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Tag Archives: B Generation

Lost Generation

WHY YOUNG PEOPLE CAN’T GET THE JOBS THEY WANT AND WHAT CAN BE DONE ABOUT IT

By Martin Allen and Patrick Ainley

The current generation of young people are the most qualified but the most underemployed generation ever. Meanwhile, a third of men and a fifth of women between the ages of 20-34 still live with their parents – in most cases because they cannot afford otherwise.

This e-booklet explains why so many young people are unable of get the jobs and the lives that they want. It challenges claims about the growth of the ‘knowledge economy’ and questions the legitimacy of education programmes designed to ‘raise standards’. With the new Coalition government and most policy makers offering almost nothing, save ‘apprenticeships without jobs’ for the masses and ‘internships’ for ‘the squeezed middle’, the pamphlet offers some preliminary proposals to start addressing the problem.

Available as free download from Radicaled: Rethinking education, economy and society: http://radicaled.wordpress.com/

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

THE REVOLT OF A GENERATION

Revolt

Euro-Mediterranean Happening on Education, Welfare and New Political Practices
Rome, May 12th – 13th

In the last two years we have participated and assisted with extraordinary movements that have fought for a quality education, for labour rights and new welfare against the austerity politics of the European Union. The wild demonstrations, picket lines and strikes, the university occupations and the turmoil of theMediterranean signal a generational revolt and the necessity of a new social pact that involves all those subjects that stand up for their rights and refuse to be blackmailed.

The huge strikes last autumn inFranceshowed us the possibility of creating an intergenerational alliance, as blockades of production and circulation of goods constitute different aspects of a common struggle. InRome, as inLondon, the Book Block was a collective political practice able to speak out about the dismantling of public universities and processes of deskilling. At the same time, the revolts of Maghreb-Mashrek demonstrate how the construction of a future is tightly bound to both the radical claim for democracy and with the necessity of freedom from the parasitic and corrupt power that commands over our lives, universities, schools and workplaces.

The recent revolts and movements have crossed national and European borders as well as the limits imposed on education and mobility by Bologna Process to clash with the failure of a strategy we have always opposed. The struggles of these months have indicated that the possibility of radical change can only become concrete through the alliance among the different actors of labour and education, through common and transnational practices guided by those whom put their own bodies and knowledge.

We hope to give a common meaning to this new space redefined by the conflicts in which the crises open new possibilities to create an “other” future. It is for this reason that we want to initiate an open debate about the common projects we want to build together, starting in Romeon 12 and 13th May 2011.

Program

[ Thursday 12th May ]
6 p.m. – Department of Philosophy, Villa Mirafiori

Opening workshop – with:
Mouhamed Ali Oueled Itaief Student of the “École des beaux-arts” in Tunis
Youad Ben Rejeb Université Femministe
Trifi Bassem Forum des jeunes pour la citoyenneté et la créativité (FJCC)
Mondher Abidi Union Diplomées Chomeurs
Wissem Sghaier UGET Union General Etudiant Tunisi
Tim Uncut UK
Maham Hashni SOAS
Mark Bergfeld Education Activist Network
Rita Maestre Fernandez Juventud sin futuro

Annalisa Cannito AgMigrationUndAntirassismus
Tatiana Kai- Browne Plattform Geschichtspolitik

7 p.m.

Aperitive – Global video session #1
Contributions from education revolt – Book Bloc videos and photos

[ Friday 13th May ]

10 a.m. – Department of Political Science, University “La Sapienza”
Conflictual knowledge: from Europe to Mediterranean area

3 p.m. – Department of Literature, University “La Sapienza”
Education, Welfare and Precariousness

5 p.m. – Department of Literature, University “La Sapienza”
Labour, income and democracy against the crisis
With Fiom’ general secretary Maurizio Landini and members of tunisian General Union UGTT.

8 p.m. – ESC (via dei Volsci, 159)

Global video session #2

Contributions and interviews from Maghreb – Mashrek’ revolts

Follow Live-Streaming on: http://www.unicommon.org

READ THE PROGRAM IN FRENCH AND ARABIC

***
http://www.unicommon.org
http://www.coordinamentouniversitario.it

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Capitalist Crisis

EDUCATION DEMONSTRATIONS 29th JANUARY 2011

ALL OUT FOR SATURDAY JANUARY 29 DEMONSTRATIONS

LONDON 

March for Education, Fight Every Cut

Assemble 12noon ULU, Malet St. March to Parliament

PUBLICITY: http://educationactivistnetwork.files.wordpress.com/2011/01/unite-for-education-29-jan1.pdf  

MANCHESTER

March for A future that Works

Assemble 10:30am Manchester Museum. March to Platt Fields Park:

PUBLICITY: http://www.ucu.org.uk/media/pdf/2/f/futurethatworks_29jan_poster.pdf http://educationactivistnetwork.files.wordpress.com/2011/01/unite-for-education-29-jan1.pdf

WHY THE 29th

Just months into office the Coalition government’s vicious attack on education and young people has faced mass opposition on the streets. Hundreds of thousands of students have protested, walked-out of their schools and colleges, or occupied their universities.

The vote to treble tuition fees and scrap EMA might have passed through parliament, but as the movement in France has shown “what parliament votes for the streets can undo” Our movement has generated mass support up and down the country and has shown it is possible to resist the coalitions vicious attacks.

This week’s protests to save EMA saw the return of the student movement onto the streets with hundreds of London students chanting outside parliament: ‘wipe off David Cameron’s smile, let’s all go Tunisian style’.

Now we are gearing up for two very important demonstrations on 29th January in London and Manchester. The “Unite for Education” London demonstration has been supported by UCU, PCS, GMB, UNISON HE Committee and CWU Gen Sec Billy Hayes. The “Future for All” Manchester demonstration has been called by NUS, UCU and the TUC and is supported by PCS, GMB, UNITE, NUT, FBU and PCS.

The attacks on education and young people are part of a wider assault on workers and the public sector. A record one million under 25s are now unemployed and hundreds of thousands of public sector jobs, as well as pensions and benefits, are under threat.

These demonstrations present a real opportunity to bring trade unionists, parents, the unemployed, pensioners and all those under attack in behind the student movement to build a movement that can stop fees, win back EMA and defeat the government.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

 

David Cameron

‘THE MEANING OF DAVID CAMERON’ – WITH RICHARD SEYMOUR

Wednesday, 26 May 2010
Time: 19:00 – 21:00
Location: Housmans Bookshop
Street: 5 Caledonian Road, Kings Cross
Town/City: London, United Kingdom

Description:
Richard Seymour, blogger of ‘Lenin’s Tomb’ fame, and author of ‘The Liberal Defence of Murder’ will be in store discussing his latest publication, ‘The Meaning of David Cameron’.

The Tories are posing as a ‘progressive’ and ‘radical’ alternative to New Labour. Drawing from George W Bush’s ‘compassionate conservatism’, they maintain that the ‘Big Society’ can do what ‘Big Government’ cannot – produce a cohesive, mutually supportive, happy society. Cameron’s court intellectual, Philip Blond, maintains that this if David Cameron’, which is a viable alternative to the failures of the egalitarian left and the excessively pro-market right. But is this more than campaign mood music? And are the conservative traditions that they draw on – from the bucolic, pseudo-medievalism of G K Chesterton to the anti-statism of Friedrich Hayek – really a bulwark of progress and radicalism?

Richard Seymour argues that such ideas can only seem ‘progressive’ in light of New Labour’s acquiescence to Thatcherism. To understand the Cameronites, it is necessary to understand how the social landscape and corresponding political language was transformed by the collapse of post-war social democracy and its more radical competitors. To resist the Cameronites, he argues, it is necessary to attack the neoliberal consensus on which all major parties found their programme.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski