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Tag Archives: Art and Politics

Aesthetics

SOCIALIST REALIST ART: PRODUCTION, CONSUMPTION, AESTHETICS

An International Conference, sponsored by the Center for Baltic and East European Studies, Södertörn University, Stockholm, in collaboration with the Museum of Modern Art, Stockholm
Stockholm, 19-20 October 2012

Since the early 1990s, there has been a striking growth of interest in the legacy of Soviet Socialist Realist art, which has reshaped our understanding of it in fundamental ways. A substantial body of research has demonstrated that the method of Socialist Realism was a highly creative and diversified cultural arena that was both heterogeneous in its pictorial strategies and often conflicted and ambivalent in its representations of the social and political messages of the day. Yet the label ‘totalitarian’ continues to influence the ways in which Soviet art is interpreted and contextualised, limiting our understanding of Socialist Realism and obstructing its integration into a broader narrative of twentieth-century art.

In the proposed conference we seek to examine the interests and influences which contributed to the development of Socialist Realism as a diverse and contested field of art from the 1930s to the 1980s. Participants will be invited to focus on aspects of Socialist Realist fine art production, evaluation and consumption in order to consider the ways in which artistic conventions of pictorial representation were established, adapted and transformed to reflect the changing nature of the Soviet project. This approach will facilitate a shift away from the tendency to draw conclusions about Socialist Realism based on a limited number of canonical works of art and acclaimed artists, and will encourage a reappraisal of the diversity and originality of creative output in its formal, stylistic and geographical variations.

Proposed topics may include (but should not be restricted to) the following:

· How did Socialist Realist art develop over time and according to changing sociopolitical contexts? On what basis should specific periods can be identified, for example “Stalinist” or “post-Stalinist” art?
· What were the variations in Socialist Realist art beyond Moscow and Leningrad: across the different parts of the RSRSR and the other SSRs? How did the centre-periphery relationship function in the Soviet art world?
· Who were the audiences for Socialist Realist art and how was fine art consumed in the Soviet Union?
· What was the role of the art critic in the definition of artistic merit? How was value and significance ascribed to works of art in the absence of an art market?
· What was the role of the state in the definition of Socialist Realist art and how was the interface between artists and art world authorities managed?
· What was the status of minor genres within the canon of Socialist Realist art (e.g. landscape, still life, personal portraiture) and what new and hybrid genres emerged?
· How did artists seek to manipulate the development of Socialist Realism according to their own aesthetic preferences and agendas?
· How did Socialist Realist art in the USSR relate to broader international narratives of Realism in the visual arts of the twentieth century?
· How did Soviet Socialist Realism relate to the art sponsored by other authoritarian regimes, in the inter-war period and after? Is “totalitarian art” a viable concept?
· How did the ideas and methods of Socialist Realist art relate to developments in other fields of cultural production in the USSR and vice versa? Was Socialist Realism a uniform canon, or did it vary across the fields of art, literature, music, film, architecture and so on?

Proposals for Papers
We invite proposals dealing with these or related themes. Proposals should include your name, institutional affiliation, email address, proposed paper title, 150-word abstract and short curriculum vitae. Post-graduate students are encouraged to apply. Successful applicants will be asked to submit a conference paper of around 3000 words for pre-circulation before the conference.

Participants will be asked to cover their own travel expenses. We are currently exploring possibilities for support for accommodation expenses. The submission deadline for proposals is 20 April 2012. Applicants will be informed about acceptance by around 1 May 2012.

Contacts For general questions and further information, please contact Mark Bassin (mark.bassin@sh.se). Please submit proposals via email to Oliver Johnson (o.johnson@sheffield.ac.uk)

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

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The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Books

38th ANNUAL ASSOCIATION OF ART HISTORIANS CONFERENCE AND BOOKFAIR

The Open University, Milton Keynes
29 – 31 March 2012

Association of Art Historians (AAH) Conference: Aesthetics and Politics (Again?)

Session Convenors:

Alexander García Düttmann, Goldsmiths College, ADuttmann@aol.com

James Hellings, Teeside University j_hellings@hotmail.com

34 years ago New Left Books published Aesthetics and Politics, collecting together ‘the key texts of the classic debate within German Marxism’ by Adorno, Benjamin, Bloch, Brecht and Lukács. The collections editors (Rodney Livingstone, Perry Anderson and Francis Mulhern), assembled texts with coherent (if almost entirely antagonistic) inter-relationships – in what they refer to as an incomparable ‘tradition of major aesthetic debate’, held between the 1930s and 1950s in ‘Germany (…); the classical land of aesthetic thought inEurope’. The editors subtitles are fantastically revealing of perceived conflict; ‘Bloch against Lukács / Lukács against Bloch’, ‘Brecht against Lukács’, subtle condemnation; ‘Adorno on Lukács’, ‘Adorno on Brecht’ conviviality; ‘Benjamin with Brecht’, and conciliation; ‘Adorno to Benjamin / Benjamin to Adorno’.

Ideological differences over art (and its histories: Realism, Expressionism, Modernism) were the order of the day. But what’s happened to political aesthetics, Marxist or otherwise, since this golden age? Can we still speak of an ‘aesthetic field’ conditioned by ‘the two recurrent poles of all culture still subject to capital’, being either ‘autistically advanced or collusively popular’.

In recent years, Rancière has done most to ‘widen participation’ by opening up Left aesthetics to encompass the people and places who disrupt this either/ or – but (speaking with Eagleton) ‘how are we to receive and appropriate these polemics today?’ Potential contributors are asked to address the tenor of contemporary inter-relationships of aesthetics and politics by re-interpreting the ideas and authors of this past. The panel-session seeks to stage a dialectic of (dis-)agreement.

 

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The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

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The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Bonuses for Some

ART AND POLITICS – CALL FOR PAPERS

Call for Papers: Studia Politica, Special issue on “Art and Politics” No.4/2011

We invite contributions for a special issue of Studia Politica that explores the relationship between art and politics in postcommunist contexts. We welcome interdisciplinary approaches of these topics in English, French or Romanian.

We are especially interested in submissions that situate communist art and culture in their connections to politics in the post-communist countries of Central and Eastern Europe. Questions contributors might address include, but are not limited to:

How were artistic institutions transformed by the changes of regime?
How did the double transition (political and economic) affect the artistic domain?
How are artistic discourses transformed in the aftermath of communism?
How is the communist past deconstructed by artists?
Which is, comparatively, the approach of the post-communist states towards the artistic world?

Approaches of the various artistic contexts during the communist period are also welcomed.

Submission Guidelines: the articles should have 40.000 characters (including spaces).

Please consult our Author Guidelines before submitting your article at: http://www.studiapolitica.eu/Author-guideline s.

The deadline to submit your articles is October 15, 2011.

The editor, Caterina Preda may be contacted at: caterina.preda@fspub.unibuc.ro

Studia Politica. Romanian Political Science Review also welcomes reviews of books recently published (no more than 3 years old). The editorial board suggests the following titles for this special number:

Anca Benera & Alina Serban, Bucuresti. Materie si istorie. Monumentul public si distopiile lui (Bucuresti: ICR, 2011) Boris Groys, Art power (Cambridge MA, London: The MIT Press, 2008) Piotr Piotrowski, In the shadow of Yalta. The Avant-garde in Eastern Europe, 1945-1989 (London: Reaktion Books, 2009) Jacques Ranciere, The politics of aesthetics (London, NY: Continuum, 2010) Jacques Ranciere, Dissensus. On politics and aesthetics (London, NY: Continuum, 2010) Michael Shapiro, Cinematic geopolitics (London, NY: Routledge, 2009) Cristian Vasile, Literatura si artele in Romania comunista 1948-1953 (Bucuresti: Humanitas, 2010).

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Bonuses for Some

A USER’S GUIDE TO (DEMANDING) THE IMPOSSIBLE

New booklet on art and activism…

A Users Guide to (Demanding) the Impossible: Laboratory of Insurrectionary Imagination

This guide is not a road map or instruction manual. It’s a match struck in the dark, a homemade multi-tool to help you carve out your own path through the ruins of the present, warmed by the stories and strategies of those who took Bertolt Brecht’s words to heart: “Art is not a mirror held up to reality, but a hammer with which to shape it.”

It was written in a whirlwind of three days in December 2010, between the first and second days of action by UK students against the government cuts, and intended to reflect on the possibility of new creative forms of action in the current movements.

“Art is useless, so they tell us, as soon as it truly affects the world it loses its status as art. (You never know, it might slide down the slippery slope, becoming instrumental, propaganda, or even worse craft!). The strange thing is that those who tell us this are often the same people who put art to the crudest instrumental use – the art market. Maybe what they mean is that – art is useless when it’s not ultimately used to make a profit. Perhaps it’s the same logic as that which argues that education has no use outside slotting us into the mutilated world of work and consumption. This guide is for those of us who suspect that art has other uses and who are prepared to seek them.”

PDF available freely online (http://www.minorcompositions.info/usersguide.html), and discounts for ordering multiple copies.

64 pages, A6 size (4.134 x 5.827)

To be released June 1st, 2011

Released by Minor Compositions,London /New York / Port Watson
Minor Compositions is a series of interventions & provocations drawing from autonomous politics, avant-garde aesthetics, and the revolutions of everyday life.

Minor Compositions is an imprint of Autonomedia
www.minorcompositions.info |info@minorcompositions.info

— 
Stevphen Shukaitis
Autonomedia Editorial Collective
http://www.autonomedia.org
http://www.minorcompositions.info

**END**

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Marxism and Art

ART, PSYCHOANALYSIS AND REVOLUTION

Hervé Hubert-Klein
Art, Psychoanalysis and Revolution
From 29 January to 25 February 2011

Opening Saturday 29th of January at 6.00pm

The artist and psychoanalyst H. Hubert-Klein introduces his artistic work and discusses his conceptions in a roundtable conversation

Underdog Art Company
384, Old Kent Road, SE1 5AA
London, United Kingdom

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The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Situationism

Alternative Culture

MARXIST LITERARY GROUP: INSTITUTE ON CULTURE AND SOCIETY 2011

Call for Papers
2011 Marxist Literary Group Institute on Culture and Society
Special Topic: “What Is Revolution?”
Deadline for Proposals: March 1, 2011.

The Marxist Literary Group´s 2011 Institute on Culture and Society (2011 MLG-ICS) will convene this summer (June 20-24) on the campus of the University of Illinois at Chicago. As always, any submission that engages seriously with Marxist thought will be considered, including, but not limited to, Marxist considerations of literature or literary considerations of Marxism.

This year’s special topic will be “What is Revolution?” What is class struggle? Can there be one without the other, as horizon or precondition? How does radical social change take place? Is it necessary to have a theory of revolution, or is it better to pursue an intelligent opportunism? Does Marxism require revolution? Does revolution require class? What would a plausible political subject, or a plausible subject of history, look like today? Does our present moment hold any revolutionary possibility? What contemporary movements, possibilities, and practices hold promise (or do not)? Is there a plausible relationship today between aesthetic practices and the end of capitalism (as we know it)? How does one represent what is only possible, not actual? Is “struggle” another name for the possible? What is the relationship between politics as such and the economic as such? What is the relationship between politics and thinking, between revolution and philosophy? These questions and others will be the focus of this year’s Institute. Selected papers will be invited for submission to Mediations (http://mediationsjournal.org).

Recent years´ programs can be accessed at http://mlg.eserver.org/the-institute

The Institute on Culture and Society is run in consecutive sessions, and the discussion is most fruitful when participants stay for the entire Institute. Housing is available on campus, and every effort is made to keep the cost of attendance low. Graduate student participation is subsidized by the Marxist Literary Group. Proposals are welcome for:

Traditional panels
Individual presentations
Roundtables
Film Screenings
Performances
Reading Groups

All proposals except panel proposals should be a maximum of 250 words in length, and should include title, author, and author’s affiliation. Panel proposals should include for each proposed paper a 250-word abstract, including title and affiliation, as well as a title and 100-word rationale for the session itself. Please send submissions (plain text or commonly used file format) by March 1, 2011 to: 2011mlgics@gmail.com

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

2001

ART: WHAT’S THE USE?

Symposium

Art: What’s the Use?

Friday 14 January, 2011. 11am-6pm
Zilkha Auditorium, Whitechapel Gallery (£15/£10 conc.)

How subversive really is the social uselessness of art?  Could art play a more directly functional role in culture? Dean Kenning and Gavin Grindon challenge the idea that art should be allowed to take critical positions safe from any real intervention. Participants include Artur Zmijewski, Dmitry Vilensky (Chto Delat), James Marriott &Jane Trowell (PLATFORM), John Roberts, Stephen Wright, Marina Vishmidt, Peter Osborne and Gail Day.

In association with Stanley Picker Gallery Public Lectures on Art & The Visual and Material Culture and Contemporary Art Research Centres at Kingston University of London.

The increasing visibility of contemporary art, together with the shift in art discourse towards the social dimension, not to mention the sheer number of people now practicing as artists, all make the use value of art a vital issue. At a local and national level contemporary art has clearly taken on a role as instigator of local regeneration/gentrification and city branding. Such projects usually involve star artists, while activist, community and socially engaged practices often take place off the art world radar, or else adopt conventional art spaces as leverage for their work. How do organisations and institutions with their resources and networks influence this equation of art and use? In light of the radical changes to higher education which are currently being pushed through alongside simultaneous cuts in the arts budget, can we develop a language beyond the business-model discourse of ‘creative industries’ in which to defend and promote the value of art to a wide public?

This symposium aims to ask: What is the use-value of art today, how is it useful, and for whom? What are the particular imaginative and cognitive skills, competences and approaches that could take effect as part of the general symbolic economy beyond the artworld? What are the lessons and influences of movements which sought an unambiguously social and political function for their experiments? And finally, what are the conditions that enable artists not simply to reflect upon the world, but to act within and change it?

Tickets are available here: http://www.whitechapelgallery.org/shop/product/product_id/800

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

The Black Rock

SEMINAR ON THE AVANT-GARDE

KCL EUROPEAN STUDIES RESEARCH STUDENTS SEMINAR presents:

Tuesday 2nd November 2010, 5pm

Chrysi Papaioannou – From New Left Books to the October group: editorial collectives, publishing houses, and the emergence of an avant-garde paradigm

All meetings in room D11, French Department, East Wing, Strand Campus

All welcome!

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Boris Groys

A POST-COMMUNIST MANIFESTO

Boris Groys talks at the ICA

Wednesday 21st July, 6.45pm

Institute of Contemporary Art
12 Carlton House Terrace
London
SW1Y 5AH

Tickets £12

With the collapse of neoliberalism, the idea of communism has made a surprise return to the table.  Thinkers such as Slavoj Zizek, Toni Negri and Alain Badiou, have argued that communism, a society based on equality, is now proved to be the only alternative to the chaos of capitalism. Building on this discussion, the renowned art critic and thinker Boris Groys argues that the strength of the communist vision comes from the fact that it represents the subordination of the economy to politics.

For more information on the event or to buy tickets go to:
http://ica.org.uk/24948/Talks/Boris-Groys-A-PostCommunist-Manifesto.html

Or call the ICA box office on +44 (0)20 7930 3647

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COMRADES OF TIME

Boris Groys’s lecture at the TATE MODERN

Thursday 22nd July, 6.30-8pm
Tate Modern
Starr Auditorium
53 Bankside
London
SE1 9TG

Tickets £10

In this special lecture Boris Groys, will respond to the FRANCIS ALYS’ exhibition at Tate Modern with the provocative and counter-intuitive insight that has made him one of the most important thinkers and art critics today.

For more information on the event or to buy tickets go to:
http://www.tate.org.uk/modern/eventseducation/talksdiscussions/22015.htm

Or call the TATE box office on +44 (0)20 7887 8888

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Boris Groys is Professor of Aesthetics, Art History, and Media Theory at the Center for Art and Media Technology in Karlsruhe, and since 2005, the Global Distinguished Professor in the Faculty of Arts and Science, NYU. He has published numerous books including Art Power and The Total Art of Stalinism.

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Since Plato, philosophers have dreamed of establishing a rational state rules through the power of language. In this radical and disturbing account of Soviet philosophy, Boris Groys argues that communism shares that dream and is best understood as an attempt to replace financial with linguistic bonds as the cement uniting society. The transformative power of language, the medium of equality, is the key to any new communist revolution.

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For more information visit: http://www.versobooks.com/books/ghij/g-titles/groys_boris_the_communist_postscript.shtml

To buy this book in the UK: http://www.bookdepository.co.uk/book/9781844674305/The-Communist-Postscript

or: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Communist-Postscript-Boris-Groys/dp/1844674304/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1265807841&sr=8-1-spell

To buy the book in the US: http://www.amazon.com/Communist-Postscript-Boris-Groys/dp/1844674304/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1265807799&sr=1-1-spell

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Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon Profile: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

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