Close

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic 

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com