Skip navigation

Tag Archives: Bisexual

Education is Not for Sale

Education is Not for Sale

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK: UPDATE 20th MARCH 2013

EVENTS

MARCH ORGANIZING MEETING – LGBITQ/TRANS PEOPLE & ALLIES SEA OF RED OPEN COLLECTIVE

The 519 Church St. Community Centre
Tuesday, March 13
8:00 pm

All welcome!

As an open all-inclusive collective in the LGBTIQ (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Two-Spirited, Intersex & Questioning)/Trans or Queer community, our main mission over the next couple of years is to bring to Canada a contingent of LGBTIQ / Trans & Allies Cuban workers as part of a LGBTIQ/Trans & Allies union worker-exchange between Canada and Cuba for the 2014 World Pride Parade’s demonstration on Yonge Street, in Toronto, Ontario, and for their mid-May 2014 Cuban Anti-Homophobic Pride events, all throughout Cuba.

We want to see our LGBTIQ/Trans & Allies Cuban worker friends, proudly united together with our many allies and Queer workers from all over the world, marching with them and encircling them, with a “Sea of Red” flags, and rainbow flags that surround their Cuban flags, in the Toronto’s World Pride Parade of 2014, on Sunday afternoon, June 29, 2014, moving down Yonge Street.

In preparation for World Pride Day, we want to have fun nights of Cuban LGBTIQ/Trans & Allies film showings, up-to-date Cuban dance music, and Cuban-English translated readings and discussions every two to three months in and beyond Toronto’s LGBTIQ/Trans & Allies community.

We hope to gather the funds mainly through the unions of the Ontario Federation of Labour & Canadian Labour Congress, as well as other community organizations and faith supportive groups.

Email contact: S. O’Brien or D. Foreman at seaofredopencollective@gmail.com

+++++

BOOK LAUNCH – UNLIKELY RADICALS: THE STORY OF THE ADAMS MINE DUMP WAR

Thursday, April 11
6:30pm
The Supermarket
268 Augusta Avenue, Toronto

Free. Not wheelchair accessible.

Join author Charlie Angus and friends for a launch and celebration of his new book Unlikely Radicals: The Story of the Adams Mine Dump War. Unlikely Radicals traces the compelling history of the First Nations people and farmers, environmentalists and miners, retirees and volunteers, Anglophones and Francophones who stood side by side to defend their community with mass demonstrations, blockades, and non-violent resistance.

“A Grisham-like political thriller with the feel-good accents of a Frank Capra movie.”
– Quill & Quire

Published by Between the Lines. More info: info@btlbooks.com or http://www.btlbooks.com

+++++

OCAP COMMUNITY ORGANIZING COURSE – CALL FOR PARTICIPANTS

Dates: 4 consecutive Saturdays – April 6th, 13th, 20th, and 27th
Time: 2-5pm, followed by a meal each week

Following the great success of our first Community Organizing Course in October 2012, OCAP is holding a second course to offer people some of the knowledge and skills they will need to mobilize in their communities to resist poverty and austerity. Since the last course, OCAP has been on the front lines of some major fights against social cutbacks and homelessness and the second course will benefit from these experiences.

Course Outline:
– Week 1 (April 6th): A brief introduction to OCAP. How do capitalism and colonialism work? How do they produce poverty? What is the austerity agenda and how is it playing out in our communities?
– Week 2 (April 13th): How does the law and the welfare system regulate the poor? How does OCAP organize actions to defend people under attack by these systems?
– Week 3 (April 20th): How can poor people use disruptive action to defend themselves and win victories? How are effective campaigns and actions organized?
– Week 4 (April 27th): Histories of anti-poverty resistance in Toronto.

Presentations by course participants. What have we learned and how are we going to take that knowledge into our communities?

Childcare and transportation costs will be provided and the location will be wheelchair accessible. An exciting four week children’s program is in the works!

This course is for people who want to fight back. Those who participate will be presented with ideas and methods that OCAP has developed over more than twenty years of organizing in poor communities. We can offer knowledge and skills that they don’t teach in schools and you won’t get from the newspapers. We intend the sessions to be lively, engaging and informative. The opinions and proposals of those who attend will be vital to the success. If you are interested in being part of this course, contact OCAP as soon as possible. We want to stress that all who agree to participate should make a serious commitment to attending all four sessions. Please don’t reserve a spot unless you can make that commitment. Space is limited to allow for maximum engagement with participants.

How to apply:
**Please email or call us with the following information as soon as possible:
– Name:
– Email and/or phone contact:
– What do you hope to get out of the course?
– What area of Toronto will you be coming from?
– Do you need childcare?
– Do you have an accessibility concerns?

Send to: the Ontario Coalition Against Poverty at: ocap@tao.ca / 416-925-6939

+++++

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE – LABOUR RIGHTS AND THEIR IMPACT ON DEMOCRACY, ECONOMIC EQUALITY AND SOCIAL JUSTICE

March 26 – 28
Downtown Hilton Hotel, Toronto

The conference is designed to provide a forum to advance social science research which affirms the critical role labour rights play in advancing democracy within nations, creating greater economic equality and promoting the social well-being of all citizens.

It will examine how to communicate this research using key message frames that connect labour rights to the core values that Canadians share as citizens. The conference will also consider strategies to help labour and civil society build a broad-based progressive coalition in support of shared values of Canadians and the labour movement.

The keynote speaker at the conference will be Richard Wilkinson, one of the world’s most preeminent researchers on social inequalities. He is best known for his 2010 book with Kate Pickett, The Spirit Level: Why Equality is Better for Everyone. The headline-generating UK bestseller showed that societies with more equal distribution of incomes have better health, fewer social problems such as violence, drug abuse, teenage births, mental illness, obesity, and others, and are more cohesive than ones in which the gap between the rich and poor is greater. Wilkinson will speak at the opening of the conference on Tuesday evening, March 26, 2013.

Hosted by The Canadian Foundation for Labour Rights (CFLR).

Participation at the conference will be limited and by invitation only.
Further information on the conference can be obtained by e-mailing conference2013@labourrights.ca

+++++

Melt the Freeze! Raise the Minimum Wage!

Noon
Thursday March 21
Ministry of Labour office, 400 University Ave.
Toronto

Ontario’s minimum wage has been frozen for 3 years, while the cost of living continues to rise. Join us as we call for an immediate increase! The minimum wage should bring workers and their families above the poverty line. That means Ontario’s minimum wage should be $14 in 2013. A minimum wage increase is an investment in healthy communities and good jobs for workers in Ontario. On March 21st, the first day of spring and the International Day for the Elimination of Racism, communities around Ontario will be coming together for a decent minimum wage. Get involved! Endorse the campaign. Organize an action in your city. Sign up for a delegation visit to your MPP

Contact us at raisetheminimumwage@gmail.com or (416) 531-2411, ext. 246.

The Campaign to Raise the Minimum Wage is coordinated by ACORN, Freedom 90, Mennonite New Life Centre, OCAP, Parkdale Community Legal Services, Put Food in the Budget, Social Planning Toronto, Toronto and York Region Labour Council and Workers’ Action Centre.

+++++

NEWS & VIEWS

JUST PUBLISHED! ADULT LEARNING TRENDS IN CANADA: BASIC FINDINGS OF THE WALL 1998, 2004 AND 2010 SURVEYS

Authors: D.W. Livingstone and Milosh Raykov

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) Work and Lifelong Learning (WALL) research network, mainly funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC), conducted national surveys on work and lifelong learning in Canada in 1998, 2004 and 2010. These surveys provide profiles of paid employment and unpaid household work and community volunteer work as well as the array of adult learning activities.

The relations between work and learning are summarized in a number of reports available on the http://www.wallnetwork.ca website and several published books (see the Related WALL Reports section). The purpose of this report is to provide a brief summary of the basic findings on trends in adult participation in further education courses and informal learning activities. This information may be of general global interest because, in spite of widespread concern about the importance of lifelong learning, there are no other available national-level estimates of trends in the array of adults’ formal and informal learning activities during this period.

Publisher: Centre for the Study of Education and Work, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto
ISBN: 0-7727-2639-6, ISBN: 978-0-7727-2639-1

To download the study: http://www.wallnetwork.ca/Adult-Learning-Trends-in-Canada-2013.pdf

+++++

HAVE GUITAR, WILL TRAVEL: PROTEST TRAVEL WRITING BY DAVID ROVICS

Ebook! My ebook of stories from the road is available on Amazon, Kobo and other ebook platforms. At $2.99 each, I’m hoping I’m pricing it to sell…!

Please be encouraged to a) buy the ebook, b) write a review, and c) tell all your friends to do the same.

A crowd-sourced bestseller is the aim!

Read more: http://songwritersnotebook.blogspot.ca/2013/02/have-guitar-will-travel-protest-travel.html

+++++

IT’S MORE THAN POVERTY: EMPLOYMENT PRECARITY AND HOUSEHOLD WELL-BEING

United Way Toronto’s newest report, It’s More than Poverty: Employment Precarity and Household Well-being examines dramatic changes in precarious employment over the last few decades, revealing that only sixty percent of all workers in our region have stable, secure jobs. In addition to looking at the impact of precarious employment on individuals, the report also looked at its harmful effect on families and communities.

Read more: http://www.unitedwaytoronto.com/whatWeDo/reports/PEPSO.php

+++++

PORTER AIRLINES: THE LITTLE STRIKE THAT COULD

By Sean Smith, The Bullet

On Saturday, 26 January 2013 tens of thousands of teachers and supporters rallied outside the Liberal leadership convention at Maple Leaf Gardens in Toronto in opposition to their Bill 115 which stripped Ontario teachers’ collective bargaining rights. Every corporate media outlet covered this story. By all accounts the rally was a huge, peaceful success.

Although the perceived ‘progressive,’ Kathleen Wynne, won the leadership, it is a hollow victory as there is no commitment to undo this repugnant Bill’s purpose. Nor is there any new impetus to change, since some union leaders have once again demonstrated a willingness to bankroll neoliberal politicians no matter what they do to their members.

Meanwhile a few kilometres away from this piece of political theatre, a direct challenge to the neoliberal agenda was occurring. With no media cameras rolling, dozens of police moved with force to suppress the actions of an Industrial Workers of the World (IWW) Flying Squad who were there in solidarity with 22 striking ‘fuelers’ of Porter Airlines at Toronto Island Airport represented by COPE Local 343.

Read more: http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/780.php

+++++

RANK AND FILE.CA IS LOOKING FOR WRITERS AND CONTRIBUTORS

Calling all writers and trade unionists!

Rank and File.ca is looking for writers, contributors, and people willing to help promote our website.

Rank and File.ca is a new Canadian labour media project launched by union activists in early 2012. We publish original, researched news reports and analysis of major labour issues. Some recent examples include the battle against Bill 115, the CP Rail strike, back-to-work legislation at Air Canada, and developments in provincial and federal labour and employment standards legislation.

Rank and File.ca also publishes statements by union members who seek to promote alternative viewpoints regarding ratification votes, union strategy, and union elections. We publish such documents in the interest of fostering democratic debate within unions.

Read more: http://rankandfile.ca/?p=714

+++++

CCPA’S ALTERNATIVE FEDERAL BUDGET 2013: DOING BETTER TOGETHER

The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA) has just released its 2013 Alternative Federal Budget: Doing Better Together.

This year’s AFB shows how growth-killing austerity can be replaced by a plan that strengthens the economy, leads to a better quality of life for all Canadians, and eliminates the deficit by 2016. This plan invests in programs that are good for growth and good for the people of Canada—and still balances the books. Instead of making things worse and leaving Canadians to fend for themselves, the Alternative Federal Budget shows we can do better, together.

The complete budget document and a handy Budget in Brief are available on our website in both English at http://www.policyalternatives.ca/afb2013 and French at http://www.policyalternatives.ca/abgf2013

+++++

AN OPEN LETTER TO PRIME MINISTER HARPER

By Rick Arnold, Common Frontiers

Dear Prime Minister Harper,

It is with a profound sense of indignation that I read about your letter sent in the wake of the death of Venezuela´s President, Hugo Chavez.

Canadians would expect their Prime Minister to take the high road in responding to another nation´s grief following the death of their leader. Instead the letter you sent took the low road in not sending condolences to the Chavez family and for calling into question the deceased leader’s dedication to democratic principles following more than a decade of clean elections, unrivalled in the Americas.

Any sitting Canadian prime minister who met an early end could only dream of such massive outpouring of grief that has seen millions of Venezuelans line up for 35 kilometers to get a brief view of Chavez´s body lying in state.

Read more: http://www.commonfrontiers.ca/

+++++
+++++

ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK, OISE/UT):

Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education. For more information about this project, visit http://www.apcol.ca

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

World Crisis

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 13th FEBRUARY 2011

EVENTS

LEFT FILM AND VIDEO – CULTURE FORUM ONE

Monday, February 21
7:30 pm.
The Regal Beagle (back room)
335 Bloor St West (near St George), Toronto

Left film and video: a discussion with Frank Saptel and other Board members of the Canadian Labour International Film Festival (CLIFF)

Performances by:
– Wally Brooker, saxophone
– Jerry Lee Miller, stand-up comedy
– Mike Constable, animation films
– plus short films by invited guests

Presented by the Culture Committee (Cultcom) of the Greater Toronto Workers Assembly

+++++

WEBINAR – THE CO-OPERATIVE MODEL: A DURABLE AND SUSTAINABLE ENTERPRISE

Friday, February 18
12pm EST

Featured Speakers: Professor Ian MacPherson (Professor Emeritus University of Victoria and author of A Century of Co-operation) and David Bent (Author of Forthcoming book Determined to Prosper: The Story of Sussex Co-op, the Oldest Agricultural Society in the World, PhD Student in History, University of New Brunswick)

More info: http://www.cooperativedifference.coop/page/4-Events-Opportunities

+++++

CLiFF (CANADIAN LABOUR INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL) CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS FOR 2011

The Selection Committee of the Canadian Labour International Film Festival (CLiFF) invites you to submit your film or video for possible screening during our second Festival to be held this November in Toronto, Ontario and in 50 communities across the country (and counting). Films are due 30 June, 2011.

CLiFF features film and video made by, for, and about the world of work and those who do it, in Canada and internationally. The films we showcase are about unionised workers, as well as those not represented by unions. We encourage projects regarding any and every aspect of work, as well as issues affecting work or workers.

The festival draws thousands of trade unionists, community members, youth, activists, students, educators, artists, and allies from across North America and one day, we hope, the world.

We are looking for films on a wide spectrum of issues. We seek films about privatization, youth, First Nations people, people of colour, immigrants, refugees, detainees, health and safety, resistance, art, poetry, women, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered people, taxi drivers, truck drivers, rickshaw drivers – anyone who does anything considered work.

We also encourage the widest possible variety of films: from documentaries to drama to poetry/poetic treatments to comedy and animation.

More info: http://labourfilms.ca/cliff/2011/02/08/2011-call-for-submission-now-available/

+++++

FORUM – GLOBAL CRISIS, FISCAL RESTRAINT AND PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS

Thursday March 10, 2011
7pm
Ryerson University, Oakham Lounge, 2nd floor
63 Gould Street, Toronto

2011 Phyllis Clarke Memorial Lecture: John Loxley
Co-sponsored and supported by Ryerson’s CUPE Locals 233, 1281, 3904, Ontario Council of Hospital Unions/CUPE and the Department of Politics and Public Administration, Ryerson University

Dr. John Loxley is a professor in the Department of Economics, University of Manitoba. He specializes in International Money and Finance, International Development and Community Economic Development and has published extensively in these areas. He has researched public-private partnerships for almost fifteen years and recently published Public Service Private Profits: The Political Economy of Public-Private Sector Partnerships, with Salim J. Loxley, Fernwood Publishers, 2010.

For further information contact Bryan Evans at 416 979-5000 x4199 or e-mail: b1evans@ryerson.ca

+++++

LUNCHBOX SPEAKERS’ SERIES – SOCIAL ECONOMY CENTRE (OISE/UT)

Community Foundations

Wednesday, February 23, 2011
Noon – 1:30 pm.
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto, Room 12-199, 252 Bloor St. West, Toronto

With Rosalyn Morrison, Community Initiatives, Toronto Community Foundation and Betsy Martin, Community Foundations Canada

Rosalyn Morrison will talk about how the Toronto Community Foundation mobilizes more than 300 individual and family donors, high-impact community organizations and cross-sector leaders to tackle complex, quality of life issues in creative and inspiring ways.

Betsy Martin will discuss how foundations in Canada can support social enterprise and how this is part of the evolution of the investment model of foundations around the world. She will give examples of what community foundations in Canada and the United States are doing, to give a sense of the potential for this kind of community foundation investing.

Moderator: Michael Hall, Primus

– Bring your lunch and a mug.  Water, coffee and tea will be provided.
– For more information, please contact Lisa White at: secspeakerseries@gmail.com
– This event will also be webcast live on the Internet.  Please see our website for detailed instructions: http://socialeconomy.utoronto.ca/english/webcast.php

+++++

NEWS AND VIEWS

REPORT: WAL-MART ACTUALLY KILLS JOBS, CREATES TAXPAYER BURDENS

from The Raw Story

NEW YORK – Wal-Mart’s lengthy struggle to open in New York City has hit fresh problems — a controversial report that said America’s biggest discounter does not just sell cheap, it makes neighborhoods poorer.

The report concludes that Wal-Mart, the biggest U.S. private employer, kills jobs rather than creates them, drives down wages and is a tax burden because it does not give health and other benefits to many part-time employees, leaving a burden on Medicaid and other public programs.

Read more: http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2011/02/10/walmart-draws-ire-poor-parts-brooklyn/

+++++

MUBARAK’S FOLLY: THE RISING OF EGYPT’S WORKERS

by David McNally, The Bullet

Rarely do our rulers look more absurd than when faced with a popular upheaval. As fear and apathy are broken, ordinary people – housewives, students, sanitation workers, the unemployed – remake themselves. Having been objects of history, they become its agents. Marching in their millions, reclaiming public space, attending meetings and debating their society’s future, they discover in themselves capacities for organization and action they had never imagined. They arrest secret police, defend their communities and their rallies, organize the distribution of food, water and medical supplies. Exhilarated by new solidarities and empowered by the understanding that they are making history, they shed old habits of deference and passivity.

Read more: http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/460.php

+++++

TAKE A STAND AGAINST WAGE THEFT

We work hard, but too often we don’t get paid.  

In December 2010, the Workers’ Action Centre recorded our experiences looking for work. Go to http://www.workersactioncentre.org to listen to the reality workers in Ontario face every day.

We are offered work for less than minimum wage, we don’t get overtime pay, we are charged fees to get work, we are told we have to be self-employed to get a job.

This is wage theft.

TAKE ACTION

We are taking action against wage theft and so can you.

–  Watch workers’ stories of wage theft and share with others. (http://cts.vresp.com/c/?WorkersActionCentre/0760994829/46f0beda64/0feed76c2b)

–  Email the Minister of Labour Charles Sousa on our Wage Theft Action page (http://www.workersactioncentre.org/campaigns_stopwagetheft.html)

–  Call our workers rights hotline at (416) 531-0778.  Report wage theft.

+++++

CBC NEWS OTTAWA – UNION WASTE COLLECTORS SAVE OTTAWA MILLIONS

The City of Ottawa said Tuesday it saved close to $5 million, over four years, by using unionized employees to collect garbage in its downtown core.

The city said since the Canadian Union of Public Employees Local 503 — the city’s largest union — won the garbage collection contract for Ottawa’s downtown area in 2005, it has delivered the services it promised for less money.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/canada/ottawa/story/2011/02/08/ottawa-union-garbage-208.html

+++++

PUBLIC-WORKER UNIONS SKIP ALBANY AD BLITZ FOR NEW TACTICS

by Nicholas Confessore, New York Times

ALBANY — The airwaves are virtually silent. The fiery criticism of years past has given way to conciliatory press releases. And the halls of the Capitol ring not with angry protests but with the quiet hum of lawmakers and lobbyists making their daily rounds.

Michael Mulgrew, president of the United Federation of Teachers, the New York City teachers’ union, said, “We think the ad wars make people feel disenfranchised from the process.”

Faced with devastating budget cuts from Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo and a deeply hostile electorate, New York’s most influential public-employee unions have unexpectedly shifted their strategy for defending cherished government programs and worker benefits. Put off for now are the angry denunciations and millions of dollars of advertisements, chiefly from hospitals and a health care union, that have traditionally begun haunting governors in early February.

Read more: http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/10/nyregion/10unions.html?ref=nyregion

(END)

++++++++++++++++++++
++++++++++++++++++++

ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK, OISE/UT):

Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Pink Curtain

Pink Curtain

BEYOND THE PINK CURTAIN?

 

Winter Colloquium: Beyond the Pink Curtain? Eastern European Sexualities, Homophobia and Western Eyes

22nd January 2010

Birkbeck Institute for Social Research

Sexualities, as aspects of identity and as part of the public language of nation, are a controversial feature of post-communist transition in Central and Eastern Europe. Radical political changes have led to the emergence of new social actors, such as the LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender) movement, the airing of new discourses about sexuality, as well as the eruption of new social conflicts and divisions.

This interdisciplinary Colloquium will  bring together scholars in the social sciences, history, Slavic and other area studies, as well as activists from LGBT communities, to examine the relationships between gender, nation and sexuality. How, for example, did the emergence of revised national identities after 1989 relate to new conceptions of non-normative gender and sexuality? What were the local dimensions of the ‘lesbian and gay question’, and why did they develop? How did queer sexualities in this region evolve historically? And what influence does that historical legacy have today? What are the specificities and particularities of Central and Eastern European sexual identities, within the region and compared with Western and other non-Western formations?

There will be a screening of the film “Beyond the Pink Curtain” (2009) and a discussion with Director Matthew Charles at 3pm on Thursday 21st January in the Birkbeck Cinema, 43 Gordon Square.

Numbers are strictly limited, so please register early.

Cost, includes vegetarian lunch:  £25 Standard, £10 Birkbeck staff and all students.
Payment is by credit/debit card – Standard Booking Form   Birkbeck Staff & all Students
Friday 22nd  January 2010, Room 541, Birkbeck College Main Building, 9.30am – 5pm (Registration 9.30 in Room 538)

Film screening – Thursday 21st  January 2010  Registration for the free film screening – email Julia Eisner j.eisner@bbk.ac.uk

Detailed program and abstracts:
http://robertkulpa.com/index.php?/projects/BISR-Colloquium.html

Info: http://www.bbk.ac.uk/bisr/news/pinkcurtain

Organiser: Robert Kulpa (roberto@kulpa.org.uk)

All the best,
Robert Kulpa
0044.785.999.5074
http://robertkulpa.com

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Sextures

QUERYING SEXUAL CITIZENSHIPS: DIFFERENCE, SOCIAL IMAGINARIES AND EUROPEAN CITIZENSHIP 

‘Harbingers of death’, ‘the shame and ruin of humanity’, ‘anti-life’, ‘threat to the survival of the human race’, ‘moral and physical cripples’, and ‘vampires sucking the life blood of the nation’ are only some of the images of radical alterity invoked and regularly rehearsed by major political figures in post-socialist European countries when faced with native lesbian, gay, bisexual, transsexual and queer (LGBTQ) claims to citizenship. Citizenship, understood here as the practicing of social, cultural, political and economic rights, and the active involvement in the organized life of a political community, is still firmly tied in most countries of Central and Eastern Europe to a heteropatriarchal social imaginary in which the nation continues to be metaphorically configured as the exclusive home of the traditional heterosexual family – the purveyor of pure ethnic bloodlines based on rigid asymmetrical power system of gender relations. The conflation of heterosexism with ethnic nationalism that permeates this imaginary also fuels a vicious politics of national belonging where the use of highly inflammatory, offensive and dehumanising language has led to a dramatic increase in violence against members of various sexual minorities, which in turn has resulted in the effective silencing of queer voices in the public sphere and the paradoxical feeling that sexually different people were somehow ‘more free’ under the previous regime.The Amsterdam Treaty, a legal document attempting to define the evolving concept of European citizenship, intends to temper the current trend of hyper-nationalist integration into ‘Europe of nations’ by moving to a vision of Europe of (individual) citizens. The Treaty, particularly Article 13, clearly states that the respect for human rights and the principle of non-discrimination based on sex, racial or ethnic origin, religion or belief, disability, age or sexual orientation forms the basis of 21st century European citizenship. However, many new member-states of the EU and candidate-countries blatantly and proudly flout their human rights obligations derived from their (current or future) accession into the EU and continue to devise a raft of laws and policies denying basic human and citizenship rights to lesbians, gays, transsexuals and queers, including the right to assembly and free expression.

Deep historical distrust in identity based organizations and identity politics, a weak civil society, a fragile rule of law, and the ignorance about, or unpreparedness to use, the legal and political instruments of European citizenship, create a very unique set of challenges for LGBTQ people in post-socialist Europe on their road to freedom and equality. Transnational LGBTQ rights movements arising from the institutional, legal, social, political, economic and intellectual successes of the gay, lesbian and queer movements in Western Europe, North America, Australia and New Zealand become increasingly aware that a western model of sexual politics and citizenship based on political and economic (capitalist) liberalism is simply unworkable in post-socialist Europe.

Given this context, SEXTURES invites theoretical, conceptual and empirical essays from scholars of all disciplines (philosophy, women’s studies, gay and lesbian studies, Slavonic/Eastern European/ Balkan studies, cultural studies, sociology, geography, anthropology, political science, history, and comparative literatures) who are working on topics related to gender, sexuality and citizenship in post-socialist Europe.

We are particularly interested in inter- and transdisciplinary essays, critically drawing from feminist, gay and lesbian, transsexual, queer, postcolonial and critical race theories, that examine the concept of (sexual) citizenship in all its complexity; from being a social relationship inflected by intersecting sexual, gender, ethnic, national, class and religious identities; positioning across various cross-cutting social hierarchies; cultural assumptions about ‘good’ and ‘bad’ citizens and ‘humans’ and ‘aliens’; to institutional practices of active discrimination and marginalization, and a sense and politics of belonging to an imagined community like the nation or  ‘united Europe’.

We welcome thoughtful philosophical reflections on the relationship between ideology, utopia and European citizenship with a particular emphasis on the productive function of the social imaginary as understood, for example, by Deleuze and Ricoeur. In this context, we particularly encourage submissions examining the promises and limits of the concepts of ‘flexible’ or ‘nomadic’ citizenship for lesbians, gays, bisexuals, transsexuals, and queers living in post-socialist Europe.

We are also interested in empirically grounded close examinations of actual practices of social belonging (or non-belonging) as lived by ordinary LGBTQ people in a number of everyday social situations at home, school, work, dealing with the state, etc. In this context, we welcome submissions that explore the emotional dynamic, and the cultural politics of emotions, played out in these situations.

While we focus on Central and Eastern Europe, we welcome submissions that cover issues of sexual citizenship in other parts of the world.

Submissions should be no longer than 8000 words. Please consult our guide for contributors when preparing your manuscripts. The guide can be found at http://www.sextures.net/guidelines-for-contributors. Deadline for submission of papers is 2 June 2009.

About the Journal

Sextures is a refereed international, independent, transdisciplinary electronic scholarly journal that aims to provide a forum for open intellectual debate across the arts, humanities and social sciences about all aspects affecting the intricate connections between politics, culture and sexuality primarily, but not exclusively, in the Balkans, Eastern and Central Europe. It is published in English twice a year. Sextures is dedicated to fast turnaround of submitted papers. We expect this special issue to be published in September 2009. More information about the journal can be found on its website: http://www.sexturesnet.

Please direct all inquiries regarding this special issue or send manuscripts to:


Dr Alexander Lambevski

Founding Editor and Publisher

alex@sextures.net, editor@sextures.net

http://www.sextures.net

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski