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Education Crisis

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK: UPDATE 25th SEPTEMBER 2012

 

EVENTS

Film – Revolucion

Tuesday Sept. 25, 7pm
OISE (252 Bloor St.W. Toronto) Room 2279
PRICE: Pay What You Can

Toronto the Better movie series kicks off on Sept.25th with an original movie from Toronto teacher and union activist Paul Bocking. Revolucion tells the stories of Mexicans impacted by The North American Free Trade Agreement. More bust than boom, they tell us. And they are fighting back. Join us in solidarity with our Mexican brothers and sisters in the “free trade” barrel.

This movie is part of our “Learning with Latin America” series and will be followed in October by Marmato: Manger of Gold.

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The State of Labour, Past and Present

Wednesday, September 26, 8 – 11 p.m.
Gladstone Hotel, 1214 Queen Street West (near Dufferin)

Ever wonder how we got the weekend, vacation pay, workman’s compensation and many other things that we take for granted? These were the hard won spoils of the labour movement. The “Voice of Industry”, an early labor newspaper published by the first union for working women in the United States, was an early emblem of that movement. And we’re reviving the conversations that took place in its pages. The Voice of Industry was a weekly American labour newspaper that ran from 1845-1848, published by the first union of working women in the U.S. In its pages, working women published articles and poetry about a range of issues related to the social changes wrought by the Industrial Revolution. While their world was very different from our own, much of their criticism remains as powerful and relevant today as it was over a hundred years ago. In 2008 the paper was recovered in its entirety and made freely available online. This year, a substantial redesign of the site was undertaken, with a view of making the sentiments, criticism and moral vision of these workers accessible to a broader audience. To celebrate the redesign, we will be holding an evening of speakers and performances on September 26th at the Gladstone Hotel.

SPEAKERS:
* Jim Stanford – Chief Economist, Canadian Auto Workers Union
* Bryan Palmer – Professor of Labour History, Trent University
* Fay Farady – Labour, Human Rights and Constitutional Lawyer

PERFORMANCES:
* Sean Morley Dixon
* the Voice of Industry Choir
* and others.

voiceofindustry.com | https://www.facebook.com/events/393136110753762

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Toronto Socialist Action Presents Rebel Films: Students in Revolt – Chile, Mexico and Quebec
2012. 54 minutes (total)

Friday, September 28 – 7 p.m.
OISE, 252 Bloor St. West, Room 2-212 (at the St. George Subway Station)
Everyone welcome. $4 donation requested.
Please visit: http://www.socialistaction.ca or call 416 461-6942.

Co-sponsored by Youth for Socialist Action. Three short documentaries are joined together by Rebel Films to show the rise of students and youths around the world in action against the corporate agenda.  It depicts street protests challenging reactionary education ‘reforms’ in Chile, electoral fraud (once again) in Mexico, and the university fees hikes and repressive legislation in Quebec.  This event is co-sponsored by Youth for Socialist Action. YSA leaders Tyler Mackinnon and Evan Engering will lead off the open discussion following the screening.

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Dispatches From the Global Labour Movement: A Speaker Series at York University

A collaboration of:
* Centre for Research on Work & Society
* Canada Research Chair in Comparative Political Economy
* Canada Research Chair in the Political Economy of Gender & Work
* Work & Labour Studies Program, LAPS

All are welcome.
For more info, contact: crws@yorku.ca

1. Lessons from the 2012 Quebec Student Strike: A Panel Discussion
Wed. September 26th
Ross S701 2:30-4:30pm

2. Developments in Collective Bargaining & Gender Equity in Australia
Sue Wiilliamson, University of Sydney
Tuesday October 30th
Ross S701 2:30-4:30pm

3. The Political Economy of the New Attack on Canadian Unions
Andrew Jackson, Packer Visiting Professor in Social Justice
York University
Monday December 3rd
Ross S674 (Verney Room) 2:30-4:30pm

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NEWS & VIEWS

Chicago Teachers Raise the Bar

by Theresa Moran, Labor Notes

The Chicago Teachers Union has done the seemingly impossible. At a time when teachers are pilloried in the press and attacked by Democrats and Republicans alike, Chicago teachers walked out for seven days in a strike that challenged every tenet of the corporate agenda for overhauling education.

Read more: http://labornotes.org/2012/09/chicago-teachers-raise-bar

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Voter equality for a healthy democracy

by the Maytree Foundation

If we told you that voters in some Ontario ridings have twice the influence in Parliament as voters in Oak Ridges-Markham, what would your response be? In the latest Maytree Opinion, Alan Broadbent discusses how our democracy is healthy only when Parliament represents people in all parts of the country equally. Currently, we’re a bit ill.

Read this month’s Maytree Opinion: http://maytree.com/spotlight/voter-equality-for-a-healthy-democracy.html

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Progressives Must Move Beyond Occupy

by Cynthia Alvarez, Common Dreams   

Average citizens evaluate political organizations based on how those organizations actually function. They know a political organization is a microcosm of the society it wishes to create. So after ten months of heavy involvement in Occupy, I have this question for Occupiers: would you honestly want to live in a society that is organized like Occupy and functions like Occupy? Do you want a society that claims to be “leaderless” while its true leaders remain hidden and unelected? Do you want a society with no written rules? Do you really expect the general public to support an organization that would extend this model to the rest of society?

Read more: http://www.commondreams.org/view/2012/09/17

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Abuse of migrant workers ‘endemic’ in Canada, new study says

by Toronto Star

The moment Liliane arrived in Toronto from Uganda as a live-in caregiver, her boss seized her work permit and passport. For two years of work, she was only paid a total of $2,100.

Senthil Thevar was promised $15 an hour by a recruiter in India to work as a chef in a Toronto restaurant. Instead, he only earned $8 hourly, sharing accommodation in a cold basement, with no vacation and holidays.

On paper, Tanzanian taxidermist Juma was supposed to make $16.08 an hour to make animal specimens in Canada. His boss wrote him a $3,168 paycheque each month, but Juma must immediately withdraw the money and pay it back as “my taxes.”

It might seem these migrant workers just happened to be struck by bad luck — and unscrupulous employers. But a new report released Monday by the Metcalf Foundation says Canada’s current immigration and labour laws virtually doom temporary migrant workers to mistreatment.

Read more: http://www.thestar.com/news/gta/article/1257536–abuse-of-migrant-workers-endemic-in-canada-new-study-says

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Book – Researching the Social Economy

Edited by Laurie Mook, Jack Quarter, and Sherida Ryan
University of Toronto Press, Scholarly Publishing Division © 2010

Researching the Social Economy is one of the first comprehensive research collections on the social economy in Canada. While the term “social economy” is used widely is Western Europe and Quebec, it has had minimal currency in English Canada, where the differences between the public and private sectors and among nonprofits, co-operatives, social enterprises, and community economic development organizations have been emphasized.

The contributions to this volume, flowing from an inter-regional and international network of scholars and community organizations, analyze how the social economy, in its many manifestations, interacts with and shares commonalities with organizations in the other sectors of the economy. Taken as a whole, Researching the Social Economy enriches our understanding of how this important cluster of organizations contributes to Canadian society in both economic and social terms, and lays the groundwork for future study.

Read more: http://www.utppublishing.com/Researching-the-Social-Economy.html

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ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK, OISE/UT):

Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education. For more information about this project, visit http://www.apcol.ca.

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

 

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

Glenn Rikowski’s paper, Critical Pedagogy and the Constitution of Capitalist Society has been published at Heathwood Press as a Monthly Guest Article for September 2012, online at:

http://www.heathwoodpress.com/monthly-guest-article-august-critical-pedagogy-and-the-constitution-of-capitalist-society-by-glenn-rikowski/

 

Heathwood Press: http://www.heathwoodpress.com 

Higher Education Crisis

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 3rd SEPTEMBER 2012

HAPPY LABOUR DAY!

EVENTS

Fall 2012 Assembly of the Greater Toronto Workers’ Assembly (GTWA)

Sunday, September 16, 2012
9:00am until 5:00pm
   
Steelworkers Hall, 25 Cecil St. Toronto, Ontario
   
Registration required. All members and supporters are encouraged to attend and bring guests. Please register as soon as possible to help us plan. Childcare and lunch provided. Please note your childcare needs upon registering.

Register online: http://gtwa.eventbrite.ca/
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Portraits of Resistance: The Art and Activism of Carol Conde and Karl Beveridge

Tues. Sept. 4, 6:45 p.m.
Bloor Cinema (Bloor and Bathurst)

PORTRAIT OF RESISTANCE is an intimate documentary about Conde & Beveridge’s pioneering creative collaboration. It began in New York’s competitive art scene in the 1970’s. Finding themselves in competition with each other, the young married artists abandoned their rising individual careers to save their marriage. Returning to Canada they began working with each other, and with a range of community activists.  Inspired by their wit and visual innovations, PORTRAIT OF RESISTANCE captures the artists as they create provocative staged photographs about the environment, the rights of workers and the current global financial crisis.
http://www.cinemapolitica.org/bloor
https://www.facebook.com/events/345112085573875/

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ALL RISE! The People’s Court is Convening

Saturday, September 15, 2012
1:00pm
Court House, 361 University Ave., Toronto

Federally, Provincially and Municipally, governments are taking away public services people rely upon. We are all affected by these cuts. On September 15th community groups, labour unions and concerned citizens will be holding a mock trial for these injustices against the people. Come join us in front of the court house at 361 University Avenue, Toronto so your voice and our vision of Canada can be heard.

http://ontario.psac.com/node/442

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Book Launch – Social Democracy After the Cold War
edited by Bryan Evans and Ingo Schmidt

Guest speaker: Leo Panitch

Wednesday September 19th, 6:30pm

CMA Student Lounge
Room 1-003 (7th floor)
Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University
55 Dundas Street West

Sponsored by the Centre for Labour Management Relations at Ryerson University and the Centre for Social Justice

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NEWS & VIEWS

Labour movement must be defender of all workers
by Morna Ballantyne and Steven Staples
from the Guelph Mercury

The Labour Day picnics and parades might be the calm before the storm for the labour movement this fall.

On top of terrible job losses in manufacturing and resource industries, governments in Canada are sharpening their swords, preparing to do battle with the country’s trade unions.

It’s not just unions that should be worried.

http://www.guelphmercury.com/opinion/columns/article/790187–labour-movement-must-be-defender-of-all-workers

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The Marikana massacre: a turning point?

by Martin Legassick
from Facts for Working People

The massacre of 34, and almost certainly more, striking mineworkers at Marikana (together with more than 80 injured) on 16 August has sent waves of shock and anger across South Africa, rippling around the world. It could prove a decisive turning-point in our country’s post-apartheid history.  A recent report also states that autopsies reveal that most of the workers killed at Marikana were shot in the back. That is, they were escaping. A further blow to the initial police story is that they fired because they were being attacked by an armed mob.

http://weknowwhatsup.blogspot.ca/2012/08/the-marikana-massacre-turning-point.html

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Rethinking Common vs. Private Property

Introduction: Outline of the argument
The purpose of this paper is to suggest a rethinking of the common-versus-private framing of the property rights issue in the Commons Movement.

http://www.blog.ellerman.org/2012/08/rethinking-common-vs-private-property/

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Auto Manufacturing Workers at a Crossroads
by Marlon Berg, The Bullet

“The place is hot like hell, especially in the summer time at night, bad ventilation, a lot of humidity and of course machines emitting heat doesn’t help,” said ‘Iain’, a temporary worker at an auto parts plant in the Toronto area.

“To top it off I work night shift so there’s the extra stress of not actually functioning like a normal human being. I work for what by most standards are fairly good starting wages but are drastically inferior to the wages of permanent workers. But I’m hardly the hardest done by of the employees that work there; a lot of them have families they never see because we’re given 6-7 days a week. Yes, overtime is paid, but it doesn’t give you much time to do anything else. Theoretically you could turn down the overtime but then you wouldn’t be working there for very long.”

These are typical working conditions for auto parts plant workers in the inner suburbs of Toronto and nearby cities.

http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/691.php

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ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK, OISE/UT):

Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education. For more information about this project, visit http://www.apcol.ca.

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

No Future

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 19th MARCH 2011

EVENTS

PANEL AND BOOK LAUNCH – “EDUCATING ELITES: CLASS PRIVILEGE AND EDUCATIONAL ADVANTAGE”

Wednesday, April 13th, 2011
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE), room 5-250
252 Bloor St. West (St. George subway station), Toronto

10:00am – 11:45am (Panel)
11:45am – 1:00pm (Book Launch / Lunch Reception)

Panelists:

– Jane Kenway, Professor Monash University – “Elite Schools, Trans-national Capitals, and Global Elite Formations”
– Paul Tarc, Assistant Professor University of Western Ontario – “The Uses of International Education for (Becoming) Elites: The Case of the International Baccalaureate”
– Adam Howard, Associate Professor Colby College – “Shifting Landscapes: Elite Education in the New Economy”
– Rubén Gaztambide-Fernández, Assistant Professor CTL, OISE – “Notes on the Emergence and Significance of Elite Schooling as a Subject of Educational Research”

Chair : Kari Dehli, Professor SESE, OISE

Books by the panelists will be on sale from the Toronto Women’s Bookstore: http://www.womensbookstore.com

Co-sponsors: Ontario Institute for Studies in Education – Department of Curriculum, Teaching, and Learning; Department of Sociology and Equity Studies in Education; Comparative, International & Development Education Centre; Centre for Media and Culture in Education, Toronto Women’s Bookstore
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COMMON THREAD COMMUNITY CHORUS OF TORONTO – BENEFIT CONCERT FOR MENNONITE NEW LIFE CENTRE & JUSTICIA FOR MIGRANT WORKERS

March 26
7:30 pm
St Simon’s Anglican Church, 525 Bloor Street East
Sherbourne subway station (Glen Road exit)

Tickets: Adults $20/advance – $25/door;  Students & Seniors $15/advance – $20/door; Children under 10 – free

http://www.commonthreadchorus.ca/sites/default/files/poster-spring-2011.jpg

– Mennonite New Life Centre: http://mnlct.org
– Justicia for Migrant Workers:  http://justicia4migrantworkers.org
– Proyecto Altiplano:  http://myspace.com/proyectoaltiplano/stream

Common Thread Chorus: http://www.commonthreadchorus.ca

For Tickets: 416-410-5022 or info@commonthreadchorus.ca
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CU EXPO 2011 – COMMUNITY-UNIVERSITY PARTNERSHIPS: BRINGING GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES TO LOCAL ACTION

May 10-14, 2011
Waterloo Region, Ontario

CU Expo 2011 will showcase the exemplars in community-university partnerships worldwide, and explore and introduce creative ways of strengthening our local communities.

The conference is expected to draw over 800 people from Canada and around the world who are passionate about the power of community-university partnerships as a vehicle for social change. Students, community leaders, researchers, educators, funders, policy makers and others invested in community-building will be in attendance.

The CU Expo movement began in Canada as a response to individuals involved community-university partnerships needing a forum to share experiences, strategies and ideas. CU Expo 2011 will address the conference objectives, themes and streams through a variety of session offerings and opportunities for dialogue.

Learn more: http://www.cuexpo2011.ca/

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BUILDING SOLIDARITY: CAMPUS LABOUR STRUGGLES AND THE STUDENT CONNECTION

A forum to discuss and unite worker and student struggles at U of T

March 31, 2011
6-9pm
Bahen Centre, University of Toronto
Room 2175 (40 St. George Street)

A brief overview of the working conditions at the University of Toronto shows that something is just not right: most contract faculty members have virtually no job security; largely racialized food-service workers are paid less than a living wage; post-doctoral fellows have zero input in the drafting of their contracts; female administrative staff members receive less pay than their male counterparts; and non-tenured professors fear termination for voicing opinions on contentious political issues.

Meanwhile, students at the U of T are also engaged in pitched battles to keep post-secondary education accessible and equitable. Campaigns to eliminate ever-increasing tuition fees, to defend equity-based programs under threat of extinction, to challenge autocratic room booking policies, and to overturn unrepresentative and unaccountable governing bodies are just some of the issues that they organize around everyday.

In short, there is a whole host of injustices that plague both workers and students on this campus. As a working group of the newly-formed University of Toronto General Assembly, Student-Worker Solidarity (SWS) seeks to challenge this state of affairs by bringing different campus workers together to speak with students about their issues, while also providing students with an opportunity to relay their concerns to workers.

With this forum, SWS hopes to begin the conversation in order to create new ways of thinking about and participating in the struggles of those who make our University what it is.

Speakers will include members of the following:

– Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE) Local 3902
– United Steelworkers (USW) Local 1998
– UniteHERE Local 75
– University of Toronto Faculty Association (UTFA)
– University of Toronto General Assembly (UTGA)

**Refreshments will be provided
**Email utgeneralassembly@gmail.com for more information
**This event is endorsed by OPIRG-Toronto

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SOCIAL ECONOMY CENTRE LUNCHBOX SPEAKERS’ SERIES –  HOUSING ALTERNATIVES

Wednesday, March 23, 2011
Noon – 1:30 pm
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto
252 Bloor St. West, Toronto
Room 12-199

with Joe Deschênes Smith and Michael Shapcott

– Joe Deshchênes Smith will talk about investment process for new affordable housing, as well as attributes of the Home Ownership Initiative’s 2nd mortgage for low/modest income home-buyers.
– Michael Shapcott will discuss the social economy elements of the Precarious Housing report recently released by Affordable Housing and Social Innovation at the Wellesley Institute.

Moderator: David Hulchanski, Director, Centre for Urban and Community Studies, University of Toronto

Bring your lunch and a mug. Water, coffee and tea will be provided.

For more information, please contact Lisa White: secspeakerseries@gmail.com

This event will also be webcast live on the Internet.  Please see our website for detailed instructions: http://socialeconomy.utoronto.ca

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PANEL – PAUL ROBESON: THE TALLEST TREE IN OUR FOREST

Wednesday, March 23
7:00 PM – 9:00 PM
East Common Room, Hart House
University of Toronto
7 Hart House Circle

Speakers:
– Ken Jeffers (City of Toronto Manager, Access and Diversity, Parks Forestry and Recreation)
– Norm Kelly (Writer and Playwright)
– Lee Lorch (Civil rights activist and York Professor Emeritus)
– Rathika Sitsabaiesan (Scarborough-Rouge River Federal NDP Candidate)

Sponsored by Centre for the Study of the United States

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NEWS & VIEWS

UFCW CANADA RELEASE: WORKERS’ ACTION CENTRE LAUNCHES PROVINCIAL INITIATIVE – “UNDERCOVER STORIES ON WAGE THEFT”

Wage theft, in its various incarnations, is a workplace plague in Canada which is evident in a variety of communities. It is a particularly painful in immigrant communities. Many employers continuously abuse Employment Standards protections of these precarious workers as a means to simple but effectively improve profits.

On behalf of the 250,000 UFCW Canada members across Canada, we say NO to Wage Theft and YES to the much needed advocacy initiatives by the Workers’ Action Centre in Toronto. No worker deserves to get less than their fair wage. Every worker deserves to be heard.

We commend the Workers’ Action Centre on their initiative entitled “Undercover Stories on Wage Theft” and their advocacy in support for this initiative. We encourage you to take the time to support this important campaign.

To learn more: http://www.workersactioncentre.org

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ALTERNATIVE FEDERAL BUDGET 2011 LAUNCHED – RETHINK, REBUILD, RENEW: A POST-RECESSION RECOVERY PLAN

From Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA)

The Alternative Budget presents a comprehensive recovery plan designed to:

– get Canadians working in good jobs again;
– reduce record-high income inequality, strengthen Canada’s middle class, and improve supports for Canada’s poor and most vulnerable;
– protect public programs that all Canadians rely on — including public health care and public pensions;
– manage Canada’s debt-to-GDP ratio without vital public program cuts;
– get serious about reducing greenhouse gas emissions; and
– launch a multi-pronged initiative to expand high value-added production in key sectors.

Read more: http://www.policyalternatives.ca/afb2011

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TEACHING ABOUT LABOR ISSUES AND THE WISCONSIN WORKER FIGHTBACK

From Rethinking Schools

According to labor historian Mark J. Naison, the movement of workers that began in Wisconsin and is now spreading to other states is “the most important labor struggle in the United States in the 21st century.”

The current uprising of workers in Wisconsin and other states presents a powerful opportunity to teach students about what the protests are about and why their teachers and neighbors are joining the struggle.  It’s an opportunity to critically examine issues, and to model for students’ responsible civic action and engagement in the political process.

As members of teacher unions, we have an additional responsibility, summarized by the late Howard Zinn in an interview published in Transforming Teacher Unions:

“If teacher unions want to be strong and well-supported, it’s essential that they not only be teacher unionists but teachers of unionism. We need to create a generation of students who support teachers and the movements of teachers for their rights.”

Embrace this “teachable moment” and share with us in the comments what resources you are using, how you are using them, and how your students are responding.

Read more: http://rethinkingschools.org/news/WIProtestTeachingResources.shtml

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BOOK – THE SPIRIT LEVEL: WHY GREATER EQUALITY MAKES SOCIETIES STRONGER

[The authors] Wilkinson and Pickett make an eloquent case that the income gap between a nation’s richest and poorest is the most powerful indicator of a functioning and healthy society. Amid the statistics that support their argument (increasing income disparity sees corresponding spikes in homicide, obesity, drug use, mental illness, anxiety, teenage pregnancies, high school dropouts—even incidents of playground bullying), the authors take an empathetic view of our ability to see beyond self-interest…There is evidence that the human brain—with its distinctively large neocortex—evolved the way it has because we were designed to be attentive to, depend on, and be depended on by others.

Ordering information: http://www.amazon.com/Spirit-Level-Equality-Societies-Stronger/dp/1608190366

Hear Wilkinson give a 1:34:42 speech on the subject of his book. The volume is okay after he’s introduced. The graphics he uses appear on your screen as he proceeds through the presentation.

http://www.fhs.sfu.ca/news/events/special-guest-speaker-dr.-richard-g.-wilkinson

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MAYTREE FOUNDATION – THE “PILOT” FOR RECRUITING TEMPORARY FOREIGN WORKERS FOR LOW-SKILLED JOBS SHOULD BE ABOLISHED

The latest Maytree discussion paper argues that the growth in the temporary foreign worker program is contrary to Canada’s social and economic interests. It suggests that those currently in Canada under the Pilot Project for Occupations Requiring Lower Levels of Formal Training should be granted permanent residence.

Read more: http://bit.ly/eVP7jX

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NO FARE IS FAIR – A ROUNDTABLE WITH MEMBERS OF THE GREATER TORONTO WORKERS’ ASSEMBLY TRANSIT COMMITTEE

By Ali Mustafa, The Bullet

The Greater Toronto Workers’ Assembly (GTWA) is a promising new initiative aiming to build a united, non-sectarian, and militant anti-capitalist movement in the city among a diversity of rank-and-file labour unionists, grassroots community organizers, and youth alike. Since the GTWA’s inception in early 2010, mass public transit has emerged as one of the organization’s key political battlegrounds. In this in-depth roundtable discussion, members of the GTWA’s transit committee Jordy Cummings, Lisa Leinveer, Leo Panitch, Kamilla Pietrzyk, and Herman Rosenfeld explore both the opportunities and obstacles facing the campaign Towards a Free and Accessible TTC.

Read more: http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/480.php

(END)
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ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK, OISE/UT):

Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

World Crisis

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 13th FEBRUARY 2011

EVENTS

LEFT FILM AND VIDEO – CULTURE FORUM ONE

Monday, February 21
7:30 pm.
The Regal Beagle (back room)
335 Bloor St West (near St George), Toronto

Left film and video: a discussion with Frank Saptel and other Board members of the Canadian Labour International Film Festival (CLIFF)

Performances by:
– Wally Brooker, saxophone
– Jerry Lee Miller, stand-up comedy
– Mike Constable, animation films
– plus short films by invited guests

Presented by the Culture Committee (Cultcom) of the Greater Toronto Workers Assembly

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WEBINAR – THE CO-OPERATIVE MODEL: A DURABLE AND SUSTAINABLE ENTERPRISE

Friday, February 18
12pm EST

Featured Speakers: Professor Ian MacPherson (Professor Emeritus University of Victoria and author of A Century of Co-operation) and David Bent (Author of Forthcoming book Determined to Prosper: The Story of Sussex Co-op, the Oldest Agricultural Society in the World, PhD Student in History, University of New Brunswick)

More info: http://www.cooperativedifference.coop/page/4-Events-Opportunities

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CLiFF (CANADIAN LABOUR INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL) CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS FOR 2011

The Selection Committee of the Canadian Labour International Film Festival (CLiFF) invites you to submit your film or video for possible screening during our second Festival to be held this November in Toronto, Ontario and in 50 communities across the country (and counting). Films are due 30 June, 2011.

CLiFF features film and video made by, for, and about the world of work and those who do it, in Canada and internationally. The films we showcase are about unionised workers, as well as those not represented by unions. We encourage projects regarding any and every aspect of work, as well as issues affecting work or workers.

The festival draws thousands of trade unionists, community members, youth, activists, students, educators, artists, and allies from across North America and one day, we hope, the world.

We are looking for films on a wide spectrum of issues. We seek films about privatization, youth, First Nations people, people of colour, immigrants, refugees, detainees, health and safety, resistance, art, poetry, women, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered people, taxi drivers, truck drivers, rickshaw drivers – anyone who does anything considered work.

We also encourage the widest possible variety of films: from documentaries to drama to poetry/poetic treatments to comedy and animation.

More info: http://labourfilms.ca/cliff/2011/02/08/2011-call-for-submission-now-available/

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FORUM – GLOBAL CRISIS, FISCAL RESTRAINT AND PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS

Thursday March 10, 2011
7pm
Ryerson University, Oakham Lounge, 2nd floor
63 Gould Street, Toronto

2011 Phyllis Clarke Memorial Lecture: John Loxley
Co-sponsored and supported by Ryerson’s CUPE Locals 233, 1281, 3904, Ontario Council of Hospital Unions/CUPE and the Department of Politics and Public Administration, Ryerson University

Dr. John Loxley is a professor in the Department of Economics, University of Manitoba. He specializes in International Money and Finance, International Development and Community Economic Development and has published extensively in these areas. He has researched public-private partnerships for almost fifteen years and recently published Public Service Private Profits: The Political Economy of Public-Private Sector Partnerships, with Salim J. Loxley, Fernwood Publishers, 2010.

For further information contact Bryan Evans at 416 979-5000 x4199 or e-mail: b1evans@ryerson.ca

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LUNCHBOX SPEAKERS’ SERIES – SOCIAL ECONOMY CENTRE (OISE/UT)

Community Foundations

Wednesday, February 23, 2011
Noon – 1:30 pm.
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto, Room 12-199, 252 Bloor St. West, Toronto

With Rosalyn Morrison, Community Initiatives, Toronto Community Foundation and Betsy Martin, Community Foundations Canada

Rosalyn Morrison will talk about how the Toronto Community Foundation mobilizes more than 300 individual and family donors, high-impact community organizations and cross-sector leaders to tackle complex, quality of life issues in creative and inspiring ways.

Betsy Martin will discuss how foundations in Canada can support social enterprise and how this is part of the evolution of the investment model of foundations around the world. She will give examples of what community foundations in Canada and the United States are doing, to give a sense of the potential for this kind of community foundation investing.

Moderator: Michael Hall, Primus

– Bring your lunch and a mug.  Water, coffee and tea will be provided.
– For more information, please contact Lisa White at: secspeakerseries@gmail.com
– This event will also be webcast live on the Internet.  Please see our website for detailed instructions: http://socialeconomy.utoronto.ca/english/webcast.php

+++++

NEWS AND VIEWS

REPORT: WAL-MART ACTUALLY KILLS JOBS, CREATES TAXPAYER BURDENS

from The Raw Story

NEW YORK – Wal-Mart’s lengthy struggle to open in New York City has hit fresh problems — a controversial report that said America’s biggest discounter does not just sell cheap, it makes neighborhoods poorer.

The report concludes that Wal-Mart, the biggest U.S. private employer, kills jobs rather than creates them, drives down wages and is a tax burden because it does not give health and other benefits to many part-time employees, leaving a burden on Medicaid and other public programs.

Read more: http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2011/02/10/walmart-draws-ire-poor-parts-brooklyn/

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MUBARAK’S FOLLY: THE RISING OF EGYPT’S WORKERS

by David McNally, The Bullet

Rarely do our rulers look more absurd than when faced with a popular upheaval. As fear and apathy are broken, ordinary people – housewives, students, sanitation workers, the unemployed – remake themselves. Having been objects of history, they become its agents. Marching in their millions, reclaiming public space, attending meetings and debating their society’s future, they discover in themselves capacities for organization and action they had never imagined. They arrest secret police, defend their communities and their rallies, organize the distribution of food, water and medical supplies. Exhilarated by new solidarities and empowered by the understanding that they are making history, they shed old habits of deference and passivity.

Read more: http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/460.php

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TAKE A STAND AGAINST WAGE THEFT

We work hard, but too often we don’t get paid.  

In December 2010, the Workers’ Action Centre recorded our experiences looking for work. Go to http://www.workersactioncentre.org to listen to the reality workers in Ontario face every day.

We are offered work for less than minimum wage, we don’t get overtime pay, we are charged fees to get work, we are told we have to be self-employed to get a job.

This is wage theft.

TAKE ACTION

We are taking action against wage theft and so can you.

–  Watch workers’ stories of wage theft and share with others. (http://cts.vresp.com/c/?WorkersActionCentre/0760994829/46f0beda64/0feed76c2b)

–  Email the Minister of Labour Charles Sousa on our Wage Theft Action page (http://www.workersactioncentre.org/campaigns_stopwagetheft.html)

–  Call our workers rights hotline at (416) 531-0778.  Report wage theft.

+++++

CBC NEWS OTTAWA – UNION WASTE COLLECTORS SAVE OTTAWA MILLIONS

The City of Ottawa said Tuesday it saved close to $5 million, over four years, by using unionized employees to collect garbage in its downtown core.

The city said since the Canadian Union of Public Employees Local 503 — the city’s largest union — won the garbage collection contract for Ottawa’s downtown area in 2005, it has delivered the services it promised for less money.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/canada/ottawa/story/2011/02/08/ottawa-union-garbage-208.html

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PUBLIC-WORKER UNIONS SKIP ALBANY AD BLITZ FOR NEW TACTICS

by Nicholas Confessore, New York Times

ALBANY — The airwaves are virtually silent. The fiery criticism of years past has given way to conciliatory press releases. And the halls of the Capitol ring not with angry protests but with the quiet hum of lawmakers and lobbyists making their daily rounds.

Michael Mulgrew, president of the United Federation of Teachers, the New York City teachers’ union, said, “We think the ad wars make people feel disenfranchised from the process.”

Faced with devastating budget cuts from Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo and a deeply hostile electorate, New York’s most influential public-employee unions have unexpectedly shifted their strategy for defending cherished government programs and worker benefits. Put off for now are the angry denunciations and millions of dollars of advertisements, chiefly from hospitals and a health care union, that have traditionally begun haunting governors in early February.

Read more: http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/10/nyregion/10unions.html?ref=nyregion

(END)

++++++++++++++++++++
++++++++++++++++++++

ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK, OISE/UT):

Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

No Future

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON RESEARCHING WORK AND LEARNING

Special Conference Announcement
International Conference on Researching Work and Learning (RWL)

The Seventh RWL Conference will be taking place in Shanghai, China (December 4-7, 2011)

All conference information can be found at http://www.rwlecnu.org/

Deadline for proposals (papers, symposia, workshops, poster sessions) is March 1st, 2011.

Conference Streams include:
a) Learning, Organizational Change and Organizational Development
b) Professional Work and Learning
c) Leadership Studies in Work and Learning
d) Labour Studies in Work and Learning
e) Trade Unions’ Education and Learning
f) Quality of Work/Learning Life
g) Trans-nationalism, Migration, Work and Learning
h) Work, Learning and Community
i) Learning Theory, Skills and Work
j) Identity, Work and Learning
k) Gender, Ethnicity, Spirituality, Diversity in Workplace and Learning
l) Vocational Education, Labour Markets and Learning
m) Policy Studies, Work and Learning
n) Unpaid Work and Learning
o) Historical Approaches to Work, Learning and Social Change
p) Best practice studies, work and learning

About the RWL Series:
The RWL international conference series was established in 1999 and has run continuously since on a bi-annual basis. Successful conferences have been held in the UK, Canada, Finland, Australia, South Africa, Denmark. In close association with the Journal of Workplace Learning and Emerald Publishing, the RWL series is the longest, continuously running international conference series in the field of work and learning studies currently in operation.

——————————————————————-

ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK, OISE/UT):

Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 4th SEPTEMBER 2010

 

EVENTS

VOICES OF DISSENT: INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL OF POETRY OF RESISTANCE

Sept. 16-20
Toronto

Poets, artists, musicians and social activists will gather in various Toronto venues later this month to celebrate the boundless capacity of verse to resist oppression and create links among diverse communities. The International Festival of Poetry of Resistance will feature readings, roundtable discussions, musical performances and a special “festivalito” for children.

The festival will begin on Thursday, September 16 at 5 p.m. at the New Horizons Auditorium, 1140 Bloor Street West (at Dufferin), Toronto. It will continue until Monday, September 20 at various locations. The children’s “Festivalito” will take place on Friday, September 17 from 2 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. at the 519 Church Street Community Centre.

+++++

SOCIAL ECONOMY CENTRE SPEAKERS’ SERIES: SOCIAL STOCK MARKETS & IMPACT INVESTING

Wednesday, Sept. 29, 2010
Noon – 1:30 pm
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE), Room 12-199
University of Toronto
252 Bloor St. West, Toronto

With:
Adam Spence, Social Innovation Generation (SiG) @ MaRS
Annie Malhotra, Social Venture Exchange (SVX)

Adam Spence will discuss the practical development of impact investing in Canada, an investment approach aiming to solve social or environmental challenges while generating financial profit.

Annie Malhotra will discuss the development of the social venture exchange (SVX) project and the work of ethical stock markets around the globe.

Bring your lunch and a mug. Water, coffee and tea will be provided.

For more information, please contact: Lisa White at secspeakerseries@gmail.com.

This event will also be webcast live on the Internet.  Please see our website for detailed instructions: http://socialeconomy.utoronto.ca/english/webcast.php

+++++

FREE TRANSIT STREET PARTY

Saturday, Oct. 2
1:00-4:00
In Christie Pits Park off Bloor St
(across the street from the Christie subway stop)

No Fare Is Fair!

Come to the park to celebrate the campaign to win free and accessible transit for the GTA.

Food, music, puppets, entertainment and more.

For more info or to get involved contact: nofareisfair@gmail.com

A project of the GTWA: http://www.workersassembly.ca

Join us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=147217141977827

Poster for October 2nd event (please copy and distribute):
http://www.workersassembly.ca/events/FreeTransit.pdf

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WORKING WITH GRASSROOTS COMMUNITY GROUPS: LUNCH N’ LEARN

September 13, 2010
12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Centre for Social Innovation, 4th Floor, Alterna Savings Room
215 Spadina Ave., Toronto

Mario Tellez, Projects Coordinator of the Casa Canadiense Community Centre in Managua, Nicaragua will facilitate a discussion about the challenges and possibilities of working with community groups.  As the Projects Coordinator, Mario works closely with 10 grassroots community associations in Nicaragua to develop proposals, implement projects and effectively relay the stories of communities back to donors.  He is developing a capacity building program where representatives of community groups will work to improve their proposal writing skills.

If you want to discuss your experiences working with the grassroots and share ideas about what works, what doesn’t and how we can engage respectfully with partners, please attend!

To register: katie@pueblito.org

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CLIMATE REALITY: A CONVERSATION WITH DR. JAMES HANSEN, NAOMI KLEIN & CLAYTON THOMAS-MULLER

Wednesday, September 15
5:30-9:30
McMillan Theatre, University of Toronto
Edward Johnson Bldg (North), 80 Queen’s Park, Toronto

A public event on climate science and climate justice with the world’s foremost climate scientist and author of Storms of My Grandchildren, Dr. James Hansen; the author of The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism, Naomi Klein and Indigenous Environmental Network’s Tar Sands Campaigner, Clayton Thomas-Muller. Moderator: Dr. Cynthia Wesley-Esquimaux (U of T, Aboriginal Studies and Social Work).

5:30pm – 6:30pm Science presentation by James Hansen
6:30pm – 7:00pm Intermission
7:00pm – 8:45pm Climate Reality: A Conversation with Dr. James Hansen, Naomi Klein & Clayton Thomas-Muller, moderated by Cynthia Wesley-Esquimaux.

Admission free.

Organized by:
The Centre for Global Change Science, U of T, http://www.cgcs.utoronto.ca/Page4.aspx

Science for Peace, http://www.scienceforpeace.ca

Contact: Science for Peace office, sfp@physics.utoronto.ca

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SUBURBAN UNIVERSITY-COMMUNITY RESEARCH NETWORK MEETING

September 17
10am – noon
East Scarborough Storefront
4040 Lawrence Ave East, Toronto

On the agenda so far:
– follow up on the Mimico 20/20 plan and response
– other housing / anti-poverty initiatives?
– transit activism in East Scarborough and city wide
– municipal elections

Please feel free to make additions!

The August 16th meeting took place in South Etobicoke, hosted by LAMP and local area residents. We went on a walking tour of the community, guided by local residents, and learned about city hall’s vision for the area’s redevelopment and the implications for tenants. Some members of our network have undertaken research about the planning process in support of the residents and will provide an update in September.

For more information, contact Deb Cowen at: deb.cowen@utoronto.ca

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UNION ACTION WITHOUT BORDERS: AN INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM

Thursday, 23 September 2010
HEC Montreal
Cote-Sainte-Catherine Bldg.
3000 Cote-Sainte Catherine Avenue
Montreal, PQ

The Interuniversity Research Centre on Globalization and Work (CRIMT) in collaboration with CISO, CSQ, CSN and FTQ is organizing a symposium on international trade union action. Its purpose is to assess the different initiatives undertaken by labour unions at various levels, be it local, national and international.

This important Symposium will tackle a variety of contemporary relevant issues. What tools and resources are available to unions? How can we build a dialogue between northern and southern countries? How can we enhance workers’ awareness with respect to international trade unionism? How can these actions improve the working conditions here in Canada and abroad? These are some of the questions to be discussed among participants during plenary sessions and workshops.

For more info: http://www.crimt.org/uawb.html

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NEWS & VIEWS

PRIVATE SECTOR IS NOT HELPING ECONOMIC RECOVERY

Tepid GDP numbers released Tuesday by Statistics Canada confirm that Canada’s economic recovery, such as it was, is sliding completely into the ditch. We’re clearly heading for stagnation at best, and quite possibly another “double dip” downturn.

Read more: http://rabble.ca/columnists/2010/09/private-sectors-continuing-failure-lead-economic-recovery  

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NON-UNION HOSPITAL STAFF FORCED TO TAKE TWO YEARS OF ZEROES. AN INCENTIVE FOR UNIONIZATION?

by Doug Allan, leftwords

The Toronto Star reports: “Thousands of Ontario nurses who work at …non-unionized hospitals complain they’re getting the cold shoulder from Premier Dalton McGuinty’s public sector pay freeze.”

While the non-union RNs are in the midst of a government imposed two year wage freeze, unionized RNs got pay increases April 1, as per their collective agreement. “I don’t know why they’re doing this to us,” non-union RN Julia Fisher said. “The government has created a two-tier pay schedule. We’re being penalized.”

Read more: http://www.ochu.on.ca/leftwords_ochuBlog.php

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ON MLK’S DAY, UNIONS, CONSERVATIVES RALLY FOR JOBS, JUSTICE—HONOR?

by Tiffany Ten Eyck, Labor Notes

Forty-seven years after Martin Luther King, Jr. uttered the words “I have a dream” to an overflow crowd on the Washington Mall, August 28 still has resonance for civil rights activists, the union movement, and, now, the Tea Party?

Read more: http://www.labornotes.org/blogs/2010/09/mlks-day-unions-conservatives-rally-jobs-justice-honor

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POLICE MADE MISTAKES IN G20 TACTICS, CHIEF ADMITS FOR FIRST TIME

By Kate Allen, Globe & Mail

Acknowledgment comes on heels of raft of complaints, lawsuits, inquiries into police actions during June weekend.

Read more: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/toronto/police-made-mistakes-in-g20-tactics-chief-admits-for-first-time/article1694815/

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NEW BOOK ON THE GLOBAL WORKING CLASS: “LIVE WORKING OR DIE FIGHTING”

Paul Mason’s “Live Working or Die Fighting” is one of the most important books to come out about the international labour movement in recent years.  It’s just come out in paperback and it’s LabourStart’s book of the month for September.

Live Working or Die Fighting is a two-hundred year story of the global working class and its many struggles for justice. The stories in the book come to life through the voices of remarkable individuals: child laborers in Charles Dickens’ England, visionary women on the barricades of Paris, gun-toting railway strikers in America’s Wild West, and beer-swilling German metalworkes who tried to stop the First World War. It is a story of urban slums, self-help cooperatives, choirs and brass bands, free love, and self-education by candlelight. And in the developing industrial economies of the world, it is still with us.

To learn more about it and to order your copies, visit https://ssl30.pair.com/unionist/ccp51/cgi-bin/cp-app.cgi?rrc=N&pg=prod&ref=workclass&affl=labourstart  

Remember that every copy you order helps support LabourStart’s campaigning activities; for more info about LabourStart, visit http://www.labourstart.org/

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REPORT: WORKING AS ALLIES

by Jen Margaret, Auckland Workers Educational Association

A critical dimension of social justice struggles is the work of the people who support those more directly affected by a particular justice issue, the work of allies. This report documents learning from a visit, made possible with support from the Winston Churchill Memorial Trust, to North America in May 2010 to meet with people who are working as allies supporting the struggles of indigenous peoples and/or undertaking anti-racism work. In 15 separate meetings I met with 18 people who were working in a range of contexts that included Indigenous studies programmes in universities, community organisations, church and human rights organisations. I also had email discussions with a number of people with whom it was not possible to meet face to face.

Read the full report: http://awea.org.nz/sites/default/files/Jen_Margaret_Working_as_Allies_2010.pdf
Resources for working as allies: http://awea.org.nz/allies_resources

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ONLINE JOURNAL ARTICLES

MIND THE GAP: SCHOOL LEAVER ASPIRATIONS AND DELAYED PATHWAYS TO FURTHER AND HIGHER EDUCATION
Author: Tom Stehlika
Journal of Education and Work, Volume 23, Issue 4 September
http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content~db=all~content=a926503481~frm=titlelink
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HEALTH LEARNING AND ADULT EDUCATION: IN SEARCH OF A THEORY OF PRACTICE
Sandra R. Schecter and Jacqueline Lynch
Adult Education Quarterly published 27 August 2010, 10.1177/0741713610380438
http://aeq.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/0741713610380438v

IS ANY JOB BETTER THAN NO JOB? LIFE SATISFACTION AND RE-EMPLOYMENT
Carola Grün, Wolfgang Hauser and Thomas Rhein
Journal of Labor Research,Volume 31, Number 3, 285-306
http://www.springerlink.com/content/7x18u6642w15g634/

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JOB POSTINGS

CENTRE FOR SOCIAL INNOVATION, TORONTO – INTERNSHIP

Wanna be an agent for change? Are you ready to change the world? Crazy creative? Love helping people? Juiced by turning wild ideas into action? And have a little extra time to invest in your future?

The Centre for Social Innovation is offering a world-changing opportunity to trade your time and energy for our expertise, networks and free office space! Warning: We have no money! This isn’t a paying gig.

The deal: your time & positive energy = free office space, ideas and networks

The Centre for Social Innovation is looking for up to fifteen incredible people to participate in a four month agents of change pilot program.

You get trained up in a community animation intensive.  Then you give your time as a community animator for free office space — 1 day per week of your time = 60 hours/month of hot desking. The program runs from October 1, 2010 to January 30, 2011.

More info: http://socialinnovation.ca/internship

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CANVASSERS, F/T, TORONTO ENVIRONMENTAL ALLIANCE, TORONTO ON

TEA is recognized locally and nationally for our municipal work on smog, waste reduction, pesticides, transit, Greenbelt protection, energy efficiency and green power — issues we believe are critical to the health and well-being of Toronto residents. Our collaborations with the community (eg. community groups, local labour groups, small businesses, anti-poverty groups) are cherished and key to our past and future successes.

The Toronto Environmental Alliance (TEA) has exciting opportunities for
environmentally minded, articulate, and passionate individuals.

TEA is currently hiring front line campaign positions. The job gives you the opportunity to go door to door and talk to the public about some of Toronto’s key environmental issues. Give yourself the chance to really make a difference in our community.

The job hours are from 2pm – 10pm, Monday through Friday. Starting pay is $410 a week for full-time.

More info: http://torontoenvironment.org/jobs

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FOODSHARE COMMUNICATIONS COORDINATOR, TORONTO

Deadline: Friday, September 17, 2010, 5pm

FoodShare Toronto is seeking a Communications Coordinator to join our dynamic and passionate team.

Reporting to the Fundraising and Communications Manager, this position will support all of FoodShare’s communications activities and the creation of all of our communications materials for our diverse stakeholders including customers, program participants, community members, partners, donors, policy makers, educators, the general public and more. More specifically, the Communications Coordinator will take responsibility for assuring that brand standards and guidelines are maintained, that the FoodShare website and social media channels are fresh and up-to-date, and will assist with media relations and event coordination.

For more info: http://www.foodshare.net/upcomingjobs-CommCoord.htm
++++++++++++++++++++
++++++++++++++++++++

ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK):

Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

—END—

I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon Profile: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

 
 

Work, work, work

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 25th JULY 2010

EVENTS

SEND US YOUR RESEARCH REQUESTS! / ENVOYEZ NOUS VOS REQUÊTES DE RECHERCHE !

The Community-University Research Exchange (CURE), a joint initiative of the Concordia and McGill Quebec Public Research Groups (QPIRG), seeks to connect university students and community groups through research collaborations for social and environmental justice.

Through our database, students complete research projects for grassroots community groups working towards environmental and social justice. Examples of projects possibilities are:

* a report * a research paper * video or photo production * graphic design * business planning * program design communication plans * annotated bibliography * journalistic writing * pamphlets * translation * curriculum design * policy reports * grant applications * feasibility studies * surveys and more

You can look at examples of current and finished projects on our website, http://www.qpirgconcordia.org/cure

To submit a research request for our database, please submit the CURE Research Request Form which you can access through our website. If you need assistance in completing the form, please do not hesitate to contact us.

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COMMUNITY FORUM: AUDISM AND THE TORONTO POLICE SERVICE

August 7
6:00pm – 8:00pm
OISE/UofT, Room 2212, Second Floor
252 Bloor Street West (St. George subway station)
Toronto

We have all heard the stories of the Toronto Police Services denying interpreters, accusing Deaf people of “faking”, interpreting attempts to communicate as violence, misunderstanding facial expressions that are a part of our grammar as anger, and countless other acts of audism, discrimination, and violence. It is time to do something about it!

Join us in sharing our stories and coming together as a …united community of Deaf, oral deaf, hard of hearing, late-deafened, and hearing allies! We will share our experiences in a public forum to promote healing, equality and change. This will be the beginning of a long process of achieving change within the Toronto Police Services policy, training, and sensitivity to our diverse communities.

ASL interpretation provided. If you require accommodations or childcare, please contact Jenny Blaser at jb.signsofsupport@gmail.com as soon as possible.

Endorsed by the LEAF’s Youth Commission, Signs of Support, Ryerson Student Union, OPIRG, and the Association of Part-Time Undergraduate Students

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CALL FOR QUERIES: THE PEOPLE’S FOOD MOVEMENT

Deadline: July 29, 2010

Community food security and what’s often called food sovereignty are drawing together diverse groups – from rural folks and farmers to urbanites, environmentalists and those involved in public health and social justice. It has created powerful new alliances that are being replicated globally.

In this issue of Alternatives, we will investigate the people’s food movement, both domestically and globally. We want examples of what is working and what isn’t, and what these examples tell us of the challenges that lie ahead. What will a secure and resilient food system taste like? What can be done to keep the food movement a people’s movement? How will the special things about food make food movements different from other social, environmental and public health movements? How will food organizers link to people with other causes? And what is the food movement anyway?

If you can say something big, new and powerful in a small number of plain words, we want to hear from you. Details are at our website: http://alternativesjournal.ca/food2011

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ON PRIVILEGE AND PROTEST – ANOTHER CATALYTIC CONVERSATION

July 26
4:00pm – 5:30pm
OISE, 252 Bloor Street West
7th floor in Peace Lounge
Toronto

Reflecting on what happened in our city around the G8/G20 and continues to happen, difficult questions need to be asked:

– Who was surprised by the police violence when every day in our world people are subjected to this kind of brutality?
– What makes us think that the same kind of brutality exacted on Aboriginal communities and other so called minority communities would never be turned on mainstream communities, i.e. those with unjust privilege?
– Who is ‘us’?

In order to prepare for this conversation we invite you to review Chapter 3 from Starhawk’s Truth or Dare – Fierce Love: Resisting the Weapons the Culture Has Devised against the Self.

Sponsored by The Catalyst Centre

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CATCH 22 HARPER CONSERVATIVES – 1ST TORONTO AREA MEETING

July 28
7:00pm – 8:30pm
Lower level meeting room
31 Wellesley Street East
Toronto

Had enough of the Harper Conservatives and their wrecking ball? Ready to help defeat them in the next federal election? Join us for our first Toronto-area campaign meeting.

The Catch 22 Harper Conservatives campaign is a nationwide, grassroots effort to help send the PM packing. We launched our website in March. The campaign’s name comes from the 22 days that Parliament was prorogued last winter. There need to be consequences at the ballot box for Harper’s disdainful attitude and attacks on democratic values and institutions.

Catch 22 is independent of the political parties. Everyone who shares our goal is welcome to participate. Our strategy is to work in 30 to 40 winnable Conservative-held ridings across the country.

As long as Canada continues to use the antiquated first past the post voting system, strategic voting campaigns like Catch 22 are necessary in order to lessen the impact of vote splitting. The opposition is unprepared and unlikely to take measures that will ensure the defeat of Harper’s weakest team members. After all, their strategies are also based on vote splitting. That leaves it up to the voters to figure out how to rid Canada of PM Harper. Catch 22 is trying to fill that gap.

More info: http://catch22campaign.ca/

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NEWS & VIEWS

FIGHTING AUSTERITY? THE PUBLIC SECTOR AND THE COMMON FRONT IN QUEBEC

by David Mandel, The Bullet

The 2005 round of negotiations in Quebec between the provincial Liberal government and the public sector unions was ended abruptly by the adoption of a special law that unilaterally imposed wages and conditions on the workers…The special decree (Bill 142/Law C-43) was quite a remarkable attack on public sector collective bargaining, even by the standards of the Quebec state… In May 2009, the CSN (Confédération des syndicats nationaux – Confederation of National Trade Unions), the FTQ (Fédération des travailleurs et travailleuses du Québec – Federation of Workers of Quebec, affiliated with the CLC) and the SISP (Secrétariat intersyndical des services publics – Inter-union Secretariat of Public Services) announced a ‘Common Front’ (Front commun) of provincial public-sector workers (recalling in name the illegal general strikes of Quebec workers in 1972).

Read more: http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/396.php

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BEHIND THE HEADLINES: THE WORKPLACE KILLS 14 PER DAY—ONE BY ONE

by Tom O’Connor, Labor Notes

Month after month, year after year, workers die in trench collapses and falls from roofs. OSHA cites the employer, slaps it with a modest fine (a median penalty of only $3,675 per death in 2007), and points out that simple methods exist to prevent such tragic loss of life. Yet some employers continue to ignore the hazards and workers continue to lose their lives due to this criminal neglect.

Read more: http://labornotes.org/2010/06/behind-headlines-workplace-kills-14-day-one-one

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FEW AWARE OF LABOUR RIGHTS IN TORONTO’S CHINATOWN
Exploitation typical in other immigrant communities, labour activists say

by Nicholas Keung, Toronto Star

Sue Zheng was happy to land her first job in Toronto at a manicure salon. But there was a catch: she had to pay a $400 deposit to work there, and receive only $25 a day for 10 hours of work, seven days a week.

Read more: http://bit.ly/9u7MuD

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NGOS RISK ALL IN STANDOFF WITH HARPER OVER CIVIL SOCIETY CRACKDOWN

by Alice Klein, rabble.ca

You have to admire the political logic. If there is no data to research, there will be no facts to account for. How perfect the Tories’ ditching of the mandatory long-form census data collection is for themselves — and how dangerous for the rest of us.

Read more: http://rabble.ca/columnists/2010/07/ngos-risk-all-standoff-harper-over-civil-society-crackdown

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WANT TO BE POOR? WORK ONE OF THESE 8 JOBS

by Josie Raymond, change.org

Post-recession job creation is coming, the experts say. Unfortunately, many of these jobs will pay less than $10 an hour. Yeah, it’s an honest day’s work, but if it’s not enough to live on, much less raise a family and maintain a home, what’s the point?

Read more: http://uspoverty.change.org/blog/view/want_to_be_poor_work_one_of_these_8_jobs

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CPP SURVIVED GLOBAL CRASH BETTER THAN MOST PLANS

(NUPGE – National Union of Public and General Employees)

The reserve fund of the Canada Pension Plan (CPP) was one of the top international performers during the 2005-09 boom-and-bust period, according to a report by the Paris-based Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD).

By comparison, Canada’s private pensions, as is the case in most western developed countries, still have not recovered from huge losses during the global recession, the OECD reports in an analysis of public and private programs in 13 countries.

Read more: http://nupge.ca/content/3399/cpp-survived-global-crash-better-most-plans

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ONLINE JOURNAL ARTICLES

SOCIAL DETERMINANTS OF HEALTH: WORKING CONTINUOUSLY TOWARDS CHANGE
Thomas Abel
International Journal of Public Health, Volume 55 Number 4
http://www.springerlink.com/content/n86756k7330p7555/

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DEBATING AGGREGATE DEMAND AND AGGREGATE SUPPLY: INTRODUCTION
Fred Moseley
Review of Radical Political Economics published 14 July 2010
http://rrp.sagepub.com/cgi/rapidpdf/0486613410377461v1

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EVOLUTION OF NONPROFIT SELF-REGULATION IN EUROPE
Angela L. Bies
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly published 14 July 2010
http://nvs.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/0899764010371852v1

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THE PRACTICE OF DIALOGUE IN CRITICAL PEDAGOGY
Jodi Jan Kaufmann
Adult Education Quarterly published 14 July 2010
http://aeq.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/0741713610363021v1

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JOB POSTINGS

FULL-TIME EDITOR, INFORMATION WARFARE MONITOR

The Information Warfare Monitor (a collaboration between the Citizen Lab, Munk School of Global Affairs and the SecDev Group) seeks applications for a full-time editor of the Information Warfare Monitor. The position comes as a paid full-time fellowship at the Citizen Lab, Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto.

The Information Warfare Monitor is an advanced research activity tracking the emergence of cyberspace as a strategic domain. We are an independent research effort. Our mission is to build and broaden the evidence base available to scholars, policy makers, and others.

More info: http://www.infowar-monitor.net/2010/07/call-for-applicants-information-warfare-monitor-full-time-editor/

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THE STOP COMMUNITY FOOD CENTRE: CATERING SALES & MARKETING COORDINATOR

The Stop’s catering services are a new social enterprise initiative of our fundraising department, with all net proceeds supporting our anti-hunger, community-building programs. We are seeking a dynamic, experienced, resourceful coordinator to drive catering sales, liaise with clients, and assist in the execution of events.

Reporting to the Director of Development, and working as part of the fundraising team, the Catering Coordinator will:

– Develop new business and ensure retention of current clients
– Develop and execute marketing strategies to increase catering sales
– Initiate and execute strategies to ensure The Stop’s a preferred caterer at key venues
– Develop marketing collateral including catering brochures, website, etc.
– Liaise with our chef and other staff to coordinate catering functions including booking, selecting and costing menu items, pricing, coordinating staff and equipment rentals
– Attend events to ensure client expectations are met or exceeded
– Prepare thorough and professional proposals
– Attend industry events as required

More info: http://thestop.org/jobs

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VOLUNTEER & FUNDRAISING COORDINATOR, NORTH YORK WOMEN’S SHELTER, TORONTO

Deadline: August 6, 2010

North York Women’s Shelter is an emergency shelter and support service provider to abused women and their children.

You will be joining our Development team and will be responsible for fostering and growing our volunteer base through recruitment and recognition. You will also support our fundraising efforts, particularly around donor relations and donor management. In particular, manage our database and tax receipting, processing donations, as well as donor stewardship. This position also has some cross functional duties with front-line and support staff. This position is unionized with OPSEU Local 518.

For more information: http://www.idealist.org/if/i/en/av/Job/389908-298

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OUR MANDATE:

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

—END—

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon Profile: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Work No More

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK: UPDATE 7th MARCH 2010


EVENTS

BILL FLETCHER JR. – “OPERATING IN THE OBAMA MOMENT: CHALLENGES FOR PROGRESSIVES”

Public Forum: 2010 Phyllis Clarke memorial Lecture

7:00 PM
Wednesday March 10, 2010
Cara Commons/Lounge 7th floor, 1-148
Ryerson University, 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto.

Bill Fletcher Jr. is a longtime labour and international activist and the former President and chief executive officer of TransAfrica Forum. He is the executive editor of The Black Commentator and founder of the Center for Labor Renewal. His latest book is Solidarity Divided.

Co-sponsored and supported by Ryerson’s CUPE Locals 233, 1281 and 3904 and the Department of Politics and Public Administration, Ryerson University.

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ACCUMULATION CRISIS AS ECOLOGICAL CRISIS: THE END OF CHEAP FOOD, CHEAP ENERGY, AND CHEAP LABOUR

CIS Development Seminar Series
Speaker: Jason W. Moore (Department of Human Geography, Lund University)

Friday, March 19, 12:00 PM – 2:00 PM
108N – North House, Munk Centre for International Studies, U of T
1 Devonshire Place

Register online at: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=8206

Sponsored by Centre for International Studies

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TRIBUNAL SAYS SPECIAL DIET PROGRAM DISCRIMINATES

Government considering scrapping the program in response

Discrimination. That’s the ruling of the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario on the way the province’s Special Diet Allowance Program provides benefits to three people who made human rights complaints.

On February 17, the Tribunal issued its decision that the way the program is administered in these three cases violates the Human Rights Code. These three cases are lead cases in a Tribunal proceeding that involves human rights complaints from nearly 200 other people and Social Benefit Tribunal complaints from another 800 people, so the implications are large.

The Tribunal has ordered the government to increase the benefit amounts for these three people – and any other Special Diet recipients with the same medical conditions. And it set out the legal test that will help determine the outcome of the nearly 200 human rights complaints.

But the government seems to be thinking about scrapping the program altogether.

The Special Diet Allowance program is too important to lose. Take Action Now!

To read more: http://www.incomesecurity.org/specialdietdecision.htm

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CANADIAN COMMITTEE ON LABOUR HISTORY ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING

The Canadian Committee on Labour History will once again be holding their annual general meeting during Congress and your attendance will be much appreciated.

Please mark your calendars for the following:

Date:  Monday, May 31
Time: 12:30 – 2:00
Location:  LB-1042.03, 10th floor of the Library Building, Concordia University, Montreal

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NEWS & VIEWS

MURRAY DOBBINS’ BLOG: HARPER’S STRATEGIC ELECTION BUDGET

As one would expect from Stephen Harper, he has come down with a very strategic budget and a fairly smart one at that. As with his other strategic considerations this one is aimed at achieving the goal he is obsessed with: getting a majority in the next election.

To read more: http://murraydobbin.ca/2010/03/04/harpers-strategic-election-budget/

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THE CASE FOR KEEPING OUR HYDRO UTILITIES PUBLIC

By Paul Kahnert, Bullet No. 319, March 2 2010

Most people don’t pay much attention to electricity, except when the lights are out or when they get their bill. But, they soon will. The most valuable asset in virtually every Ontario municipality is its hydro utility. For 90 plus years, local municipal hydro utilities ran at cost and returned ‘profits’ to residents in the form of lower and stable rates. They were well run and virtually debt free.

Debts created by cost overruns at Ontario Hydro’s nuclear power stations were no worse than privately-owned nuclear power stations everywhere else. Yet the debt level of Ontario Hydro opened the door for the Harris Conservatives to ram through a plan to deregulate and privatize Ontario’s power system.

To read more: http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/319.php

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2010 FEDERAL BUDGET A “MAJOR DISAPPOINTMENT” FOR POST-SECONDARY EDUCATION AND RESEARCH

OTTAWA, March 4 /CNW Telbec/ – The organization representing Canada’s university and college educators says today’s federal budget is a major disappointment for post-secondary education, leaving Canada’s researchers behind, providing no new support for universities and colleges to deal with increasing enrolments, and no relief for students grappling with high debt loads and tuition fees.

“The government was supposed to have taken time off to ‘recalibrate,’ but there’s been no change in direction when it comes to post-secondary education and funding for research,” said James Turk, executive director of the Canadian Association of University Teachers (CAUT).

To read more: http://www.newswire.ca/en/releases/archive/March2010/04/c7181.html

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JAMES LAXER’S BLOG: GEORGE SMITHERMAN, THE PRIVATIZER: NO THANKS

You learn a lot about a candidate for public office when he or she first stakes out a position on a key issue.

In this case, the candidate is George Smitherman, who recently left the Ontario Liberal cabinet, to run for mayor of Toronto. In an in-depth interview with the Toronto Star, Smitherman mused that he would consider privatizing garbage pick-up in Toronto and the privatization of some of the city’s public transit lines.

To read more: http://www.jameslaxer.com/blog.html

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ALTERNATIVE BUDGET 2010

The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA) released the 2010 Alternative Federal Budget yesterday along with a six point jobs plan to confront the jobs crisis and tackle the fiscal deficit with less pain and more gain.

The alternative budget and jobs plan would bring unemployment back to pre-recession levels by the end of 2011 and demonstrate there is a better way to get out of deficit through smart investments and smart taxation.

To read more: http://www.policyalternatives.ca/publications/reports/alternative-federal-budget-2010
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RAISE MY TAXES, PLEASE! EVALUATING HOUSEHOLD SAVINGS FROM HIGH QUALITY PUBLIC TRANSIT

High quality public transit consists of service sufficiently convenient and comfortable to attract travel that would otherwise be by automobile. This paper uses data from U.S. cities to investigate the incremental costs and benefits of high quality transit service.

The analysis indicates that high quality public transit typically requires about $268 annually per capita in additional tax subsidy and $104 in additional fares, but provides vehicle, parking and road cost savings averaging $1,040 per capita, plus other benefits including congestion reductions, increased traffic safety, pollution reductions, improved mobility for non-drivers, improved fitness and health.

This indicates that residents should rationally support tax increases if needed to create high quality public transit systems in their communities. Current planning practices tend to overlook or undervalue many of these savings and benefits and so result in underinvestment in transit quality improvements.

To read more: http://www.vtpi.org/raisetaxes.pdf

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JOURNAL ARTICLES

* Research on social determinants and health: what sorts of data do we need?
Siegfried Geyer
Journal of Public Health, Volume 55 Number 1
http://www.springerlink.com/content/p81v501h560702n7/

* Get the lead out: Environmental politics in 1970s St. Louis
Robert Gioielli
Journal of Urban History published 5 March 2010, 10.1177/0096144210363070
http://juh.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/0096144210363070v1

* Book review: Jarvis, P. (2006). The lifelong learning and the learning society trilogy, Volumes 1-3.
Shibao Guo
Adult Education Quarterly 2010;60 207-211
http://aeq.sagepub.com/cgi/reprint/60/2/207

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OUR MANDATE:

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

This is a moderated list. To send postings to the list, please email them to rhonda_sussman@yahoo.ca

To change your subscription settings, visit http://listserv.oise.utoronto.ca/mailman/listinfo/csewbroadcast

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

*END*

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Socialist Project

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 12TH DECEMBER 2009

NEWS & VIEWS

CSEW LAUNCHES ANTI-POVERTY NEWSLETTER

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work has just launched a newsletter, “Learning Changes”, which will highlight the work of its Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning Project.

To read more, click here: http://www.csew.ca/APCOLnewsletter2009v1n1.pdf

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25 IN 5 NETWORK FOR POVERTY REDUCTION – BULLETIN

Dec 11, 2009: Stand Up Against the Backlash from the Auditor General’s Report

In this week’s eBulletin:

-Quote of the Week
-Ontario Auditor General’s Report Underlines Need for Social Assistance Reform
-Backgrounder: Just the Facts
-What Can You Do? TAKE ACTION

To read more, click here: http://bit.ly/5NmQu2

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VIDEO: ROOTS OF THE ECONOMIC CRISIS: CRITICAL PERSPECTIVES

A Presentation of the Critical Social Research Collaborative

Ottawa, October 29, 2009 – Facilitator: Carlo Fanelli

This workshop explores alternative interpretations of the current economic crisis. The presentations are from organized labour, community activists and academics. The focus of this workshop is critical engagement, discussion and debate. Questions addressed include: How have various perspectives analyzed and understood the roots of the current economic crisis? Is there something fundamentally unsound about the current political-economic structure? Is the current crisis to be located within a set of recently established policies, or better understood over the long-term historical development of capitalism? How have the policy prescriptions and ideological rationales shifted over the years? And, more ambitiously, where do we go from here?

View: http://www.socialistproject.ca/leftstreamed/

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WE AREN’T BUILDING AFFORDABLE HOUSING

Posted December 9, 2009

>From No Excuse: The Poverty Project Blog:

The Ontario Auditor General’s latest report has received a lot of media attention. With the report nearly three hundred pages long, it is not surprising that the media has to pick and choose what it will focus on. In this case, they seem to have come down on that old chestnut, welfare fraud. More on that to follow. But first I’ll say that they missed this bigger story — affordable housing programs don’t really build affordable housing.

For more details visit: http://bit.ly/6w7YQp

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THE NEW SOCIALIST REGISTER WEBSITE IS NOW FULLY UP AND RUNNING!

Featuring SR 2010 on Morbid Symptoms: Health Under Capitalism, alongside our amazing archive of all 700+ essays we’ve published since 1964!

We’re sure you will want to check it out at http://socialistregister.com

This is first year the Register is being published simultaneously online and in print and it is the first time that all the essays ever published in the Register are available in one electronic archive. We are sure you agree this is a big deal, and given how much the world needs the Socialist Register that you will want to do all you can to make it successful. We would very much hope that you will personally subscribe now (from the home page go to the Subscriptions tab and click on the Merlin order link at the bottom – at £25 it’s value for money, to use that term).

We would also appreciate your help to make effective a major subscriptions campaign we are undertaking. At the very least, if you are working at an institution with a library, could you immediately contact the appropriate people at your library and ask them to take out an institutional subscription to the Register? Many of these librarians will be getting a version of the attached flyer, but we know that librarians are only likely to act on this when requests are made from users.

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VIDEO: OCAP METRO HALL OCCUPATION

Toronto, December 8, 2009

More Than 150 Angry Social Assistance Recipients Storm and Occupy Municipal Welfare Offices

Members of the Ontario Coalition Against Poverty (OCAP) and more than 150 people struggling to survive on Ontario Works and ODSP occupied the 12th floor of Toronto’s Metro Hall. The group refused to leave until they receive the Special Diet Benefit that they are entitled to. The City is responsible for administering social assistance in Toronto, and people are currently being denied their right to the Special Diet Benefit. More people than ever are being forced to live on welfare in Ontario. They face two major problems. First of all, the income they receive does not let them pay their rent and feed their families properly. Secondly, welfare offices do all they can to deny even the small benefits people are supposed to get. When they apply for Special Diet, Community Start Up and other benefits, they are denied their rights. This must stop.

View: http://www.socialistproject.ca/leftstreamed/

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CANADIAN CENTRE FOR POLICY ALTERNATIVES (CCPA) UNVEILS NEW WEBSITE

Dear Friends and Members,

We’re excited to announce the launch of the CCPA’s new website. Built on an entirely new platform with open-source software, the site is loaded with new features to make the Centre’s research easier to access and follow.

– find what you’re looking for with an advanced search engine;
– watch and listen to videos, slideshows and podcasts in our new multimedia section;
– share our content to social networking sites or email pages to your contacts;
– purchase CCPA books, gift memberships, and join or donate to the Centre with an improved shopping cart system.

Click here for a full tour of the site: http://www.policyalternatives.ca/welcome-new-site

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SOCIAL PLANNING TORONTO CALL FOR ABSTRACTS: RESEARCH ON HEALTHCARE FOR THE UNDOCUMENTED AND UNINSURED

Individuals/organizations are invited to submit abstracts for oral presentations or poster presentations by Friday December 18, 2009 for a conference aiming to gather local academic and community researchers with interest in health services for uninsured and undocumented clients.

For more info, click here: http://bit.ly/667OnB

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HOUSING AGAIN BULLETIN

Sponsored by Raising the Roof as a partner in Housing Again.

A monthly electronic bulletin highlighting what people are doing to put housing back on the public agenda across Canada and around the world, sponsored by Raising the Roof as part of the Housing Again partnership.

To read more, click here: http://bit.ly/6rbsyg

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THE NEW UNIONISM NETWORK – ORGANIZING FOR WORKPLACE DEMOCRACY

New Unionism is about unions setting agendas, rather than just reacting to them. This network unites supporters of four key principles: organizing, workplace democracy, internationalism and creativity.

To read our latest blog entries, click here: http://newunionism.wordpress.com/

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OPPORTUNITIES FOR GREEN JOBS IN CANADA HIGHLIGHTED IN GROUNDBREAKING RESEARCH REPORT

The world is facing climate and economic crises, people are experiencing serious impacts and without urgent action the world is in peril. Mere weeks away from the important climate negotiations in Copenhagen, Denmark, world leaders are already warning that urgent action may not come soon. This must change.

The Council of Canadians and the Canadian Labour Congress have produced Green Decent and Public, a report focused on opportunities for the public sector to play a prominent role in generating good jobs. Green Decent and Public focuses on opportunities for improving energy efficiency and rapidly expanding electricity production from renewable resources. Public and community ownership of renewable power is offered as an alternative that has distinct advantages to further market liberalization in the electricity sector. These advantages include retaining economic revenues, maximizing social benefits, prioritizing conservation and ensuring energy security.

To read more, click here: http://bit.ly/4FIs8A

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RADICALS AT WORK NETWORK

Radicals at Work is a network of young activists and radicals involved in workers’ movements. We have come together to connect our radical ideas to our jobs and to work together to build a stronger labor movement.

We come from many jobs and communities – we are young rank and file workers, office workers, union and non-profit staff, activists working with workers centers, students, and teachers. We have a shared commitment to grassroots democracy and a workers movement that takes on racism, sexism, homophobia and isn’t afraid to go head-to-head with the boss.

Our website is meant to inform, spark discussion and be a place for conversations and education on some of the issues facing workers’ movements today.

To read more, click here: http://radicalsatwork.org/

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CALEDON INSTITUTE OF SOCIAL POLICY – DEVELOPING A DEPRIVATION INDEX: THE RESEARCH PROCESS

by Richard Matern, Michael Mendelson and Michael Oliphant, December 2009

This paper tells the story of the development of the Ontario Deprivation Index by the Daily Bread Food Bank and the Caledon Institute of Social Policy. A ‘deprivation index’ is a list of items which are widely seen as necessary for a household to have a standard of living above the poverty level so that most households not in poverty are likely to have these items, but households in poverty are likely to find some of them unaffordable and so not have all those items. The index should therefore contain those items that distinguish the poor from the non-poor in the prevailing social and economic conditions.

To read more, click here: http://www.caledoninst.org/Publications/PDF/836ENG.pdf

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MURRAY DOBBIN’S BLOG – POVERTY: THE ULTIMATE LITMUS TEST OF DEMOCRACY

If we were to judge democracy using the language of business we would ask how it does on the “deliverables.” In other words, does it deliver on its promises of equality? In a capitalist society it is virtually impossible to deliver anything like complete equality but the role of government in the period following the Second World War was to provide a measure of equality in a system whose foundation was inequality. It has always struck me that the term we use to describe our political economic system – liberal democracy – is an oxymoron. Or more accurately a system that tries to integrate two mortally hostile notions: property rights and democracy. These are two principles that cannot be reconciled – eternal conflict is literally guaranteed.

To read more, click here: http://bit.ly/4mRZCs

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BOOK REVIEW – UNPREDICTABLE FUTURES: STORIES FROM WORKER-RUN FACTORIES IN ARGENTINA

Written by Benjamin Dangl  

Reviewed: Sin Patron: Stories From Argentina’s Worker-Run Factories, edited by Lavaca, 320 pages, Haymarket Books, 2007.

Following the social upheaval in Argentina in 2001-2002 a book was published in Spanish that a lot of activists and independent journalists in the country began trying to get their hands on. It wasn’t in all of the bookstores, but news about it traveled like wildfire. Now the legendary book, Sin Patron: Stories From Argentina’s Worker-Run Factories, is translated and available to the English-speaking world.

To read more, click here: http://towardfreedom.com/home/content/view/1770/1/

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JAMES LAXER’S BLOG – BEYOND THE BUBBLE: IMAGINING A NEW CANADIAN ECONOMY

(Here is a brief summary of my new book, published earlier this month by Between The Lines Publishing, Toronto.)

Beyond the Bubble: Imagining A New Canadian Economy, makes the case that the economic crash of 2008 marked the end of one world age and the beginning of another. What has ended is the neo-liberal age of globalization and the American-centred global economy. What lends weight to this thesis is both the nature of the system of finance whose collapse is at the centre of the global crisis and the crushing problems that face the United States, making the re-assertion of an American-centred global economy exceedingly improbable.

To read more, click here: http://bit.ly/4xbapx

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MUSEUM WORKERS AT WAR: PRECARIOUS EMPLOYMENT AND THE PUBLIC SECTOR SQUEEZE

by Priscillia Lefebvre

The casualization of labour has placed many workers in a position of precariousness forcing them into a state of perpetual insecurity characteristic of the ‘new economy’ neoliberal nightmare. In an effort to reduce production costs and maximize profitability, many employers have adopted a neoliberal approach to employment, which is achieved through the temporary and discretional use of labour, major layoffs, the retrenchment of wages, workplace intensification and the denial of benefits. The result of which has brought real wages to a near stand-still over the past twenty-years, as well as a growing chasm between worker productivity and the compensation that follows.

The battle for wage parity and job security rages on in Ottawa between the Canadian Museum of Civilization Corporation (CMCC), which operates both the Canadian Museum of Civilization and Museum of War, and the 92% of fed up workers who voted in favour of a strike. The current strike by 420 Public Service Alliance of Canada (PSAC) members is the longest running labour strike in PSAC history. The workers have been on strike for more than 60 days after initial attempts to bargain for a fair collective agreement came to a halt on September 18th of this year.

To read more, click here: http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/278.php

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OUR MANDATE:

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

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Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Note: the Socialist Project web site is excellent: http://www.socialistproject.ca/