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Monsters

Monsters

GODS AND MONSTERS: HISTORISIZING RITUAL, PUBLIC MEMORY, AND THE RELIGIOUS IMAGINATION

Call for Papers!

History Students Association Conference 2015

In his seminal essay The Great Cat Massacre, Robert Darnton gave a sage bit of advice to academics who study culture : “When you realize that you are not getting something—a joke, a proverb, a ceremony—that is particularly meaningful to the natives, you can see where to grasp a foreign system of meaning in order to unravel it.”

The monster is a construct and a projection, always interpreting the moment in which it is created. So too we see constructions of self in cultural phenomena as diverse as comic book heroes, ghost stories, fertility rituals, hagiography-even the villainization of the “other” informs the moment in which it enter public consciousness.

It is in this spirit that the 2015 History Students Association Conference at San Francisco State University is seeking papers that explore the intersection between humanity and its constructs.

How does ritual inform mentality? What can the supernatural tell us about historic truth and memory? How can we interpret stories so as to better understand the storyteller? How does politicization shape religious experience? How does the demonization of the other inform cultural fear? What do the fantastic elements interwoven with oral histories help us to discover about cultural norms?

Cross disciplinary submissions from film studies, literature, religious and ethnic studies, art history, and anthropology are encouraged.

Submission Guidelines: Please submit abstracts of 300 words or less to: hsa@mail.sfsu.edu

Please include the title of the submitted paper, your name, affiliated institution, field of study, and contact information. The deadline for submissions is FEBRUARY 13, 2015. If selected, final papers will be due to your panel chair no later than MID MARCH, 2015. Conference will be held April 25, 2015 at San Francisco State University.

Recent works that resonate with the spirit of the conference include:

Louise White’s monograph published in 2000, Speaking with Vampires: Rumor and History in Colonial Africa serves as a cogent example of how tales of the fantastic can be examined and interpreted to allow us to better understand the mentalities of discursive or liminal groups.

Stefan Goeble’s brilliant book on medievalism published in 2007, The Great War and Medieval Memory: War, Remembrance and Medievalism in Britain and Germany, 1914-1940, looks at how elements of medieval chivalric culture were interpreted in war memorials, interpreting iconography to uncover how communal memory functions in the search for historical continuity in the face of such horrific events.

 

HSA Conference website: http://history.sfsu.edu/content/hsa-2015-conference

WW2download

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

BlackMetaldownload

Marxism and Art

Marxism and Art

MARXISM AND ART

The Marx Memorial Library presents lectures on Marxism and Art with Dr Grant Pooke

 

Tuesday 24 September:

‘Red-Spectre Jitters: Francis Klingender, Art History and the Cold War’

 

Lectures begin at 7 pm in the Library.

Lectures are free although a collection will be taken.

 

Dr Laura Miller

Administrator

Marx Memorial Library

37a Clerkenwell Green

London EC1R 0DU

(Tel)  0207 253 1485

(Web site): http://www.marx-memorial-library.org

Marx Memorial Library

Marx Memorial Library

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academic.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

Herbert Marcuse

Herbert Marcuse

THE RIGHT TO FREEDOM: A SYMPOSIUM ON CRITICAL THEORY

London, 6-7 May, 2014

Venue: Woburn Suite (G22/26, Ground Floor), Institute of Philosophy, University of London, Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU

 

Invited Speakers:

Prof. Dr Axel Honneth
Institute for Social Research/University of Frankfurt/Columbia University

Prof. Lois McNay
Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Oxford

Dr David McNeill
School of Philosophy and Art History, University of Essex

Dr Jörg Schaub
School of Philosophy and Art History, University of Essex

Dr Timo Jütten
School of Philosophy and Art History, University of Essex

Prof. Michael Rosen
Department of Government, Harvard University

ALL ARE WELCOME

 

This event is jointly organised and funded by the Department of Philosophy, The Open University, the Faculty of Philosophy, University of Oxford, and the School of Philosophy and Art History, University of Essex.

Full programme details and venue directions.

The symposium is free but requires registration.

To register, please email your name and affiliation to criticaltheorysymposium2014@gmail.com.

For further information, please contact Dr Manuel Dries at manuel.dries at open.ac.uk.

 

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: http://independent.academic.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

Aesthetics

SOCIALIST REALIST ART: PRODUCTION, CONSUMPTION, AESTHETICS

An International Conference, sponsored by the Center for Baltic and East European Studies, Södertörn University, Stockholm, in collaboration with the Museum of Modern Art, Stockholm
Stockholm, 19-20 October 2012

Since the early 1990s, there has been a striking growth of interest in the legacy of Soviet Socialist Realist art, which has reshaped our understanding of it in fundamental ways. A substantial body of research has demonstrated that the method of Socialist Realism was a highly creative and diversified cultural arena that was both heterogeneous in its pictorial strategies and often conflicted and ambivalent in its representations of the social and political messages of the day. Yet the label ‘totalitarian’ continues to influence the ways in which Soviet art is interpreted and contextualised, limiting our understanding of Socialist Realism and obstructing its integration into a broader narrative of twentieth-century art.

In the proposed conference we seek to examine the interests and influences which contributed to the development of Socialist Realism as a diverse and contested field of art from the 1930s to the 1980s. Participants will be invited to focus on aspects of Socialist Realist fine art production, evaluation and consumption in order to consider the ways in which artistic conventions of pictorial representation were established, adapted and transformed to reflect the changing nature of the Soviet project. This approach will facilitate a shift away from the tendency to draw conclusions about Socialist Realism based on a limited number of canonical works of art and acclaimed artists, and will encourage a reappraisal of the diversity and originality of creative output in its formal, stylistic and geographical variations.

Proposed topics may include (but should not be restricted to) the following:

· How did Socialist Realist art develop over time and according to changing sociopolitical contexts? On what basis should specific periods can be identified, for example “Stalinist” or “post-Stalinist” art?
· What were the variations in Socialist Realist art beyond Moscow and Leningrad: across the different parts of the RSRSR and the other SSRs? How did the centre-periphery relationship function in the Soviet art world?
· Who were the audiences for Socialist Realist art and how was fine art consumed in the Soviet Union?
· What was the role of the art critic in the definition of artistic merit? How was value and significance ascribed to works of art in the absence of an art market?
· What was the role of the state in the definition of Socialist Realist art and how was the interface between artists and art world authorities managed?
· What was the status of minor genres within the canon of Socialist Realist art (e.g. landscape, still life, personal portraiture) and what new and hybrid genres emerged?
· How did artists seek to manipulate the development of Socialist Realism according to their own aesthetic preferences and agendas?
· How did Socialist Realist art in the USSR relate to broader international narratives of Realism in the visual arts of the twentieth century?
· How did Soviet Socialist Realism relate to the art sponsored by other authoritarian regimes, in the inter-war period and after? Is “totalitarian art” a viable concept?
· How did the ideas and methods of Socialist Realist art relate to developments in other fields of cultural production in the USSR and vice versa? Was Socialist Realism a uniform canon, or did it vary across the fields of art, literature, music, film, architecture and so on?

Proposals for Papers
We invite proposals dealing with these or related themes. Proposals should include your name, institutional affiliation, email address, proposed paper title, 150-word abstract and short curriculum vitae. Post-graduate students are encouraged to apply. Successful applicants will be asked to submit a conference paper of around 3000 words for pre-circulation before the conference.

Participants will be asked to cover their own travel expenses. We are currently exploring possibilities for support for accommodation expenses. The submission deadline for proposals is 20 April 2012. Applicants will be informed about acceptance by around 1 May 2012.

Contacts For general questions and further information, please contact Mark Bassin (mark.bassin@sh.se). Please submit proposals via email to Oliver Johnson (o.johnson@sheffield.ac.uk)

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

ANTHROPOLIGICAL MATERIALISM AND MATERIALISM OF ENCOUNTER: REINTERPRETING OUR PRESENT IN THE WAKE OF WALTER BENJAMIN AND LOUIS ALTHUSSER

Call for Participation

German-French summer school, organised by the DFH Saarbrücken 2012

Anthropological Materialism and Materialism of Encounter: Reinterpreting our Present in the Wake of Walter Benjamin and Louis Althusser

A Cooperation of the University of Potsdam and the University Paris-Sorbonne (ParisIV)

Location: University of Potsdam, Institute of Philosophy, Am Neuen Palais 10 (Building 9, Room 1.14), 144469 Potsdam

Date: July 16. – 20. 2012

This cross-cultural and interdisciplinary summer school aims to foster an innovative dialog between the philosophies of Walter Benjamin (1892-1940) and Louis Althusser (1918-1990). After the self-confident liberalism of the 1980s and 90s proclaimed the post-histoire and the end of all utopias, it is today all the more necessary to debate the real frontiers of the global social and political order from a non-dogmatic and unorthodox materialist point of view. To approximate such a materialist perspective, this summer school seeks to interrogate and compare Walter Benjamin’s “anthropological materialism” and Louis Althusser’s “materialism of encounter”. We cordially invite young academics – primarily graduate and Ph.D. students from France and Germany– to propose their research projects or to act as respondents to plenary lectures from a series of renowned Althusser and Benjamin scholars from the fields of philosophy, philology, psychoanalysis, art history, and political theory.

Further Information: http://anthropologicalmaterialism.hypotheses.org/

Organisation:

Prof. Hans-Peter Krüger (Potsdam)
Prof. Gérard Raulet (Paris)
Dr. Marc Berdet (Paris/Potsdam)
Dr. Thomas Ebke (Potsdam)

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Books

38th ANNUAL ASSOCIATION OF ART HISTORIANS CONFERENCE AND BOOKFAIR

The Open University, Milton Keynes
29 – 31 March 2012

Association of Art Historians (AAH) Conference: Aesthetics and Politics (Again?)

Session Convenors:

Alexander García Düttmann, Goldsmiths College, ADuttmann@aol.com

James Hellings, Teeside University j_hellings@hotmail.com

34 years ago New Left Books published Aesthetics and Politics, collecting together ‘the key texts of the classic debate within German Marxism’ by Adorno, Benjamin, Bloch, Brecht and Lukács. The collections editors (Rodney Livingstone, Perry Anderson and Francis Mulhern), assembled texts with coherent (if almost entirely antagonistic) inter-relationships – in what they refer to as an incomparable ‘tradition of major aesthetic debate’, held between the 1930s and 1950s in ‘Germany (…); the classical land of aesthetic thought inEurope’. The editors subtitles are fantastically revealing of perceived conflict; ‘Bloch against Lukács / Lukács against Bloch’, ‘Brecht against Lukács’, subtle condemnation; ‘Adorno on Lukács’, ‘Adorno on Brecht’ conviviality; ‘Benjamin with Brecht’, and conciliation; ‘Adorno to Benjamin / Benjamin to Adorno’.

Ideological differences over art (and its histories: Realism, Expressionism, Modernism) were the order of the day. But what’s happened to political aesthetics, Marxist or otherwise, since this golden age? Can we still speak of an ‘aesthetic field’ conditioned by ‘the two recurrent poles of all culture still subject to capital’, being either ‘autistically advanced or collusively popular’.

In recent years, Rancière has done most to ‘widen participation’ by opening up Left aesthetics to encompass the people and places who disrupt this either/ or – but (speaking with Eagleton) ‘how are we to receive and appropriate these polemics today?’ Potential contributors are asked to address the tenor of contemporary inter-relationships of aesthetics and politics by re-interpreting the ideas and authors of this past. The panel-session seeks to stage a dialectic of (dis-)agreement.

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Feminism

FEMINISMS OF MULTITUDES

Dear All

We would like to make you aware of a Call for Papers which may be of interest.

The panel Feminisms of Multitudes is part of the Association of Art Historians UK Conference in March 2012, for which the paper proposal deadline is 7th November 2011.

More details are available here: http://feminismsofmultitudes.wordpress.com/

Please circulate widely

All the best
Angela Dimitrakaki, Vicky Horne, Harry Weeks (University ofEdinburgh)

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MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

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Utopia

ALTERNATIVE WORLDS

Alternative Worlds: A retrospective of the last 111 years

Call for Papers / Art Presentations

Seminar in Visual Culture 2011
Deadline for proposals: 13 December 2010

Institute of Germanic & Romance Studies, Room ST 274 (School of Advanced Study, Stewart House, 32 Russell Square, WC1B 5DN London)

This series of seminars acts as a forum for practicing artists, researchers, curators, students, and others interested in visual culture who are invited to present, discuss and explore a given theme within the broad field of Visual Culture.

In an attempt to escape the doom and gloom of the economic crisis the theme for 2011 is ‘Alternative Worlds’. The aim is to examine the dreams, plans and hopes, but also the nightmares and fears reflected in utopian thinking since 1900 in the Western hemisphere. What has become of all those possible worlds? How do they reflect their contemporary culture and society and what, if anything, do or can they mean for our present, or indeed, our future? What alternative worlds are engendered by our own times, by the world of 2011 itself? This is, hence not only a retrospective of past utopias and their after-lives but also an invitation to look towards our possible futures.

Looking backwards, we could revisit the Futurist utopia of a mechanical universe based on the principles of speed and technology, or look at the somewhat similar proposals of the American Technocratic Society for a world based on the laws of engineering. Or we could examine the repercussions of Hermann Sörgel’s plan for Atlantropa, a merger of Europe and Africa created by damming the Strait of Gibraltar, meticulously worked out in the late 1920s and promoted by Sörgel until his death in 1952. Or we could look at the architectural utopias of Modernism, at Le Corbusier’s Plan Voisin, or at GM’s 1939 Futurama exhibit of the ‘City of the Future’ with its intricate congestion-free road systems. We could look at the social housing projects of the 1950s and ’60s – those that were built and those that were imagined. We could look at the many futures inspired by the space age, or at the alternative lives and societies envisaged in reaction to the Cold War and the nuclear threat. We could revisit the multiple Ballardian worlds or the various projects for the future proposed by the architects and artists who contributed to “This is Tomorrow”, the exhibition held at London’s Whitechapel Gallery in 1956 and restaged in 2006 at Tate Britain. We could look at the social utopias of the 1960s, the communes, sex and free love as a basis for a new society. We could look at the alternative worlds inspired by the possibilities of robotics, cybernetics or genetics; or at virtual worlds, like Second Life or all those parallel lives made possible by social networking sites. We could look backwards and at the same time look forwards.

Contributions on any of the above topics or on other alternative worlds of the past and the present are invited from individuals working in the fields of art history, philosophy, literary, cultural and visual studies, fine arts, film and media studies, theatre, history, etc.

Artists are also invited to present new (and existing) work on the theme.

Please send proposals for art presentations (200 words plus images) or academic papers (200 words) to Ricarda Vidal: ricarda.vidal@sas.ac.uk ||| by 13 December 2010.

Please indicate which date you would prefer for your talk.

Dates and times:

Wednesday 26 Jan. 2011, 6.30pm – 8.00pm

Wednesday 23 Feb. 2011, 6.30pm – 8.00pm

Wednesday 30 March 2011, 6.30pm – 8.00pm

Wednesday 27 April 2011, 6.30pm – 8.00pm

Wednesday 25 May 2010, 6.30pm – 8.00pm

END

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Eisenstein

EISENSTEIN-CINEMA-HISTORY

SEMINAR AND CONFERENCE

Featuring the World Premiere of Sergei Eisenstein’s UNPUBLISHED “Notes for a General History of Cinema”
Free and Open to the Public

Sept. 30 & Oct. 1, 2010, Columbia University
http://museonazionaledelcinema.it/filmtheories/events.php?id=10

SEMINAR: Thursday, Sept. 30
7:30 PM – 9:30 PM
Columbia University: Faculty House (64 Morningside Drive, New York, NY – click for map)

Speaker: Antonio Somaini (Professor, University of Genoa)
“The Possibilities of Cinema: History as montage in Eisenstein’s ‘Notes for a General History of Cinema'”
Respondent: John MacKay (Professor of Slavic Literature and Language, Yale University)
CONFERENCE: Friday, Oct. 1

9:00 AM – 6:30 PM
Columbia University: 501 Schermerhorn, (1190 Amsterdam Ave., New York, NY – click for map) Conference Schedule:

9:00 AM – 10:20 AM    Panel: “Eisenstein and the Comic”

Hannah Frank (Graduate Student in Cinema Studies, University of Chicago)
      “‘A New Kind of Weapon’: Eisenstein’s Drawings as a Theory of the Comic”
Ada Ackerman (Graduate Student in Art History, Paris-Ouest-Nanterre-La Défense and Université de Montréal)
      “Why Daumier’s art seemed so ‘cinematic’ to Eisenstein”
Luka Arsenjuk (Graduate Student in Literature, Duke University)
      “Eisenstein’s Comic Dynamism”

10:20 AM – 10:45 AM Coffee Break

10:45 AM – 12:00 PM
Yuri Tsivian (Professor of Art History, University of Chicago)
            “Chaplin and the Russian Avant-Garde: The Law of Fortuity in Art”
12:15 PM – 1:45 PM Lunch Break

2:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Masha Salazkina (Associate Professor of Cinema, Concordia University)
       “Eisenstein’s General History of Cinema: General Historical Context”

3:00 PM – 4:00 PM
Mikhail Iampolski (Professor of Comparative Literature and Russian and Slavic Studies, NYU)
       “Point, Pathos and Totality”

4:00 PM – 4:20 PM Coffee Break

4:20 PM – 6:00 PM Roundtable Discussion
Moderator:  Philip Rosen (Professor of Modern Culture and Media, Brown University)
Participants: Antonio Somaini, Yuri Tsivian, Masha Salazkina, Mikhail Iampolski, John MacKay

6:00 PM – 6:45 PM Reception: Schermerhorn

6:45 PM Film Screening (501 Schermerhorn): News From Ideological Antiquity: Marx – Eisenstein – Capital (Directed by Alexander Kluge, 2008, 84 min.) 
Sponsors: Columbia University Seminars on Cinema & Interdisciplinary Interpretation and Sites of Cinema, The Harriman Institute, Film Program, School of the Arts, Columbia University, Permanent Seminar on Histories of Film Theories, Museo del cinema di Torino, Turin, Italy: http://museonazionaledelcinema.it/filmtheories

__._,_.___

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Boris Groys

A POST-COMMUNIST MANIFESTO

Boris Groys talks at the ICA

Wednesday 21st July, 6.45pm

Institute of Contemporary Art
12 Carlton House Terrace
London
SW1Y 5AH

Tickets £12

With the collapse of neoliberalism, the idea of communism has made a surprise return to the table.  Thinkers such as Slavoj Zizek, Toni Negri and Alain Badiou, have argued that communism, a society based on equality, is now proved to be the only alternative to the chaos of capitalism. Building on this discussion, the renowned art critic and thinker Boris Groys argues that the strength of the communist vision comes from the fact that it represents the subordination of the economy to politics.

For more information on the event or to buy tickets go to:
http://ica.org.uk/24948/Talks/Boris-Groys-A-PostCommunist-Manifesto.html

Or call the ICA box office on +44 (0)20 7930 3647

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COMRADES OF TIME

Boris Groys’s lecture at the TATE MODERN

Thursday 22nd July, 6.30-8pm
Tate Modern
Starr Auditorium
53 Bankside
London
SE1 9TG

Tickets £10

In this special lecture Boris Groys, will respond to the FRANCIS ALYS’ exhibition at Tate Modern with the provocative and counter-intuitive insight that has made him one of the most important thinkers and art critics today.

For more information on the event or to buy tickets go to:
http://www.tate.org.uk/modern/eventseducation/talksdiscussions/22015.htm

Or call the TATE box office on +44 (0)20 7887 8888

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Boris Groys is Professor of Aesthetics, Art History, and Media Theory at the Center for Art and Media Technology in Karlsruhe, and since 2005, the Global Distinguished Professor in the Faculty of Arts and Science, NYU. He has published numerous books including Art Power and The Total Art of Stalinism.

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Since Plato, philosophers have dreamed of establishing a rational state rules through the power of language. In this radical and disturbing account of Soviet philosophy, Boris Groys argues that communism shares that dream and is best understood as an attempt to replace financial with linguistic bonds as the cement uniting society. The transformative power of language, the medium of equality, is the key to any new communist revolution.

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For more information visit: http://www.versobooks.com/books/ghij/g-titles/groys_boris_the_communist_postscript.shtml

To buy this book in the UK: http://www.bookdepository.co.uk/book/9781844674305/The-Communist-Postscript

or: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Communist-Postscript-Boris-Groys/dp/1844674304/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1265807841&sr=8-1-spell

To buy the book in the US: http://www.amazon.com/Communist-Postscript-Boris-Groys/dp/1844674304/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1265807799&sr=1-1-spell

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Visit Verso’s new blog for information on our upcoming events, new reviews and publications and special offers: http://versouk.wordpress.com/

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And get updates on Twitter too! http://twitter.com/VersoBooksUK

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon Profile: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Marxism and Art

THE QUESTION OF CLASS: AN ONGOING CHALLENGE TO ART HISTORY

A Conference in Honour of Andrew Hemingway

Saturday 19 June 2010
Gustav Tuck Lecture Theatre
University College London

Organisers: Warren Carter and Frederic J. Schwartz

10.00 Introduction

Fred Schwartz (University College London)

10.15 Landscape/Class/Ideology
Chair: Tom Gretton (University College London)

Alan Wallach (College of William & Mary)
“Toward a Social History of Mid-Nineteenth Century American Landscape Painting”

Alex Potts (University of Michigan)
“The Shifting Terrain of Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century Art Histories”

12.15 Lunch

13.15 Marxism & Modernism
Chair: Warren Carter (University College London)

Gail Day (University of Leeds)
“Realism, Totality, and the Militant Citoyen: Or, What Has Lukacs To Do With Contemporary Art?”

Respondents:
Esther Leslie (Birkbeck, University of London)
Michael Corris (Sheffield Hallam University)
Jody Patterson (Ecole Normale Supérieure)
Barnaby Haran (University College London)

15.15 Tea

15.15 Marxist Historiography & Art History
Chair: Matthew Beaumont (University College London)

Steve Edwards (Open University)
“Forms of History”

Respondents:
Caroline Arscott (Courtauld Institute)
John Roberts (University of Wolverhampton)
Fred Schwartz (University College London)
Fred Orton (University of Leeds)

17.45 Valediction

Pete Smith (Thames Valley University)

18.00 Closing Remarks

Tamar Garb (University College London)

Admission is free and all are welcome, but spaces must be reserved.
Please contact Warren Carter (w.carter@ucl.ac.uk) by Wednesday 9 June.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Political Moment

IMAGE POLITICS

Image Politics – To see is to Destroy 

Seminar April 10 & 11 2010, Folkets Hus (The People’s House), Copenhagen 

Since September 11 a new visual landscape has emerged following the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. As a part of the so-called War on Terror a visual bombardment threatens to leave us with still fewer counter-images and resistance-strategies. Censorship of the media and control of the public sphere has become the order of the day. But the images from the Abu Ghraib prison show that despite a tightly managed visual regime – images that disturb the tightly managed control of representation of the war do still appear.

The seminar’s main focus will be the image politics during the War on Terror combined with an attempt to pick up on new modes of resistance and production of counter images emerging from subcultural groupings around the world. 

Speakers include: Iain Boal/Retort (US/Ir), O.K. Werckmeister (Ger), AW (DK), Curatorial Action (DK), Madeleine Bernstoff (Ger) and more to be confirmed.

Organised by associate professor Mikkel Bolt (art historian), University of Copenhagen, Professor Nils Norman (visual artist), The Royal Academy of Copenhagen, and professor Jakob Jakobsen (visual artist), Funen Art Academy in collaboration with a group of students.

Venue:

Folkets Hus
Stengade 50,
Nørrebro, Copenhagen

Time:
Saturday April 10 at 10am to 6pm – food/social in the evening
Sunday April 11 at 11am to 6 pm.

Info and schedule:
http://billedpolitik.dk/sem.html

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