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Will Self

WILL SELF BOOK SIGNING AT FRIERN BARNET LIBRARY

Will Self Book Signing at Friern Barnet Library

Wednesday, November 14, 2012

7:00 PM  

Friern Barnet Road, N11 3DR

Will Self will be attending the Friern Barnet Community Library to sign copies of his latest novel, Umbrella which is set in Friern Barnet and was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize 2012. Hopefully, given the location of the book signing, which has regularly made the national news in recent months (see below), there will be a lively political discussion to follow. 

Sign up for this event at http://www.meetup.com/Enfield-Network21/events/87837672/

Google map of location http://goo.gl/maps/7XhyS

Watch Will reading from Umbrella http://will-self.com/2012/09/25/umbrella-reading/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=umbrella-reading

 

Praise for Umbrella:

“Umbrella is a magnificent celebration of modernist prose, an epic account of the first world war, a frightening investigation into the pathology of mental illness, and the first true occasion when Self’s ambition and talent have produced something of real cultural significance.” (The Spectator)

A “brilliant and original work” (Mark Lawson, The Guardian)

“A stunning novel” (David Evans, The Independent)

Info and news links about the Occupied Library: http://fbpeopleslibrary.co.uk/?page_id=158

Sign the petition to re-open the library: http://petitions.barnet.gov.uk/RE-OPENFBLIB/#detail

http://www.channel4.com/news/library-campaigners-battle-on

http://www.itv.com/news/london/2012-09-20/the-campaign-to-save-friern-barnet-library/

Financial Times http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/33ccf288-16b2-11e2-957a-00144feabdc0.html#axzz29hE1ArST

 

“Last week a district judge in the London borough delayed eviction proceedings against squatters who a month ago occupied and reopened a library at Friern Barnet. It had been closed by the Conservative-controlled council as part of its radical experiment in shrinking local public services. “Guerrilla” librarians have kept the building open 48 hours a week and residents have donated 5,000 books to restock the shelves. There are children’s story sessions and exercise classes. Donations dropped into a biscuit tin keep the lights on.”

http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2012/oct/12/friern-barnet-library-cuts-fight

“”The community library is the ‘big society’ by definition, but it is not the ‘big society’ as the government envisaged it,” said Mrs Angry, whose real name is Theresa Musgrove. “They wanted the ‘big society’ to be obedient and to enable the cuts they wanted.”

This is an ecumenical insurrection where full-time activists and union leaders worried about jobs are joined by retirees and local mothers. The cause has attracted the support of the leftwing film-maker Ken Loach, who has contributed to a documentary about the matter called The Billion Pound Gamble.

But there is also anecdotal evidence that the aggression of the council’s cuts is alienating core Conservative voters.

Ann Foskett, a Tory-voting grandmother who has lived in the area for 40 years, dropped off a bag of books at the library as the activists celebrated their court victory with tea and biscuits. She said the closure was “absolutely scandalous” adding: “I do vote Tory normally, but things have gone to pot, particularly for old people. There used to be lots of local groups meeting in libraries, but there’s nothing now.””

 

**END**

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Blog: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski/blog

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski 

 

Sociology

ENGAGING SOCIOLOGY: BSA ANNUAL CONFERENCE

The theme for the 2013 Annual Conference is: Engaging Sociology.  The conference will take place at the Grand Connaught Rooms, London from 3-5 April 2013. 

This conference highlights Sociology’s contribution as it engages with topical issues affecting contemporary society – whether this is the recent riots, the financial crisis, climate change, social mobility, the Big Society, or the London Olympics.  Presentations from scholars throughout the UK (and beyond) demonstrate the value of engaging with sociological theory, combined with rigorous methodological approaches, in illuminating how these compelling issues impact on us all – over the life course; in the domestic sphere; in our communities and localities; in our dealings with institutions (the worlds of work, education, the arts and media; the justice system, religion, politics and the State); through our leisure pursuits and sport; via civic participation and political involvement; and as members of a European and global society. Fifteen concurrent streams (including, for example, social divisions/identities; cities, space, mobilities & place; media, culture & consumption) allow delegates to focus on specific interests. Our engaging plenaries bring delegates together, encouraging broader sociological debate and providing an opportunity to explore synergies with other disciplines.

The 2013 annual conference promises to be dynamic, informative, inspiring and is definitely not to be missed.  

Our themes are deliberately broad and all-encompassing, designed to appeal to the entire spectrum of sociologists and stimulate lively debate.  You are at the heart of the discipline. Your voice is important. Join the finest scholars from across the globe to lead the debate. Policy makers are coming to hear what you – the people with real experience – have to say.

 

Who should attend?

* Senior academics looking to engage in a lively, stimulating debate with peers and bright new stars.

* Researchers looking to connect with like-minded colleagues.

* Teachers looking for new ideas and inspiration.

* Students looking and learn from experts and Postgraduates looking to present and get ideas on their research.

* Policy-makers looking for scientific facts to back or steer their ideas or to develop new directions in policy.

* Anyone looking to engage with the wider sociological community.

The aims of this conference are: to showcase the latest sociological research; to attract a concentration of international specialists in our major research fields; to provide a forum in which to discuss the teaching of sociology and the professional practice of being a sociologist; and to facilitate debate, networking and professional development opportunities.

The BSA annual conference is the primary annual conference for sociology in the UK with opportunities for everyone connected to the discipline.

 

UPDATE: ABSTRACTS

Engaging Sociology: Are you engaging with topical issues affecting contemporary society?

Submit your abstract for the BSA Annual Conference 2013

To find out more about the BSA Annual Conference 2013, or to submit an abstract, please visit our website: http://www.britsoc.co.uk/events/bsa-annual-conference.aspx

The conference promises to be yet another dynamic, informative, inspiring meeting of minds and is definitely not to be missed.

Deadline for abstract submissions: Midnight on Friday 5 October 2012.

SUBMIT Your Abstract online NOW!

3-5 April 2013
BSA Annual Conference:  Engaging Sociology
Grand Connaught Rooms, London

www.britsoc.co.uk

events@britsoc.org.uk

 

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

Heraclitus

PHILOSOPHER KINGS?

HOW PHILOSOPHY INFORMS REAL POLITICS TODAY

A new series of 5 weekly lectures by major practicing politicians, in May – June 2012, on Thursday evenings. With responses from leading political philosophers. Held in Lecture Theatre 2, University of East Anglia, Norwich

Free admission: All welcome. [Please note: starting-times of talks vary.]

 

May 10: 5.15pm  Jon Cruddas MP, “The good society”.

Response by Dr. Liz McKinnell, Philosophy, UEA

 

May 17: 6pm  Lord Maurice Glasman, “Labour ideology”.                 

Response by Professor Alan Finlayson, Political, Social and International Studies , UEA

 

May 24: 6pm  David Willetts MP, title tba.

Response by Dr. Alex Brown, Political, Social and International Studies, UEA.

 

May 31: 7.30pm (time tbc)  A major Green speaker, tbc.

Response by Dr. Rupert Read, Philosophy, UEA.

 

June 7: 6pm  Baroness Ros Scott, “Localism”.

Response by Professor Molly Scott-Cato, Roehampton Institute. 

 

For further information, contact: Series organiser Rupert Readr.read@ uea.ac.uk  01603 592079

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

SURVIVING ECONOMIC CRISES THROUGH EDUCATION – BY DAVID R. COLE

David R. Cole (ed.)

Surviving Economic Crises through Education

New York, Bern, Berlin, Bruxelles, Frankfurt am Main, Oxford, Wien, 2012. 288 pp.

Global Studies in Education. Vol. 11

General Editors: Michael Peters, Cameron McCarthy, Athlone C. (Tina) Besley and Fazal Rizvi

Print: ISBN 978-1-4331-1478-6 pb.

SFR 35.00 / €* 26.20 / €** 27.00 / € 24.50 / £ 22.00 / US$ 36.95

Order online: http://www.peterlang.com

This book comes at a time of increasing anxiety about the repercussions of financial instability and the probability of widespread market volatility. The educators and researchers whose work is collected here have considered these factors deeply when constructing their responses to prevailing financial conditions. These views guide the reader through economic crises as a mode of survival and as a means to deploying education at its most meaningful and intense. The approach aligns practice with theory and takes the empirical evidence from these studies as a means to determining the economic influence on education. This book will be a valuable asset for teachers and professors, as well as an excellent textbook for undergraduate and graduate classrooms.

Contents:

Stephen J. Ball: Foreword. Crisis and Attentiveness – David R. Cole: Introduction to Surviving Economic Crises through Education – Michael A. Peters: ‘Knowledge Economy’, Economic Crisis and Cognitive Capitalism: Public Education and the Promise of Open Science – Jim Crowther/Mae Shaw: Education for Resilience and Resistance in the ‘Big Society’ – Mike Cole: Capitalist Crisis and Fascism: Issues for Educational Practice – Gustavo E. Fischman/Victor H. Diaz: Teach for WhatAmerica? Beginning Teachers’ Reflections about Their Professional Choices and the Economic Crisis – Patrick Carmichael/Kate Litherland: Transversality and Innovation: Prospects for Technology-Enhanced Learning in Times of Crisis – Silvina Gvirtz/Ana Laura Barudi: When the Sun Does not Shine after the Rain: The Effects of the 2001 Crisis on the Education System of Argentina – Ana Inés Heras: Struggle for Agency in Contemporary Argentinean Schools – Silvia Grinberg/Eduardo Langer: Education and Governmentality in Degraded Urban Territories: From the Sedimented to the Experience of the Actual – David R. Cole: Doing Work as a Reflection of the Other: Notes on the Educational Materialism of Deleuze and Guattari – Robert Haworth/Abraham P. DeLeon: The Crisis of Mutative Capitalism: Holey Spaces, Creative Struggle and Educative Innovations – Torill Strand: The Current Dynamics of Professional Expertise: The Movable Ethos, Pathos, and Logos of Four Norwegian Professions – R. Scott Webster: Educating the Person for Democratic Participation – Jason J. Wallin: Remachining Educational Desire: Bankrupting Freire’s Banking Model of Education in an Age of Schizo-Capitalism – Marcus Bussey: Afterword. When No Crisis Is the Real Crisis! The Endless Vertigo of Capitalist Education.

The Author:

David R. Cole received his PhD in education from the University ofWarwick. He is an Associate Professor in English and pedagogy at the University of Western Sydney. David has edited three books (two with Darren Pullen) and has published a novel. His latest monograph is Educational Life-Forms: Deleuzian Teaching and Learning Practice.

Reviews:

“At last, we have a book that not only attempts to chart the crucial relationship between education and the crisis of economics, but one that explores critically and insightfully what that crisis may tell us about how to proceed in both opening up new understandings of pedagogy, education, politics, and charting a notion of hope that is as militant as it is realistic. We live at a crucial time, when the ethos of surviving has replaced the possibility of imagining a decent life and the promises of a real democracy. The discourse of surviving for the authors in this book does not suggest a retreat into cynicism or a life stripped of possibility. On the contrary, it suggests a new beginning, a new sense of struggle, and a new sense of hope. ‘Surviving Economic Crises through Education’ puts education back into politics, and in doing so puts politics back on a footing that makes individual and collective struggle possible again.” (Henry Giroux, Global Television Network Chair, English and Cultural Studies,McMasterUniversity)

“The recent huge hiccup of capitalism (‘global financial crisis’) and its continuing gurgles of pain have profound implications for education, teacher training, and the role of knowledge for human betterment (given that claims to knowledge and expertise were no protection from the cataclysm itself). This collection shows us why this is so, framing an imperative for rethinking education as a process of self-knowing and empowerment in a period of enormous economic and ontological insecurity. David R. Cole has brought together a significant set of theorists whose empirical evidence flows through to insights and indications of what is to be done. One hopes, as some of the authors propose, it is the very depth of the crisis that may force the shedding of the most deeply entrenched (mis)beliefs about education, enabling thereby a new if wobbly space for innovation and growth.” (Andrew Jakubowicz, Professor of Sociology, Director of the Institute of Cultural Diversity, University of Technology,Sydney)

“In times of economic crisis politicians often present their policies by claiming that ‘there is no alternative.’ This book unmasks such claims by providing critical readings of the politics of contemporary crisis talk and by presenting a range of generative educational responses that provide real alternatives for educational thought and action. This is a timely and inspiring collection that affirms the crucial role of education in the struggle for democracy in uncertain times.” (Gert Biesta, Professor of Education and Director of Research, School of Education & Laboratory for Educational Theory,Universityof Stirling)

“This book represents a kaleidoscope of views on the roles of education in a world rapidly changing since the 2008 financial crisis and the collapse of the Western world economies. Ideas mushroom from each chapter challenging the role of education in a capitalist society. A mustread for those from various disciplines who care about education.” (Arnaud Chevalier, Senior Lecturer in Economics, Royal Holloway,UniversityofLondon)

**END**

 

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a new song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Public-Private Partnership

PUBLIC SECTOR REFORM: OPENING UP SERVICES

29th September 2011, The Barbican, London.

The government’s ‘Open Public Services White Paper’, due in July, will set out the bold blueprint for the reform of our public services. It is a process that is not just about efficiencies, cost savings or achieving value for money. But an opportunity to rethink and reform how services are designed, to systematically engage with communities and gain a better understanding of how to integrate services and create better outcomes. Releasing services from the grip of state control encourages bids for public work from voluntary groups, charities and the private sector.

The reforms aim to reduce unnecessary bureaucratic burdens, duplication and overspending. Opening up public services to a range of providers fosters greater competition to offer better services, ones that are tailored to local needs and allow for more innovative and flexible models. The government plans see competition as crucial to raising the standards of quality.

At the Public Sector Reform: Opening Up Services conference we will explore how we can seize the opportunities presented in the white paper, engage with communities and new providers, and deliver credible benefits to public service users.

OVERVIEW

The challenge for change has been set – requiring a seismic shift in the delivery of public services. Top-down policy direction has been consigned to the past and replaced by the localism agenda. There can be no doubts that the depth of public spending cuts increased the complexities, debates and urgency of delivering this change. But it is a process that is not just about efficiencies, cost savings or achieving value for money. It is also an opportunity to rethink and reform how services are designed, to systematically engage with communities and gain a better understanding of how to integrate services and create better outcomes. Releasing services from the grip of state control encourages bids for public work from voluntary groups, charities and the private sector. However, many public sector workers are likely to be unenthusiastic over job losses or reapplying to take on a service – is the public sector too risk adverse for such change?

The reforms aim to reduce unnecessary bureaucratic burdens, duplication and overspending. Opening up public services to a range of providers fosters greater competition to offer better services, ones that are tailored to local needs and allow for more innovative and flexible models. The government plans see competition as crucial to raising the standards of quality. What is the role of local authorities in making this new approach work? Responsibility lies in setting up investment and advisory services to help community projects and organisations have a rigorous business plan, ensuring a level playing field, and fair funding and access for all. Council and policy leaders will need to understand the limits of what can be achieved within core budgets and what the acceptable operational risk across services will be.

The reforms are not without sizable concerns, as highlighted by the Deloitte report ‘A Little Local Difficulty’. The report findings suggested that there remains ambiguity on what exactly is meant by the localism and Big Society agendas and how they should be delivered at a local level. How will frontline services be affected in this period of upheaval, and do authorities realistically have the timescales to manage performance, service outcomes and set accountable frameworks?

At the Public Sector Reform: Opening Up Services conference we will explore how we can seize the opportunities presented in the White Paper, engage with communities and new providers, and deliver credible benefits to public service users.

Booking online: http://www.cvent.com/events/public-service-reform-opening-up-services/event-summary-8a1f6a8e93164c64b9342e8c30ab987e.aspx

Speakers include:

Keynote Address
Rt Hon Greg Clark MP (invited)
Minister of State for Decentralisation, Communities & Local Government
“Opening Up Services”

Councillor Richard Kemp (confirmed)
Vice-Chairman of the Local Government Group; Leader of the Liberal Democrats, Local Government Association
“Modernising Public Services: A Flexible and Community-led Approach”

Closing Keynote Address
Julian McCrae (confirmed)
Director of Research, Institute for Government
“Reforming Service Delivery to Meet the Citizen’s Needs”

Further details of the programme can be found online: http://www.publicserviceevents.co.uk/190/public-sector-reform  

Places are limited to 250 and are awarded on a first come, first served basis

If you are unable to attend, please feel free to forward details of this event to a colleague.

If you wish to register your interest in exhibiting or delivering a workshop, you can submit your contact details online and one of our advisors will be in touch shortly.

If you have any further queries, please don’t hesitate to contact me directly.

Mark Barkley
Marketing Executive
mbarkley@p-s-events.co.uk
Publicservice.co.uk Ltd
City Wharf
New Bailey Street
Manchester, M3 5ER

Tel: 0161 831 7111
Fax: 0161 832 7396

Registered in England
Co. Reg No. 4521155
Vat Reg No. 902 1814 62

 

Obviously this is a pro-business takeover of public services conference. It would be good to have some critical voices at this shindig – Glenn Rikowski

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Age of Austerity

CRITICAL THEORY IN AN AGE OF AUSTERITY

Critical Theory in an Age of Austerity
Brunel University, London

Tuesday June 21st
Brunel Lecture Centre
Room 207
12.00-4.30

Critical Theory is closely associated with the work of a generation of postwar social theorists. Figures such as Theodor Adorno drew on earlier critical traditions, most notably Marxism, to provide an original and sophisticated critique of society that included groundbreaking work on popular culture, politics and philosophy. Since then, new and exciting strands of critical theory have emerged to take account of the changing nature of (global) societies.

The aim of this workshop is to explore various strands of critical theory in order to help us make sense of our current age of austerity. We will also discuss the possibilities of establishing a critical theory research network at Brunel.

The workshop brings together academics from across the social sciences and humanities at Brunel and will cover both empirical and theoretical issues such as neoliberalism and culture, the Big Society, refugees, queer theory, deconstruction, politics of in/difference, law and critique, structures of feeling, and critical media studies.

All are welcome!

For further information, contact:

John Roberts (Sociology and Communications): John.Roberts@brunel.ac.uk
Gareth Dale (Politics and History): Gareth.Dale@brunel.ac.uk
Peter D. Thomas (Politics and History): PeterD.Thomas@brunel.ac.uk

Travel directions: http://www.brunel.ac.uk/about/campus/directions/directions

Critical Theory in an Age of Austerity
Programme Sessions:

Tea/coffee – available from 12.00

Introduction – 12.15
Gareth Dale (Politics & History)
John Roberts (Sociology & Communications)
Peter Thomas (Politics & History)

Session 1 – 12.30-1.30
Big, Little, Local, or Global Society? (Chair: John Roberts)
Nadine El-Enany (Law)
Fiona Cullen (Social Work)
Milly Williamson (Screen Media)

Break: 1.30-1.45

Session 2 – 1.45-2.45
Theory in the Humanities: Palintropes, Indifference, Queer (Chair: Gareth Dale)
William Watkin (English)
William Spurlin (English)
Sean Gaston (English)

Break: 2.45-3.00

Session 3 – 3.00-4.00
Critical Media Studies, Social Structures, and Law (Chair: Peter Thomas)
Julian Petley (Journalism)
Mike Wayne (Screen Media)
Craig Reeves (Law)

Conclusion:
Critical Theory at Brunel: Prospects for a Research Network/Centre (general discussion)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

School Privatisation

FORUM FOR PROMOTING 3-19 COMPREHENSIVE EDUCATION – VOLUME 53 NUMBER 1 (2011)

Published online at: http://www.wwwords.co.uk/forum/content/pdfs/53/issue53_1.asp

FORUM: for promoting 3-19 comprehensive education
Volume 53 Number 1  2011     ISSN 0963-8253

SPECIAL ISSUE

A COMPREHENSIVE CURRICULUM: REAFFIRMATION AND RENEWAL 
Guest Editor: MICHAEL FIELDING

CONTENTS: 

Michael Fielding. Editorial. A Comprehensive Curriculum: reaffirmation and renewal

Clyde Chitty. A Massive Power Grab from Local Communities: the real significance of the 2010 White Paper and the 2011 Education Bill

John Elliott. The Seesaw Curriculum: it’s time that curriculum policy matured

Tony Booth. Curricula for the Common School: what shall we tell our children?

Mike Davies. Curriculum Lost: a festival of errors

Michael Armstrong. Introductory remarks to Robin Alexander’s Brian Simon Memorial Lecture

Robin Alexander. Legacies, Policies and Prospects: one year on from the Cambridge Primary Review OPEN [FREE] ACCESS

Gareth Pimley. Curriculum Autonomy through Curriculum Expertise

Michael Armstrong. Time and Narrative at Eight Years Old: an essay in interpretation

John Morgan. What is Radical in School Geography Today?

Alasdair Smith. Big Society? Better History? Or Same Old Nonsense? Drawing the Battle Lines for the Future of School History

Anne Watson. Mathematics and Comprehensive Ideals

Richard Pring. Can Education Compensate for Society?

Bernard Barker. Can Schools Change Society?

Access to the full texts of most articles is restricted to those who have a Personal subscription, or those whose institution has a Library subscription. However, all articles become free-to-view 18 months after first publication.

PERSONAL SUBSCRIPTION. Subscription to the three printed issues of 2011 (including online access to all available past issues) is available to private individuals at a cost of US$70.00 (approximately £43.00). If you wish to subscribe you may do so immediately at www.wwwords.co.uk/subscribeFORUM.asp

LIBRARY SUBSCRIPTION (campus-wide access). If you are working within an institution that maintains a library, please urge your Librarian to take out a Library subscription so we can provide full access throughout your institution. Detailed information for libraries can be found at http://www.symposium-books.co.uk/downloads/SYM-BOOKS-Rate-List-2011.pdf

For all editorial matters, including articles offered for publication, please contact the Editor, Professor Clyde Chitty, 19 Beaconsfield Road, Bickley, Bromley BR1 2BL, United Kingdom(clydechitty379@btinternet.com).

In the event of problems concerning a subscription, or difficulty in gaining access to the journal articles on the website, please contact the publishers at info@symposium-books.co.uk

***END***

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Richard Alpert

RADICAL FOUCAULT EXPANDED! AN INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE

September 8th – 9th, Universityof East London(Docklands Campus)
Centre for Cultural Studies Research, University of East London
http://culturalstudiesresearch.org/?p=591

Following the  superb international response to our initial call for papers, we have decided to expand the  event into a two-day conference. This has opened up a very limited amount of space for further contributions. Abstracts of no more than 350 words are invited, to arrive no later than Sunday May 8th 201.

The publication of Michel Foucault’s Lectures at the Collège de France, 1983-84 in English will be complete in April 2011 and his first Collège de France lecture course, La Volunté de Savoir will be published for the first time in February. The Centre for Cultural Studies Research at the University of East London is holding a an international conference which will re-assess Foucault’s contribution to radical thought and the application of his ideas to contemporary politics. What does it mean to draw on Foucault as a resource for radical politics, and how are we to understand the politics which implicitly informs his work?

Many commentators today would seem to claim Foucault as  the theorist of a politics which eschews all utopian ambition in favour of a certain governmental pragmatism, while others would claim him for a rigorous but ultimately rather simple libertarianism: can either of these positions ever be adequate to the radicalism of Foucault’s  analyses? Does it matter?

What is the significance of Foucault’s ideas of ‘governmentality’ and ‘biopolitics’ in understanding his later oeuvre and its implications; do either of these terms deserve to carry the weight attributed to them by some commentators? What is the ongoing relevance of Foucault’s account of disciplinarity: is, it, as Lazzarato has claimed, a historical category no longer fully applicable to contemporary forms of power?

How can Foucauldian ideas be brought bear on the analysis of austerity politics? Is there a role for Foucault’s ideas in formulating effective resistance to the increasing erosion of civil liberties that operates both within countries and across state boundaries? Can the notion of bio-power account for contemporary forms of racism? How can Foucauldian epistemology enable an understanding of the biopolitics of contemporary scientific discourse?

Confirmed Keynotes:
Stuart Elden, Professor in the Department of Geography, Durham University.
Mark Kelly, Lecturer in Philosophy, Middlesex University.

Subjects may include, but are not limited to:
Foucauldian thought and contemporary subjectivation
Foucault and other thinkers
Governmentality and everyday life
Strategic discourses of war and terror
New technologies of the self
Foucault and new forms of resistance
Heterotopias  now and in the future
Foucault and the erosion of the state
Disciplinary society and the society of control
Foucault, British politics and the ‘big society’
Foucault, post-Fordism and post-democracy

Email abstracts to Jeremy Gilbert (j.gilbert@uel.ac.uk) and Debra Benita Shaw (d.shaw@uel.ac.uk)

Registration will cost £110.00 per delegate (including lunch, not including accommodation or dinner) for both days. A day-rate of 65.00 will be available, but delegates will be strongly encouraged to attend on both days, and the organisers cannot promise to accommodate requests to present on a particular day.

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

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Big Society

DEVELOPMENTS IN CONTEMPORARY CITIZENSHIP

CENTRE FOR EUROPEAN STUDIES POSTGRADUATE RESEARCH GROUP
KING’S COLLEGE LONDON
CALL FOR PAPERS
DEADLINE: MAY 2nd 2011

The European Studies Postgraduate Research Group at King’s College London is pleased to announce a call for papers for their forthcoming research seminar, Developments in Contemporary Citizenship.

The institution of citizenship is undergoing a period of intense scrutiny in academia and political practice. The widening and deepening of the European Union, the social inclusion of migrant populations and the economic inequalities emphasised by the repercussions of the financial crisis are just a few examples of processes which today urge a renewed assessment of citizenship as a normative ideal and a political project.

The seminar is free and open to all. We hope to engage a range of speakers from interdisciplinary backgrounds in debate over theoretical conceptualizations of citizenship (Panel One) as well as case studies of the forms of and provisions for modes of citizenship in dynamically changing societies (Panel Two). The discussions will be chaired by Dr Stathis Kouvelakis and Dr Nagore Calvo of King’s College London. 

Key areas include (but are not limited to):
– The theoretical and social relevance of the concept of citizenship
– Citizenship, nationhood and the State
– Citizenship as inclusion: immigration, race, ethnicity
– Citizenship beyond national borders: the European Union and global rights
– Crisis, recession and economic rights
– Inclusion and exclusion on the local level: citizenship ‘from below’?

We aim to create a space for open discussion and critical development of original work. Papers should be of around 15 minutes’ duration, followed by discussion from the audience. Academics, researchers and postgraduate students are encouraged to send abstracts of no more than 250 words proposing articles, working papers, discussion pieces on theoretical debates or empirical case studies that can offer a new perspective to the debate.

Date: 10th June 2011
Place: King’s College London, Waterloo Campus

Abstracts should be sent to Simon McMahon at simon.mcmahon@kcl.ac.uk by Monday 2nd May at the latest. Speakers will be contacted during the following week.

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Big Society

HITLER IN GLOUCESTERSHIRE

Video spoofs ‘Nazi’ library cuts

The Daily Telegraph, Wednesday 2nd March, 2011, p.5

By Daily Telegraph Reporter

A video posted on the internet that compares a county council to Nazi Germany for making cuts to libraries has been condemned as “sickening”.

The spoof clip, which was uploaded to the YouTube website, shows Adolf Hitler in his bunker with sub-titles of him supposedly ranting about opposition to spending cuts in Gloucestershire.

One councillor, Philip Booth, was criticised by the Tory county council leader, Mark Hawthorne, for describing the video as “great stuff”. Mr Hawthorne said: “I am always disgusted when idiots try to use Hitler, Nazism and the Holocaust to score political points. To see this branded ‘great stuff is sickening.”

Mr Booth, from the Green Party, defended the clip, which is from the 2004 film Downfall, which depicts Hitler’s last days. “I think it has come out of the frustration of library campaigners that they haven’t been listened to,” he said. “I apologise if anyone has taken offence.”

***********

You can see the video at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vAMRCY55lnQ

The Daily Telegraph, ironically, has listed the video as one of its top spoof videos!

The article online: http://www.pressdisplay.com/pressdisplay/viewer.aspx

Philip Booth’s blog, Ruscombe Green is at: http://ruscombegreen.blogspot.com/ It was voted 11th best blog in the Total Politics Top 30 Councillor Blog national poll for 2010. It was also voted 10th in the Green Blog poll for Total Politics in 2010.

Report on the issue in This is Gloucestershire, ‘Man behind Youtube Hitler spoof video stands by library message’, at: http://www.thisisgloucestershire.co.uk/news/Man-Hitler-video-stands-library-message/article-3281693-detail/article.html See also: http://www.thisisgloucestershire.co.uk/news/Political-row-Hitler-library-video/article-3275999-detail/article.html  

Friends of Gloucestershire Libraries (FoGL): http://foclibrary.wordpress.com/

Friends of Minchinhampton Library: http://friendsofminchinhamptonlibrary.wordpress.com/

See also the ‘Hitler Versus Library Campaigners’ video, by Phil Bradley at the Use Libraries and Learn Stuff blog: http://use-libraries-and-learn-stuff.blogspot.com/2011/02/hitler-attempts-to-close-libraries.html  

Book Burning: http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10005852

Heinrich Heine on Burning Books: http://atheism.about.com/od/weeklyquotes/a/heine01.htm

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Equality

HOW FAIR IS BRITAIN? REFLECTIONS ON EQUALITY OVER THE PAST 12 YEARS – FROM THEORY TO PRACTICE

 

Saturday 19th March 2011

10.00 – 4.00pm

Park Campus

University of Northampton

Northampton NN2 7AL

Registration:

Full fee: £35 (early payment by March 1st £30)

Non-waged / Students: £10

SPEAKERS:

Anna Henry (Head of Social Analysis & Foresight, Equality & Human Rights Commission)

Professor Andy Pilkington (Professor of Sociology at the University of Northampton)

Lystra Hagley-Dickinson (Senior Lecturer in Criminology, University of Northampton)

Manny Barot (Ex-Police Officer with Leicestershire Police. Researcher into equality and human rights within the criminal justicesystem)

Dr. Fionna Warner-Gale (Senior Visiting Fellow. Children, Young People and Mental Health. University of Lincoln)

Surinder Sharma (Director for Equality and Human Rights with the Department for Health)

Dave Coppock (Director, AimHigher Nottinghamshire)

Dr. Jane Callaghan (Senior Lecturer, Psychology, University of Northampton. Course Leader for Child and Adolescent Mental Health)

Martin Pratt (Corporate Director, Children & Learning, Luton Borough Council)

Floyd Douglas (Children’s Services, Northamptonshire County Council)

Dr. Daniel Burdsey (Senior Lecture in the Sociology of Sport at Brighton University)

Cyrille Regis MBE (Ex-professional footballer and England International)

Ben Cohen (Ex-England and Northamptonshire Saints rugby player. Now playing for Sale. Campaigns against homophobia in sport)

How Fair is Britain?

This is the question posed by the Equality and Human Rights Commission in its 700-page anatomy of disadvantage in the 21st century published in 2010. In the context of the new Equality Act 2010, and also the Government’s proposals around the “Big Society” and the future for public services in particular, this conference could not be more timely. The aim of this conference is to engage with these issue by drawing together academics and professionals/practitioners to look at challenges, and outline solutions, to make Britain fairer, based on how far we have come over the past 12 years.

Conference Themes:

  • Fairness and the Criminal Justice System
  • Fairness and Education
  • Fairness in Social Care / Local Government
  • Fairness in Health
  • Fairness in Sport

 

For further information about the conference, please email: equality@northampton.ac.uk

Visit the website at: http://www.northampton.ac.uk/equality

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Midnight

RADICAL FOUCAULT

CALL FOR PAPERS

Radical Foucault: A One Day Conference

Centre for Cultural Studies Research, University of East London

The publication of Michel Foucault’s Lectures at the Collège de France, 1983-84 in English will be complete in April 2011 and his first Collège de France lecture course, La Volunté de Savoir will be published for the first time in February. The Centre for Cultural Studies Research at the University of East London is holding a one-day conference on Friday, September 9th, 2011 which will re-assess Foucault’s contribution to radical thought and the application of his ideas to contemporary politics. What does it mean to draw on Foucault as a resource for radical politics, and how are we to understand the politics which implicitly informs his work?

Many commentators today would seem to claim Foucault as the theorist of a politics which eschews all utopian ambition in favour of a certain governmental pragmatism, while others would claim him for a rigorous but ultimately rather simple libertarianism: can either of these positions ever be adequate to the radicalism of Foucault’s  analyses? Does it matter?

What is the significance of Foucault’s ideas of ‘governmentality’ and ‘biopolitics’ in understanding his later oeuvre and its implications; do either of these terms deserve to carry the weight attributed to them by some commentators? What is the ongoing relevance of Foucault’s account of disciplinarity: is, it, as Lazzarato has claimed, a historical category no longer fully applicable to contemporary forms of power?
How can Foucauldian ideas be brought bear on the analysis of austerity politics? Is there a role for Foucault’s ideas in formulating effective resistance to the increasing erosion of civil liberties that operates both within countries and across state boundaries? Can the notion of bio-power account for contemporary forms of racism? How can Foucauldian epistemology enable an understanding of the biopolitics of contemporary scientific discourse?

Confirmed Keynotes:
Stuart Elden, Professor in the Department of Geography, Durham University.
Mark Kelly, Lecturer in Philosophy, Middlesex University.

Abstracts of no more than 350 words are invited, to arrive no later than Tuesday, 1st March 2011. Subjects may include, but are not limited to:

Foucauldian thought and contemporary subjectivation
Foucault and other thinkers
Governmentality and everyday life
Strategic discourses of war and terror
New technologies of the self
Foucault and new forms of resistance
Heterotopias  now and in the future
Foucault and the erosion of the state
Disciplinary society and the society of control
Foucault, British politics and the ‘big society’
Foucault, post-Fordism and post-democracy

Email abstracts to Jeremy Gilbert (j.gilbert@uel.ac.uk) and Debra Benita Shaw (d.shaw@uel.ac.uk)

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