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Black Power

THE FIRE EVERY TIME: REFRAMING BLACK POWER ACROSS THE TWENTIETH CENTURY AND BEYOND

 

A PUBLIC HISTORY CONFERENCE AND COMMUNITY GATHERING

 

On September 21st & 22nd, 2012, the College of Charleston’s Avery Research Center for African American History and Culture will host a public history symposium and community event on the topic of “The Fire Every Time: Reframing Black Power Across the Twentieth Century and Beyond”.

 

RATIONALE

In his 1963 collection of essays, The Fire Next Time, James Baldwin reflected on the expulsion of African Americans from the “American Dream” of economic opportunity, political equality, and social belonging.   Rather than be daunted by what Baldwin called “the center of this dreadful storm, this vast confusion,” he connected the present and future struggles of Black people to their past:  “I know that what I’m asking is impossible. But in our time, as in every time, the impossible is the least that one can demand—and one is, after all, emboldened by the spectacle of human history in general, and American Negro history in particular, for it testifies to nothing less than the perpetual achievement of the impossible.”

In our contemporary age, where some have claimed the nation has achieved the “impossible” through the election of Barack Obama as the nation’s first African-American president, we ask scholars, activists, and artists to re-conceptualize the twentieth century through the lens of past, present, and future struggles for Black Power, which in the words of James Baldwin spread as a “fire” every time.

 

CONFERENCE AGENDA

The conference will feature two plenary panels, two roundtable panels, and fourteen paper presentation panels on such topics as policing, incarceration, higher education, Black arts and cultural institutions, the military, self-defense, images and iconography of the Black Panther Party, inter-racial alliances and “Rainbow” coalitions, religion, nationalism, trans-nationalism and global impact of Black Power, and film and documentary film-making.

 

PLENARY & ROUNDTABLE SPEAKERS

PLENARY Session: State of the Field
Yohuru Williams (Fairfield University), Peniel Joseph (Tufts University), Donna Murch (Rutgers University), Hasan Jeffries (The Ohio State University), Rhonda Williams (Case Western Reserve University).

PLENARY Session: Activists Then and Now
Cleveland Sellers (Voorhees College & Scholar Activist), Herman Blake (Medical University of South Carolina & Scholar Activist), Millicent Brown (Claflin University & Scholar Activist), James Campbell (Community Leader and Organizer), Osei Terry Chandler (Community Leader).

ROUNDTABLE: Reframing the Orangeburg Massacre: Protest and Police Reprisals
Cleveland Sellers (Voorhees College & Scholar Activist), Judy Richardson (Director & Former SNCC Activist), Jack Shuler (Denison University), Jack Bass (College of Charleston).

ROUNDTABLE Film Excerpt Screenings: Black Power on Film: Documentaries, Hollywood, and Filmmaking
Portia Cobb (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee), Marylou Tibaldo-Bongiorno (Director,Revolution ’67), Judy Richardson, (Former SNCC Activist & Film Director, Scarred Justice: The Orangeburg Massacre 1968).

ROUNDTABLE: The Longue Durée: Black Power from the Nineteenth Century to the 1990′s
Van Gosse (Franklin Marshall College), Deborah Gray White (Rutgers University), Curtis Austin(The OhioStateUniversity).

 

“ORANGEBURG MASSACRE”

We will also feature a special roundtable on the “Orangeburg Massacre of 1968” during which three African American students were killed by state police in Orangeburg during a civil rights protest of a segregated bowling alley.  This event was quite similar to the KentState shooting of 1971, and yet received little national media attention.  We hope to rectify the media’s lack of attention by bringing together Dr. Cleveland Sellers, a protest organizer and now president of VoorheesCollege, with two recent and noted authors on the incident, namely Jack Bass and Dr. Jack Shuler, and a documentary filmmaker, Judy Richardson, who will show her film on the Orangeburg Massacre of 1968.   This promises to be a valuable and important discussion on a pressing matter of South Carolina’s history that has dominated the history books, but not public dialogue.

POLITICAL AND COMMUNITY ACTIVISM

Although our community conference and gathering considers the history of African American politics and activism in Charleston, the Lowcountry, and beyond, we also consider how these topics have manifested in the contemporary world, a matter of pressing and national importance as the nation considers the reelection of the country’s first Black president.  Importantly, these scholars aim to create a dialogue with the audience that will think about how civil rights organizing and Black Power activism has fundamentally reshaped and broadened American democracy and citizenship for all peoples.

PUBLIC HISTORY AND COMMUNITY GATHERING

Altogether, we will bring together over 50 of the country’s top scholars on African American history and culture alongside activists and community members.  This represents a seminal gathering and a rare opportunity to create a memorable dialogue.  Far too often historians and scholars are seen as being removed from the general public and we hope to bridge that distance by creating a unique public history seminar and community gathering.  In addition to offering two-days of plenary speakers, roundtable panels, and presentations, this conference also features documentary film and a juried art exhibition. 

Please come join what will be an engaging conference and conversation.

 

For additional information contact:
Dr. Robert Chase
chasert@cofc.edu
843.953.7609

Conference Registration information

Hotel Information

 

For General Conference Information email: averyconferences@gmail.com

First published at: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/the-fire-every-time-reframing-black-power-across-the-twentieth-century-and-beyond-charleston-sc-21-22-september  

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK: UPDATE 30th JANAURY 2011

 

EVENTS

FREE SCREENING OF ‘HOME SAFE TORONTO’ DOCUMENTARY

Friday, February 4
7:30pm – 10:30pm
The Centre of Gravity
1300 Gerrard St. East, Toronto

With Street Nurse and Executive Producer Cathy Crowe and Director Laura Sky

HOME SAFE TORONTO is the second in the Sky Works series of documentaries that deals with how Canadian families live with the threat and the experience of homelessness.

It shows how the housing crisis in Canada is an expression of the increasing economic and job insecurity that has devastated the manufacturing sector in the Greater Toronto Area and throughout southern Ontario.

The film reveals the consequences of this “new economy”, where families surviving on low wages with no benefits, or on dwindling social assistance, are faced with the terrible choice between keeping a roof over their heads or putting food on the table.

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GREATER TORONTO WORKERS’ ASSEMBLY

Saturday, February 19
9:30am – 6:00pm
Steelworkers’ Hall, 25 Cecil St, Toronto

How to join the GTWA: http://www.workersassembly.ca/join

Committees: http://www.workersassembly.ca/committees

Our vision statement: http://www.workersassembly.ca/vision

Contact us at: workingclassfightback@gmail.com

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BLACK HISTORY MONTH CELEBRATION

Thursday, February 24, 5:00pm – 8 pm and
Friday, February 25, 9:00am – 1:00pm
Ontario Federation of Labour (OFL) Building
15 Gervais Drive, Toronto

The OFL and CBTU (Coalition of Black Trade Unionists) present the acclaimed exhibition “And Still I Rise: A History of African Canadian Workers in Ontario.” This travelling exhibit originally developed by the Workers Arts and Heritage Centre explores the rich legacy of Ontario’s black Community.

Four exhibits designed to look like train coaches span the twentieth century with exhibition topics ranging from “Challenges to Freedom”: “1900 to World War II” to the reflective “Legacy of African Canadians”. Visitors are invited to learn more about the historic and present day lives and experiences of Black Canadians through the investigation of themes including immigration, work roles and the labour movement, the agitation of civil rights, the contributions of African Canadians to the arts and sports, the importance of church, schools and voluntary organizations to building strong communities.

For more information, contact Janice Gairey at jgairey@ofl.ca or 416.347.9732.

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“EL CONTRATO”: FILM PRESENTED BY PUEBLITO FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT WEEK 2011

February 8, 2011
6:00pm-9:00pm
Beit Zatoun
612 Markham St., Toronto

“El Contrato” follows the path of migrant workers from Central Mexico to pick tomatos in Lemington, Ontario and the struggles and racism they face. Following the movie, prominent speaker Chris Ramsaroop will be addressing the issues about how immigrant workers in Canada still face injustices in today’s labour market and what should be the role of the Canadian labour movement.

To register for this event please email barrerasandy@hotmail.com with your name, email address and number of tickets you would like to reserve.

Suggested donation: $10.00

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CONFERENCE & CFP – TRANSNATIONAL MIGRATION AND ADULT EDUCATION: GLOBAL ISSUES AND DEBATES

June 9, 2011
9:30 am – 4 pm
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education
University of Toronto

A pre-conference held in conjunction with the 52nd Adult Education Research Conference (AERC) and the 30th Canadian Association for the Study of Adult Education (CASAE) Conference

Keynote speakers: Dr. Roxana Ng, OISE/University of Toronto and Dr. Mary V. Alfred, Texas A&M University

When migrants arrive in a new society, they bring with them their values, language and culture, contributing significantly to the diversity of their host countries. Without a doubt, the resulting demographic, social, and cultural changes create new opportunities for development as well as new challenges for adult education. However, we are left to grapple with many important questions, such as: What is the impact of transnational migration on adult education? What are the challenges and opportunities for adult education? How can adult education best facilitate migrants’ adaptation in a new society?

Call for Proposals: If you are conducting research or have completed studies in this area, we invite you to submit proposals to: Dr. Shibao Guo, University of Calgary, guos@ucalgary.ca. Deadline: February 15, 2011

For more information: http://silenceandvoice.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/08/AERC-CASAE-Call-2011.pdf

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NEWS AND VIEWS

RADICAL LABOR EDUCATION, PART I (FROM CHEAP MOTELS AND A HOT PLATE)

By Michael Yates

We are on our way to Amherst, Massachusetts, where I will be teaching a two-week course in labor economics to labor union brothers and sisters.  I have been a labor educator for thirty years. I have taught working people, mostly union leaders and members, a wide variety of courses in all kinds of settings… While working people are often enough unhappy with their work, or lack of it, and alienated from the political system, they ordinarily do not have a very clear understanding of the nature of our political economy or a desire to radically transform it. Why is this?

Read more: http://blog.cheapmotelsandahotplate.org/2010/12/27/radical-labor-education-part-i/

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SHARING IN A COMMON STRUGGLE

By Anthony Arnove, Socialist Worker

Anthony Arnove, Howard Zinn’s collaborator on projects like the book Voices of a People’s History of the United States and the documentary The People Speak, pays tribute to a friend whose sense of solidarity and joy in life was infectious.

FILMING OUR documentary The People Speak in Boston one afternoon, Howard said that the camaraderie between our cast members, the sense of collective purpose and joy, was a feeling he hadn’t experienced with such intensity since his active participation in the civil rights movement.

Since Howard’s passing, I have thought often of that moment, which crystallizes for me what made him so compelling an example of someone committed to, and enjoying to its fullest, a life of struggle.

Read more: http://socialistworker.org/2010/02/12/sharing-in-the-struggle

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EGYPT (FROM WADE RATHKE: CHIEF ORGANIZER BLOG)

If there was ever a more dramatic case study of the political impact of protest on or off the grid of internet, telecommunications, and social networking, the world saw it on the streets of Egypt yesterday. It was as if there were a perfect laboratory experiment on what would happen if the only avenues for protest were “old school” removing the variable of communications.

Read more: http://chieforganizer.org/2011/01/29/egypt/

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BEARING THE BRUNT OF A NEW WITCH-HUNT

By Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, Socialist Worker

The bipartisan campaign against “privileged” public-sector workers threatens to erode some of the gains of the civil rights and Black Power movements.

IN THE run-up to the midterm elections, overheated rhetoric from both Republicans and Democrats identified public-sector workers as a central factor in historically high budget state deficits and the collapse of local economies.

Public-sector workers have been described as the “haves”–as an “elite” group of workers who are living high on the fat of tax dollars, while the rest of the workforce wallows in job insecurity, lack of health care, foreclosure and falling wages.

Read more: http://socialistworker.org/2011/01/27/brunt-of-a-new-witch-hunt

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“ALONE TOGETHER”: AN MIT PROFESSOR’S NEW BOOK URGES US TO UNPLUG

By David Zax, Fast Company

In her new book, an MIT professor shares her ambivalence about the overuses of technology, which, she writes, “proposes itself as the architect of our intimacies.”

Sherry Turkle has been an ethnographer of our technological world for three decades, hosted all the while at one of its epicenters: MIT. A professor of the social studies of science and technology there, she also heads up its Initiative on Technology and Self. Her new book, Alone Together, completes a trilogy of investigations into the ways humans interact with technology. It can be, at times, a grim read. Fast Company spoke recently with Turkle about connecting, solitude, and how that compulsion to always have your BlackBerry on might actually be hurting your company’s bottom line.

Read more: http://www.fastcompany.com/1716844/alone-together-an-mit-professors-new-book-urges-us-to-unplug

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POVERTY BY POSTAL CODE 2: VERTICAL POVERTY

Poverty by Postal Code 2: Vertical Poverty presents new data on the growing concentration of poverty in the City of Toronto and the role that high-rise housing is playing in this trend. The report tracks the continued growth in the spatial concentration of poverty in Toronto neighbourhoods, and in high-rise buildings within neighbourhoods. It then examines the quality of life that high-rise buildings are providing to tenants today. Its primary focus is on privately owned building stock in Toronto’s inner suburbs. This research is part of United Way’s Building Strong Neighbourhoods Strategy.

Read more: http://unitedwaytoronto.com/verticalpoverty/report/introduction/

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ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK, OISE/UT):

Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon Profile: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com