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The Black Rock

DOCK(ING): OR, NEW ECONOMIES OF EXCHANGE

Banff Research in Culture 2013: Dock(ing); or, New Economies of Exchange (Call for Participants)

Dock(ing); or, New Economies of Exchange

BANFF RESEARCH IN CULTURE 2013

Program dates: May 27-June 14, 2013

Application deadline: January 15, 2013

Application Information can be found here.

 

Banff Research in Culture (BRiC) is a research residency program designed for scholars engaged in advanced theoretical research on themes and topics in culture. BRiC is designed to offer researchers with similar interests from different disciplinary and professional backgrounds an opportunity to exchange opinions and ideas. Participants are encouraged to develop new research, artistic, editorial, and authorial projects, both individually and in connection with others.

During the residency, participants will attend lectures, seminars, and workshops offered by visiting faculty from around the world. The residency will help to develop new approaches toward the study and analysis of culture, as well as creating lasting networks of scholars who might use this opportunity as the basis for future collaborative work.

The Banff Centre is a world-renowned facility supporting the creation and performance of new works of visual art, music, dance, theatre, and writing. The 2013 edition of BRiC is organized in conjunction with the Liverpool Biennial.

BRiC is funded by The Banff Centre, Canada Research Chair in Cultural Studies, Faculty of Arts, University of Alberta and the Office of the Vice-President (Research), University of Alberta. In 2013, BRiC is being organized by Imre Szeman, Sally Tallant, Maria Whiteman, and Visual Arts at The Banff Centre. 

 

Dock(ing); or, New Economies of Exchange

Faculty: Joseph GrimaSuzanne LacyMichael Speaks

A dock is the place where the land meets the ocean, where goods arrive from abroad, and where foreigners step onto the surface of the country they are visiting. It is a liminal space of encounters and exchanges, both legal and illegal — a space of furious new activity that can upset the given order, just as often as it confirms it through the smooth operations of legal power and border control. The physical space of the sea wharf is only one of the ways in which ‘dock’ names a necessary yet potentially dangerous threshold. A dock is also the space in a courtroom where prisoners are placed on trial, exposed to the full power of the law. And when used as a verb, ‘dock’ names such varied practices as the punishment of workers by withholding payment for their labour, the removal of an animal’s tail to bend its body into shape in line with human demands and desires, and the connection of different bits of computer hardware to allow for the exchange of information. 

Banff Research in Culture 2013 is organized in partnership with the Liverpool Biennial. For the city of Liverpool, which has undergone a significant period of de-industrialization and de-population, the docks that line its waterfront constitute a reminder of a more prosperous moment in its development. They are also a site of potential urban re-development and re-imagining, with all the promise and hazards that such gentrification and rebuilding bring with them. BRiC 2013 seeks to bring together critical thinkers intent on exploring the politics played out on physical and metaphoric docks, as well as practices of docking in art, culture, design, critical theory, cultural studies, and urban development. The liminal spaces to which docks point include legal, national, physical and conceptual borders of all kinds — spaces and places where power is exerted over identities and collectivities, and so, too, sites where power is actively challenged with the aim of enabling new possibilities for a new century.

The collective interrogation of docks and docking that will take place during BRiC 2013 constitutes a starting point for understanding some of the major social, political and cultural challenges we face at the outset of this new century. Far from being an end in itself, a multifaceted, multidisciplinary investigation of docks promises to open new vantage points on long-standing problems. In the case of the City of Liverpool, for instance, this includes the very real trials involved in re-constituting genuine civic life in the wake of de-industrialization, the role played by art in this process, and the difficulties of creating new urban possibilities and opportunities that do not follow the problematic script of capitalist gentrification.

We look forward to receiving compelling and original project proposals from thinkers and creators working on a wide range of projects.

 

Applications

Applications to BRiC 2013 are processed through The Banff Centre.

For information on Application Requirements or to Apply to the program, please visit:

http://www.banffcentre.ca/programs/program.aspx?id=1334&p=requirements

Applicants will be notified of their status as soon as adjudication is complete. 

 

Questions?

For questions on preparing your application, please contact the Office of the Registrar:

Email: arts_info@banffcentre.ca

Phone: 403.762.6180 or 1.800.565.9989

Fax: 403.762.6345

 

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Blog: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski/blog

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

Glenn Rikowski’s paper, Critical Pedagogy and the Constitution of Capitalist Society has been published at Heathwood Press as a Monthly Guest Article for September 2012, online at:

http://www.heathwoodpress.com/monthly-guest-article-august-critical-pedagogy-and-the-constitution-of-capitalist-society-by-glenn-rikowski/

 

Heathwood Press: http://www.heathwoodpress.com 

 

The Individuality Pr♥test: http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/transcontinental/the-individuality-prtest

I Love Transcontinental: http://ihearttranscontinental.blogspot.co.uk/

Global Crisis

Global Crisis

THE GLOBAL CRISIS AND AFRICA: STRUGGLES FOR ALTERNATIVES

 

Rosa Luxemburg Foundation

Call for contributions

CONFERENCE on The Global Crisis and Africa: Struggles for Alternatives

A conference organised by the Rosa Luxemburg Foundation in cooperation with its partners in Africa

To be held in Johannesburg, South Africa from 19-21 November 2009

While the current world economic crisis in its complexity is unprecedented, crises are inherent to capitalism and more often than not the South has borne the brunt of these crises. For the first time in history however a crisis in the financial markets and its repercussions in the real economy have coincided and mingled with a socioecological crisis which stand to seriously affect the basic living conditions of mankind. Emerging from the financial crisis in the US, it has been raging through the G8 countries and is now extending its impact to all corners of the world, including Africa.

Much can and will be said about the negative effects of the crisis on Africa; however the conference will approach it from the angle of the search and struggle for alternatives. What different alternative responses have been or are being developed; for example an Ecological Solidarity Economy, Economy of the Commons, Ecological Socialism, Marxist instead of Keynesian concepts, a different global financial system? What struggles are being fought already and how can we better link these struggles in pursuit of such alternatives?

The conference will be structured along these lines:
1. Which basic tenets have to be changed?
2. Spaces of alternatives & sites of struggle
3. Linking struggles

The conference aims at linking the local, national and global quest for alternatives by social movements, NGOs, trade unions, political parties both in North and South and other global actors.

While we want to offer enough space for different issues and interests of the respective participants the focus during the conference itself will be on crucial, overarching problems with the ultimate aim of developing common strategic perspectives for the left in both South and North.

The conference will bring together contributions from union, social movement and NGO activists as well as academics. Participants are therefore kindly invited to send in contributions on any of following themes:
* the impact of the present crisis (e.g. in the areas of food production and food prices, energy, climate, trade/production, debt and development aid); * responses by various stakeholders in both North and South; * overall utopian views like an economy of the commons, climate justice, food security, de-globalisation; * critical analysis of reactions to the crisis like the G-20, the UN Stiglitz Commission, the EU EPA negotiations, the New Green Deal, the new role of the BRIC states.

Contributions might be traditional academic papers, but any other forms (statements, petitions, video, audio etc.) are more than welcome. Registered participants will be informed about the detailed programme in due course.

Registration and offering of contributions are requested before 25th October 2009.

For more information please contact the office of the Rosa Luxemburg Foundation in Johannesburg, South Africa by e-mail: esther@rosalux.co.za or jos@rosalux.co.za or at the Berlin Office: hopfmann@rosalux.de.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Crisis Theory

Crisis Theory

INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES AND THE CURRENT CRISIS

 

Call for Papers

A Special Issue of tripleC (http://www.triple-c.at): Information and Communication Technologies and the Current Crisis: How Are They Connected?

The Crisis that began in 2007 continues to convulse the world. Labelled by some as merely a recession, yet it is associated with dramatic changes in national and global power. Others frame the Crisis as merely a consequence of over-promoting a narrow range of financial transactions associated with subprime mortgage instruments. These were indeed overly aggressively oversold by deregulated bankers, but this was likely only an important trigger of the Crisis, not the primary cause.

In this special issue, we will explore the notion that much of the basis of the Crisis should be assigned to financial transactions not just made possible but also strongly afforded by use of computer technologies. Thus, those operating at the highest levels of algorithmic capacity bear substantial responsibility for the Crisis.

For students of technological innovation and diffusion, many questions emerge about the connection between the Crisis in general and computerization. Some of the questions involve the tight relationship between cultures of technological empowerment and financial elites. Others questions, while appearing initially to be purely economic, turn out on examination to articulate strongly with the public interest, civil society, policymaking, and public discourse more generally.

These in turn lead to further, perhaps quite new critical questions about the emerging relationships between capitalism, democracy and the data-information-knowledge-technology nexus. Thus, equally important for responsibility is specification of what is known within computer science about the technological dimensions of the Crisis of this crisis. Ultimately, a rethinking of the very notion of “crisis” itself may be needed.

Some specific questions authors may choose to address include:

* What kind of crisis is this, how is it different from previous ones, how are these differences related to automated ICTs and the changed practices they have afforded?

* What role do computer professionals have in the crisis?

* Does this crisis suggest a dystopian post-human future?

* What media theories best explain the crisis, or has the time arrived for newly radical approaches in this area?

* How does public policy fit in the private world of computerization?

* What historical guides are available as tools to foster better analyses of technological crisis?

* Will the BRIC nations (Brazil, Russia, India, China) be the “winners” of this crisis?

* Are there artistic innovations that help refine political and policy responses to this crisis?

* What new knowledge innovations are needed to understand the forces at work in this crisis and its implications for democracy?

* What new questions need to be addressed to orientate research about the crisis?

* How are the computing-, information-, and media-industries affected by this crisis? How will they develop in the future?

This special issue of tripleC is intended to feature research from both theoretical and practical perspectives. We seek contributions from any theoretical, professional, or disciplinary perspective that offers innovative analysis that promotes debate about technology and the Crisis.

Submission deadline: Full papers should be submitted until October 31st, 2009. All papers will be peer reviewed. The special issue will be published in spring 2010. 

tripleC – Cognition, Communication, Co-operation: Open Access Journal for a Global Sustainable Information Society (http://www.triple-c.at) promotes contributions within an emerging science of the information age with a special interest in critical studies following the highest standards of peer review.

Submissions must be formatted according to tripleC’s guidelines: http://triplec.at/index.php/tripleC/about/submissions#authorGuidelines, make use of APA style, and use the style template: http://triplec.at/files/journals/1/template-0.dot. Papers should be submitted online by making use of the electronic submission system: http://triplec.at/index.php/tripleC/user/register, http://triplec.at/index.php/tripleC/login). When submitting to the electronic system, please select “Special issue on crisis & communication” as the journal’s section.

ISSUE CO-EDITORS: David Hakken (dhakken@indiana.edu) and Marcus Breen (m.breen@neu.edu)

David Hakken is professor of informatics at Indiana University. Marcus Breen is associate professor of communication studies at Northeastern University.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk