Skip navigation

Tag Archives: Capitalist Development

Utopia

DEVELOPMENT WITHIN OR AGAINST CAPITALISM

Development Within or Against Capitalism: A Critical Engagement with Amartya Sen’s ‘Development as Freedom’.

Ben Selwyn (University of Sussex)

Date: 29 November 2011,

Time: 5:00 PM

Venue: School of Oriental and African Studies, Russell Square: Room: G50
University of London
Thornhaugh Street, Russell Square,
London WC1H 0XG
Tel: +44 (0)20 7637 2388

Ben Selwyn is the author of ‘Liberty Limited? A Sympathetic Re-Engagement with Amartya Sen’s Development as Freedom’. In Economic and Political Weekly. September 10, 2011 Vol.xlvI No.37

 

*****

 

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a new song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Capitalism

INTERNATIONAL PROJECT ON CAPITALIST DIVERSITY

Call for Contributions

Comparison, Analysis, Critique –Perspectives on the Diversity of Contemporary Capitalism(s) 

The observation that there is significant diversity within capitalism is an old one, but recently it has been mostly associated with the so-called comparative capitalisms, notably the Varieties of Capitalism literatures. These institutionalist perspectives on capitalist diversity have acquired a hegemonic status within comparative political economy research in and after the 2000s. In contrast, the critical political economy literature helped contribute to its own marginalisation in this field by neglecting the rich history of scholarship on historically and geographically specific forms of capitalism. It is against this background that this project seeks to engage with comparative capitalisms research from a series of alternative perspectives rooted in the broad and pluralistic field of critical political economy. Through this we also hope to strengthen and improve the dialogue between critical political economy scholars from different disciplinary, philosophical and geographical traditions. 

With the support of the Assoziation für kritische Gesellschaftsforschung and the International Political Economy working group of the British International Studies Association we will hold a conference at Goethe University Frankfurt from 10-11 February 2012. The proceedings of the event will feed into two publications: a German-language volume to be published in autumn 2012 with Verlag Westfälisches Dampfboot ; and a special issue of a peer-reviewed English-language journal in 2013. The two publications will be oriented to tackling most effectively the gaps and omissions in German- and English-language scholarship on the topic, respectively.

Perspectives from which interventions could be framed include critical institutionalism, regulation theory, materialist state theory, structural Marxism, feminist political economy, transnational historical materialism, dependency and world systems approaches, postcolonial studies, critical geography, uneven and combined development. This list is not exhaustive, however, and we seek contributions from scholars with an interest in critical political economy research, whatever their paradigmatic background and disciplinary affiliation (sociology, political science, economics, geography, anthropology, ethnology, development studies, area studies, history, etc.). Moreover, we invite both junior and senior researchers to contribute. Given the nature of the intervention that we seek to make, we expect participants to be committed to completing a full paper shortly after the conference.

Proposals of about 400 words , outlining the central theoretical-conceptual arguments and empirical support, should be sent to the organisers of the Frankfurt event under  ian.bruff@manchester.ac.ukm.ebenau@qmul.ac.uk, and a.noekle@soz.uni-frankfurt.de, by Friday 11 November 2011 at the latest.

A decision on the proposals will be made by Wednesday 23 November. Papers presented can be in English or German and will be translated if necessary for their inclusion in either or both of the publications. 

Best wishes 
Ian Bruff (University of Manchester), 
Matthias Ebenau (Queen Mary, University of London), and 
Andreas Nölke (Goethe-Universität Frankfurt)

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Capitalism

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

A Crisis of Capital

CAPITALISM IN CRISIS

MARXISM 21

Discussion Forum

Capitalism in Crisis: Causes, Consequences and Cure?

 

Speaker: Gerry Gold

Author of: A House of Cards: From fantasy finance to global crash

 

SATURDAY 30 JULY 1PM
INCA (General Confederation of Labour), Italian Advice Centre, 124 Canonbury Road, London, N1 2UT

Nearest Station: Highbury and Islington

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Karl Marx

REFORM COMMUNISM

Call for Papers:

One-day seminar/workshop on: “Reform communism” since 1945 in comparative historical perspective.

Saturday 22 October 2011.

Organised by UEA School of History in conjunction with the journal Socialist History
Venue: School of History, University of East Anglia, Norwich, NR4 7TJ.

The collapse of the USSR and the Eastern bloc in the wake of Gorbachev’s perestroika seemed to show that communism was essentially unreformable. It could be preserved, dismantled, or overthrown, but it could not be reconstructed as a viable alternative to capitalism, free from the defects of its Leninist-Stalinist prototype.

Prior to 1989-91, however, reform communism was a live political issue in many countries. At different times in countries as diverse as Yugoslavia, the USSR, Czechoslovakia, Western Europe, Japan, and China, the leaderships of communist parties themselves sought to change direction, re-evaluate their own past, correct mistakes and so on with the aim of cleansing, strengthening and improving communism, rather than undermining or dismantling it. In countries ruled by communist parties this process usually involved political relaxation and an easing of repression, and was often accompanied by an upsurge of intellectual and cultural ferment.

The aim of this seminar is to consider reform communism as a distinct phenomenon, which can usefully be distinguished from, on the one hand, mere changes of line or leader without any engagement with a party’s own past and the assumptions which underpinned it, and on the other, dissenting and oppositional activity within and outside parties which failed to change the party’s direction.

This seminar will explore different experiences of reform communism around the world after 1945 in a comparative context. 

Examples might include:
·        Tito and Titoism
·        Khrushchev and “de-Stalinisation”
·        Kadarism and the “Hungarian model”
·        Eurocommunism and ideas of socialist democracy
·        The Prague Spring
·        The Deng Xiaoping reforms in China
·        Gorbachev’s perestroika

We are seeking papers of 5000 to 10000 words on various experiences or aspects of reform communism in history, to be presented at the seminar. Selected papers will be published in 2012 in a special issue of Socialist History (http://www.socialist-history-journal.org.uk) devoted to the subject.

Proposals for papers should be submitted by 1 July 2011 to Francis King (f.king@uea.ac.uk) and Matthias Neumann (m.neumann@uea.ac.uk) at School of History, UEA, Norwich NR4 7TJ.

Attendance at the seminar is free of charge, but space is limited. Please e-mail us if you are interested in attending.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Chinese Revolution

Taweret

UNEVEN DEVELOPMENT

NEW EDITION FROM VERSO:

UNEVEN DEVELOPMENT: Nature, Capital and the Production of Space

By NEIL SMITH

New and updated edition with a new foreword by DAVID HARVEY
—————————–
“Smith provides a brilliant formulation of how the production of a particular kind of nature and space under historical capitalism is essential to the unequal development of a landscape that integrates poverty with wealth.” –– EDWARD SAID
—————————–
In UNEVEN DEVELOPMENT, a classic in its field, NEIL SMITH offers the first full theory of uneven geographical development, entwining theories of space and nature with a critique of capitalism.

Featuring groundbreaking analyses of the production of nature and the politics of scale, Smith’s work anticipated many of the uneven contours that now mark neoliberal globalization.

DAVID HARVEY’S new foreword highlights the increasingly uneven nature of the globalized economy, and notes that this inequality, along with accelerating levels of urbanisation and environmental degradation, have only accelerated since the book was first published. Smith’s analysis is thus more urgent and relevant than ever.

While globalisation has not led to a weakening of state power in the political sphere, it is increasingly difficult to conceive of distinct state economies – for example by the 1980s the majority of trade across national borders took place within corporations. National and international organisations rival states in economic power – in 2007 Harvard University had more money in its bank account than the GDP of some 39 countries. Thus, Smith argues, the global system can increasingly be defined more in terms of geoeconomics than traditional geopolitics.

In recognition of the dramatic changes in capitalism and its geography over the quarter century since this volume was written, Neil Smith has updated the text with a discussion of the current crisis of neoliberalism and the rise of geoeconomics.

UNEVEN DEVELOPMENT is a radical attempt to reconstruct the politicalbasis of society, in order to produce a genuinely social geography by encouraging a revolutionary imaginary.
———————————-
Praise for UNEVEN DEVELOPMENT

“A foundational text of great historical significance, constantly worthy of reappraisal…You will not be disappointed.” David Harvey

“Smith attempts no less than the integration of nature and space in the Marxian theory of capitalist development … he improves the clarity even of the arguments made in disagreement with him. His book should be widely read, used, and discussed.’ –ENVIRONMENT AND PLANNING

“UNEVEN DEVELOPMENT provides a theoretical discussion of immense range – from nature through space and the economy – whereby Neil Smith extends David Harvey’s Marxist conception of the geography of capitalism” – GEOGRAPHICAL REVIEW

“One of the most important books of specifically geographical social theory to be written in the English language in the last thirty years.” – Scott Prudham, author of KNOCK ON WOOD: NATURE AS COMMODITY IN DOUGLAS-FIR COUNTY
———————————
NEIL SMITH is Distinguished Professor of Anthropology and Geography at the City University of New York and Director of the Center for Place, Culture, and Politics. He is author or editor of nine books that explore the broad intersection between space, nature, social theory, and history and is co-organizer of the International Critical Geography Group. His website is http://neil-smith.net/
———————————
ISBN: 978 1 84467 643 9 / £16.99 / Paperback / 344 pages
———————————
For more information and to buy the book visit:
http://www.versobooks.com/books/704-704-uneven-development
———————————
ACADEMICS BASED OUTSIDE NORTH AMERICA MAY REQUEST AN INSPECTION COPY – PLEASE CONTACT tamar@verso.co.uk

ACADEMICS BASED WITHIN NORTH AMERICA MAY REQUEST AN EXAMINATION COPY – PLEASE CONTACT clara@versobooks.com
———————————
Become a fan of Verso on Facebook:
UK page – http://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Verso-Books-UK/122064538789
US page – http://www.facebook.com/home.php?#!/pages/Verso-Books-USA/123812329709

And get updates on Twitter too:
http://twitter.com/VersoBooksUK

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

 

BROWN-HARVARD CONFERENCE ON SLAVERY AND CAPITALISM

Brown-Harvard Conference on Slavery and Capitalism, April 7-9, 2011

This conference is intended to explore the centrality of slavery to national economic development in the decades between the American Revolution and the Civil War. Presentations will explore New England investment in the plantation economies of the Caribbean; the technological and managerial innovations in plantation management that coincided with northern industrialization; and the origins of modern finance and credit in the buying and selling of enslaved men and women and the crops they produced.

This new research suggests that the hotbeds of American entrepreneurship, speculation, and innovation might as readily be found in Mississippi or Virginia as in New York or Massachusetts. The issue is not whether slavery was or was not capitalist (an older debate), but rather the impossibility of understanding the nation’s spectacular pattern of economic development without situating slavery front and center.

The conference begins on Thursday, April 7th, with a keynote address by President Ruth Simmons of Brown University. Paper presentations will follow on Friday the 8th at Brown University. The conference then moves to Harvard for additional papers on Saturday, April 9th. This event is free and open to the public.

All the information (including the program and registration form) is here: http://brown.edu/web/slaveryconf/

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Socialism and Hope

SOCIALIST STUDIES: SPECIAL SECTION ON ROSA LUXEMBURG

Vol.6, No.2 (2010)
Table of Contents
SS/ES 6(2)

Editorial
‘I Class Struggle’: French Exceptionalism and Challenges for Socialist Studies
Elaine Coburn

Interview
‘You Are Here’: an interview with Dorothy E. Smith
William K Carroll

Special Section
Rosa Luxemburg’s Political Economy: Contributions to Contemporary Political Theory and Practice
Elaine Coburn

Social Classes in the Process of Capitalist Landnahme: On the Relevance of Secondary Exploitation
Klaus Dörre

Accumulation, Imperialism, and Pre-Capitalist Formations: Luxemburg and Marx on the non-Western World
Peter Hudis

Rosa Luxemburg’s ‘Accumulation of Capital’: New Perspectives on Capitalist Development and American Hegemony
Ingo Schmidt

Rosa Luxemburg’s Reform or Revolution in the Twenty-first Century
Helen C Scott

The current relevance of Rosa Luxemburg’s thought
Estrella Trincado

Research Note: Rosa Luxemburg and the Global Violence of Capitalism
Paul LeBlanc

Review Essays

Honour Songs and Indigenous Resistance
Deborah Simmons

Book Reviews
Various Authors

Socialist Studies: http://www.socialiststudies.ca/

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rosa Luxemburg

PROGRESS IN MARX

Denis Mäder, Fortschritt bei Marx (Progress in Marx). Berlin: Akademie Verlag, 2010, pp. 367

ISBN 978-3-05-004916-8

http://www.oldenbourg-verlag.de/akademie-verlag/fortschritt-bei-marx/9783050049168

In the 20th century, both Marxists and their opponents took it for granted that Marx’s work contains an elaborate theory of history rooted in a decidedly optimistic mindset. This theory was usually considered to be essentially a sketch of an ideal future society – a theory of salvation merely dressed up as science. It is all the more surprising, therefore, that Marx’s thoughts on progress have so far not been the subject of a thorough investigation.

Denis Mäder’s study analyses the modern idea of progress and the way in which it is being discussed today. This analysis serves as the background to a reconstruction of the original concept of progress that emerges as a result of Marx’s critical confrontation with his own philosophical milieu (especially with Hegel, the Hegelians, and Proudhon).

Progress is the historical movement of goodness. Yet, for the dialectician Marx there can be no progress without opposition. He sees in progress the possibility of positive development without, however, obliterating alternative or contradictory forms of development.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Capitalism

UNEVEN AND COMBINED DEVELOPMENT AND CONTEMPORARY WORLD POLITICS

Dear Colleague,

I am pleased to announce that Queen Mary’s Centre for the Study of Global Security and Development will be hosting a symposium on ‘Uneven and Combined Development and Contemporary World Politics’ on Wednesday, Februaury 9, 2011 between 2-6pm.

The programme is below. If you wish to attend please contact Rick Saull – r.g.saull@qmul.ac.uk – in advance of the symposium.

Regards,
Rick Saull
Director, Queen Mary, Centre for the Study of Global Security and
Development

Symposium on UNEVEN AND COMBINED DEVELOPMENT AND CONTEMPORARY WORLD POLITICS

Wednesday, February 9, 2-6pm (room Arts G.02), Queen Mary, Mile End Campus, London, E1 4NS

Programme/Presenters

Session 1, 2.00pm – 3.30pm

Alex Anievas (Cambridge)
‘Origins and Extensions of Uneven and Combined Development in the History and Theory of International Relations: The Case of the First World War’ This paper aims to contribute to recent debates on ‘international historical sociology’ specifically regarding the potential utility of Leon Trotsky’s concept of uneven and combined development (U&CD) in advancing a theory of modern inter-state conflict. The paper first re-examines recent debates over the theoretical status of U&CD considering, in particular, the various socio-historical and spatial registers covered by the idea as deployed by the different positions within the debates. Considering the possible benefits and pitfalls of stretching the concept to a generalized theory of ‘the international’ throughout history, the paper argues that a central challenge remains. This regards the development of a sufficiently historically-differentiated conception of ‘unevenness’ and ‘combination’-one capable of theorizing the radical historical disjuncture represented by the international relations of capitalist modernity while nonetheless capturing aspects of inter-societal relations common to all historical epochs and thus forming a crucial causal element in the transition to capitalism itself. Developing such a perspective, a theory of U&CD could take up John Hobson’s (and others) charges of ‘Euro-centricism’ with a more historically-sensitive interpretation of the internationally-pressurized multiple paths to capitalist modernity and their crucial ‘feed-back’ effects in restructuring processes of inter-state competition. Drawing on and further contributing to the theory, the second half of the paper sketches an alternative approach to the causes of the First World War distinctively combining ‘geopolitical’ and ‘sociological’ modes of explanations into a single framework. This highlights how the necessarily variegated character of interactive socio-historical development explains the inter-state rivalries leading to war. Contextualizing the sources of conflict within the broad developmental tendencies of the Long Nineteenth century (1789-1914) and their particular articulation during the immediate pre-war juncture, the paper aims further develop the theory of U&CD in and through the rich empirical terrain of the pre-war period thereby providing a much needed empirical contribution to recent debates.

Ben Selwyn (Sussex)
‘Trotsky, Gerschenkron and the Political Economy of Late Capitalist Development’
The study of late capitalist development is often characterised as a battle between protagonists of market-led vs state-led development. For the latter position, Alexander Gerschenkron looms large, as one of the most significant theorists of state-led development under conditions of relative backwardness. There are striking similarities between Gerschenkron’s explication of the advantages of backwardness and Trotsky’s concept of uneven and combined development and the privilege of backwardness. (These similarities have been commented upon often but rarely subject to closer comparison): Indeed, both men share a common problematic – the comprehension of how economically backward countries could skip stages of development in order to join the ranks of economically advanced countries. This paper compares their conception of this problematic and illustrates how in a number of areas the two are complementary. These are: Their rejection of unilinear patterns of capitalist development, their appreciation of the role of states and institutions in facilitating late development, and their understanding of development as a disruptive social process.  However, in crucial areas the two diverge. These are: Their comprehension of international economic and political relations, the role and position of labour in late development, and ultimately, the potential for late capitalist development to unleash social upheavals and further, non-capitalist transformations. Overall, I suggest how Trotsky and Gerschenkron’s approaches can complement each other, but that ultimately they represent fundamentally opposed approaches to human development.

Coffee Break, 3.30pm – 4.00pm

Session Two, 4.00pm – 6.00pm

Mick Dunford (Sussex)
‘Combined and Uneven Development: A Geographical Perspective’

John Hobson (Sheffield)
‘What’s at Stake in the Neo-Trotskyist Debate? Towards a Non-Eurocentric Historical Sociology of Uneven and Combined Development’
This piece seeks to advance what is being termed ‘third wave historical sociology of IR’ (HSIR). In particular I consider how a third-wave ‘non-Eurocentric’ HSIR could be developed by entering into the extant internecine debate that is raging within the newly emergent neo-Trotskyist school of HSIR. At one extreme lies Justin Rosenberg who argues that the concept of uneven and combined development (U&CD) should be historically generalised while the majority position insists that U&CD is specific only to the modern capitalist era (e.g., Ashman, Davidson, Allinson and Anievas). Here I provide some support for the Rosenberg position, by arguing that failure to historically generalise the concept beyond modern capitalism leads into the cul-de-sac of Eurocentrism. As a counter, I spend the majority of the piece sketching the outlines of a non-Eurocentric theory of U&CD by considering the ‘rise of the West’ as a case of a late-developing civilization; and in the process sketching the basis for an adequate third-wave non-Eurocentric HSIR.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rosa Luxemburg

ROSA LUXEMBURG AND THE CRITIQUE OF POLITICAL ECONOMY

Rosa Luxemburg and the Critique of Political Economy
Edited by Riccardo Bellofiore

This book analyzes the important contributions of Rosa Luxemburg to economic theory as well as devoting some space to her background as a left social-democratic politician and her personality.

The book’s main focus of attention is the theory of capitalist development and the theory of the crash, but its connection with the theory of value, the theory of the monetary circuit, the theory of distribution and the theory of international finance are also explored.

The contributors to the volume come from different theoretical perspectives, both from within and outside the Marxian tradition – Post-Keynesians, Kaleckians and Circuitists are all included.

Table of Contents

Rosa Luxemburg and the Critique of Political Economy, edited by Riccardo Bellofiore, Routledge Studies in the History of Economics, Routledge: Thirteen papers discuss Rosa Luxemburg’s contribution to Marxian critical political economy.

Papers explore:

Rosa Luxemburg’s on capitalist dynamics, distribution and effective demand crises (Riccardo Bellofiore);

Luxemburg’s critique of Karl Marx’s schemes of reproduction–a re-evaluation and a possible generalization (Meghnad Desai and Roberto Veneziani);

Where does the money and demand come from?–Rosa Luxemburg and the Marxian reproduction schema (Andrew B. Trigg);

The monetary circuit of capital in the Anti-Critique (Riccardo Bellofiore);

Late Marx and Luxemburg–opening a development within political economy (Paul Zarembka);

Rosa Luxemburg and finance (Jan Toporowski);

Economics, politics, and crisis theory–Luxemburg, Bukharin, and Grossmann on the limits of capital (Paul Mattick);

Luxemburg’s and Kalecki’s theories and visions of capitalist dynamics (Tadeusz Kowalik);

Imperialism today (Joseph Halevi);

Rosa Luxemburg on imperialism–some issues of substance and method (Roberto Veneziani);

Rosa Luxemburg’s The Accumulation of Capital: East and West (He Ping);

A very political political economist– Rosa Luxemburg’s theory of wages (Michael R. Kraetke);

Rosa Luxemburg on trade unions and the party–the polemics with Kautsky and Lenin—an assessment (Andrea Panaccione); and

Luxemburg–the woman, the revolutionary (Edoarda Masi).

Index

Riccardo Bellofiore is Professor of Political Economy at the University of Bergamo and Research Associate with the Centre for the History and Methodology of Economics at the University of Amsterdam.

June 2009: 216pp | Hardback: 978-0-415-40570-6 £70.00 DISCOUNTED PRICE: £56.00 €66.00

For more information visit: http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9780415405706/

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon Profile: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Capitalism

POWER AND THE HISTORY OF CAPITALISM

The History Department of Lang College and the New School for Social Research and the Culture of the Market Network of the University of Manchester are pleased to announce a conference on Power and the History of Capitalism, to be held April 15-16, 2011 at the New School in New York City.

Purpose

This conference seeks to sharpen our long-term historical perspective on relations of power, politics, and modern capitalism, with a special emphasis on United States history from the eighteenth to the twenty-first century.  We ask how capitalism and its periodic crises have revised political rights and responsibilities, reconfigured political practices and institutions, and redistributed wealth.  Conversely, we aim to analyze how power relations – whether organized by state policy and laws, structured by social norms and institutions, articulated in ideology, or embedded within racial, gender and class relations — have shaped economic outcomes.  The ongoing crises of contemporary capitalism – as well as the heightened emphasis on questions of power within the social sciences and humanities – invest these questions with new urgency.

This event will be the third meeting of the Culture of the Market Network, a two-year collaboration between the University of Manchester, Oxford University, the New School, and Harvard University. The Network brings together an international group of scholars from the humanities and social sciences to investigate in four conferences how economic ideas, institutions, practices and objects are embedded in the wider culture. The project also aims to reinsert the study of markets, finance and business into mainstream history.

Conference Themes and Topics

Organizers of the conference solicit papers that will examine the mutual constitution of political and economic systems in the United States. Possible themes and topics may include:

* The relation between capitalist development and political revolution
* The socio-political origins and consequences of monetary standards and policy
* The rise and fall of the Fordist political-economic paradigm
* The recurring collapses and resurgences of financial capitalism
* The distribution of power among the institutions of capitalism
* The salience of racial, gender, and class relations for structuring economic power
* The ability of economic and financial globalization to challenge or to sustain the economic boundaries and policies of nation-states
* Concepts of economic citizenship
* The relationship between economic crisis, popular insurgency, and social change
* Hegemony of — and competition between — capitalist elites
* The substitution of market relations for social policy
* The capacity of economic theories to operate as political ideology and to shape the reality they purport to describe
* The institutions that incubate ideologies of the market
* Finance as a mode of governmentality
* The role of the economics discipline in policy-making
* The role of policies, laws, and norms in structuring markets in ways that produce particular distributional outcomes.
* Forms of labor and their management
* Theories and practice of corporate governance
* Debates over the proper relationship between the financial markets, the state, and the real economy

Submissions

Proposals for papers must include the following information:

Title
Maximum 250 word summary of proposed paper
1 page CV including author’s name, address, telephone, email, and institutional affiliation

All proposals must be sent to powerandhistoryofcapitalism@gmail.com no later than October 1, 2010.

Notification will be sent November 1, 2010.

Further Information
http://www.arts.manchester.ac.uk/cultureofthemarket/

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon Profile: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski