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Work & Days

Work & Days

EDUCATION FOR REVOLUTION

“Education for Revolution,” is a special issue collaboration of the journals Works & Days and Cultural Logic that has just been launched. 

Works & Days, published by the English Department at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, explores problems of cultural studies, pedagogy, and institutional critique, especially as they are impacted by the global economic crisis (http://www.worksanddays.net).

Cultural Logic has been online since 1997 and is a non-profit, peer-reviewed, open access, interdisciplinary journal publishing essays, interviews, poetry, and reviews by writers working within the Marxist tradition (http://clogic.eserver.org).

This is the second collaboration between the two journals. 

Cultural Logic will be publishing an expanded, open access, version of this issue in the coming months. The expanded edition of the issue will include new articles addressing education for revolution in Greece, Turkey, and India. 

Read Works & Days editor David B. Downing’s “Foreword to the Revolution” here:

http://blogs.ubc.ca/ross/files/2013/12/WD-Front-pages.pdf

 

Works & Days + Cultural Logic

Education for Revolution

E. Wayne Ross & Rich Gibson (Editors)

 

Table of Contents

 

Barbarism Rising: Detroit, Michigan, and the International War of the Rich on the Poor

Rich Gibson, San DiegoStateUniversity

 

Resisting Neoliberal Education Reform: Insurrectionist Pedagogies and the Pursuit of Dangerous Citizenship [Available online: http://goo.gl/lm2PIl ]

E. Wayne Ross, University of British Columbia

Kevin D. Vinson, University of The West Indies

 

Reimaging Solidarity: Hip-Hop as Revolutionary Pedagogy

Julie Gorlewski, State University of New York, New Paltz

Brad Porfilio, LewisUniversity

 

Learning to be Fast Capitalists on a Flat World

Timothy Patrick Shannon, The OhioStateUniversity

Patrick Shannon, PennStateUniversity 

 

Contesting Production: Youth Participatory Action Research in the Struggle to Produce Knowledge

Brian Lozenski, Zachary A. Casey, Shannon K. McManimon, University of Minnesota

 

Schooling for Capitalism or Education for Twenty-First Century Socialism?

Mike Cole, University of East London

 

Class Consciousness and Teacher Education: The Socialist Challenge and The Historical Context

Curry Stephenson Malott, West ChesterUniversity of Pennsylvania

 

The Pedagogy of Excess

Deborah P. Kelsh, The College of Saint Rose 

 

Undermining Capitalist Pedagogy: Takiji Kobayashi’s Tōseikatsusha and the Ideology of the World Literature Paradigm

John Maerhofer, RogerWilliamsUniversity

 

Marxist Sociology of Education and the Problem of Naturalism: An Historical Sketch

Grant Banfield, FlindersUniversity of South Australia

 

The Illegitimacy of Student Debt

David Blacker, University of Delaware

 

Hacking Away at the Corporate Octopus

Alan J. Singer, HofstraUniversity

 

A Tale of Two Cities — and States

Richard Brosio, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee

 

SDS, The 1960s, and Education for Revolution

Alan J. Spector, PurdueUniversity, Calumet

 

E. Wayne Ross, PhD
Professor
Department of Curriculum and Pedagogy
University of British Columbia
2125 Main Mall
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4
Canada
604-822-2830
wayne.ross@ubc.ca
http://www.ewayneross.net

Critical Educationwww.criticaleducation.org
Cultural Logicwww.eserver.org/clogic
Workplace: A Journal for Academic Laborwww.workplace-gsc.com

 

**END**

 Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

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Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Falling Rate of Learning

The Falling Rate of Learning

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Education is Not for Sale

Education is Not for Sale

CRITICAL EDUCATION – CALL FOR MANUSCRIPTS

SPECIAL SERIES

CALL FOR MANUSCRIPTS

The Media and the Neoliberal Privatization of Education

 Series editors: Derek R. Ford (Syracuse University), Brad Porfilio (Lewis University), Rebecca A. Goldstein (Montclaire State University)

Abstracts due: December 31,2013

Manuscripts due: May 1,2014

As the neoliberal agenda for public education in North America intensifies, educational literature has increasingly turned its attention toward understanding the logics and processes of neoliberal privatization. Additionally, attention has been paid as to how educators resist these processes and practices, both in the classroom and beyond. This special issue seeks to deepen our understanding of the neoliberal privatization of education by extending critical examinations to an under-represented field of cultural production: that of mainstream media reporting on education and the neoliberal privatization of education, which many believe represents a new round of primitive accumulation. By examining and analyzing the mainstream media’s relationship to the processes in which neoliberal education ideologies are constructed, reflected, and reified, articles in this issue will explicate the various ways in which the mainstream media has helped facilitate and legitimate neoliberalism as universal logic in reforming education, both locally and globally. Articles will also speak to how critical educations have guided students in K-20 schools to understand the mainstream media’s relationship to supporting the neoliberal takeover of schools.

We welcome conceptual, empirical, theoretical, pedagogical and narrative articles that approach this topic from a variety of perspectives and frameworks. Articles included in the special issue may ask and examine questions such as, but not limited to:

* How has media coverage of teachers’ unions and teachers’ strikes reinforced and/or advanced privatization?

* What shift has taken place in terms of who is positioned in the media as educational “experts”?

* What are the differences between the way that various major news networks, newspapers, and news magazines talk about educational privatization?

* How are Teach For America and Teach For All being propelled by media coverage?

* What are the variations in media coverage of the neoliberal agenda for education?

* What are the alternatives and prospects for challenges to the mainstream media?

* How has ALEC impacted school reform policies and practices on the state level and to what extent has the media covered it?

* How have critical educators positioned their students to understand the mainstream media’s role in supporting the corporate agenda for schooling?

Critical Education is an international peer-reviewed journal, which seeks manuscripts that critically examine contemporary education contexts and practices. Critical Education is interested in theoretical and empirical research as well as articles that advance educational practices that challenge the existing state of affairs in society, schools, and informal education.

An early expression of interest and a 250-500 word abstract is preferred by December 31, 2013. Please address correspondence to drford@syr.edu and include “Critical Education” in the subject line.

For details on manuscript submission, please visit:  http://ojs.library.ubc.ca/index.php/criticaled/information/authors

 **END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Athens - The Academy

SECOND INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON CRITICAL EDUCATION

 The Department of Education, University of Athens, Greece is hosting the

2nd INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON CRITICAL EDUCATION
10-14 July 2012, Athens, Greece

Organized by the journals:
JOURNAL OF CRITICAL EDUCATION POLICY STUDIES (UK)
CULTURAL LOGIC (USA/CANADA)
KRITIKI (GREECE)
RADICAL NOTES (INDIA)

ICCE Conference Website: http://icce-2012.weebly.com/index.html

Some of last year’s papers (from the 2011 conference) will go into a special edition of JCEPS, the Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies, coming out in around April 2012. In addition, all the papers that were presented at the 2011 conference and were submitted in written form will be published as conference proceedings in the next couple of months.

The website is in process of improvement, e.g. regarding methods of payment. Also the final keynote speakers are not yet confirmed. We are asking Dennis Beach, me (Dave Hill), Marnie Holborow, and Alex Callinicos, as well as leading Greek Marxists/ critical educators.

So, hope to see you at this conference inAthens in July! Last year’s was great – politically, intellectually, and socially!

Professor Dave Hill

INTERNATIONAL PROGRAM COMMITTEE (subject to confirmation)

Kostas Skordoulis (University of Athens, Greece)

Dave Hill (Universities of Middlesex, United Kingdom; Limerick, Ireland; Athens, Greece)

Peter McLaren (University of Auckland, New Zealand)

Grant Banfield (University of South Australia, Australia)
 
Dennis Beach (University of Göteburg, Sweden)
 
Ramin Farahmandpur (Portland State University, Oregon, USA)
 
Marnie Holborrow (University College Dublin, Ireland)
 
Alpesh Maisuria (Anglia Ruskin University, United Kingdom)
 
Sharzad Mojab (University of Toronto, Canada)

Ravi Kumar (South Asian University, New Delhi, India)
 
Deborah Kelsh (College of St. Rose, Albany, NY, USA)
 
Curry Malott (West Chester University, Pennsylvania, USA)
 
Gregory Martin (University of Technology, Sydney, Australia)
 
Micheal O’Flynn (University of Limerick, Ireland)
 
Perikles Pavlidis  (Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece)
 
Brad Porfilio (Lewis University, Romeoville, Illinois, USA)
 
Martin Power (University of Limerick, Ireland)
 
Helena Sheehan (University College Dublin, Ireland)
 
Juha Suoranta (University of Tampere, Finland)
 
Spyros Themelis (Middlesex University, United Kingdom)
 
Salim Vally  (University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa)

 

**END**

 

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

 

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

 

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a new song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Red

THE ROUGE FORUM @ AERA 2012

Hi Folks

If you’re planning on being inVancouver for the American Educational Research Association in April 2012, I hope you’ll attend The Rouge Forum @ AERA 2012.

Web site: www.rougeforumconference.org

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=240261179366501

Details below. Please share in your networks.

Confirmed Speakers include:

Antonia Darder, Loyola Marymount U
Abraham DeLeon, U of Texas, San Antonio
Gustavo Fischman, Arizona State U
Elizabeth Heilman, Michigan State U
Nathalia Jaramillo, U of Auckland
Philip Kovacs, U of Alabama, Huntsville
Rebecca Martusewicz, Eastern Michigan U
Sandra Mathison, U of British Columbia
Peter McLaren, U of Auckland
Stephen Petrina, U of British Columbia
Brad Porfilio, Lewis U
E. Wayne Ross, U of British Columbia
Kenneth Saltman, DePaul U
Patrick Shannon, Penn State U

*****

The Rouge Forum @ AERA 2012

www.rougeforumconference.org

Free Interactive Conference Open to All

To Know is Not Enough: Activist Scholarship, Social Change & The Corporate University

Friday April 13, 2012

Universityof British Columbia,

Robson Square Campus

HSBC Hall

Vancouver, BC

The theme for the 2012 annual meeting of the American Education Research Association is “Non Satis Scire: To Know Is Not Enough.” It is laudable that AERA is promoting “the use of research to improve education and serve the public good” rather than the mere accumulation of research knowledge, but The Rouge Forum is interested in exploring what it means for scholars, and educators in general, to move beyond “knowing” to the pursuit of activist agendas for social change:  

·      What happens when teachers and other academics connect reason to power and power to resistance?

·      How can academic work (in universities and other learning environments) support local and global resistance to global neoliberal capitalism?

·      How do we respond to the obstacles and threats faced as activist scholars?

The Rouge Forum @ AERA will bring together world-renowned scholars, teachers, community organizers, and other activists to discuss these questions and others related to activist scholarship, social change, academic freedom, and work in the corporate university as part of a one-day interactive conference at the Robson Square Campus of University of British Columbia in downtownVancouver.

E. Wayne Ross

http://www.ewayneross.net

wayne.ross@mac.com

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

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End the Damage

AN INTERNATIONAL EXAMINATION OF TEACHER EDUCATION: EXPOSING AND RESISTING THE NEOLIBERAL AGENDA – JCEPS SPECIAL ISSUE + CALL FOR PAPERS

The Journal of Critical Education Policy Studies
Special Issue: Spring 2012
An International Examination of Teacher Education: Exposing and Resisting the Neoliberal Agenda
Chief Editor: Professor Dave Hill, Chief/Managing Editor and Founding Editor, Professor Dave Hill, Professor Peter L. McLaren Editor, North America, Professor Pablo Gentili Editor, Latin America

Guest Editors: Dr. Brad Porfilio, Lewis University & Dr. Julie Gorlewski, SUNY at New Paltz

In recent decades, the transnational capitalist class has wielded power and influence to gain control over elements of social life that were once considered vital domains to fostering the social welfare of global citizens. Affected public domains include natural resources, health care, prisons, transportation, post-catastrophe restoration, and education. The chief linchpin in the elite’s corporatization over social affairs is its effective propaganda campaign to inculcate the global community to believe that neoliberal capitalism ameliorates rather than devastates humanity. According to political pundits, free-market academics, and corporate leaders, economic prosperity and improvements in the social world emanate from “unregulated or free markets, the withering away of the state as government’s role in regulating businesses and funding social services are either eliminated or privatized, and encouraging individuals to become self-interested entrepreneurs” (Hursh, 2011).

Since neoliberalism is a term rarely uttered is most dominant (mainstream) media outlets, most citizens are not cognizant of how it is linked to many deleterious economic and social developments at today’s historical juncture, such as massive unemployment, the swelling of home foreclosures, homelessness, militarism, school closings, maldistribution of wealth, and environmental degradation (Hill, 2008; Hursh, 2011; McLaren, 2007; Ross & Gibson, 2007; Scipes, 2009). Equally important, many global citizens fail to recognize how the transnational elite have spawned a McCarthy-like witch hunt to eliminate academics, policies, and programs that have the potential to engage citizens in a critical examination of what is responsible for today’s increasingly stark social world – as well as what steps are necessary to radically transform it.

In this special issue of The Journal of Critical Education Policy Studies, we call on progressive scholars from across the globe to provide empirical research, conceptual analysis, and theoretical insights in relation to how corporate policies, practices, and imperatives are structuring life in schools of education.

Since the impact of neoliberal capitalism on programs, policies, relationships, and pedagogies in schools of education is not uniform, as local histories and politics structure how macro-forces come to impact people in local contexts (Gruenwell 2003), the issue will be integral in understanding and confronting the social actors and constitute forces gutting the humanizing nature of education. Additionally, we call on critical scholars and pedagogues who have found emancipatory fissures amid corporatized schools of education to share policies, pedagogies, and cultural work that have the potency promote critical forms of education, democratic relationships, and peace, equity and social justice across the globe.

Manuscripts are due by December 1, 2011 and should be submitted as email attachments to porfilio16@aol.com and gorlewsj@newpaltz.edu.

Papers submitted for publication should be between 5,000 and 8000 words long. While we would hope that papers would be submitted in accordance with the Harvard Referencing Style, we do accept those written in any commonly accepted academic style, as long as the style is consistent throughout the paper.

Please direct all inquires about this special issue to the guest editors at Porfilio16@aol.com and gorlewsj@newpaltz.edu

 

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The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

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Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Critical Pedagogy

CRITICAL PEDAGOGIES IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY: A CONFERENCE ON TRANSFORMATIVE PEDAGOGIES

Call for Papers

Critical Theories in the Twenty First Century: A Conference of Transformative Pedagogies

West Chester University of Pennsylvania

Conference Founders: Curry Malott, John Elmore, and Brad Porfilio

November 18th and 19th 2011

Proposals for papers, panels, performances, workshops, and other multimedia presentations should include title(s) and names and contact information for presenter(s). The deadline for sending prooposals is August 31, 2011. The Steering Committee will email acceptance or rejection notices by September 8, 2011. The proposal formats available to the presenters are as follows:

The general purpose of the West Chester Critical Theory Conference is to promote and support critical scholarship within students, and to advance critical theory and pedagogy more generally. By “advance” we mean to expose more people to critical practices and understandings as part of the process of the development of theory.

Through this focus we hope to work toward unifying and strengthening the sub-genres of critical pedagogy from Marxism, critical race theory, to critical neo-colonial studies. This goal is approached through the conferences internal pedagogy and therefore through a horizontal rather than a vertical organizing structure; by including students and classroom teachers in the critical pedagogical work dominated by professors; and by attempting to create a space where criticalists who do not usually work together can create meaningful unity, respect, and common goals. Since the dominant form of power in the twenty first century—neoliberal capitalist power—is both multicultural and global, critical pedagogy must too become more multicultural and global if it is to pose a significant challenge to it for a more democratic life after capitalism.

Because critical theory is concerned with not only understanding the world, but with transforming it, the conference is focused on not only understanding the consequences of an unjust social and economic system (i.e. corporate take-over of schools, high stakes testing and behaviorist pedagogy, micro classroom aggressions and bullying, poverty, racism, sexism, white supremacy, homophobia, perpetual war, ableism, etc.), but with transforming or dissolving their root causes (i.e. neoliberal capitalism and settler-state, Euro-centric oppression and their patriarchal, homophobic, racist, etc. hegemonies). As part of this goal the conference will hopefully provide introductory discussions and presentations on critical pedagogy and critical theory.

SUBMISSIONS
Proposal Formats

Individual Proposal: (45 minutes)
The conference committee welcomes individual paper proposals, with the understanding that those accepted will be grouped together around common or overlapping themes, Presenters will have approximately 45 minutes to present or summarize their individual papers. Individual paper submissions will be considered for panels with the same topic/theme. If you would prefer to present your paper/research individually you should consider the alternative format proposal. A 300-500 word abstract of the paper will be peer reviewed for acceptance to the conference.

Symposium Proposal: (90 minutes)
Presenters are also welcomed to submit proposals for a symposium. A symposium is typically composed of a chair and discussant and three to five participants who present or summarize their papers. Each symposium is organized around a common theme. Each participant will have between 15 and 45 minutes to present their papers, depending upon the number of participants involved in the symposium. A 300-500 word abstract of the symposium will be peer reviewed for acceptance to the conference.

Panel Proposal: (90 minutes)
A panel discussion is another venue available presenters. A panel discussion is typically composed of three to six participants who discuss their scholarly work within the context of a dialogue or conversation on a topic or theme related to the conference theme. Typically, each panelist is given 10-15 minutes to discuss the topic, present theoretical ideas, and/or point to relevant research. A chair should be identified who introduces the panel and frames the issues and questions being addressed. In addition to the chair, we encourage (but do not require) organizers of panels to include a discussant who responds to the comments of the panelists. Individual proposal submissions will be combined into panels with the same theme/topic. A 300-500 word abstract of the panel discussion will be peer reviewed for acceptance to the conference.

Alternative Format and Special Interest Groups (90 minutes)
Alternative proposals that do not fit into the above categories, such as workshops, performances, video and multimedia presentations, and round-table dialogues, are encouraged. We also welcome proposals for the organization of special interest groups. A 150-250 word abstract of the panel discussion will be peer reviewed for acceptance to the conference.

Email proposals to conference coordinators Brad Porfilio (porfilio16@aol.com) and Curry Malott (currymalott@hotmail.com) by August 31, 2011.

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The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

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Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Red

THE ROUGE FORUM – UPDATE 13th NOVEMBER 2010 AND LONDON STUDENTS POINT THE WAY

 

A message from Rich Gibson

Dear Friends,

The Rouge Forum web page is updated at: http://www.richgibson.com/blog/

We invite you to join us in Chicago for Rouge Forum 2011. http://www.rougeforumconference.org/

The Rouge Forum 2011 conference will be held May 20-22 at Lewis University’s suburban campus in Romeoville, IL.

Call for proposals and information on conference registration and housing will be online soon!

And here is a call for chapter authors: Hip-Hop(e): The Cultural Practice and Critical Pedagogy of International Hip-Hop.
Peter Lang
Co-Edited with Mike J. Viola UCLA
by Brad Porfilio
http://lewisu.academia.edu/BradPorfilio/Papers/330392/Hip-Hop_e_Call_for_Chapters

 

Good luck to us, every one.
Rich Gibson

 

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MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

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Crisis Sublime

THE PHENOMENON OF OBAMA AND THE AGENDA FOR EDUCATION

CALL FOR CHAPTER PROPOSAL SUBMISSIONS

The phenomenon of Obama and the agenda for education: Can hope audaciously trump neoliberalism?

Under Contract with Information Age Publishing

Co-editors:

Dr. Paul R. Carr: Educational Foundations, Beeghly College of Education, Youngstown State University, Youngstown, OH, USA, 44555, prcarr@ysu.edu http://www.coe.ysu.edu/~paulcarr/

Dr. Brad J. Porfilio: Educational Leadership, School of Education, Lewis University, Chicago, IL, USA, porfilio16@aol.com

Paul R. Carr is originally from Toronto, and now resides in Montreal. He studied for two years in France in the early 1980s, and then undertook the rest of his university studies in Canada in the areas of political science, sociology and education. He completed his doctorate in the sociology of education at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education at the University of Toronto in 1996, with his thesis examining anti-racism and institutional culture in education. For the past few years, he has been a professor at Youngstown State University, where he teaches courses in multicultural education, the sociology of education, diversity and leadership, and qualitative methodology. His current research is broadly concerned with social justice, with specific threads related to critical pedagogy, democracy, media literacy, and intercultural education. In 2007, he co-edited The Great White North? Exploring Whiteness, Privilege and Identity in Education ( Rotterdam : Sense Publishers), and, in 2008, co-edited another book, entitled Doing Democracy: Striving for Political Literacy and Social Justice ( New York : Peter Lang). He is currently finalizing two other edited books dealing with intercultural education and youth culture, respectively, as well as a single-author book on critical pedagogy and democracy. Paul is the co-founder and co-director of the Global Doing Democracy Research Project, which aims to produce a range of studies on the international level, leading to critical, comparative analysis of how democracy and education can be more effectively connected. He has a blog on the Paulo and Nita Freire International Center for Critical Pedagogy on the theme of democracy. Lastly, he has been involved in a range of projects and initiatives in relation to solidarity with Latin America. His website is: http://www.coe.ysu.edu/~paulcarr/

Dr. Brad J. Porfilio is Assistant Professor of Education at Lewis University in Romeoville, IL. He teaches courses on critical pedagogy, qualitative research, globalization and education, multicultural education, foundations of education, and curriculum theory in the Educational Leadership for Teaching and Learning Doctoral Program. The Educational Leadership Program at Lewis University is unique in its critical and transformative focus where students are prepared to become transformative educational leaders who are deeply discerning, knowledgeable and approach the educational system as a potential avenue for challenging and transforming the status quo. Dr. Porfilio received his PhD in Sociology of Education in 2005 at the University at Buffalo. During his doctoral studies, he served as an Assistant Professor of Education at Medaille College and D’Youville College, where he taught courses across the teacher education spectrum and supervised pre-service and in-service teachers from Canada and the US. He has published numerous peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, edited volumes, and conference papers on the topics of urban education, critical social studies education, neoliberalism and schooling, transformative education, teacher education, gender and technology, and cultural studies.

Premise for the book:

Obama is, arguably, popular at home and (especially) abroad, especially among people of “color”. Expectations are high that he will transform the United States. His style, message and presence are extremely attractive, especially following eight years of problematic leadership in the White House.

Why is Obama popular? Does he provide hope, as he eloquently argued throughout the electoral campaign? Can he change society when the two-party system, combined with an overpowering neoliberal economic model, is infused into the cultural and political landscape of society? Will he challenge the military-industrial model, scaling back the 750 US military bases in a hundred countries and untold billions being spent on military purposes? Will he dismantle monopolistic, undemocratic business practices that supposedly underpin the marketplace? How will he promote meaningful critical engagement and change in relation to race, discrimination, marginalization and differential power relations?

The above questions are fundamental to framing a debate around what type of hope and change we are considering. To undertake an analysis of what this means in real terms of change, we are seeking progressive scholars to interrogate Obama’s education vision, agenda and policies, and, further, to assess how well the education agenda might address the broader call for change. While this is early in Obama’s first term, we consider education to be the lynchpin to promoting a paradigm of engagement that advances social justice while contextualizing neoliberalism. We have found only one book that addresses the Obama agenda but this work is not a critical diagnosis of the issues.

Globalization is not simply a concept that leads to prosperity for all, and continuing to consider education as a consumer-good, rather than a public good, can serve to reinforce social inequities. Moreover, the antipathy that many people around the world exemplify toward Americans, often focused on US foreign policy, will not be diminished if Americans themselves are not more engaged with “others”. Education is the key to critically understanding and challenging war, patriotism, inequities, injustices, and building a more robust, dynamic and meaningful democracy.

The challenges in education are enormous, given the effect of several years of No Child Left Behind. Obama’s early indications at changing education policy have left some believing that the substance is much more conservative than the style. Support for charter schools and merit pay for teachers have left some wondering if the US will further slide into decay internationally, where it traditionally does poorly on comparative assessments. Renowned cultural studies scholar Henry Giroux has commented that Obama’s plans for education will serve to further disenfranchise marginalized groups.

We are interested in examining the state of public education under Obama, and how education may or may not be used as a lever to transform society, to effectively build the socio-cultural and political architecture that can buttress a diminution of racial, ethnic, religious, gender and class cleavages. Thus, understanding and interrogating neoliberalism will be an integral focus of this book, seeking to determine if the change espoused from above (the Obama government) can find its way into the classroom, the community and workplace.

Our conceptual framework is inspired by the burgeoning critical pedagogical movement (Freire, Giroux, Kincheloe, Macedo, McLaren, Steinberg). As Freire has underscored, education is a political project, and our analysis will critically dissect and unravel the policy, curricular, pedagogical and socio-political contextual variables, manifestations and proposals framing the Obama educational agenda.

With trillions of dollars being spent on bailouts of banks, insurance companies and car manufacturers, in addition to the endless stream of funds being allocated for war, little attention has been paid to the importance of education. Yet, education is where society can be transformed or re-produced.

This book will not only provide a detailed, critical analysis of the Obama education agenda. It will also provide proposals and insight into an alternative vision for education, one that takes into consideration neoliberalism, and seeks to neutralize it through critical pedagogy.

Audience:

 This volume will be a valuable resource to instructors who teach in the fields of teacher education, social studies, educational leadership, social work, social, cultural and philosophical foundations of education, sociology, political science, and global studies as well as their students. It may also be of interest to researchers, scholars, and the broader education public as well as mainstream and media sources.

Time-frame:

1)      Proposals due by March 1, 2010;

2)      Confirmation of selected chapters by April 1, 2010;

3)      Contributors will have their first drafts completed by June 15, 2010.

4)      The editors will review these first drafts, and provide authors detailed comments and suggestions by July 15, 2010.

5)      The contributors will make all of the necessary edits, and send the final chapters to the editors by September 1, 2010.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk