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Money Menace

FOURTH CRITICAL FINANCE STUDIES CONFERENCE

15-17 August 2012
Call for Papers
Essex Business School, University of Essex
Colchester, UK

‘…In what is broadly called commentary, the hierarchy between primary and secondary text plays two roles which are in solidarity with each other. On the one hand it allows the (endless) construction of new discourses. The dominance of the primary text…..is the basis for an open possibility of speaking. But on the other hand the commentary’s only role, whatever the techniques used, is to say at last what was silently articulated “beyond”, in the text. By a paradox which it always displaces but never escapes, the commentary must say for the first time what had, nonetheless, already been said, and must tirelessly repeat what had, however, never been said.’ (Foucault, 1981: 55-56)

Critical Finance Studies Conference

Studying finance critically is playing with / being played by the normative forces of financial apparatuses; risking one’s self in the course of producing radically novel ways of thinking and comprehending finance and, ultimately, of creating new possibilities of life. With this in mind the Fourth Annual Critical Finance Studies conference will be held this year at the University of Essex, Essex Business School, August 15th -17th. With a conference gap in 2011 and with a financial crisis that is still on the agenda, and perhaps even stronger than ever, even compared with 2008, we have decided to devote this year’s conference to the ongoing financial crisis.

The Financial Crisis– futures and pasts re-interpreted

We strongly encourage papers that contribute to our ongoing collaborative research project that seeks to engage finance in new and critical ways and from a variety of perspectives and disciplines. This is especially important when trying to understand the current ‘financial situation’, e.g. how people in everyday work and life are affected, how the environment is affected, how theories cope and adapt in the face of a protracted crisis, and how politicians, professional bodies and professionals respond to or promote change or not. We encourage papers that tackle these sorts of issues and, with this in mind, the conference is organized around three sub-streams: an open stream on theory, method, and critique; a stream on financial imaginaries/imagining finance; and a stream on sustainability/finance (see below for more details). The conference finale will comprise a semi-public and interdisciplinary panel in order to, we hope, create some interesting debates, and inspire new thoughts and create new possibilities of life.

Papers should be submitted to the allocated convenor for each sub-theme. We encourage and welcome passionate academic work in different stages and forms, but they all need to be developed enough so that the audience can be intellectually challenged and involved in discussions. The deadline for an extended abstract (about 1000 words) is 15th April 2012. A review panel will announce their decision of acceptance within two weeks from the deadline. Accepted papers should be submitted in their final form by 1 July 2012.

The conference is organised by Dr Ann-Christine Frandsen at Essex Business School, Essex University in collaboration with Dr Thomas Bay Stockholm University (Forslund and Bay, 2009). The venue will be at the University of Essex, Colchester Campus. The conference language will be English. Discussants will be appointed – introducing papers, chairing sessions, involving participants.

Open Stream: Theory, Method, and Critique

Convenors: Jason Glynos, Department of Government, University of Essex ljglyn@essex.ac.uk & Ann-Christine Frandsen, Accounting Group, Essex Business School, frandsen@essex.ac.uk

We invite papers in finance studies that provoke critical engagement with current practices, open up pathways for effective political mobilization and socio-economic transformation, or sketch out possible counter-visions entailing alternative practices and forms of governance. The open stream is designed to catch contributions that tackle issues that fit the conference theme but do not necessarily fall neatly into one of the titled streams. For example: How might critical engagements with finance tell us something about the way markets are performed in other areas of economic life? What forms of subjectivity might different finance practices promote? How should we think the connections between finance and other sectors of the economy? What role should key concepts such as merit and remuneration, surplus labour, speculation, technology, and competition play in how we theorize and imagine finance?

The politics of financial reform draws on a range of characterizations, diagnoses, and prognoses of the recent financial crisis. Such ‘problematizations’ matter because they set in train path dependencies that invite us to problematize those problematizations themselves. Some, for example, seek to avoid heaping blame onto a few individual ‘bad apples’, one of the most trenchant narratives repeatedly and insistently articulated in the mass media. Some seek to avoid locating the fault with finance as such. Others argue that the financial crisis should be understood as a hubris-induced elite debacle rather than a systems accident or fiasco (Engelen et al 2011). The tension between explanatory and interpretive dimensions in these problematizations is never far from the surface, but what is clear is that the way finance is characterized, problematized, and contested has consequences for citizens and for policy makers, not least because of the sorts of futures they open up or close down. This raises issues about how different theoretical perspectives and methodological techniques shape the way we characterize, problematize, and contest financial practices and associated policy and media representations at elite and popular levels; or about how different sorts of critique emerge, relate, and interact with one another, for example, normative and ideological forms of critique.

We encourage the submission of papers that draw on poststructuralist, post-marxist, psychoanalytic, Deleuzian, Foucauldian, and other traditions, and that explore a range of theoretical, methodological, and critical issues linked to the analysis of finance. What forms of innovative, progressive, and sustainable banking and finance do such perspectives enable us to imagine? What role should experiment play in these efforts to conjure alternative visions? How should these experiments be financed? What innovative means of critique are available to citizens living in democratic polities with a tightly coupled nexus of elites in politics-finance-media? What role should music, film, television, social networking platforms, and other media play in facilitating both the process of critique and the conjuring of counter-visions of finance practice and governance?

Stream 2: Financial Imaginaries/Imagining Finance

Convenor: Christian de Cock, Management Group, Essex Business School cdc@essex.ac.uk

A key area of concern in this stream is the “imaginary of finance”, the semiotic system that gives meaning and shape to the economic field in which finance is embedded. Empirically we encourage the submission of papers that explore how, despite the convulsions of 2008 and their continuing reverberations, this imaginary has remained pretty much intact anno 2012 (in that we have witnessed over and over again the re-articulation of established themes and genres). Established financial imaginaries have no doubt proved extremely powerful in shaping the thoughts and perceptions of key political and economic decision makers and it would be interesting to learn more about the mechanics of this. Theoretically we encourage papers that can enrich and develop the notion of “imaginary” itself within a financial context. Examples could include Lacan’s (Real-Symbolic-Imaginary) or Iser’s (Real-Fictive-Imaginary) triad.  We also encourage the submission of papers that can offer new ways of imagining finance. Following Yusoff and Gabrys (2011), we see imagination as “a way of sensing, thinking, and dreaming the formation of knowledge, which creates the conditions for material interventions in and political sensibilities of the world”. What are the conditions of possibility to change dominant framings of the financial imagination? Can we re-imagine the organization of finance as an ethical, societal, and cultural problem? Can we open up a generative space of unknowing which can create the possibility to take us beyond the seemingly eternal dialectic of economic catastrophe and ‘business as usual’? These are just some of the questions you may help formulate answers to.

Stream 3: Sustainability / Finance

Convenor: Steffen Böhm, Management Group, Essex Business School and interdisciplinary Centre for Environment and Society, University of Essex, steffen@essex.ac.uk

Finance is arguably at the heart of what might be called the global capitalist economy, which is geared towards ever increasing growth of production and consumption. A whole host of critics and social movements have pointed to the unsustainable nature of this self-referential system, and particularly its negative environmental consequences. Specifically, financial service industries have been repeatedly accused of funding environmentally very damaging extractive industry projects (such an open pit mining, oil tar sands, etc), contributing to the creation of speculative bubbles of commodity markets (e.g. leading to higher basic food prices), and endangering the livelihood of indigenous and other communities (threatened by global industries invading their land, for example), to name but a few of the grievances that have been articulated. We are seeking contributions that map, evaluate and expand such critiques of finance and its problematic relation to sustainability.

On the other hand, however, finance increasingly likes to portray itself as part of the solution, rather than part of the problem. The financial services industry has arguably made some efforts to positively contribute to issues such as climate change (e.g. through carbon disclosure), land grab and livelihoods in developing countries (e.g. through the Equator Principles) and environmental protection in more general terms (e.g. through the UN Global Compact). While some might accuse such initiatives as ‘hot air’ or even ‘greenwash’, which often lack real power and impact, there are more concrete efforts to offer sustainable finance solutions, ranging from microfinance to carbon offsetting, from community finance to payments for environmental services. What should we make of this move of finance ‘going green’ and ‘ethical’? What empirical evidence is there to suggest that such finance approaches to solving environmental and social issues are actually working?

Overall, then, we encourage submissions that problematize the relationship between sustainability and finance in its broadest sense. We are not only interested in critiques of current finance approaches to sustainability, but particularly encourage studies of how groups and communities can use money and finance in novel ways to live more sustainable lives. We are hence keen to explore the ways of how finance can make a contribution to another possible world.

For any general enquiry about the conference please contact Ann-Christine Frandsen. Any specific questions related to one of the streams each please contact relevant convenor

Organising committee: (Alphabetic order)
Professor Steffen Böhm
Professor Christian de Cock
Dr Ann-Christine Frandsen
Dr Jason Glynos
Dr Pik Liew
Dr Sumohon Matilal
Chloe Warren – Marketing Officer, EBS

Organiser: Ann-Christine Frandsen Essex Business School, University of Essex, Colchester Campus, Wivenhoe Park, Colchester CO4 3SQ, UK

Phone: +44 (0)1206 87 869 809

Email: frandsen@essex.ac.uk

To find out more about Essex Business School visit: http://www.essex.ac.uk/ebs

In Collaboration with

Thomas Bay, Stockholm University

References:

D. Forslund and T. Bay, (2009). ‘The eve of critical finance studies’.  Ephemera: Theory and Politics in Organization. Vol. 9(4), pp. 285-299.

M. Foucault, (1981). ‘The Order of Discourse’ (Inaugural Lecture at the College de France, given 2 December, 1971). In R. Young (ed), Untying the Text: a Post-Structuralist Reader.  London: Methuen, 1981, pp. 48-78.

Dr Steffen Böhm | Professor in Management and Sustainability | Essex Business School | University of Essex | Colchester CO4 3SQ, UK | Rm 5NW.4.4 | Tel. +44(0)1206 87 3843 | http://www.essex.ac.uk/ebs/staff/profile.aspx?ID=727
http://steffenboehm.net

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‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Aesthetics

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE IN INTERPRETIVE POLICY ANALYSIS

Special Panel on Globalisation, Discourse and Education Policy, to be held at the International Conference in Interpretive Policy Analysis, Tilburg, the Netherlands (July 5-7, 2012)

See: http://event.globe-view.com/event/wvDhkJP4ln/panel/279/ 

It is part of the 7th International Conference in Interpretive Policy Analysis: Understanding the Drama of Democracy, Policy Work, Power and Transformation.

The International Conference in Interpretive Policy Analysis has travelled throughEurope. After visiting Birmingham, Amsterdam, Essex, Kassel, Grenoble and Cardiff, interpretivists of various kinds will gather in Tilburg, the Netherlands.

Michael Farrelly
m.farrelly@open.ac.uk

Dr. Jane Mulderrig
j.mulderrig@sheffield.ac.uk

Few would disagree that the perceived relevance and impact of contemporary policy-making is no longer confined to the nation state. Whether in economic or social policy, the spectre of globalisation and its perceived exigencies plays a significant role in circumscribing the parameters of the ‘thinkable’ and ‘doable’. This is partly due to the increased power of international governmental organisations in promoting a neoliberal agenda in both national and transnational contexts. Within this political rationality the dominant logic of competitiveness has leaked from economic to other policy domains like education. In the context of the EU this is closely linked to, and justified on the basis of, visions of achieving global economic competitiveness as a knowledge-based-economy.

Since the global banking crisis and subsequent recession the financial climate in which policy-making is now taking place has altered radically. This state of affairs potentially adds strength to neoliberal policy agendas in education (as elsewhere). In an era of acute fiscal squeeze and harsh austerity measures imposed across numerous advanced liberal economies, does the logic of the market take a firmer hold?  Papers in this panel will explore the current state of education policy through the lens of discourse. Adopting a variety of empirical approaches they will probe discourses of and about education policy in a range of national and transnational contexts. They will explore such questions as: conceptions of globalisation as a driving force in policy; the logic and rhetoric of the market; identities and roles in education; governance and financing structures; and tensions between regionalism and internationalism.

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‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

We Are the Crisis

SPRINGTIME: THE NEW STUDENT REBELLIONS

Edited by Clare Solomon and Tania Palmieri
OUT NOW in the UK; Published September 2011, USA

Book launch and party on: Thursday 7 April, 2011, 6.30pm – 11pm
At The Venue & Gallery bar @ ULU, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HY
Free entry / All ages / All proceeds to PalestineConnect http://www.palestineconnect.org
Come early for drinks reception
Books available for purchase at discounted price of £7

With talks and readings from:

Clare Solomon, (President of ULU)

Jody McIntyre, (Equality Movement)

Dr Nina Power, (Roehampton)

Jo Casserly, (UCL)

Ashok Kumar, (LSE SU)

Kanja Sesay, (NUS Black Students Officer)

James Meadway, (SOAS)

& more tbc

And open mic, poetry, live graffiti wall, music and projections by: Noel Douglas, (Globalise Resistance), Tyler Perkin, (Havering Sixth  Form College), DJ Steaz, Logic MC, (The Peoples Army & We are Dubist), Zain (Words Apart poetry group)

The autumn and winter of 2010 saw an unprecedented wave of student protests across the UK in response to the coalition government’s savage cuts in state funding for higher education, cuts which formed the basis for an ideological attack on the nature of education itself. Middle-class students, teenagers from diverse backgrounds and older activists took part in marches, teach-ins and occupations, and also creative new forms: flashmobs, YouTube dance-offs, and the literal literary resistance of colourful book blocs.

The protests spread with wildfire speed, mainly organised through the unprecedented use of social media such as facebook and twitter. Web-savvy, media-literate students developed Sukey, the anti-kettling phone app, publicise their demands through online and traditional media outlets and continue to build ever-denser international networks of solidarity.

The winter of discontent now gives rise to the new spirit of rebellion this spring with a broader, stronger resistance to austerity measures. We have already seen the astonishing events in the Arab world, trade union rallies in Wisconsin on a scale not seen in America since the Vietnam protests, direct-action by tax-justice campaigners UK Uncut – and 26 March will see ‘March for the Alternative’ the largest national anti-cuts demonstration yet. SPRINGTIME is both an inspiring chronicle of and companion to this movement: “the formulation of an experience” of a generation.

Rather than considering them a series of isolated incidents, this new book locates the student protests in the movement spreading across the entire western world: ever since the financial crash of 2008 there has been growing social and political turbulence in the heartlands of capital and beyond. From Athens to Rome, San Francisco to London – and the stunning events in Tunisia and Egypt that captured the world’s imagination – students are playing a key role in developing a strong, coherent social and political movement.

*****

CLARE SOLOMON is President of the University of London Union and has been centrally involved in the student protests.

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ISBN: 978 1 84467 740 5/ $14.95 / £9.99 / Paperback / 296 pages
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For more information or to buy the book visit: http://www.versobooks.com/books/799-springtime
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Become a fan of Verso on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Verso-Books-UK/122064538789
And get updates on Twitter too! http://twitter.com/VersoBooksUK

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‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Work, work, work

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 6th MARCH 2011

EVENTS

REGISTER FOR CERTIFICATE IN ADULT & CONTINUING EDUCATION (CACE) DISTANCE EDUCATION COURSES, UNIVERSITY OF VICTORIA

CACE distance education courses beginning in April 2011

University of Victoria’s Certificate in Adult and Continuing Education (CACE) is an award-winning professional development program for those interested in adult learning, program coordination, instruction/training, facilitation, instructional design/technologies, and leadership.

Courses include: Planning Program Evaluation, Managing Collective Learning in the Workplace, Strategic Marketing in Adult Education, and more.

For further information/registration:

Heather Brand, Program Secretary, Continuing Studies in Education, Phone: (250) 721-8944; Fax: (250) 721-6603, E-mail: brandh@uvic.ca

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MOVIE: INSIDE JOB

From Academy Award nominated filmmaker Charles Ferguson (No End in Sight) comes Inside Job, the first film to expose the shocking truth behind the economic crisis of 2008. The global financial meltdown, at a cost of over $20 trillion, resulted in millions of people losing their homes and jobs.

Through extensive research and interviews with major financial insiders, politicians and journalists, Inside Job traces the rise of a rogue industry and unveils the corrosive relationships which have corrupted politics, regulation and academia. Narrated by Academy Award winner Matt Damon, Inside Job was made on location in the United States, Iceland, England, France, Singapore, and China.

Official Site: http://www.sonyclassics.com/insidejob/

Now playing at Magic Lantern Theatres (formerly Carlton Cinema), Toronto.
Show times: http://www.rainbowcinemas.ca/A/index.php?theatre=Carlton&synopsis=true#Inside_Job

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CASAE/AERC JOINT CONFERENCE IN TORONTO

Adult Education Research Conference (AERC) and the Canadian Association for the Study of Adult Education (CASAE/ACEEA).

Registration is now open for the 2011 Joint Meeting of AERC and CASAE in celebration of CASAE’s 30th Anniversary. Early bird rates apply until May 1st and seating in pre-conference events is limited, so register as early as you can! Visit http://www.casae2011aerc.org  to register online, view abstracts for pre-conference workshops, and find information on accommodation and travel to Toronto.

Please read the following registration instructions carefully. Our on-line registration process has three steps. First, you have the option to register for ONLY pre-conference events or to register for the entire conference (including pre-conference events). Second, you will fill out a form on our website with your registration and contact information. Third, when you press submit you will be redirected to the University of Toronto website to process your online payment. A confirmation of your registration will be sent to your email and you will receive a second email confirming payment. Unfortunately, you can only register one conference participant at a time.

For more info and to register: http://www.casae2011aerc.org

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ENGAGING HEARTS AND MINDS: EQUITY, SOCIAL JUSTICE AND GLOBAL CITIZENSHIP IN ACTION

March 7-8, 2011
Delta Toronto East Hotel
2035 Kennedy Road, Toronto

The Institute for Global Citizenship and Equity at Centennial College invites you to attend a unique conference. This event will be addressing how as global citizens we can get involved locally, nationally and internationally to dialogue and exchange ideas on global issues.

Many dynamic speakers will be taking part including:

– Justice Murray Sinclair, Chair of the TRC – Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada
– Dr. Sherene Razack, Professor, Sociology and Equity Studies in Education, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto
– Dr. Henry Giroux, Global Television Network, Chair in Communication Studies, McMaster University
– Rev. Gretta Vosper, founder of the Canadian Centre for Progressive Christianity, author and participant at United Church of Canada

Presenters and panelists from around the world are also confirmed, discussing equity, social justice and global citizenship in action.

Space is limited. Call Aida Haroun at 416-289-5000 x. 3438.

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OUR CITY, OUR SERVICES, OUR FUTURE!

Community Day of Action in Toronto
Saturday, April 9, 2011 (details to be announced)
1 p.m.
Toronto City Hall

Since taking office in November, Toronto Mayor Rob Ford has begun implementing his own personal agenda … an agenda that is frighteningly similar to the Tea Party Republicans in Wisconsin and Ohio whose actions have sparked massive protests. Ford has made it clear that he is hell bent on selling off public services, derailing public transit, targeting trade unions and rolling-back Toronto’s environmental plans. This style of “aggressive conservatism” is designed to usher in a new wave of Harris-style cuts across Ontario.

Toronto should be a city that everyone can be proud of – one that serves all its residents regardless of income, which celebrates its diversity and plays a leadership role in crucial areas like climate change and social equality. Today, all of these priorities are under threat in Toronto. Tomorrow they could be challenged in any town or city in Ontario!

Take Action:
On Saturday, April 9, 2011, come to Toronto City Hall to help defend good jobs, public services and greener cities throughout Ontario. Together, we can challenge the conservative agenda that is threatening our jobs, our livelihoods and our neighbourhoods.

Book Buses to Toronto:
Organize and fill buses to Toronto and register them with the rally organizers.
Eddie Ste. Marie, CLC: 416-441-3710 x226 or estemarie@clc-ctc.ca

Contact Rally Organizers: Laurie Hardwick, OFL: 416-571-3087 or lhardwick@ofl.ca

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NEWS & VIEWS

DISASTER IN THE MAKING: THE QUIET EROSION OF CANADA’S REGULATION SYSTEM

By Trish Hennessy, Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives

In Canada, regulations adopted by every level of government have historically helped to make this one of the safest, most desirable places to raise a family. But a slow, steady, and quiet erosion of regulations by our governments put Canadians’ health, safety and well-being increasingly at risk. This primer on regulation, by the CCPA’s Trish Hennessy, tells the story of Canada’s slippery slide into deregulation. It also provides resource information to learn more about regulation issues in Canada.

Read more: http://www.policyalternatives.ca/publications/reports/disaster-making

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CANADIAN WORKER CO-OP FEDERATION (CWCF) URGES GOVERNMENT SUPPORT FOR CONVERSIONS TO WORKER CO-OPS

The Canadian Worker Co-operative Federation (CWCF) has called on the federal government to provide funding to support conversions to worker co-ops.

Appearing before the Standing Committee on Finance on February 15, CWCF president Alain Bridault and executive director Hazel Corcoran said worker co-ops could meet the challenge posed by the imminent retirements of large numbers of “baby boomers”.

“We know that with the retirement of very large numbers of workers from the baby-boomer generation, we shall face a serious problem of manpower shortages,” Mr. Brideault said, adding that the democratic and participatory nature of worker co-ops would be attractive to potential employees.

Read more: http://www.canadianworker.coop/news/worker-co-op-news/cwcf-presentation-standing-committee-finance-february-15-2011

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WISCONSIN SPIRIT SWEEPS ACROSS THE MIDWEST

By Jenny Brown, Dan La Botz, Labor Notes

The spirit of Wisconsin is inspiring union members in Ohio, Indiana, and Michigan to jam capitol buildings by the tens of thousands to fight a raft of union-busting bills in their states.

By aiming their attack against such a broad range of working people—teachers to state workers to building trades—conservative legislators and their shadowy billionaire funders unintentionally created the conditions for unity.

By making their aggression so naked, the legislators scotched the usual impulse from most labor leaders to think they could negotiate a way out behind closed doors. When the right took off the gloves, labor finally put up its dukes.

Read more: http://labornotes.org/2011/02/wisconsin-spirit-sweeps-across-midwest

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USW-CANADA IN SOLIDARITY WITH WISCONSIN WORKERS – RESISTING THE ATTACK ON COLLECTIVE BARGAINING RIGHTS

The United Steelworkers stands in support of the working people of Wisconsin who are fighting an unprecedented attack on their rights by Republican Governor Scott Walker.

This direct attack on public workers has far-reaching implications. Unionists across North America are watching closely and standing together with our sisters and brothers in Wisconsin. We know that governments and corporations in Canada and the U.S. will be eager to attempt similar measures to weaken workers’ rights.

Read more: http://www.usw.ca/media/statements/opinions?id=0018

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A FUTURE FOR STEEL IN CANADA?

By D.W. Livingstone and Warren Smith, Hamilton Spectator

The Jan. 29 Day of Action in Hamilton has been met by a deafening silence from both U.S. Steel and the federal government. This is an ominous sign for the future of steelmaking at the site that a generation ago employed the largest industrial workforce in Canada.

Read more: http://www.thespec.com/opinion/article/493015–a-future-for-steel-in-canada

[D.W. Livingstone is Canada Research Chair in Lifelong Learning and Work and Professor Emeritus at University of Toronto. Warren Smith was president of USW Local 1005 from 1997 to 2003. They have just published Manufacturing Meltdown: Reshaping Steel Work (Fernwood Publishing,
http://www.fernwoodpublishing.ca/Manufacturing-Meltdown/).]

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JOB POSTINGS

EDUCATION DIRECTOR, SEIU LOCAL 1 CANADA

SEIU Local 1 Canada is seeking an Education Director to develop and implement the education program for the local.  The successful candidate must understand the organizing, mobilizing model of trade unionism, be able to develop education programs that reflect this model, and be able to work with the Leadership and staff and executive board as they go through the process of implementing a mobilizing model.

For more info: http://www.charityvillage.com/cvnet/viewlisting.aspx?id=227954&eng=True&fs=True&fa=False

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CULTURAL CONSULTING SERVICES PROMOTER, MAYWORKS

Mayworks Festival of Working People and the Arts Contract Position: Cultural Consulting Services Promoter (Contract position, March – May 2011)

This short term contract position will undertake targeted outreach and promotion of Mayworks’ cultural consulting services to the union movement.

The primary outcome is the expansion and diversification of Mayworks’ consulting services in order to maintain and increase earned revenue through consulting services. The contract will also serve to raise the profile of the festival in the labour movement as well as build and maintain festival audiences.

General overview of activities to be implemented*:

March/April 2011
– Identify upcoming union conferences and conventions
– Identify unions for targeted outreach
– Design and print consulting services flyers, ‘give-away’ item and slide show
– Print business cards

April 2011
– Mail out of promotional flyer with letter, follow-up with email, phone calls
– Start targeted outreach to identified unions for general promotion
– Set meetings, start making any travel arrangements**
– Pitch specific event programming to unions with upcoming conferences, meetings or conventions
– Meet with unions and continue outreach

May 2011
– Negotiate any new contracts
– Look into social enterprise umbrella organisations that would support Mayworks or provide networks
– Table at union conferences
– Any last meetings, outreach, contract negotiations
– Wrap up promotional work
– Write final report
– Evaluate success of promotional tour, and next steps

*At times, working in consultation/collaboration with graphic designer **Potential travel to Ottawa for promotional meetings with Canadian Union of Postal Workers and the Public Service Alliance of Canada. Travel expenses will be covered by Mayworks.

Hours of work and remuneration:
The total work hours for the initiative is 100 hours from March 2011 through May 2011 (at least 40 hours per month April and May 2011).  Remuneration for the project is $2710 which includes a percentage in lieu of all fringe benefits.

The applicant should have the following qualifications:
– A minimum of two years experience in event/project development and coordination
– Good working knowledge of the labour movement and social justice/activist communities
– Established networks within the labour movement an asset
– Good negotiation, outreach and promotional skills
– Ability to meet tight deadlines
– Ability to work with union members and manage different needs
– Strong written and oral communication skills

Send a letter of application and resume by March 18, 2011 to:

Email: Hiring Committee, c/o mbwall@sympatico.ca Regular mail: Mayworks, 25 Cecil St., 3rd Floor, Toronto, Ontario, M5T 1N1. Fax: 416-599-8661.
No phone calls, please.

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ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK, OISE/UT):

Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

World Crisis

UNDERSTANDING THE GLOBAL FINANCIAL CRISIS

The Richmond University Colloquium in Public & International Affairs (RUCIPA)
This year’s theme is on: “Understanding the Global Financial Crisis”
Friday, 25 March 2011, 17 Young Street, London W8 5EH (Underground: High Street Kensington)

Programme

10.30am Registration

11.00 Welcome Address by Professor Alex Seago, Richmond University

11.15 Professor Bülent Gökay, Keele University, “Global fault-lines three years after: An analysis of the 2008 global economic crisis” (Chair: Dr. Preslava Stoeva, RU)

11.45 – 12.15 Discussion

12.15 – 13.45 Lunch

13.45 Professor Engelbert Stockhammer, Kingston University, “Neo-liberalism, income distribution and the causes of the crisis” (Chair: Professor Wolfgang Deckers, RU)

14.30 Professor Costas Lapavitsas, SOAS, “World crisis, world money: the Euro-crisis and Marxist monetary theory” (Chair: Dr. Sabine Spangenberg, RU)

15.15 – 16.00 Discussion

16.00 – 16.15 Coffee/Tea

16.15 Professor Robert Wade, LSE, “The future of global financial governance” (Chair: Dr. Mike Keating, RU)

17.00 – 17.15 Discussion

17.15 – 18.15 Round Table Discussion with Lapavitsas, Wade, Stockhammer and Gökay chaired by Prof Stephen Haseler, London Metropolitan University and Global Policy Institute

Further info from: Jelena.Pivovarova@Richmond.ac.uk, Tel: 0207-3688437

Supported by http://www.globalfaultlines.com and the Journal of Balkan and Near Eastern Studies (quarterly, Routledge)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Money, money, money

PRIVATE EQUITY, CORPORATE TURBULENCE AND LABOUR REGULATION

Call for Papers
Private Equity, Corporate Turbulence and Labour Regulation

ESRC/Middlesex University One Day Workshop
Monday June 13th  2011, University of Geneva, Switzerland

Concerns over the role of private equity in shaping corporate behaviour were already apparent in the years immediately preceding the Great Financial Crash of 2008. In 2006 alone buy-outs of businesses by private equity organisations amounted to US$ 725bn. – equivalent to the economies of Argentina, Poland and South Africa combined. One quarter of all takeovers before the financial crash were financed by such private equity.

Major household names, such as Nabisco, Carrefour, Gate Gourmet and EMI have already fallen to such venture capital. Private equity finance depends on leverage, or the ability to borrow money to raise more finance. There is thus a dependence on debt, which enormously increases the risk of such investment. Up until the financial crash such risky ventures produced huge returns for the financiers, but after the crash such debt led to huge losses. Harvard University, for example, lost millions of dollars from its funds after it had mistakenly switched to private equity investment as an alternative to stocks and bonds. The result was lay-offs and redundancies of workers to cover the cost, a pattern of events being repeated elsewhere for workers whose employing organisation is dependent on debt finance.

Such ‘short-termism’ appears built in to the private equity model, as the financiers seek immediate gains from their investments at the cost of longer term corporate stability. Employees and their unions are faced with continuous episodes of restructuring as corporations are treated as ‘bundles of assets’ and plants are sold off to make profits or avoid losses. Productive investment in a company becomes less likely, as it is an additional cost to the remote owners. Workers suffer from increased job insecurity as off-shoring and contracting-out is encouraged, while industrial relations and collective bargaining becomes a casualty of corporate instability and ‘invisible’ employers.

This seminar will discuss and debate the continuing problems of private equity finance and corporate turbulence by bringing together academics and practitioners from trade unions, government bodies, employers and NGOs to discuss policy initiatives. The seminar is convened by Middlesex University, London and funded by the UK’s Economic and Social Research Council. It is part of a series of seminars examining global labour regulation in the international economy. Previous seminars reviewed problems arising from the increasing use of contract and agency labour, and migrant workers.

Overview speakers include:

Professor John Grahl (Middlesex University) on Restructuring under the Rule of the Capital Markets: the case of private equity? and
Professor Geoff Wood (Sheffield University), Professor Marc Goergen (Cardiff University) and Professor Noel O’Sullivan (University of Sheffield) with a data presentation on The Employment Consequences of Private Equity Acquisitions: The Case of Institutional Buy-Outs.

Plus speakers from International Trade Union Federations on the trade union response.

If you wish to contribute a paper to this seminar, or wish to attend as a delegate please contact below. We are particularly keen to hear case study presentations on labour-related problems flowing from private equity and institutional buy-outs. Some financial assistance may be available for selected presenters to cover costs of travel and accommodation.

For more information, and registration at the Seminar, please contact Professor Martin Upchurch, Middlesex University, London, UK: m.upchurch@mdx.ac.uk or Denise Arden d.arden@mdx.ac.uk

Further information on the seminar series can be found at Beyond Labour Regulation blog: http://www.globalworkonline.net/blog/private-equity-corporate-turbulence-and-labour-regulation/

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Dharma Initiative

THE RISE AND FALL OF NEOLIBERALISM

The Rise and Fall of Neoliberalism: The Collapse of an Economic Order?
London and New York: Zed Books, 2010
Edited by Kean Birch and Vlad Mykhnenko

Hardback: £70.00   ISBN: 9781848133488
Paperback: £18.99  ISBN: 9781848133495

Book website: http://www.zedbooks.co.uk/book.asp?bookdetail=4351 

About the Book

The recent, devastating and ongoing economic crisis has exposed the faultlines in the dominant neoliberal economic order, opening debate for the first time in years on alternative visions that do not subscribe to a ‘free’ market ethic. In particular, the core contradiction at the heart of neoliberalism – that states are necessary for the functioning of free markets – provides us with the opportunity to think again about how we want to organise our economies and societies. The Rise and Fall of Neoliberalism presents critical perspectives of neoliberal policies, questions the ideas underpinning neoliberalism, and explores diverse response to it from around the world.

In bringing together the work of distinguished scholars and dedicated activists to question neoliberal hegemony, the book exposes the often fractured and multifarious manifestations of neoliberalism which will have to be challenged to bring about meaningful social change.

What People Have Said About the Book

‘Since the 1970s, the politics of “neoliberalism,” based on the purported concern to minimize state interference in the economy and thus to unleash “free” markets, have been mobilized at various sites and scales across the world economy. This book provides useful intellectual tools for deciphering the ideological, social and institutional foundations of neoliberalism and its wide-ranging implications for the still ongoing regulatory reorganization of capitalism.’ – Neil Brenner, New York University 

‘This is an outstanding book not only because of the sophisticated critiques offered by some of the most highly regarded thinkers on the topic of the destruction and misery wrought through neoliberal capitalism, but also because its forward looking emphasis on a more egalitarian and hopeful future offers insights about the work that needs to be done by activists and scholars alike. Moreover, this book helps us recognize that the emergence of any talk of a post-neoliberal era is premature beyond helping to construct a road map for ways citizens of the world can collectively, and deliberately, move forward.’ – Nik Heynen, University of Georgia

‘This timely and wide ranging book traces the changing contours of neoliberalism, demonstrating how market-oriented policies gave rise to a globally hegemonic political-economic project. The emphasis is on identifying the different forms neoliberalism takes and the diverse responses to it. At a juncture when this political-economic project is under increasing scrutiny from supporters and opponents alike, the book challenges existing conceptions of neoliberalism and makes an important contribution to the reinvigorated search for political alternatives.’ – Wendy Larner, Professor of Human Geography and Sociology, University of Bristol

‘A timely volume on the nature, varied manifestations, and above all limitations of a an economic order that is failing so spectacularly with the financial crisis. Highly recommended for academics, students, or for that matter anyone interested in the politics of our times.’ – Magnus Ryner, Professor of International Relations, Oxford Brookes University.

Table of Contents:
1. Introduction: A World Turned Right-Way Up – Kean Birch and Vlad Mykhnenko

Part 1: The Rise of Neoliberalism

2. How Neoliberalism Got Where It Is: Elite Planning, Corporate Lobbying and the Release of the Free Market – David Miller

3. Making Neoliberal Order in the United States – Kean Birch and Adam Tickell

4. Neoliberalism, Intellectual Property and the Global Knowledge Economy – David Tyfield

5. Neoliberalism and the Calculable World: The Rise of Carbon Trading – Larry Lohmann

6. Tightening the Web: The World Bank and Enforced Policy Reform – Elisa van Waeyenberge

7. The Corruption Industry and Transition: Neoliberalising Post-Soviet Space? – Adam Swain, Vlad Mykhnenko and Shaun French

8. Remaking the Welfare State: From Safety Net to Trampoline – Julie MacLeavy
Part 2: The Fall of Neoliberalism

9. Zombieconomics: The Living Death of the Dismal Science – Ben Fine

10. From Hegemony to Crisis? The Continuing Ecological Dominance of Neo-Liberalism – Bob Jessop

11. Do It Yourself: A Politics for Changing Our World – Paul Chatterton

12. Dreaming the Real: A Politics of Ethical Spectacles – Paul Routledge

13. Transnational Companies and Transnational Civil Society – Leonith Hinojosa and Anthony Bebbington

14. Defeating Neo-liberalism: A Marxist Internationalist Perspective and Programme – Jean Shaoul

15. Conclusion: The End of an Economic Order? – Vlad Mykhnenko and Kean Birch

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon Profile: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Work, work, work

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 12th MARCH 2010

 

EVENTS

BRIDGING THE GAP: RALLY IN SUPPORT OF SUDBURY STEELWORKERS

USW Local 6500 is in the hometown fight of their lives. Our members have been fighting strong for 8 months.

On Monday, March 22nd at 4:30 pm we are having a massive rally to show the solidarity and support that our local has from our members, our community, our province, and from around the world. There are 30 delegates from around the world (Brazil, Germany, Australia, Geneva, Indonesia, Zambia, and more) who have already committed to attending. Can I count on you to attend as well? Can I count on you to share this message with everyone you know?

We are looking for community members, organizations, clubs, unions, political groups, and community businesses to attend. Show up in large numbers and bring your banners, your flags and your signs! We need your help!

For more info, email: usw@uswsudbury.ca

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NORMA SCARBOROUGH: TRIBUTE TO A PRO-CHOICE FIGHTER

Saturday, April 17
3:00pm – 5:00pm
Koffler House
569 Spadina Avenue, Room 108, Toronto

Join us to pay tribute to Norma Scarborough’s life of feminism and pro-choice activism. Memorial donations will be accepted for the Canadians for Choice Norma Scarborough Fund.

For more information or to donate to the fund, please contact Canadians for Choice at info@canadiansforchoice.ca

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THE FIFTH (AND FINAL) ANNUAL SOUTHERN ONTARIO SOCIAL ECONOMY NODE SYMPOSIUM

April 12 (8:30-4:30) and 13 (8:30-3:30)
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto,
252 Bloor St W. (St. George subway station), Ground Floor Library

Keynote:
The Social Economy: A New Way to Manage Wealth
Michel Labbé, President and Founder of Options for Homes and more recently Options for Green Energy.

Interactive sessions with academic and community researchers who will share their work and insights
Short workshops on topics relevant to social economy organizations

A preliminary program is below and more information is posted on our website: http://sec.oise.utoronto.ca/english/symposium_10.php

There is no cost for this event. However, registration is required: http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/95GS5NH

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THE GREEN ECONOMY: PRACTICAL STRATEGIES TO CREATE COMMUNITY-BASED ECO-ECONOMIES

Taught by Brian Milani, author of Designing the Green Economy: the postindustrial alternative to corporate globalization

30 Hours over 10 weeks, Thursdays
April 8-June 10, 6 to 9pm

Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE)
U of Toronto, 252 Bloor St. W.
(directly above St. George subway stop)
Eighth Floor, Room 8-214

Cost: $180

The Green Economy is an overview of radical potentials for reorganizing the economy for social and ecological purposes, while at the same time showcasing exciting alternatives being built right now in the existing economy.

The premise of the course is that today’s social, economic and environmental crises are not problems of management, but of design. A process of economic conversion is necessary to create economic structures which facilitate human self-development, social justice, community enrichment and ecological regeneration.

Sponsored by the Transformative Learning Centre, OISE.

For more info: http://www.greeneconomics.net/cour2010.htm

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APRIL 28: DAY OF MOURNING FOR INJURED, KILLED, OR SICK WORKERS

On Christmas Eve 2009, four workers in Toronto were killed and one seriously injured when a construction swing stage snapped in half and plummeted 13 storeys to the ground. Another 400 Ontario workers were killed the same year and about 374,000 were injured.

On Wednesday, April, 28th, we remember our sisters and brothers who have been killed on the job or who have died as a result of workplace diseases. This special day also offers an opportunity to re-dedicate our efforts to achieve healthier and safer workplaces and seek justice and fair compensation for injured workers.

For more details visit: http://www.whsc.on.ca/events/day_mourn.cfm

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CITY IS A SWEATSHOP: MARCH 19 & 20

As we prepare to flood the streets of Toronto on May Day (May 1, 2010), and as we build our resistance to the G8/G20 Summits coming to Toronto in June 2010, this series of events will lay out a vision for a city that includes everyone that lives, works, loves and struggles here.

More details: http://toronto.nooneisillegal.org/node/422

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NEWS & VIEWS

WE’VE SOLD OFF ASSETS SO OFTEN, BRANCH PLANTS ‘R’ US

In a global economy, a country needs global companies, headquartered at home. Canada doesn’t have enough of them… Other countries know this. In Brazil, Vale is shielded from unwanted takeover by the government’s “golden shares,” which give authorities veto power. No Brazilian government would dream of allowing Vale to fall into foreign hands, whereas Ottawa waves takeovers through like a cop trying to speed traffic along.

To read more: http://bit.ly/bGCUnJ

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WOMEN’S EQUALITY HAS DECLINED UNDER HARPER TORIES

Describing it as a “Reality Check,” labour and women’s groups have issued a stinging new report describing Canada’s lagging performance in achieving women’s equality.

The report, entitled Reality Check: Women in Canada and the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action Fifteen Years On, cites regression in everything from pay equity to child care. It was prepared by the Canadian Feminist Alliance for International Action and the Canadian Labour Congress.

To read more: http://www.nupge.ca/content/womens-equality-has-declined-under-harper-tories

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WORKERS, BANKING, AND CRISIS IN MEXICO

A striking feature of the global financial crisis is the narrow and technical focus on banks and financial corporations without accounting for ordinary workers in these institutions and in society more broadly. Yet through the intensification of work, workers have also underwritten the profitability of finance. This has been generally ignored.

In the nexus between workers, banking, and crisis, the case of Mexico is revealing due to the nature, evolution, and history of its emerging capitalist banking system. Examining the conditions of workers in Mexico is particularly important because it helps to explain not only the increase in bank profitability leading up to the global financial crisis but also the capacity of banks in Mexico to weather its worst consequences.

This focus seeks to complement, not replace, analyses concerned with large interest differentials, rising commissions and fees, as well as usurious consumer and state debt servicing.

To read more: http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/323.php

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BUDGET 2010: OVERVIEW AND SUMMARY

This budget includes two major measures: another tax cut for business  and ongoing cuts to federal public services.

Check out CUPE’s comprehensive budget analysis on everything from climate to child care to EI to education, water, women and more.

To read more: http://cupe.ca/budget/budget-2010-overview-analysis-summary

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VIDEO: TORONTO RALLY FOR STEELWORKER LOCALS 6500 AND 6200 ON STRIKE AT VALE INCO

Three years ago, Vale – a giant multinational corporation, based in Brazil – bought Canada’s mining company Inco. Now it has forced 3,500 miners and smelter workers in Sudbury, Port Colborne and Voisey’s Bay out on strike. It’s demanding huge rollbacks in pensions, nickel bonus and seniority rights.

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JOB POSTINGS

COMMUNICATIONS COORDINATOR, RAINBOW HEALTH ONTARIO, TORONTO

Deadline: March 29, 2010

Full job description: http://www.sherbourne.on.ca/PDFs/jobs/RHO-10-0207-Comm-Coordinator-FT.pdf

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COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT ADVISOR, OFFICE OF THE PROVINCIAL ADVOCATE FOR CHILDREN AND YOUTH, TORONTO

Deadline: 5pm March 15, 2010

For more information on this position follow this link: http://www.charityvillage.com/cvnet/viewlisting.aspx?id=209592&eng=true&

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COMMUNITY URBAN FORESTRY INTERNS (3), SUMMER, GREENHERE, TORONTO ON

Start Date: June 14 2010
End Date: August 13 2010
Employment Type: Full time
Closing Date: March 19 2010

Organization:  GreenHere http://www.greenhere.ca
Please submit your cover letter and resume by mail or email to: info@greenhere.ca
Mail: 21 Blackthorn Ave., Toronto, Ontario M6N 3H4

(from Canada’s Green Job Site, http://www.GoodWorkCanada.ca)

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++++++++++++++++++++

OUR MANDATE:

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

This is a moderated list. To send postings to the list, please email them to rhonda_sussman@yahoo.ca

To change your subscription settings, visit http://listserv.oise.utoronto.ca/mailman/listinfo/csewbroadcast

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

*END*

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Turbulence

TURBULENCE 5

OUT NOW!

TURBULENCE 5

AND NOW FOR SOMETHING COMPLETELY DIFFERENT?

Until recently, anyone who suggested nationalising the banks would have been derided as a ‘quack’ and a ‘crank’, as lacking the most basic understanding of the functioning of a ‘complex, globalised world’. The grip of ‘orthodoxy’ disqualified the idea, and many more, without the need even to offer a counter-argument.

And yet, in this time of intersecting crises, when it seems like everything could, and should, have changed, it paradoxically feels as though very little has. Individuals and companies have hunkered down to try and ride out the crisis. Nationalisations and government spending have been used to prevent change, not initiate it. Anger and protest have erupted around different aspects of the crises, but no common or consistent reaction has seemed able to cohere. We appear unable to move on.

For many years, social movements could meet and recognise one another on the *common ground* of rejecting neoliberalism, society’s old *middle ground* — those discourses and practices that defined the centre of the political field. The crisis of the middle has meant a crumbling of the common.

And what now? Will neoliberalism continue to stumble on without direction, zombie-like? Or, is it time for something completely different?

CONTENTS:

Turbulence: ‘Life in limbo?’

Gifford Hartman, ‘California in Crisis: Everything touched by capital turns toxic’

Bini Adamczak and Anna Dost, ‘What would it mean to lose? On the history of actually-existing failure’

Frieder Otto Wolf and Tadzio Mueller, ‘Green New Deal: Dead end or pathway beyond capitalism?’

p.m., ‘It’s all about potatoes and computers: Recipes for the cook-shops of the future’

Colectivo Situaciones, ‘Disquiet in the impasse’

George Caffentzis, ‘‘Everything must change so that everything can stay the same’: Notes on Obama’s Energy Plan’

Walter Mignolo, ‘The communal and the decolonial’

Massimo De Angelis, ‘The tragedy of the capitalist commons’

Rebecca Solnit, ‘Falling Together’

Rodrigo Nunes, ‘What were you wrong about ten years ago?’

ALSO FEATURING…

…a collection of texts, ten years after the protests against the World Trade Organisation in Seattle, asking people from across the global movement, ‘What were you wrong about ten years ago?’, at t-10.

Contributors to the feature are: David Solnit, Gustavo Esteva, Emir Sader, Phil McLeish, Rubia Salgado, João Pedro Stédile, A CrimethInc ex-Worker, Precarias a la Deriva, Trevor Ngwane, Marcela and Oscar Olivera, Heloisa Primavera, Chris Carlsson, The Free Association, David Bleakney, Olivier de Marcellus, Go Hirasawa and Sabu Kohso, John Clarke, Guy Taylor, Thomas Seibert, Dr Simon Lewis, Amador Fernández-Savater.

The Issue is illustrated by the photo series ‘Flat Horizon’ by Marcos Vilas Boas.

Turbulence: Ideas for Movement are: David Harvie, Keir Milburn, Tadzio Mueller, Rodrigo Nunes, Michal Osterweil, Kay Summer, Ben Trott.

http://www.turbulence.org.uk

ORDER A COPY

Copies can be ordered from editors@turbulence.org.uk

Turbulence is free, but we ask that you make a donation towards postage: http://turbulence.org.uk/donate/ (any additional donations greatly appreciated!)

All texts are also freely available via our website as of today.

HELP OUT

A collection of resources to help publicise the issue (posters, flyers, web-banners, etc…) can be found here:
http://turbulence.org.uk/turbulence-5/turbulence-5-resources/

Get in touch if you can help out translating any of the articles in this issue: editors@turbulence.org.uk

Order a bundle of the magazine to distribute in your part of the world.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
www.turbulence.org.uk // www.myspace.com/turbulence_ideas4movement //
www.twitter.com/turbulence_mag // editors@turbulence.org.uk

Turbulence’s Facebook Page:
http://www.facebook.com/pages/Turbulence-Ideas-for-Movement/171769885530

To stay informed about future ‘Turbulence’ publications and projects, subscribe to our (very!) low-traffic e-newsletter here: https://lists.riseup.net/www/info/turbulenceannouncementslist

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Left Forum

Left Forum

LEFT FORUM CONFERENCE 2010

 

A message from Seth Adler

Dear past Left Forum panel organizers, speakers, and friends,

I am pleased to be getting back in touch with you after you helped make last year’s conference the best attended Left Forum yet.

We would like you to consider proposing a panel for the upcoming Left Forum conference at Pace University in New York City March 19-21, 2010, and we look forward to working with you in the panel and conference organizing process.  Consider starting this process right away by proposing a panel in any of the following ways: go to our website (http://www.leftforum.org) and follow the panel submission instructions (by clicking call for panels or panel instructions), email us at panels@leftforum.org, or call our office (212 817-2003).

The last conference marked one of the most diverse and engaged left dialogue experiences to date. This year, with “recovery” of capitalist crisis meaning bailouts for the banks and continued suffering for working people, a new stridency in right wing voices, and a conservative tilt in Washington politics as a backdrop, we offer the following conference theme as one point of collaborative reference. The theme is “The Center Cannot Hold: Rekindling the Radical Imagination” (for the 2010 thematic statement click here).

This year we have an easier and more accessible online panel submission process that you will find on our website by clicking this link: call for panels. I am also happy to say that we will include bios and other panel information online and in the program, to ensure maximum turnout and awareness of the content of your panel. Also, among many panel options, one that often draws large audiences is when panel organizers secure speakers with respectfully different perspectives on the same topic or politics; such dialogues also inspire spirited audience participation.

Your participation is vital if we are to continue to strengthen the Left Forum space for critical political dialogue.

Feel free to call me or other conference organizers in the office if you have any questions.  Please note the panel submission deadline is December 1st and you must have a panel description proposed by then. We urge you to get started now. It takes a while to get ideas and people together for a strong proposal.

In Solidarity,
Seth Adler
Conference coordinator
212 817-2003

Left Forum: http://www.leftforum.org/

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Historical Materialism 6

Historical Materialism 6

HISTORICAL MATERIALISM SIXTH ANNUAL CONFERENCE – REGISTRATION

 

Sixth Historical Materialism Annual Conference
Another World is Necessary: Crisis, Struggle and Political Alternatives
27–29 November 2008
School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) and Birkbeck College, London, WC1
In association with Socialist Register and the Isaac and Tamara Deutscher Memorial Prize Committee

REGISTRATION NOW OPEN!
http://mercury.soas.ac.uk/hm/conference2009.htm

The annual Historical Materialism conference is organised by the editorial board of Historical Materialism in association with the Deutscher Memorial Prize committee and the Socialist Register. The conference has become an important event on the Left, providing an annual forum to discuss recent developments on the agenda of historical-materialist research and has attracted an increasingly high attendance over the past four years. The Editorial Board of Historical Materialism welcomes attendance and active engagement in discussion with panellists from new as well as prior participants with an interest in critical-Marxist thought.

One of the principal objectives of the conference has been to build bridges among the various Marxist communities, including the breaking down some of the linguistic and intellectual barriers which continue to hamper the circulation and expansion of critical-Marxist thought. The sixth annual Historical Materialism Conference, under the banner of ‘Crisis, Struggle and Political Alternatives’, promises to continue and take forward this objective.

The conference is organised around three plenary sessions (the Deutscher lecture, the launch of the Socialist Register 2010, and Historical Materialism’s plenary) and a host of workshops dedicated to specific themes.

THE FULL TIMETABLE WILL BE AVAILABLE SOON

For more details, please contact: historicalmaterialism@soas.ac.uk

Attendance is free, but participants must register in advance online (if this is not possible, please contact historicalmaterialism@soas.ac.uk). However, the conference is largely self-funded and we will depend on voluntary donations by attendants and participants to support the organisation and running of the event. The suggested advanced online donation is £40 for waged and £15 for unwaged: http://mercury.soas.ac.uk/hm/conference2009.htm, , and the suggested donation on the door is £50 for waged and £20 for unwaged.

For logistical and other support, Historical Materialism would like to thank the School of Oriental and African Studies and the Centre for International Security and Diplomacy. For sponsorship, thanks to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS, SOAS Student Union, Brill Academic Publishers, the Deutscher Memorial Prize committee, Socialist Register, Journal of Agrarian Change, the International Initiative for the Promotion of Political Economy and Bookmarks.

The Editorial Board of Historical Materialism

THEMES FOR THIS YEAR’S CONFERENCE INCLUDE THE FOLLOWING: A LEFT PROJECT: TRANSFORMING THE STATE? * AGENCY * AGRARIAN CHANGE IN CONTEMPORARY CAPITALISM: TECHNICAL DYNAMICS AND ENVIRONMENTAL * TRAJECTORIES * ALTHUSSER AND PHILOSOPHY * APOCALYPSE MARXISM * ART AGAINST CAPITALISM * ART AND CRITIQUE IN GERMANY BETWEEN THE WARS * BOOK LAUNCH: ALEX CALLINICOS’S IMPERIALISM AND GLOBAL POLITICAL ECONOMY * BOOK LAUNCH: KARL MARX AND CONTEMPORARY PHILOSOPHY * CAPITALISM, CITIZENSHIP AND CRISIS * CLASS AND CONFLICT IN ANCIENT GREECE * CLASS AND POLITICS IN THE ‘GLOBAL SOUTH’ * CLASS, CRISIS, DISTRIBUTION * COGNITIVE MAPPING, TOTALITY AND THE REALIST TURN * COMMODIFYING HEALTH CARE IN THE UK * CUBAN REVOLUTION AND CUBAN SOCIETY * DERIVATIVES * DEVELOPMENTALISM, THE STATE AND CLASS FORMATION * DIMENSIONS OF THE FOOD CRISIS * EASTERN CENTRAL EUROPE FROM TRANSITION TO EU ENLARGEMENT: CHANGE AND CONTINUITY IN THE GLOBAL POLITICAL ECONOMY * ECOLOGICAL CRISIS * EMPIRE AND IMPERIALISM * ENERGY AND GEOPOLITICS * ENERGY, WASTE AND CAPITALISM * EPISTEMOLOGY, DIALECTICS AND HISTORICAL MATERIALISM * EXTENDING THE MINERALS-ENERGY-COMPLEX * FEMINISM AND SOCIALIST STRATEGY * FINANCE, THE HOUSING QUESTION AND URBAN POLITICS * GLOBAL LAW AND HUMAN RIGHTS: MARXIST REFLECTIONS * GRAMSCI RELOADED * GREEN CAPITALISM AND ENVIRONMENTAL CRISIS * HISTORICAL MATERIALISM AND LATE CAPITALIST DEVELOPMENT * HISTORICAL MATERIALISM AND SOCIAL RESEARCH * HISTORICISING HISTORICAL MATERIALISM * HM BOOK SERIES LAUNCH:  MIKKO LAHTINEN ON ALTHUSSER AND MACHIAVELLI * HM BOOK SERIES LAUNCH: PETER THOMAS’S THE GRAMSCIAN MOMENT * IN MEMORY OF PETER GOWAN * INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVES ON THE CRISIS * INTERPRETATIONS OF THE CRISIS * ISAAC AND TAMARA DEUTSCHER MEMORIAL PRIZE LECTURE: KEES VAN DER PIJL, NOMADS, EMPIRES, STATES * KNOWLEDGE, NATURE, PROPERTY * LABOUR * LABOUR AND THE ECONOMIC SUBJECT IN CONTEMPORARY ART * LABOUR BEYOND THE FACTORY * LATIN AMERICAN WORKING CLASSES * LEARNING FROM PAST CRISES * LINEAGES OF NEOLIBERALISM * LISTEN TO VENEZUELA SCREENING AND DISCUSSION * MARXISM AND LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY * MARXISM AND NATIONALISM TODAY * MARXISM AND POLITICAL VIOLENCE * MARXISM AND SOCIAL MOVEMENTS * MARXISM AND TIME * MARXISM BETWEEN ETHICS AND UTOPIA * MARXISM, DEMOCRACY AND CLASSICAL POLITICAL THEORY * MIGRATION * MONEY * MORBID SYMPTOMS: HEALTH UNDER CAPITALISM * NEOLIBERALISM, AESTHETICS AND THE RECUPERATION OF DISSENT * ON THE OBJECTS OF COMMUNISM: A HACKING PANEL * PHILOSOPHY AND COMMUNISM IN THE EARLY MARX * PLANNING, LOCALISM AND THE LEFT * POSTNEOLIBERALISM * PRESENTATION OF THE JOURNAL CHTO DELAT/WHAT IS TO BE DONE? * RACE, NATION AND ORIENTALISM * RED PLANETS: MARXISM AND SCIENCE FICTION * RE-EMBEDDING MARXISM: COERCION AND POLITICAL ECONOMY * REGISTERING THE CRISIS: A SOCIALIST REGISTER ROUNDTABLE * RESEARCH ON MARX * RESTRUCTURING, OUTSOURCING, DISTRIBUTION: DIMENSIONS OF THE GLOBAL CRISIS * REVOLUTIONARY THEORY, AUTONOMIST MARXISM AND THE CRITIQUE OF POLITICAL ECONOMY * SLAVERY AND CAPITALISM IN THE US SOUTH * SOCIAL MOVEMENTS IN LATIN AMERICA: THE CURRENT CONJUNCTURE * STUDENT MOVEMENTS AND YOUTH REVOLTS * THE ARTS AND CAPITALIST CRISIS: THE NEW DEAL EXPERIENCE * THE CRITIQUE OF RELIGION AND THE CRITIQUE OF CAPITALISM * THE POLITICAL AESTHETICS OF REALISM * THE POLITICAL ECONOMY OF WORK * THE POLITICS OF FINANCE * THE POLITICS OF THE WILL * THE POLITICS OF VALUE * THE RIGHT: RACE, NATION, IDENTITY * THE TURN TO ETHICS AND THE CRITIQUE OF CAPITALISM * ‘TURBULENCE: IDEAS FOR MOVEMENT’, NEW ISSUE LAUNCH * UNION STRUGGLES * UNOISM, ECOLOGY AND CRISIS * UTOPIAS, DYSTOPIAS AND SOCIALIST BIOPOLITICS * WEBLOGS AND THE OPPOSITIONAL PUBLIC SPHERE: A DISCUSSION * WHAT IS ABSTRACTION? * WORKERS AND STRUGGLE TODAY * ZIONISM, 
ANTISEMITISM AND THE LEFT – A DEBATE

SPEAKERS INCLUDE: Gilbert Achcar * Gregory Albo * Robert Albritton * Peter Alexander * Noaman Ali * Kevin B. Anderson * Ricardo Antunes * Caroline Arscott * Sam Ashman * John Ashworth * Ilker Atac * Jairus Banaji * Fletcher Baragar * Banu Bargu * Colin Barker * Tom Barnes * Luca Basso * Matthew Beaumont * Pinar Bedirhanoglu * John Bell * Aaron Benanav * Halil Berktay * Armin Beverungen * Robin Blackburn * Paul Blackledge * Max Blechman * Derek Boothman * Mark Bould * Bill Bowring * Ulrich Brand * Craig Brandist * Michael Brie * Wendy Brown * Dick Bryan * Adrian Budd * Verity Burgmann * Alex Callinicos * Mauro Farnesi Camellone * Bob Cannon * Thomas Carmichael * Warren Carter * Giorgio Cesarale * Maria Elisa Cevasco * Dae-op Chang * Vivek Chibber * Andrew 
Chitty * Christopher Chitty * Joseph Choonara * Sheila Cohen * Alex Colas * Tim Cooper * Stipe Curkovic * Steve Cushion * Gareth Dale * Neil Davidson * Gail Day * Tim Dayton * Kathryn Dean * Angela Dimitrakaki * Demet Dinler * Kevin Doogan * Elizabeth Dore * Nick Dyer-Witheford * Juliane Edler * Aram Eisenschitz * Hester Eisenstein * Fuat Ercan * Adam Fabry * Daniel Fairfax * Mariano Feliz * Ben Fine * Robert Fine * Mark Fisher * Peter Fleming * Gregory C. Flemming * Keith Flett * John Foran * Vassillis Fouskas * Carl Freedman * James Furner * Alexander Gallas * Andreia Galvao * Ferruccio Gambino * Earl Gammon * Mike Geddes * Lindsey German * Frantz Gheller * Lesley Gill * John Glenn * Jesse Goldstein * Maya Gonzalez * Jeff Goodwin * Jamie Gough * Nick Gray * Juan Grigera * Peter Hallward * Ayeesha Hameed * Carrie Hamilton * Bue Hansen * Jane Hardy * Chris Harman * Stefano Harney * Barnaby Harran * David Harvie * Owen Hatherley * Mike Haynes * Lesley Henderson * Christoph Henning * Rob Heynen * Andy Higginbottom * Sarah Hines * John Holloway *  John Holst * Patricia Howard * Peter Hudis * Liz Humphries * Robert Jackson * Dhruv Jain * Fredric Jameson * Elinor Jean * Seongjin Jeong * Bob Jessop * Bonn Juego * Anush Kapadia * Brian Kelly * Sami Khatib * Jeff Kinkle * Kelvin Knight * Meri Koivusalo * Ahmet Hasim Kose * Conor Kostick * Primoz Krasovec * Maria Kyriakidou * Xavier Lafrance * Mikko Lahtinen * Alex Levant * Les Levidow * Iren Levina * William Lewis * Nicola Livingstone * Jean-Guy Loranger * Monica Clua Losada * David Mabb * Andreas Malm * Gonzo Poso Martin * Randy Martin * Jonathan Martineau * Meade McCloughan * David McNally * Angela McRobbie * Simon Mohun * Peter P. Mollinga * Kim Moody * Colin Mooers * Jason W. Moore * Adam Morton * Sara Motta * Tadzio Müller * Vlad Mykhnenko * Ozgur Narin * Jonathan Neale * Mike Newman * Susan Newman * Benjamin Noys * Blair Ogden * Ozlem Onaran * Deidre O’Neill * Ebru Deniz Ozan * Melda Ozturk * Leo Panitch * Giorgos Papafragkou * David Parker * Jaime Pastor * Jody Patterson * Knox Peden * Alexei Penzin * Simon Pirani * Iain Pirie * Amedeo Policante * Nicolas Pons-Vignon * Charles Post * Moishe Postone * Nina Power * Gonzalo Pozo-Martin * Lucia Pradella * Toni Prug * Ozren Pupovac * Thomas Purcell * Hugo Radice * Ravi Raman * Akbar Rasulov * Gene Ray * John Rees * Tobias Reichardt * Paul Reynolds * Sébastien Rioux * John Roberts * Ed Rooksby * Ellen Rosen * Christina Rousseau * Sheila Rowbotham * Sally Ruane * Frank Ruda * Alfredo Saad-Filho * Spyros Sakellaropoulos * Birgit Sauer * Johannes Dragsbaek Schmidt * Alan Sears * Thomas Sekine * Ben Selwyn * Greg Sharzer * Stuart Shields * Subir Sinha * Gary Slater * John Smith * Johan Soderberg * Clare Solomon * Panagiotis Sotiris * Dimitris Sotiropoulos * Susan Spronk * Kerstin Stakemeier * Julian Stallabrass * Engelbert Stockhammer * Adam Swain * Erik Swyngedouw * Lotta Takala-Greenish * Daniel Tanuro * Jean Baptiste Thomas * Peter Thomas * Hillel Ticktin * John Timberlake * Bruno Tinel * Massimiliano Tomba * Jonathon Tomlinson * Alberto Toscano * Ben Trott * Julian Tudor-Hart * Emily van der Meulen * Marco Vanzulli * Leandro Vergara-Camus * Zaira Rodrigues Vieira * Dmitry Vilensky * Marina Vishmidt * Andriana Vlachou * Hilary Wainwright * Mike Wayne * Xiaoping Wei * Duncan Wigan * Evan Calder Williams * Michael Wood * Phil Woodhouse * Galip Yalman * Karel Yon * Christian Zeller * Alexander Zevin * Mislav Zitko *

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Capitalist Crisis

Capitalist Crisis

ROBERT BRENNER ON THE ORIGINS OF THE CURRENT CRISIS

 

A paper by Robert Brenner (Center for Social Theory and Comparative History, UCLA) on What is Good for Goldman Sachs is Good for America: The Origins of the Current Crisis (18th April 2009) is now available at: http://www.sscnet.ucla.edu/issr/cstch/papers/BrennerCrisisTodayOctober2009.pdf

 

It’s 74 pages long – so stock up with ink and paper.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk