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Marxism Against Postmodernism in Educational Theory

Marxism Against Postmodernism in Educational Theory

TRANSFORMATIONS OF MASS SCHOOLING: SPECIAL ISSUE OF EUROPEAN EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH JOURNAL – VOLUME 12 NUMBER 2 (2013)

Just published at: www.wwwords.eu/EERJ/content/pdfs/12/issue12_2.asp

EUROPEAN EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH JOURNAL
Volume 12 Number 2, 2013, ISSN 1474-9041
 

ECER KEYNOTE, CADIZ 2012
Marcelo Caruso. Two Different Realms: politics and educational knowledge in European history

SPECIAL ISSUE
TRANSFORMATIONS OF MASS SCHOOLING
Guest Editors: RITA HOFSTETTER & BERNARD SCHNEUWLY

Rita Hofstetter & Bernard Schneuwly. Introduction. Changes in Mass Schooling: ‘school form’ and ‘grammar of schooling’ as reagents

Inés Dussel. The Assembling of Schooling: discussing concepts and models for understanding the historical production of modern schooling

André D. Robert. The French School System and the Universalist Metanarrative (1880-2000s): some reflections about so-called explanatory historical notions such as ‘la forme scolaire’

Marc Depaepe & Karen Hulstaert. Creating Cultural Hybridity by Exporting Metropolitan Structures and Cultures of Schooling and Educationalisation? The Emergence of a Congolese ‘Elite’ in the 1950s as a Starting Point for Further Research

Rita Hofstetter & Bernard Schneuwly. The International Bureau of Education (1925-1968): a platform for designing a ‘chart of world aspirations for education’

Martin Lawn. A Systemless System: designing the disarticulation of English state education

 

EERJ ROUNDTABLE, ECER 2012, CADIZ:
RESEARCH IMPACT AND EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH
Alis Oancea. Interpretations of Research Impact in Seven Disciplines

Paulina Korsnakova. Large-scale Comparative Studies of Educational Achievement: an impact case

GENERAL ARTICLES
Elena Makarova & Walter Herzog. Teachers’ Acculturation Attitudes and their Classroom Management: an empirical study among fifth-grade primary school teachers in Switzerland

Justin J.W. Powell & Claudia Finger. The Bologna Process’s Model of Mobility in Europe: the relationship of its spatial and social dimensions

Theo van Dellen. Toward a Social Responsibility Theory for Educational Research (in Lifelong Learning)

Access to the full texts of current articles is restricted to those who have a Personal subscription, or those whose institution has a Library subscription.

PERSONAL SUBSCRIPTION Subscription to all numbers of the January-December 2013 volume (this includes full access to ALL back numbers) is available to private individuals at a cost of US$50.00. If you wish to subscribe you may do so immediately at www.wwwords.eu/subscribeEERJ.asp

LIBRARY SUBSCRIPTION (institution-wide access). If you are working within an institution that maintains a Library, please urge them to purchase a Library subscription so access is provided throughout your institution; full details for libraries can be found at www.symposium-journals.eu/prices.html

CALL FOR PAPERS For all editorial matters, including articles offered for publication, please contact the Editor, Professor Martin Lawn (m.lawn@btinternet.com).

In the event of problems concerning subscription, or difficulty in gaining access, please contact the publishers at support@symposium-journals.co.uk

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

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Europeanizing Education

EUROPEANIZING EDUCATION

Published recently…

Europeanizing Education: governing a new policy space

MARTIN LAWN & SOTIRIA GREK

2012 paperback 172 pages US$48.00
ISBN 978-1-873927-61-8

 
IN STOCK NOW,  FREE delivery on all orders
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Click here to view further information and to order this book

The study of common and diverse effects in the field of education acrossEuropeis a growing field of inquiry and research. It is the result of many actions, networks and programmes over the last few decades and the development of common European education policies. Europeanizing Education describes the origins of European education policy, as it metamorphosed from cultural policy to networking support and into a space of comparison and data. The authors look at the early development and growth of research networks and agencies, and international and national collaborations. The gradual increase in the velocity and scope of education policy, practice and instruments acrossEuropeis at the heart of the book.

The European space of education, a new policy space, has been slowly coaxed into existence; governed softly and by persuasion; developed by experts and agents; and de-politicized by the use of standards and data. It has increasing momentum. It is becoming a single, commensurable space on a rising tide of indicators and benchmarks. The construction of policy spaces by the European Union makesEuropegovernable: policy spaces have to be mobilized by networks of actors and constructed by comparative data. They are the result of transnational flows of people, ideas and practices across European borders; the direct effects of European Union policy; and, finally, the Europeanizing effect of international institutions and globalization.

The European space of education and research has become a new place of work through interconnected institutions, networks and companies, and it is being constructed through the flow of policy ideas, knowledge and practices from place to place, sector to sector, organization to organization, and across borders. This book will be useful to any scholar of the new arena of study, the European Space of Education.

Contents

1 Introduction
A Single Space? Comparison and Complexity; Networks and Standards; The Creation of the European Education Space; The Importance of ‘Soft’: networks, space and meaning; Concluding: main points of the argument

2 Research and Policy in European Education: the first stage
Europe in Competition; Mid-Twentieth-Century European Research Formation; Research Projects; Developing European Research Institutions and Skills; UNESCO and the Comparativists; The International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA) and Surveys; The International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) and Educational Statistics; The Idea of a Common Project; Janne Report; Conclusion

3 Chaotic Uniformity: the rise of the European dimension in education, 1970-2000
Governing by Cooperation; Culture and Affinity; From Chaotic Uniformity to Networked Cooperation

4 Governing Education: the use of persuasive and unobtrusive power in the European Union
Introduction; Governing Associations Softly; Associations and Networks; Experts and Associations – EERA; Building a Platform: fluidity and stability in EERA; Finding a Platform – EERA; Idea of the Space and the Platform; Conclusion

5 Governance by Experts and Standards?
Using Experts; Ideas Brokers; Building a System through Standards; Assembling a Learning Space: data and platforms; Final Point

6 Second Wave Policy in European Union Education, 2000-2010
From Education to Learning: the role of data; Measuring Europe:Lisbon (2000) and after; ‘Key Data on Education inEurope’: an overview of the Eurydice Reports of 2000, 2002 and 2005; Conclusion

7 The New Political Work of Calculating Education
Constructing Data: European agencies; Eurostat; Eurydice; Constructing Europe: the role of actors; Concluding Comments

8 The OECD as an Agent of Europeanization in Education: the impact of international education assessment tools
Introduction; OECD and the Politics of Comparison; The Programme for International Student Assessment; The Case of Finland; The Case of Germany; The Case of the United Kingdom; PISA and Europe; Discussion

9 School Self-evaluation as Travelling Policy across Europe: the role of the Scottish Inspectorate and SICI
Introduction; From the View of the Local: school self-evaluation inScotland; SSE as a Travelling Policy: the Role of SICI; SICI: the beginnings; Self-Evaluation and SICI; Discussion

10 Conclusions

Notes – References – Notes on the Authors

Related titles:

Globalisation and Europeanisation in Education ROGER DALE & SUSAN ROBERTSON

An Atlantic Crossing? The Work of the International Examination Inquiry, its Researchers, Methods and Influence MARTIN LAWN

Materialities of Schooling: design, technology, objects, routines MARTIN LAWN & IAN GROSVENOR

Modelling the Future: exhibitions and the materiality of education MARTIN LAWN

SYMPOSIUM BOOKS
PO Box 204, Didcot, Oxford OX11 9ZQ, United Kingdom, info@symposium-books.co.uk

Specialist publishers of Comparative and International Education.
Please see our online catalogue at www.symposium-books.co.uk for bibliographical details, contents pages, and a secure order form.

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

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Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

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European Union

THE EUROPEAN HIGHER EDUCATION AREA: KEY ISSUES AND WAYS FORWARD

Monday 11th July 2011

12.00-4.00pm (lunch inclusive)

Venue: SRHE, 44 BedfordRow, London, WC1R  4LL

Programme:

The French university at the crossroads: between bureaucratic accountability and the quest for excellence

Dr Romuald Normand & Professor Jean-Louis Derouet, Institut Français de l’Education, Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon

French higher education institutions, beyond official rhetoric, remain profoundly divided between the elitism that provides excellence for the few, and the democratisation that is reflected in the massification of higher education. This is illustrated by the expanse between the prestigious and highly selective grandes écoles (the Oxbridge or Ivy League of the French system) and the ‘fac’ – the ordinary universities. Moreover, the paucity of French research and scholarship on higher education means that there is no persistent analytical and potentially critical voice coming from the academy, nor any relevant empirical findings. Changes have, however, occurred within the system with theBolognaprocess, the creation of the National Research Agency, and legislation on university autonomy. Romuald Normand and Jean-Louis Derouet will examine and analyse current tensions and propose ways forward.

The Strange Saga of Policy as Success

Guy Neave, Scientific Director of the Centre for Research in Higher Education Policies (CIPES)Porto,Portugal, and Professor Emeritus of the Centre for Higher Education Policy Studies atTwenteUniversity, theNetherlands

This presentation is not concerned with the Bologna Process so much as an exemplar to examine a broader issue of HE policy as a multi-level process. Who defines success? And at what level – inter-governmental, system or institutional level?  Does success at one inevitably mean success at another?  How is the Bologna Process perceived less by reformers – by the pays politique – as by those who have reform done to them – that is, at institutional level by the pays réel, academics, students and administrators. This presentation draws on findings across seven higher education establishments in four EU member states:Norway,Portugal,ItalyandGermany. It suggests optimism is best when heavily diluted with caution.

The European Higher Education Area (EHEA): is there a future?

Noël Vercruysse, Director, Higher Education Policy Unit, Flemish Belgian Ministry of Education

The implementation of the Bologna Process in the first decade of the 21st century has had a significant impact on European higher education at levels of the system: the government, higher education institutions, academic staff and students. Much has been achieved, but it is certainly an exaggeration to say that we are living in a vibrant and dynamic EHEA. After theLeuvenconference in 2009 the Bologna Process and the EHEA are losing momentum. Why is this, and what can be done about it? Is there still a future for the EHEA, and, if so, what kind of future? Noël Vercruysse will discuss these issues as well as focus on what he considers a main policy priority for the coming years: differentiation and diversity in higher education and the consequent need of good transparency tools.

Event booking details

To reserve a place at this seminar please email Nicola Manches at: nmanches@srhe.ac.uk or telephone +44 (0) 207 4472525. SRHE events are open to all and free to SRHE members as part of their membership package. The delegate fee for non-members is £25 [full time students £20]. Non members wishing to join the Society may do so at the time of registration and the delegate fee will be waived.

Please note that all places–for SRHE members and non members-must be booked in advance and that we have to charge £25 for non-attendance if a place has been reserved but no notice of cancellation/non-attendance given in advance of the day of the event.

(Interested in joining the IIR Network but not able to attend this event? To receive details of future events in this series and to join the mailing list, please email nmanches@srhe.ac.uk)

Yours sincerely

Francois Smit, Society for Research into Higher Education, 44 Bedford Row, London WC1R  4LL, Tel: +44 20 7447 2525, Fax: +44 20 7447 2526

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

THE REVOLT OF A GENERATION

Revolt

Euro-Mediterranean Happening on Education, Welfare and New Political Practices
Rome, May 12th – 13th

In the last two years we have participated and assisted with extraordinary movements that have fought for a quality education, for labour rights and new welfare against the austerity politics of the European Union. The wild demonstrations, picket lines and strikes, the university occupations and the turmoil of theMediterranean signal a generational revolt and the necessity of a new social pact that involves all those subjects that stand up for their rights and refuse to be blackmailed.

The huge strikes last autumn inFranceshowed us the possibility of creating an intergenerational alliance, as blockades of production and circulation of goods constitute different aspects of a common struggle. InRome, as inLondon, the Book Block was a collective political practice able to speak out about the dismantling of public universities and processes of deskilling. At the same time, the revolts of Maghreb-Mashrek demonstrate how the construction of a future is tightly bound to both the radical claim for democracy and with the necessity of freedom from the parasitic and corrupt power that commands over our lives, universities, schools and workplaces.

The recent revolts and movements have crossed national and European borders as well as the limits imposed on education and mobility by Bologna Process to clash with the failure of a strategy we have always opposed. The struggles of these months have indicated that the possibility of radical change can only become concrete through the alliance among the different actors of labour and education, through common and transnational practices guided by those whom put their own bodies and knowledge.

We hope to give a common meaning to this new space redefined by the conflicts in which the crises open new possibilities to create an “other” future. It is for this reason that we want to initiate an open debate about the common projects we want to build together, starting in Romeon 12 and 13th May 2011.

Program

[ Thursday 12th May ]
6 p.m. – Department of Philosophy, Villa Mirafiori

Opening workshop – with:
Mouhamed Ali Oueled Itaief Student of the “École des beaux-arts” in Tunis
Youad Ben Rejeb Université Femministe
Trifi Bassem Forum des jeunes pour la citoyenneté et la créativité (FJCC)
Mondher Abidi Union Diplomées Chomeurs
Wissem Sghaier UGET Union General Etudiant Tunisi
Tim Uncut UK
Maham Hashni SOAS
Mark Bergfeld Education Activist Network
Rita Maestre Fernandez Juventud sin futuro

Annalisa Cannito AgMigrationUndAntirassismus
Tatiana Kai- Browne Plattform Geschichtspolitik

7 p.m.

Aperitive – Global video session #1
Contributions from education revolt – Book Bloc videos and photos

[ Friday 13th May ]

10 a.m. – Department of Political Science, University “La Sapienza”
Conflictual knowledge: from Europe to Mediterranean area

3 p.m. – Department of Literature, University “La Sapienza”
Education, Welfare and Precariousness

5 p.m. – Department of Literature, University “La Sapienza”
Labour, income and democracy against the crisis
With Fiom’ general secretary Maurizio Landini and members of tunisian General Union UGTT.

8 p.m. – ESC (via dei Volsci, 159)

Global video session #2

Contributions and interviews from Maghreb – Mashrek’ revolts

Follow Live-Streaming on: http://www.unicommon.org

READ THE PROGRAM IN FRENCH AND ARABIC

***
http://www.unicommon.org
http://www.coordinamentouniversitario.it

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Education on Trial

UniCOMMON: THE REBELLION OF LIVING KNOWLEDGE

An extraordinary season of struggle, beyond Uniriot

Uniriot has been several things: the will to compose different political cultures, the desire of conflict and the innovation inside and against the university reformed by the Bologna Process. The attempt of building up a new experimentation outside of any reassuring identity, but creating a new network able to change and being changed by the richness of discussions and the unquestionable reality of the struggle that cross us.

Uniriot.org has been a great platform, a useful tool for the challenge we issued five years ago: not only a showcase of our ideas, but a crossroads of different experiences and projects, new narrations of struggle, communication about the transformations of the university and our research. We have been trying to carry this challenge forward since the movement of 2005, when we created Uniriot, through our experience inside the European struggles during the AntiCPE movement in France, Bologna Burns in Wien and Madrid, until the anomalous wave of 2008 and the incredible autumn we lived in 2010.

We have been profoundly changed during these extraordinary months, together with students, precarious workers and researchers that have passionately animated and continuously organized the struggles of the last year. As we cannot be the same, we close the experience of Uniriot and launch a new political constituent process to live up to our time and the transformations required by the struggles. A new challenge!

The Rebellion of Living Knowledge: UniCommon

UniCommon moves its first step in an era of crisis and austerity: the education reforms enacted without any public funding inside the framework of the failure of the Bologna Process and, at the same time, its extension outside Europe as a tool of exploitation of transnational living knowledge; the dismissal of the public university and the de-qualification of high school education, the massive youth unemployment, precarity and the absence of any future for a whole generation inside and outside the academy.

In this landscape, movements shouted firmly the shelter of public university against cuts, rising tuition fees, free research labor and debt loan, not as mere defence of the extant, but as a strategic field to claim quality of knowledge and free education against any rhetorical meritocracy. Self-education has been our political disposition, focused on the struggle for a qualified and critical knowledge, a device of organization that we are going to practice; our aim is to focus on the transformations of researchers’ status in the era of delegitimization of research work and the peer-review system. Militant research is our collective tool to understand and to map the transformations of the present; self-education is our device beyond the public/private dichotomy to make our university!

UniCommon wants to switch the nexus between education and precarity, creating a new social constituent deal within the new composition of labor, a democratic reappropriation of welfare against private plunders and feudal academic power. We have learnt that where there is a capital relation, there is exploitation of toil, passions, words and knowledge; where there is globalized cognitive capitalism so there is a parasitic power that robs our body, our life.

The European and north-African movements of the last autumn have taught us that the claim for welfare against poverty and rights against exploitation are strictly connected to the claim for democracy and freedom against power and its corruption. Students who have animated the revolts of last years, thousands of precarious and young unemployed took up the book shields to defend their lives: a rioting generation reclaiming knowledge, free access and circulation, income and new welfare, democracy and freedom of choice above our body.

UniCommon is born within the practice of Book Bloc, a common tool of defence, a production of imaginary to express our desire. We have created those book shields as an attempt of combining radicalism and people’s support; the challenge of our time is to build up a wild experimentation, widespread and radical at the same time, to step over the crisis and the failed utopia of cognitive capitalism. The Book Bloc is a transnational practice, against any fixed identity and outside any representation of conflict, it is our defence within the democracy of turmoil!

The failure of Bologna Process does not mean the end of exploitation of our knowledge, on the contrary the crisis deepens the capitalistc command over our body; at the same time, the struggles have showed us their powerful capacity of creating connections despite borders, sharing common projects and practices, shaping a different future where free knowledge, income, rights and citizenship are not just a privilege.

UniCommon is a new compass oriented by self-education, created by the wild demos that blocked the circulation of commodities; it is a device defended by the transnational Book Bloc inside a European space definitely twisted by the Mediterranean revolts, the margins that break into the center to overturn it.

Moreover, Unicommon is a network of communication and political organization, a web platform that will work as a place of information and communication of struggles from high school to the academy, a space of connection among experiences of self-education and autonomous collectives of research. UniCommon.org is a new website inside the 2.0 web time: video as a tool of enquiring and mapping transformations, photos as the continuous effort of imaging the fuzzy movement of our demos and discussions, audios as a precise opinion of different voices, augmented reality to shape and multiply our world.

UniCommon starts from La Sapienza University within a day of large discussions to make a public analysis of the past autumn and to imagine the spring that lies ahead.

Meet you in the struggles, to create the future and subvert the present; to make the university of the common!

°°°°°

Program 24.03.2011

Create the Future, Subvert the Present

10:30 a.m. College of Philosophy, Villa Mirafiori, La Sapienza – Roma
Public assembly of students and precarious collectives and networks

Against the dismissal of public university, creating the university of the common

°°°
2:00 p.m. Lunch break

°°°

4:00 p.m. College of Political Science, LaSapienza – Roma
Round table

After the revolt of the autumn toward the general strike of 6th May 2011

Speakers: Ilenia Caleo (Zeropuntotre); Roberto Ciccarelli (Il manifesto), Claudio Riccio (Link), Eva Pinna (Surf), Luca Tomassini (CPU), Giorgio Sestili (Atenei in rivolta), Simone Famularo (Assemblea di Medicina – La Sapienza)  Francesco Sinopoli (Flc-Cgil), Corrado Zunino (la Repubblica)

°°°
7:30 p.m. aperitif break and videos
°°°

Info: http://www.uniriot.org  /  and from 24th  March  >>> http://www.unicommon.org >>>

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Education Crisis

The Man in Black

MIGRATION AND EDUCATION

CALL FOR PAPERS
A Special Issue on MIGRATION AND EDUCATION

The journal Power and Education (www.wwwords.co.uk/POWER) is publishing a special issue on Migration and Education. Papers should address the role education can and should play in the context of migration and/or what migration reveals and conceals about power and education. Migration should be considered as means of empowerment as well as disempowerment. Papers are welcome from all educational disciplines.

The International Organization for Migration estimates that nearly 200 million people across the world are currently living outside their place of birth and that about 3% of the global population are therefore migrants. The mass movement of people in the 21st Century has significant implications for education – from the need to meet legal obligations to educate the children of migrants to the internationalisation of the academic marketplace. Moreover, the legacies of historic migrations continue to impact on education – from the subjugation (and the occasional post-colonial resurrection) of indigenous practices and knowledges to the ethnic lines that still fracture the socio-economic structures of education. If migration presents ‘problems’ then education has a part to play in their resolution – education is widely recognised as a key element of social integration and whilst intolerance can be learned tolerance and mutual respect can be taught.

Power runs through all these issues. It can also be discerned in the on-going debate between multiculturalism and assimilation and the question of whether migrants should be taught the culture of their host countries. Other questions saturated with power include: What histories of migration should be taught? How is the commercialisation of education in an increasingly globalised world driving migration? What is the proper and just approach to the distribution of (typically limited) educational resources to migrants? To what extent can migration be harnessed to empower intercultural education and education for global citizenship?

This special issue of Power and Education will address the complexities of migration from a range of educational disciplines and theoretical frameworks. Contributions are invited that engage with all aspects of migration, including voluntary and forced migration and intra-country migration (e.g. from rural to urban areas) as they impact on children and/or adults and on students and/or teachers. Historical perspectives on the educational legacies of previous migrations are welcome as are considerations of the transition from immigration to integration. Education should be considered in its broadest terms to include all stages of formal education, lifelong learning and informal education. Contributions should specifically address issues of power and/in education and the journal will consider papers engaging with all power paradigms.

Suggested topics include, but are not limited to:
• the Bologna Process
• the ‘brain drain’ and its consequences
• children and language learning
• cultural capital and countries of origin
• displaced children and the inclusion agenda
• global citizenship
• immigration and integration
• refugee academics
• social constructions and interpretations of migration
• teaching and learning diversity in schools

Papers should be no longer than 7000 words and should be submitted by 31 July 2011. Reviews of relevant books are also encouraged. Information on how to submit papers can be found at www.wwwords.co.uk/POWER/howtocontribute.asp

Questions about this special issue and the journal should be sent to the editor, Michael F. Watts, via the journal’s website.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com