Skip navigation

Tag Archives: APCOL

No Future

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 19th MARCH 2011

EVENTS

PANEL AND BOOK LAUNCH – “EDUCATING ELITES: CLASS PRIVILEGE AND EDUCATIONAL ADVANTAGE”

Wednesday, April 13th, 2011
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE), room 5-250
252 Bloor St. West (St. George subway station), Toronto

10:00am – 11:45am (Panel)
11:45am – 1:00pm (Book Launch / Lunch Reception)

Panelists:

– Jane Kenway, Professor Monash University – “Elite Schools, Trans-national Capitals, and Global Elite Formations”
– Paul Tarc, Assistant Professor University of Western Ontario – “The Uses of International Education for (Becoming) Elites: The Case of the International Baccalaureate”
– Adam Howard, Associate Professor Colby College – “Shifting Landscapes: Elite Education in the New Economy”
– Rubén Gaztambide-Fernández, Assistant Professor CTL, OISE – “Notes on the Emergence and Significance of Elite Schooling as a Subject of Educational Research”

Chair : Kari Dehli, Professor SESE, OISE

Books by the panelists will be on sale from the Toronto Women’s Bookstore: http://www.womensbookstore.com

Co-sponsors: Ontario Institute for Studies in Education – Department of Curriculum, Teaching, and Learning; Department of Sociology and Equity Studies in Education; Comparative, International & Development Education Centre; Centre for Media and Culture in Education, Toronto Women’s Bookstore
+++++

COMMON THREAD COMMUNITY CHORUS OF TORONTO – BENEFIT CONCERT FOR MENNONITE NEW LIFE CENTRE & JUSTICIA FOR MIGRANT WORKERS

March 26
7:30 pm
St Simon’s Anglican Church, 525 Bloor Street East
Sherbourne subway station (Glen Road exit)

Tickets: Adults $20/advance – $25/door;  Students & Seniors $15/advance – $20/door; Children under 10 – free

http://www.commonthreadchorus.ca/sites/default/files/poster-spring-2011.jpg

– Mennonite New Life Centre: http://mnlct.org
– Justicia for Migrant Workers:  http://justicia4migrantworkers.org
– Proyecto Altiplano:  http://myspace.com/proyectoaltiplano/stream

Common Thread Chorus: http://www.commonthreadchorus.ca

For Tickets: 416-410-5022 or info@commonthreadchorus.ca
+++++

CU EXPO 2011 – COMMUNITY-UNIVERSITY PARTNERSHIPS: BRINGING GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES TO LOCAL ACTION

May 10-14, 2011
Waterloo Region, Ontario

CU Expo 2011 will showcase the exemplars in community-university partnerships worldwide, and explore and introduce creative ways of strengthening our local communities.

The conference is expected to draw over 800 people from Canada and around the world who are passionate about the power of community-university partnerships as a vehicle for social change. Students, community leaders, researchers, educators, funders, policy makers and others invested in community-building will be in attendance.

The CU Expo movement began in Canada as a response to individuals involved community-university partnerships needing a forum to share experiences, strategies and ideas. CU Expo 2011 will address the conference objectives, themes and streams through a variety of session offerings and opportunities for dialogue.

Learn more: http://www.cuexpo2011.ca/

+++++

BUILDING SOLIDARITY: CAMPUS LABOUR STRUGGLES AND THE STUDENT CONNECTION

A forum to discuss and unite worker and student struggles at U of T

March 31, 2011
6-9pm
Bahen Centre, University of Toronto
Room 2175 (40 St. George Street)

A brief overview of the working conditions at the University of Toronto shows that something is just not right: most contract faculty members have virtually no job security; largely racialized food-service workers are paid less than a living wage; post-doctoral fellows have zero input in the drafting of their contracts; female administrative staff members receive less pay than their male counterparts; and non-tenured professors fear termination for voicing opinions on contentious political issues.

Meanwhile, students at the U of T are also engaged in pitched battles to keep post-secondary education accessible and equitable. Campaigns to eliminate ever-increasing tuition fees, to defend equity-based programs under threat of extinction, to challenge autocratic room booking policies, and to overturn unrepresentative and unaccountable governing bodies are just some of the issues that they organize around everyday.

In short, there is a whole host of injustices that plague both workers and students on this campus. As a working group of the newly-formed University of Toronto General Assembly, Student-Worker Solidarity (SWS) seeks to challenge this state of affairs by bringing different campus workers together to speak with students about their issues, while also providing students with an opportunity to relay their concerns to workers.

With this forum, SWS hopes to begin the conversation in order to create new ways of thinking about and participating in the struggles of those who make our University what it is.

Speakers will include members of the following:

– Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE) Local 3902
– United Steelworkers (USW) Local 1998
– UniteHERE Local 75
– University of Toronto Faculty Association (UTFA)
– University of Toronto General Assembly (UTGA)

**Refreshments will be provided
**Email utgeneralassembly@gmail.com for more information
**This event is endorsed by OPIRG-Toronto

+++++

SOCIAL ECONOMY CENTRE LUNCHBOX SPEAKERS’ SERIES –  HOUSING ALTERNATIVES

Wednesday, March 23, 2011
Noon – 1:30 pm
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto
252 Bloor St. West, Toronto
Room 12-199

with Joe Deschênes Smith and Michael Shapcott

– Joe Deshchênes Smith will talk about investment process for new affordable housing, as well as attributes of the Home Ownership Initiative’s 2nd mortgage for low/modest income home-buyers.
– Michael Shapcott will discuss the social economy elements of the Precarious Housing report recently released by Affordable Housing and Social Innovation at the Wellesley Institute.

Moderator: David Hulchanski, Director, Centre for Urban and Community Studies, University of Toronto

Bring your lunch and a mug. Water, coffee and tea will be provided.

For more information, please contact Lisa White: secspeakerseries@gmail.com

This event will also be webcast live on the Internet.  Please see our website for detailed instructions: http://socialeconomy.utoronto.ca

+++++

PANEL – PAUL ROBESON: THE TALLEST TREE IN OUR FOREST

Wednesday, March 23
7:00 PM – 9:00 PM
East Common Room, Hart House
University of Toronto
7 Hart House Circle

Speakers:
– Ken Jeffers (City of Toronto Manager, Access and Diversity, Parks Forestry and Recreation)
– Norm Kelly (Writer and Playwright)
– Lee Lorch (Civil rights activist and York Professor Emeritus)
– Rathika Sitsabaiesan (Scarborough-Rouge River Federal NDP Candidate)

Sponsored by Centre for the Study of the United States

+++++

NEWS & VIEWS

UFCW CANADA RELEASE: WORKERS’ ACTION CENTRE LAUNCHES PROVINCIAL INITIATIVE – “UNDERCOVER STORIES ON WAGE THEFT”

Wage theft, in its various incarnations, is a workplace plague in Canada which is evident in a variety of communities. It is a particularly painful in immigrant communities. Many employers continuously abuse Employment Standards protections of these precarious workers as a means to simple but effectively improve profits.

On behalf of the 250,000 UFCW Canada members across Canada, we say NO to Wage Theft and YES to the much needed advocacy initiatives by the Workers’ Action Centre in Toronto. No worker deserves to get less than their fair wage. Every worker deserves to be heard.

We commend the Workers’ Action Centre on their initiative entitled “Undercover Stories on Wage Theft” and their advocacy in support for this initiative. We encourage you to take the time to support this important campaign.

To learn more: http://www.workersactioncentre.org

+++++

ALTERNATIVE FEDERAL BUDGET 2011 LAUNCHED – RETHINK, REBUILD, RENEW: A POST-RECESSION RECOVERY PLAN

From Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA)

The Alternative Budget presents a comprehensive recovery plan designed to:

– get Canadians working in good jobs again;
– reduce record-high income inequality, strengthen Canada’s middle class, and improve supports for Canada’s poor and most vulnerable;
– protect public programs that all Canadians rely on — including public health care and public pensions;
– manage Canada’s debt-to-GDP ratio without vital public program cuts;
– get serious about reducing greenhouse gas emissions; and
– launch a multi-pronged initiative to expand high value-added production in key sectors.

Read more: http://www.policyalternatives.ca/afb2011

+++++

TEACHING ABOUT LABOR ISSUES AND THE WISCONSIN WORKER FIGHTBACK

From Rethinking Schools

According to labor historian Mark J. Naison, the movement of workers that began in Wisconsin and is now spreading to other states is “the most important labor struggle in the United States in the 21st century.”

The current uprising of workers in Wisconsin and other states presents a powerful opportunity to teach students about what the protests are about and why their teachers and neighbors are joining the struggle.  It’s an opportunity to critically examine issues, and to model for students’ responsible civic action and engagement in the political process.

As members of teacher unions, we have an additional responsibility, summarized by the late Howard Zinn in an interview published in Transforming Teacher Unions:

“If teacher unions want to be strong and well-supported, it’s essential that they not only be teacher unionists but teachers of unionism. We need to create a generation of students who support teachers and the movements of teachers for their rights.”

Embrace this “teachable moment” and share with us in the comments what resources you are using, how you are using them, and how your students are responding.

Read more: http://rethinkingschools.org/news/WIProtestTeachingResources.shtml

+++++

BOOK – THE SPIRIT LEVEL: WHY GREATER EQUALITY MAKES SOCIETIES STRONGER

[The authors] Wilkinson and Pickett make an eloquent case that the income gap between a nation’s richest and poorest is the most powerful indicator of a functioning and healthy society. Amid the statistics that support their argument (increasing income disparity sees corresponding spikes in homicide, obesity, drug use, mental illness, anxiety, teenage pregnancies, high school dropouts—even incidents of playground bullying), the authors take an empathetic view of our ability to see beyond self-interest…There is evidence that the human brain—with its distinctively large neocortex—evolved the way it has because we were designed to be attentive to, depend on, and be depended on by others.

Ordering information: http://www.amazon.com/Spirit-Level-Equality-Societies-Stronger/dp/1608190366

Hear Wilkinson give a 1:34:42 speech on the subject of his book. The volume is okay after he’s introduced. The graphics he uses appear on your screen as he proceeds through the presentation.

http://www.fhs.sfu.ca/news/events/special-guest-speaker-dr.-richard-g.-wilkinson

+++++

MAYTREE FOUNDATION – THE “PILOT” FOR RECRUITING TEMPORARY FOREIGN WORKERS FOR LOW-SKILLED JOBS SHOULD BE ABOLISHED

The latest Maytree discussion paper argues that the growth in the temporary foreign worker program is contrary to Canada’s social and economic interests. It suggests that those currently in Canada under the Pilot Project for Occupations Requiring Lower Levels of Formal Training should be granted permanent residence.

Read more: http://bit.ly/eVP7jX

+++++

NO FARE IS FAIR – A ROUNDTABLE WITH MEMBERS OF THE GREATER TORONTO WORKERS’ ASSEMBLY TRANSIT COMMITTEE

By Ali Mustafa, The Bullet

The Greater Toronto Workers’ Assembly (GTWA) is a promising new initiative aiming to build a united, non-sectarian, and militant anti-capitalist movement in the city among a diversity of rank-and-file labour unionists, grassroots community organizers, and youth alike. Since the GTWA’s inception in early 2010, mass public transit has emerged as one of the organization’s key political battlegrounds. In this in-depth roundtable discussion, members of the GTWA’s transit committee Jordy Cummings, Lisa Leinveer, Leo Panitch, Kamilla Pietrzyk, and Herman Rosenfeld explore both the opportunities and obstacles facing the campaign Towards a Free and Accessible TTC.

Read more: http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/480.php

(END)
++++++++++++++
++++++++++++++

ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK, OISE/UT):

Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK: UPDATE 30th JANAURY 2011

 

EVENTS

FREE SCREENING OF ‘HOME SAFE TORONTO’ DOCUMENTARY

Friday, February 4
7:30pm – 10:30pm
The Centre of Gravity
1300 Gerrard St. East, Toronto

With Street Nurse and Executive Producer Cathy Crowe and Director Laura Sky

HOME SAFE TORONTO is the second in the Sky Works series of documentaries that deals with how Canadian families live with the threat and the experience of homelessness.

It shows how the housing crisis in Canada is an expression of the increasing economic and job insecurity that has devastated the manufacturing sector in the Greater Toronto Area and throughout southern Ontario.

The film reveals the consequences of this “new economy”, where families surviving on low wages with no benefits, or on dwindling social assistance, are faced with the terrible choice between keeping a roof over their heads or putting food on the table.

+++++

GREATER TORONTO WORKERS’ ASSEMBLY

Saturday, February 19
9:30am – 6:00pm
Steelworkers’ Hall, 25 Cecil St, Toronto

How to join the GTWA: http://www.workersassembly.ca/join

Committees: http://www.workersassembly.ca/committees

Our vision statement: http://www.workersassembly.ca/vision

Contact us at: workingclassfightback@gmail.com

+++++

BLACK HISTORY MONTH CELEBRATION

Thursday, February 24, 5:00pm – 8 pm and
Friday, February 25, 9:00am – 1:00pm
Ontario Federation of Labour (OFL) Building
15 Gervais Drive, Toronto

The OFL and CBTU (Coalition of Black Trade Unionists) present the acclaimed exhibition “And Still I Rise: A History of African Canadian Workers in Ontario.” This travelling exhibit originally developed by the Workers Arts and Heritage Centre explores the rich legacy of Ontario’s black Community.

Four exhibits designed to look like train coaches span the twentieth century with exhibition topics ranging from “Challenges to Freedom”: “1900 to World War II” to the reflective “Legacy of African Canadians”. Visitors are invited to learn more about the historic and present day lives and experiences of Black Canadians through the investigation of themes including immigration, work roles and the labour movement, the agitation of civil rights, the contributions of African Canadians to the arts and sports, the importance of church, schools and voluntary organizations to building strong communities.

For more information, contact Janice Gairey at jgairey@ofl.ca or 416.347.9732.

+++++

“EL CONTRATO”: FILM PRESENTED BY PUEBLITO FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT WEEK 2011

February 8, 2011
6:00pm-9:00pm
Beit Zatoun
612 Markham St., Toronto

“El Contrato” follows the path of migrant workers from Central Mexico to pick tomatos in Lemington, Ontario and the struggles and racism they face. Following the movie, prominent speaker Chris Ramsaroop will be addressing the issues about how immigrant workers in Canada still face injustices in today’s labour market and what should be the role of the Canadian labour movement.

To register for this event please email barrerasandy@hotmail.com with your name, email address and number of tickets you would like to reserve.

Suggested donation: $10.00

+++++

CONFERENCE & CFP – TRANSNATIONAL MIGRATION AND ADULT EDUCATION: GLOBAL ISSUES AND DEBATES

June 9, 2011
9:30 am – 4 pm
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education
University of Toronto

A pre-conference held in conjunction with the 52nd Adult Education Research Conference (AERC) and the 30th Canadian Association for the Study of Adult Education (CASAE) Conference

Keynote speakers: Dr. Roxana Ng, OISE/University of Toronto and Dr. Mary V. Alfred, Texas A&M University

When migrants arrive in a new society, they bring with them their values, language and culture, contributing significantly to the diversity of their host countries. Without a doubt, the resulting demographic, social, and cultural changes create new opportunities for development as well as new challenges for adult education. However, we are left to grapple with many important questions, such as: What is the impact of transnational migration on adult education? What are the challenges and opportunities for adult education? How can adult education best facilitate migrants’ adaptation in a new society?

Call for Proposals: If you are conducting research or have completed studies in this area, we invite you to submit proposals to: Dr. Shibao Guo, University of Calgary, guos@ucalgary.ca. Deadline: February 15, 2011

For more information: http://silenceandvoice.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/08/AERC-CASAE-Call-2011.pdf

+++++

NEWS AND VIEWS

RADICAL LABOR EDUCATION, PART I (FROM CHEAP MOTELS AND A HOT PLATE)

By Michael Yates

We are on our way to Amherst, Massachusetts, where I will be teaching a two-week course in labor economics to labor union brothers and sisters.  I have been a labor educator for thirty years. I have taught working people, mostly union leaders and members, a wide variety of courses in all kinds of settings… While working people are often enough unhappy with their work, or lack of it, and alienated from the political system, they ordinarily do not have a very clear understanding of the nature of our political economy or a desire to radically transform it. Why is this?

Read more: http://blog.cheapmotelsandahotplate.org/2010/12/27/radical-labor-education-part-i/

+++++

SHARING IN A COMMON STRUGGLE

By Anthony Arnove, Socialist Worker

Anthony Arnove, Howard Zinn’s collaborator on projects like the book Voices of a People’s History of the United States and the documentary The People Speak, pays tribute to a friend whose sense of solidarity and joy in life was infectious.

FILMING OUR documentary The People Speak in Boston one afternoon, Howard said that the camaraderie between our cast members, the sense of collective purpose and joy, was a feeling he hadn’t experienced with such intensity since his active participation in the civil rights movement.

Since Howard’s passing, I have thought often of that moment, which crystallizes for me what made him so compelling an example of someone committed to, and enjoying to its fullest, a life of struggle.

Read more: http://socialistworker.org/2010/02/12/sharing-in-the-struggle

+++++

EGYPT (FROM WADE RATHKE: CHIEF ORGANIZER BLOG)

If there was ever a more dramatic case study of the political impact of protest on or off the grid of internet, telecommunications, and social networking, the world saw it on the streets of Egypt yesterday. It was as if there were a perfect laboratory experiment on what would happen if the only avenues for protest were “old school” removing the variable of communications.

Read more: http://chieforganizer.org/2011/01/29/egypt/

+++++  

BEARING THE BRUNT OF A NEW WITCH-HUNT

By Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, Socialist Worker

The bipartisan campaign against “privileged” public-sector workers threatens to erode some of the gains of the civil rights and Black Power movements.

IN THE run-up to the midterm elections, overheated rhetoric from both Republicans and Democrats identified public-sector workers as a central factor in historically high budget state deficits and the collapse of local economies.

Public-sector workers have been described as the “haves”–as an “elite” group of workers who are living high on the fat of tax dollars, while the rest of the workforce wallows in job insecurity, lack of health care, foreclosure and falling wages.

Read more: http://socialistworker.org/2011/01/27/brunt-of-a-new-witch-hunt

+++++

“ALONE TOGETHER”: AN MIT PROFESSOR’S NEW BOOK URGES US TO UNPLUG

By David Zax, Fast Company

In her new book, an MIT professor shares her ambivalence about the overuses of technology, which, she writes, “proposes itself as the architect of our intimacies.”

Sherry Turkle has been an ethnographer of our technological world for three decades, hosted all the while at one of its epicenters: MIT. A professor of the social studies of science and technology there, she also heads up its Initiative on Technology and Self. Her new book, Alone Together, completes a trilogy of investigations into the ways humans interact with technology. It can be, at times, a grim read. Fast Company spoke recently with Turkle about connecting, solitude, and how that compulsion to always have your BlackBerry on might actually be hurting your company’s bottom line.

Read more: http://www.fastcompany.com/1716844/alone-together-an-mit-professors-new-book-urges-us-to-unplug

+++++

POVERTY BY POSTAL CODE 2: VERTICAL POVERTY

Poverty by Postal Code 2: Vertical Poverty presents new data on the growing concentration of poverty in the City of Toronto and the role that high-rise housing is playing in this trend. The report tracks the continued growth in the spatial concentration of poverty in Toronto neighbourhoods, and in high-rise buildings within neighbourhoods. It then examines the quality of life that high-rise buildings are providing to tenants today. Its primary focus is on privately owned building stock in Toronto’s inner suburbs. This research is part of United Way’s Building Strong Neighbourhoods Strategy.

Read more: http://unitedwaytoronto.com/verticalpoverty/report/introduction/

(END)
++++++++++++++++++++
++++++++++++++++++++

ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK, OISE/UT):

Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon Profile: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Work, work, work

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 23rd JANUARY 2011

EVENTS

SEMINAR – THE FORMS & DYNAMICS OF ANTI-POVERTY ACTIVISM IN TORONTO

Insights on Methods from the Anti-Poverty Community Organizing & Learning (APCOL) Community University Research Alliance (CURA)

Monday, February 7, 2011
4:30 p.m.
Faculty of Social Work, 246 Bloor St West, Room 548
(St. George subway, Bedford exit; next to OISE)

with Grace-Edward Galabuzi & Peter Sawchuk
Ryerson University & OISE, University of Toronto

A seminar sponsored by the Cities Centre’s Community Development Collaborative Program & the Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work’s Chow Yei Ching Chair in Housing

The Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning Community University Research Alliance (2009-2014) seeks to apply the methodologies of participatory action, community-based case study research to the study of activism in Toronto to explore the processes of participation, non-participation and past-participation. In this session co-leaders of the CURA will outline for discussion the community-based research process and partnership dynamics involved in the research. Preliminary case study findings will also be presented.

APCOL is a project of the Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW), OISE/UT.

+++++

INSTITUTE – WOMEN’S RIGHTS ARE HUMAN RIGHTS!

CEDAW for Change

One Week Institute

May 16-20, 2011

Directed by Alda Facio, LLP and Martha Morgan, JD

Sponsored by Centre for Women’s Studies in Education (CWSE), Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of the University of Toronto (OISE/UT)

Offered in Association with IWRAW-AP

For full information and the online application form, see our website at: http://www.learnwhr.org
For inquiries, contact WHRI Executive Director Angela Lytle at info@learnwhr.org

+++++

WORKSHOP – MARKETING IN NON-PROFIT AND OTHER SOCIAL PURPOSE ORGANIZATIONS

with Sharon Wood & Trish Krause, The Belmont Group

Friday, January 28, 2011
9:30 am-4:00 pm
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto, 252 Bloor Street West, Toronto (St. George subway station), Room – TBA    
         
This session will cover basic marketing concepts, including segmentation, targeting and positioning, as they apply to non-profit and other social-purpose organizations. Workshop design will ensure practical applications, participant involvement in small group discussion and problem solving related to content and their own organizational needs, as well as allowing participants’ an opportunity to network. The presenters will survey participants in advance of the session to ensure the design and content is targeted to audience needs.

Participants will have the opportunity to…

* Apply marketing concepts to challenges facing their own organization
* Explore specialized applications of marketing in social purpose organizations related to such issues as branding, social marketing, volunteer recruitment and resource development (scope of applications to be determined by participants’ needs)

By the end of the workshop, participants will understand how to bring the course learning together to create a practical marketing plan for their organization/issue.

Cost: $140 + HST. Each additional participant from the same organization will receive a $15 discount. A limited number of spaces are available to students at a discounted rate.

To register: Access the online registration form at http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/FY65KMM or contact Lisa White at secworkshops@gmail.com, or 416-978-0022.

+++++

WOMEN’S HUMAN RIGHTS EDUCATION INSTITUTE (WHRI):  BUILDING A PEACEFUL WORLD IN AN ERA OF GLOBALIZATION

Six Week Institute

May 2 – June 10, 2011

Directed by: Alda Facio, LLP with Debby Danard, PhD candidate; Mary Eberts LLB, LSM, LLM; Angela Lytle, MEd; Angela Miles, PhD; Martha Morgan, JD

Sponsored by: Centre for Women’s Studies in Education (CWSE), Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of the University of Toronto (OISE/UT)

Offered in Association with Fundación Justicia y Género, Costa Rica

For full information and the online application form, see our website at: http://www.learnwhr.org
For inquiries, contact WHRI Executive Director Angela Lytle at info@learnwhr.org

+++++

STUDY GROUP – EXTRACTING PROFITS: PATTERNS OF OPPRESSION AND RESISTANCE IN LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN

In five open study sessions, “Extracting Profits” will discuss patterns of oppression and resistance in Latin America and the Caribbean. The sessions, held from February to May, include readings, brief presentations, and small-group discussions in an informal and spontaneous atmosphere. No registration – everyone welcome.

Sundays, 2 p.m.-4 p.m, OISE, 252 Bloor St. West, Toronto

1. February 6: Mexico and the Burden of “Free Trade”: NAFTA, capitalist devastation, and community resistance, OISE, Room 5150

2. February 27: Bolivia and the Right to Water
The Bolivian people have taken their “water wars” to the world stage

3. March 20: Haiti and the Struggle for Food Sovereignty
A story of pigs and rice – how Haitians were robbed of their own food supply

4. April 10: Mining in Central America
Canadian corporations at war against rights of indigenous peoples

5. May 15: ALBA and CETA: Fair Trade vs. “Free Trade”
Canada’s trade agreements violate popular rights; ALBA is based on solidarity.

Organized by Toronto Bolivia Solidarity, an action group of OPIRG–Toronto
For more information: torontoboliviasolidarity@gmail.com or
http://t.grupoapoyo.org

See us on Facebook: ‘Toronto Bolivia Solidarity’

+++++

NEWS AND VIEWS

NEW FROM FERNWOOD PUBLISHING – MANUFACTURING MELTDOWN: RESHAPING STEEL WORK

ISBN 9781552664025
$27.95
224pp
February 2011
by D.W. Livingstone, Dorothy E. Smith & Warren Smith

In the 1980s, following decades of booming business, the global steel industry went into a precipitous decline, which necessitated significant restructuring. Management demanded workers’ increased participation in ever more temporary and insecure labour. Engaging the workers at the flagship Stelco plant in Hamilton, the authors document new management strategies and the responses of unionized workforces to them. These investigations provide valuable insights into the dramatic changes occurring within the Canadian steel industry.

”Manufacturing Meltdown explains what has happened to our manufacturing, our jobs, our future and our country. This is something that needed telling and this book tells it very well.” – Bob Sutton, former recording secretary, United Steelworkers Local 1005 and editor of SteelShots

Order from: Brunswick Books Ltd., 20 Maud St. Suite 303, Toronto, Ontario, M5V 2M5, t- 416.703.3598 f- 416.703.6561 orders@brunswickbooks.ca or http://www.brunswickbooks.ca
Also available at your local independent bookstore or order online from http://www.fernwoodpublishing.ca

+++++

VIDEO – KEY UNION STRUGGLES: BUILDING THE FIGHTBACK

Toronto, January 18, 2011

As the economic crisis continues, governments and employers are bringing in austerity measures, lowering our living standards and working conditions. A number of unionized workplaces are particular targets, and have the potential to become key centres of resistance. This forum considers the strategies and political approaches needed to win and is a build-up for the January 29th/30th Workers’ Assembly Labour Conference.

Introduced and moderated by Carolyn Egan, USW Local 8300. Presentations by:

* Mark Ferguson, President of the City of Toronto Municipal Workers Local 416 (bargaining with the new Rob Ford administration in Toronto who has threatened to privatize garbage services);
* Gary Howe, Vice-President of Local 1005 Hamilton Steelworkers (facing a lockout and concession demands at US Steel);
* Marion Pollack, National Representative with the Canadian Union of Postal Workers, based in Ottawa. She is a long time activist in the union and in progressive movements.

Organized by the Labour Committee of the Greater Toronto Workers’ Assembly

Watch the video: http://www.socialistproject.ca/leftstreamed/ls85.php

+++++

VIDEO – CLC FILES ACCESS TO INFORMATION REQUEST ON PENSIONS

The Canadian Labour Congress has filed an Access to Information request to find out who lobbied the federal Finance Minister and his department against proposals that would enhance the Canada and Quebec Pension Plans.

Last summer Jim Flaherty said that improving the CPP was the best way to ensure the retirement security of Canadians but the minister has now changed his mind in favour of vastly inferior private sector plans. The financial services sector was lobbying hard prior to the finance ministers meeting in Kananaskis in December.

The CLC filed two access requests in late December 2010, and they ask for both internal government and external lobbying materials related to the CPP and private sector Pooled Registered Pension Plans (PRPPs). High management fees charged by banks and insurance companies can reduce pension savings by more than 50 per cent. The CPP is a far better option.

Watch the video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8R450pP45VE

+++++
      
ARTICLE – $1 BILLION NIGHTMARE

by Royce Millar and Clay Lucas, The Age (Victoria, AU)

Victorians are being slugged more than $1 billion a year for Melbourne’s privatised train and trams, six times more than the architects of the system forecast 11 years ago.

Read more: http://www.theage.com.au/victoria/1-billion-nightmare-20110121-1a026.html

+++++

ARTICLE – ESTABLISHING PRECEDENTS: WOMEN’S STUDENT ACTIVISM AND SOCIAL CHANGE IN THE (CANADIAN) NATIONAL UNION OF STUDENTS, 1972-1979

by Nigel Roy Moses, Memorial University

This article examines young women’s activism in the (Canadian) National Union of Students (NUS) from the time that the national student organization regrouped in 1972 to the endorsement of the NUS Declaration of the Rights of the Woman Student in 1979. The focus is on the problems NUS women faced, the solutions and organizational structures they devised, and how they helped transform the social organization of NUS to better represent their interests. This work makes an important contribution to our knowledge of Canadian student organizing and the women’s movement. Youth activists guided by a particular set of anti-patriarchal cultural orientations and values not only had a profoundly transformative effect on student organization, but were among the social agents producing a much broader social transformation.

Read more: http://library.queensu.ca/ojs/index.php/edu_hse-rhe/article/view/2152/3172

+++++

JURAVICH-HEALY WORK WITH OPSEU TO RELEASE HOME CARE MUSIC VIDEO

HAMILTON, ON, Jan. 20 /CNW/ – Who says labour songs are dead? The Ontario Public Service Employees Union has produced a music video with recording artists Teresa Healy and Tom Juravich to highlight the exodus of Ontario’s home care professionals from an unstable work environment.

The song, “What Will You Do When I’m Gone?” was written by Healy and Juravich for a 2008 rally in Hamilton following news that the Victorian Order of Nurses and St. Joseph’s Home Care were dropped from a competition to provide visiting nursing services in the city. Both agencies had close to a century of history in Hamilton.

As a result of the rally, a new moratorium was begun and the Hamilton competition cancelled.

The video is being distributed to media outlets this week and on-line.

OPSEU has produced a web site to host the video which includes a “making of” documentary, background information, a free download of the song, links to the artists’ sites and a form where patients, families and workers can leave their own stories behind.

The site is located at http://www.whatwillyoudo.ca A French version of the site is also available at http://www.queferezvous.ca

For more information or to set up interviews with the artists, contact Rick Janson at 416-443-8888 ext 8383 or 416-525-3324 (Cell).

++++++++++++++++++++
++++++++++++++++++++

(END)

ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK, OISE/UT):

Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

No Future

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON RESEARCHING WORK AND LEARNING

Special Conference Announcement
International Conference on Researching Work and Learning (RWL)

The Seventh RWL Conference will be taking place in Shanghai, China (December 4-7, 2011)

All conference information can be found at http://www.rwlecnu.org/

Deadline for proposals (papers, symposia, workshops, poster sessions) is March 1st, 2011.

Conference Streams include:
a) Learning, Organizational Change and Organizational Development
b) Professional Work and Learning
c) Leadership Studies in Work and Learning
d) Labour Studies in Work and Learning
e) Trade Unions’ Education and Learning
f) Quality of Work/Learning Life
g) Trans-nationalism, Migration, Work and Learning
h) Work, Learning and Community
i) Learning Theory, Skills and Work
j) Identity, Work and Learning
k) Gender, Ethnicity, Spirituality, Diversity in Workplace and Learning
l) Vocational Education, Labour Markets and Learning
m) Policy Studies, Work and Learning
n) Unpaid Work and Learning
o) Historical Approaches to Work, Learning and Social Change
p) Best practice studies, work and learning

About the RWL Series:
The RWL international conference series was established in 1999 and has run continuously since on a bi-annual basis. Successful conferences have been held in the UK, Canada, Finland, Australia, South Africa, Denmark. In close association with the Journal of Workplace Learning and Emerald Publishing, the RWL series is the longest, continuously running international conference series in the field of work and learning studies currently in operation.

——————————————————————-

ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK, OISE/UT):

Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 4th SEPTEMBER 2010

 

EVENTS

VOICES OF DISSENT: INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL OF POETRY OF RESISTANCE

Sept. 16-20
Toronto

Poets, artists, musicians and social activists will gather in various Toronto venues later this month to celebrate the boundless capacity of verse to resist oppression and create links among diverse communities. The International Festival of Poetry of Resistance will feature readings, roundtable discussions, musical performances and a special “festivalito” for children.

The festival will begin on Thursday, September 16 at 5 p.m. at the New Horizons Auditorium, 1140 Bloor Street West (at Dufferin), Toronto. It will continue until Monday, September 20 at various locations. The children’s “Festivalito” will take place on Friday, September 17 from 2 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. at the 519 Church Street Community Centre.

+++++

SOCIAL ECONOMY CENTRE SPEAKERS’ SERIES: SOCIAL STOCK MARKETS & IMPACT INVESTING

Wednesday, Sept. 29, 2010
Noon – 1:30 pm
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE), Room 12-199
University of Toronto
252 Bloor St. West, Toronto

With:
Adam Spence, Social Innovation Generation (SiG) @ MaRS
Annie Malhotra, Social Venture Exchange (SVX)

Adam Spence will discuss the practical development of impact investing in Canada, an investment approach aiming to solve social or environmental challenges while generating financial profit.

Annie Malhotra will discuss the development of the social venture exchange (SVX) project and the work of ethical stock markets around the globe.

Bring your lunch and a mug. Water, coffee and tea will be provided.

For more information, please contact: Lisa White at secspeakerseries@gmail.com.

This event will also be webcast live on the Internet.  Please see our website for detailed instructions: http://socialeconomy.utoronto.ca/english/webcast.php

+++++

FREE TRANSIT STREET PARTY

Saturday, Oct. 2
1:00-4:00
In Christie Pits Park off Bloor St
(across the street from the Christie subway stop)

No Fare Is Fair!

Come to the park to celebrate the campaign to win free and accessible transit for the GTA.

Food, music, puppets, entertainment and more.

For more info or to get involved contact: nofareisfair@gmail.com

A project of the GTWA: http://www.workersassembly.ca

Join us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=147217141977827

Poster for October 2nd event (please copy and distribute):
http://www.workersassembly.ca/events/FreeTransit.pdf

+++++

WORKING WITH GRASSROOTS COMMUNITY GROUPS: LUNCH N’ LEARN

September 13, 2010
12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Centre for Social Innovation, 4th Floor, Alterna Savings Room
215 Spadina Ave., Toronto

Mario Tellez, Projects Coordinator of the Casa Canadiense Community Centre in Managua, Nicaragua will facilitate a discussion about the challenges and possibilities of working with community groups.  As the Projects Coordinator, Mario works closely with 10 grassroots community associations in Nicaragua to develop proposals, implement projects and effectively relay the stories of communities back to donors.  He is developing a capacity building program where representatives of community groups will work to improve their proposal writing skills.

If you want to discuss your experiences working with the grassroots and share ideas about what works, what doesn’t and how we can engage respectfully with partners, please attend!

To register: katie@pueblito.org

+++++

CLIMATE REALITY: A CONVERSATION WITH DR. JAMES HANSEN, NAOMI KLEIN & CLAYTON THOMAS-MULLER

Wednesday, September 15
5:30-9:30
McMillan Theatre, University of Toronto
Edward Johnson Bldg (North), 80 Queen’s Park, Toronto

A public event on climate science and climate justice with the world’s foremost climate scientist and author of Storms of My Grandchildren, Dr. James Hansen; the author of The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism, Naomi Klein and Indigenous Environmental Network’s Tar Sands Campaigner, Clayton Thomas-Muller. Moderator: Dr. Cynthia Wesley-Esquimaux (U of T, Aboriginal Studies and Social Work).

5:30pm – 6:30pm Science presentation by James Hansen
6:30pm – 7:00pm Intermission
7:00pm – 8:45pm Climate Reality: A Conversation with Dr. James Hansen, Naomi Klein & Clayton Thomas-Muller, moderated by Cynthia Wesley-Esquimaux.

Admission free.

Organized by:
The Centre for Global Change Science, U of T, http://www.cgcs.utoronto.ca/Page4.aspx

Science for Peace, http://www.scienceforpeace.ca

Contact: Science for Peace office, sfp@physics.utoronto.ca

+++++

SUBURBAN UNIVERSITY-COMMUNITY RESEARCH NETWORK MEETING

September 17
10am – noon
East Scarborough Storefront
4040 Lawrence Ave East, Toronto

On the agenda so far:
– follow up on the Mimico 20/20 plan and response
– other housing / anti-poverty initiatives?
– transit activism in East Scarborough and city wide
– municipal elections

Please feel free to make additions!

The August 16th meeting took place in South Etobicoke, hosted by LAMP and local area residents. We went on a walking tour of the community, guided by local residents, and learned about city hall’s vision for the area’s redevelopment and the implications for tenants. Some members of our network have undertaken research about the planning process in support of the residents and will provide an update in September.

For more information, contact Deb Cowen at: deb.cowen@utoronto.ca

+++++

UNION ACTION WITHOUT BORDERS: AN INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM

Thursday, 23 September 2010
HEC Montreal
Cote-Sainte-Catherine Bldg.
3000 Cote-Sainte Catherine Avenue
Montreal, PQ

The Interuniversity Research Centre on Globalization and Work (CRIMT) in collaboration with CISO, CSQ, CSN and FTQ is organizing a symposium on international trade union action. Its purpose is to assess the different initiatives undertaken by labour unions at various levels, be it local, national and international.

This important Symposium will tackle a variety of contemporary relevant issues. What tools and resources are available to unions? How can we build a dialogue between northern and southern countries? How can we enhance workers’ awareness with respect to international trade unionism? How can these actions improve the working conditions here in Canada and abroad? These are some of the questions to be discussed among participants during plenary sessions and workshops.

For more info: http://www.crimt.org/uawb.html

+++++

NEWS & VIEWS

PRIVATE SECTOR IS NOT HELPING ECONOMIC RECOVERY

Tepid GDP numbers released Tuesday by Statistics Canada confirm that Canada’s economic recovery, such as it was, is sliding completely into the ditch. We’re clearly heading for stagnation at best, and quite possibly another “double dip” downturn.

Read more: http://rabble.ca/columnists/2010/09/private-sectors-continuing-failure-lead-economic-recovery  

+++++

NON-UNION HOSPITAL STAFF FORCED TO TAKE TWO YEARS OF ZEROES. AN INCENTIVE FOR UNIONIZATION?

by Doug Allan, leftwords

The Toronto Star reports: “Thousands of Ontario nurses who work at …non-unionized hospitals complain they’re getting the cold shoulder from Premier Dalton McGuinty’s public sector pay freeze.”

While the non-union RNs are in the midst of a government imposed two year wage freeze, unionized RNs got pay increases April 1, as per their collective agreement. “I don’t know why they’re doing this to us,” non-union RN Julia Fisher said. “The government has created a two-tier pay schedule. We’re being penalized.”

Read more: http://www.ochu.on.ca/leftwords_ochuBlog.php

+++++

ON MLK’S DAY, UNIONS, CONSERVATIVES RALLY FOR JOBS, JUSTICE—HONOR?

by Tiffany Ten Eyck, Labor Notes

Forty-seven years after Martin Luther King, Jr. uttered the words “I have a dream” to an overflow crowd on the Washington Mall, August 28 still has resonance for civil rights activists, the union movement, and, now, the Tea Party?

Read more: http://www.labornotes.org/blogs/2010/09/mlks-day-unions-conservatives-rally-jobs-justice-honor

+++++

POLICE MADE MISTAKES IN G20 TACTICS, CHIEF ADMITS FOR FIRST TIME

By Kate Allen, Globe & Mail

Acknowledgment comes on heels of raft of complaints, lawsuits, inquiries into police actions during June weekend.

Read more: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/toronto/police-made-mistakes-in-g20-tactics-chief-admits-for-first-time/article1694815/

+++++

NEW BOOK ON THE GLOBAL WORKING CLASS: “LIVE WORKING OR DIE FIGHTING”

Paul Mason’s “Live Working or Die Fighting” is one of the most important books to come out about the international labour movement in recent years.  It’s just come out in paperback and it’s LabourStart’s book of the month for September.

Live Working or Die Fighting is a two-hundred year story of the global working class and its many struggles for justice. The stories in the book come to life through the voices of remarkable individuals: child laborers in Charles Dickens’ England, visionary women on the barricades of Paris, gun-toting railway strikers in America’s Wild West, and beer-swilling German metalworkes who tried to stop the First World War. It is a story of urban slums, self-help cooperatives, choirs and brass bands, free love, and self-education by candlelight. And in the developing industrial economies of the world, it is still with us.

To learn more about it and to order your copies, visit https://ssl30.pair.com/unionist/ccp51/cgi-bin/cp-app.cgi?rrc=N&pg=prod&ref=workclass&affl=labourstart  

Remember that every copy you order helps support LabourStart’s campaigning activities; for more info about LabourStart, visit http://www.labourstart.org/

+++++

REPORT: WORKING AS ALLIES

by Jen Margaret, Auckland Workers Educational Association

A critical dimension of social justice struggles is the work of the people who support those more directly affected by a particular justice issue, the work of allies. This report documents learning from a visit, made possible with support from the Winston Churchill Memorial Trust, to North America in May 2010 to meet with people who are working as allies supporting the struggles of indigenous peoples and/or undertaking anti-racism work. In 15 separate meetings I met with 18 people who were working in a range of contexts that included Indigenous studies programmes in universities, community organisations, church and human rights organisations. I also had email discussions with a number of people with whom it was not possible to meet face to face.

Read the full report: http://awea.org.nz/sites/default/files/Jen_Margaret_Working_as_Allies_2010.pdf
Resources for working as allies: http://awea.org.nz/allies_resources

+++++

ONLINE JOURNAL ARTICLES

MIND THE GAP: SCHOOL LEAVER ASPIRATIONS AND DELAYED PATHWAYS TO FURTHER AND HIGHER EDUCATION
Author: Tom Stehlika
Journal of Education and Work, Volume 23, Issue 4 September
http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content~db=all~content=a926503481~frm=titlelink
+++++

HEALTH LEARNING AND ADULT EDUCATION: IN SEARCH OF A THEORY OF PRACTICE
Sandra R. Schecter and Jacqueline Lynch
Adult Education Quarterly published 27 August 2010, 10.1177/0741713610380438
http://aeq.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/0741713610380438v

IS ANY JOB BETTER THAN NO JOB? LIFE SATISFACTION AND RE-EMPLOYMENT
Carola Grün, Wolfgang Hauser and Thomas Rhein
Journal of Labor Research,Volume 31, Number 3, 285-306
http://www.springerlink.com/content/7x18u6642w15g634/

+++++

JOB POSTINGS

CENTRE FOR SOCIAL INNOVATION, TORONTO – INTERNSHIP

Wanna be an agent for change? Are you ready to change the world? Crazy creative? Love helping people? Juiced by turning wild ideas into action? And have a little extra time to invest in your future?

The Centre for Social Innovation is offering a world-changing opportunity to trade your time and energy for our expertise, networks and free office space! Warning: We have no money! This isn’t a paying gig.

The deal: your time & positive energy = free office space, ideas and networks

The Centre for Social Innovation is looking for up to fifteen incredible people to participate in a four month agents of change pilot program.

You get trained up in a community animation intensive.  Then you give your time as a community animator for free office space — 1 day per week of your time = 60 hours/month of hot desking. The program runs from October 1, 2010 to January 30, 2011.

More info: http://socialinnovation.ca/internship

+++++

CANVASSERS, F/T, TORONTO ENVIRONMENTAL ALLIANCE, TORONTO ON

TEA is recognized locally and nationally for our municipal work on smog, waste reduction, pesticides, transit, Greenbelt protection, energy efficiency and green power — issues we believe are critical to the health and well-being of Toronto residents. Our collaborations with the community (eg. community groups, local labour groups, small businesses, anti-poverty groups) are cherished and key to our past and future successes.

The Toronto Environmental Alliance (TEA) has exciting opportunities for
environmentally minded, articulate, and passionate individuals.

TEA is currently hiring front line campaign positions. The job gives you the opportunity to go door to door and talk to the public about some of Toronto’s key environmental issues. Give yourself the chance to really make a difference in our community.

The job hours are from 2pm – 10pm, Monday through Friday. Starting pay is $410 a week for full-time.

More info: http://torontoenvironment.org/jobs

+++++

FOODSHARE COMMUNICATIONS COORDINATOR, TORONTO

Deadline: Friday, September 17, 2010, 5pm

FoodShare Toronto is seeking a Communications Coordinator to join our dynamic and passionate team.

Reporting to the Fundraising and Communications Manager, this position will support all of FoodShare’s communications activities and the creation of all of our communications materials for our diverse stakeholders including customers, program participants, community members, partners, donors, policy makers, educators, the general public and more. More specifically, the Communications Coordinator will take responsibility for assuring that brand standards and guidelines are maintained, that the FoodShare website and social media channels are fresh and up-to-date, and will assist with media relations and event coordination.

For more info: http://www.foodshare.net/upcomingjobs-CommCoord.htm
++++++++++++++++++++
++++++++++++++++++++

ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK):

Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

—END—

I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon Profile: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Work, work, work

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 27th JUNE 2010

VIDEO: WHAT BIG MEDIA IGNORED: 25,000 PEACEFULLY DEMONSTRATE AGAINST G20 POLICIES IN TORONTO

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2mL46t8H4oU

+++++

THE TORONTO G20 RIOT FRAUD: UNDERCOVER POLICE ENGAGED IN PURPOSEFUL PROVOCATION AT TAX PAYERS’ EXPENSE

by Terry Burrows, Global Research

Toronto is right now in the midst of a massive government / media propaganda fraud. As events unfold, it is becoming increasingly clear that the ‘Black Bloc’ are undercover police operatives engaged in purposeful provocations to eclipse and invalidate legitimate G20 citizen protest by starting a riot. Government agents have been caught doing this before in Canada.

http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=viewArticle&code=BUR20100627&articleId=19928

+++++

THE G8 FAILS ITS OWN TEST

Editorial, The Toronto Star

Canada pledged a credible $1.1 billion in new funds over five years for Harper’s signature “Muskoka Initiative” to improve maternal and child health care…But the recession-battered G8 as a group responded feebly, mustering only $5 billion over five years. That is barely a fifth of what the United Nations reckons would be their fair share if they were determined to make a real difference…This is a shabby performance for a rich club that generates close to $40 trillion in wealth, and prides itself on the belief that “its collective will can be a powerful catalyst for sustainable change and progress,” as the communiqué put it. By that grandiose measure, the G8 failed its own leadership test.

http://www.thestar.com/opinion/editorials/article/829105–the-g8-fails-its-own-test

+++++

PUNISHMENT PARK: AN EYEWITNESS REPORT OF POLICE VIOLENCE IN EAST TORONTO

by Chris Webb, Canadian Dimension

This morning I gathered with a group of friends and comrades in Jimmie Simpson park on Queen Street East. We were small in our numbers because many organizers had been arrested and are currently being held in a large detention facility at 629 Eastern Avenue. Our intention was to provide support, food, water and transport to those who were released from the detention centre…The message and intent of the march was one of peace, solidarity and justice.

http://canadiandimension.com/blog/3115/

+++++

VIDEO: YORK UNIVERSITY POLITICAL SCIENCE PROFESSOR DAVID McNALLY TALKS TO THE CBC’S CAROLE MACNEIL ABOUT BLACK BLOC TACTICS AND ANARCHISTS

http://www.cbc.ca/video/#/News/ID=1531407713

+++++

THE HARPER PLAN FOR A GLOBAL DEPRESSION

by James Laxer, rabble.ca

If the U.S. and other major countries slam the brakes on government spending, the world will be pushed into a deflationary downward spiral. Unemployment will rise and many countries will be pushed back into recession. The U.S. needs to deal with its debt problems in such a way as not to convert the current economic malaise into a catastrophe. Over time, the U.S. will need to sharply raise taxes for the rich and the affluent, refashion its trade relationships with China and other countries, and re-launch its crumbling manufacturing sector.

http://rabble.ca/blogs/bloggers/james-laxer/2010/06/harper-plan-global-depression

+++++

POLICE POWERS TOO SWEEPING

Editorial, The Toronto Star

Since when do Canadians have to submit to police scrutiny for strolling down the street in broad daylight? We don’t do “Papers, please.” The Charter of Rights and the age-old common law affirm our right to go peacefully about our business without having to identify ourselves to the police, much less submit to searches.

Except in Toronto at the 2010 Group of 20 summit this weekend.

http://www.thestar.com/opinion/editorials/article/828909–police-powers-too-sweeping

+++++

“I HAVE LIVED IN TORONTO FOR 32 YEARS. HAVE NEVER SEEN A DAY LIKE THIS” JOURNALIST STEVE PAIKIN’S TWITTER ACCOUNT OF PROTEST

Journalist Steve Paikin, calling it an awful night for democracy, witnessed quite a bit in yesterday’s demonstration(s), including being “escorted” away by police.

Some highlights:

•   i have lived in toronto for 32 years. have never seen a day like this. shame on the vandals.
•   so the police just started arresting people. i stress, this was a peaceful, middle class, diverse crowd. no anarchists
•   the demonstration on the esplanade was peaceful. it was like an old sit in. no one was aggressive. and yet riot squad officers moved in.
•   i saw police brutality tonight. it was unnecessary. they asked me to leave the site or they would arrest me. i told them i was dong my job.
•   ppl standing around with hands in air. this was peaceful. it won’t be now. unprovoked attack by police

http://twitter.com/spaikin

++++++++++++++++++++
++++++++++++++++++++

OUR MANDATE:

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

This is a moderated list. To send postings to the list, please email them to rhonda_sussman@yahoo.ca. To change your subscription settings, visit http://listserv.oise.utoronto.ca/mailman/listinfo/csewbroadcast.

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

NOTE: D.W. Livingstone will resign as director of CSEW and as Canada Research Chair in Lifelong Learning and Work at the end of June, 2010, at the same time as he retires from teaching at the University of Toronto. Peter Sawchuk will become the director of CSEW. Livingstone will continue in an advisory role on the current CSEW CURA project, Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning (APCOL), and complete other writing projects including Manufacturing Meltdown: Case Studies in Recasting Steel Labour and Learning (with Dorothy E. Smith and Warren Smith) forthcoming from Fernwood Press, 2011.

—END—

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon Profile: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Work, work, work

Work, work, work

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 9th NOVEMBER 2009

 

OUR MANDATE: The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

To change your subscription settings, visit http://listserv.oise.utoronto.ca/mailman/listinfo/csewbroadcast

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

+++++

EVENTS

FALL COLLOQUIUM: DEVELOPING THE VISION OF SOCIAL CHANGE

Wednesday, November 18
6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
OISE Room 5 – 250
252 Bloor St. West, Toronto

With:

Kathryn Church, Associate Professor, School of Disability Studies, Ryerson University. Long-time ally and researcher with disability and mental health communities.

Winnie Ng, OISE doctoral student, well-known Toronto community activist and labour educator. Currently engaged in reimagining anti-racist learning.

What does an agenda for “workplace learning” look like from the perspective of workers with disabilities? From a racial and economic justice perspective?

Join us for these two dynamic presentations, with time for questions. You will also have an opportunity to meet with faculty and students in OISE’s Collaborative Program in Workplace Learning and Social Change.

Light refreshments will be served. For more information on the program, visit: http://aecp.oise.utoronto.ca/ae/programs/collaborative/wlsc.html

+++++

CANADIAN LABOUR INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL (CLIFF) DEBUTS!

November 22-29, 2009

Imagine a world where thousands of films are made about workers and the conditions under which they live, work, fight, and succeed in their daily lives. In just a few days, the Canadian Labour International Film Festival (CLiFF) will debut in Toronto. All screenings are free!

The launch at the Sheraton Centre at 4 pm on Sunday November 22 (site of the Ontario Federation of Labour convention) will be followed by six evenings at the Bloor Cinema in Toronto.

Hope you can join us for the grand opening on the 22nd – great films, music, speakers! And at the Bloor Cinema from Monday through Saturday. Details of the festival country-wide in dozens of locations Saturday-Sunday November 28-29 are available on the CLIFF website: http://www.labourfilms.ca

+++++

TORONTO SOCIALIST ACTION PRESENTS REBEL FILMS: DR. STRANGELOVE

Friday, November 13
7 p.m.
OISE, 252 Bloor St. West, Room 2-212
St. George Subway Station
Everyone welcome. $4 donation requested.

93 minutes, 1964, B&W. An insane general starts a process towards nuclear holocaust that a war room of politicians and generals frantically try to stop. Stanley Kubrick’s iconic spoof on the arms race makes a powerful case for nuclear disarmament. Science for Peace executive board member Jim Deutsch will speak about the current nuclear arms race, followed by an open discussion.

+++++

RESEARCH FORUM: THE PEOPLE’S RECESSION – ONE YEAR LATER

Social Planning Toronto Research and Policy Forum

Wednesday, November 11
9:30 a.m. – Noon
Lillian H. Smith Library,
239 College Street (just east of Spadina) Room BC

Please join us for our November forum with:

* Armine Yalnizyan, Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives – Recession and realcovery: what’s community service got to do with it?
* Beth Wilson, Social Planning Toronto and the Social Planning Network of Ontario – SPNO’s hard hit: impact of the economic downturn on nonprofit community social services in Ontario
* Ann Fitzpatrick, Recession Relief Coalition – Taking action on the people’s recession

All are welcome but space is limited. Register at: http://socialplanningtoronto.org/news/research-forum-the-peoples-recession-one-year-later/

+++++

LUNCHBOX SPEAKERS’ SERIES: NOVEMBER SPEAKERS’ PANEL – YOUTH FOR YOUTH INITIATIVES

Wednesday, November 18
Noon – 1:30 pm
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education
University of Toronto
252 Bloor St. West
Toronto, Room 12-199

Speakers:

Hannah Feldberg – will discuss the concept of Me to We as a new kind of social enterprise; one which was first a philosophy and is now a movement carried by dedicated social justice advocates – the youth of today.

Liam O’Doherty – will explore how social media can empower youth organizing and how online, peer-to-peer collaboration is complimentary to traditional methods of activism.

Jeffrey Ma – will talk about why crossing borders can be easier than crossing the street, and the importance of connecting with people of different faiths and values, both internationally and here at home.

Bring your lunch and a mug – coffee, tea and water will be provided.

For more information, contact Lisa White at: secspeaker@oise.utoronto.ca or visit our website at: http://socialeconomy.utoronto.ca

This event will also be webcast live on the Internet. Please see our website at: http://socialeconomy.utoronto.ca/english/webcast.php for detailed instructions.

+++++

GOOD JOBS, STRONG COMMUNITIES! UNITE-HERE CAMPAIGN 2010

Join hundreds of members of Unite Here Local 75 as we celebrate our victories and launch our 2010 multi-city campaign for good jobs and strong communities!

November 10, 2009

5:30: Gather at City Hall for rally, March to Hyatt Regency Hotel
*Pre-rally activities at City Hall, 100 Queen St. W, Toronto
3:30-4:30 Press conference and welcome, Member’s Lounge, City Hall
4:30-5:30 Briefing: Looking back, moving forward. Council Chambers, City Hall

* Hear what the Hotel Workers Rising movement has won in Toronto and North America.
* Learn about the role of hospitality jobs in the road to economic recovery
* Meet members of the “Hyatt 100,” a group of non-union housekeepers from Boston fighting Hyatt’s efforts to outsource their jobs with low-paid agency work
* Learn about the fight for good hospitality jobs in Toronto, 2010.

Hotel Workers Rising: Standing up for good jobs and strong communities.
RSVP: info@uniteherelocal75.org

Find out more: http://www.uniteherelocal75.org, http://www.uniteherecanada.org, or http://www.unitehere.org.

+++++

NEWS & VIEWS

CITY OF TORONTO’S CAPITAL BUDGET – HAVE YOUR SAY!

The City of Toronto’s proposed 2010 capital budget and 10-year plan were presented at the City’s Budget Committee on Tuesday, November 3. Find more details on how you can make a submission, read the analyst’s notes and more on the city website: http://www.toronto.ca/budget2010/.

+++++

NEW STUDY IDENTIFIES PEAK TIMES FOR BRAIN INJURIES IN THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY

TORONTO, Oct. 6 /CNW/ – August may be the cruellest month for brain injuries in Ontario’s construction industry, but a new study shows October is not far behind.

“We thought it was important to track these injuries month by month,” says Dr. Angela Colantonio, a senior scientist at Toronto Rehabilitation Institute and co-author of the study published this week in the journal Brain Injury.

Few academic studies have looked at brain injury among construction workers. Yet the construction industry – with approximately 400,000 workers in Ontario alone – is known to have a high rate of serious brain injury. The new study used data from the Ontario Workplace Safety and Insurance Board on 218 cases of non-fatal brain injury which resulted in days off work in 2004-2005.

The authors weren’t surprised to find the highest number of brain injuries in the busy construction month of August, while December had the lowest number. But they didn’t expect to find a second peak of injuries in October. This may reflect a surge in work to complete projects prior to the winter months. Contributing factors, they speculate, could be shorter days to work, less light, and more adverse weather conditions. The authors want to do further study to find out if this seasonal pattern holds for other years.

Their study also begins to raise questions about the time of day when many construction-related brain injuries occur. It identifies two peaks during the day: the hour before and the hours after lunch.

“Most of us know that lethargic feeling that hits just before or after lunch at work: our energy dips, it’s hard to focus but we have a job to finish,” says Dr. Colantonio. Other factors may also be distracting workers in anticipation of, or during, their lunch break – and affecting their attention on the job. “For construction workers, this could have devastating consequences.”

Doug McVittie, study co-author and assistant general manager and director of operations for the Construction Safety Association of Ontario (CSAO), says his group will circulate the findings to construction companies across the province, as well as labour and management health and safety committees. The results will also be shared with CSAO staff members who provide training and safety seminars for construction workers.

For further information: Carolyn Lovas, Media Relations Specialist, Toronto Rehab, (416) 597-3422, ext. 3837, Lovas.Carolyn@torontorehab.on.ca.

To read the study: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02699050903036033

+++++

BRIARPATCH MAGAZINE, NOV/DEC 2009: WORK & THE GREEN ECONOMY

The economic crisis has taken a grim toll on working people and on the labour movement. In its wake, can labour activists and environmentalists join forces to build a green economy that works for everyone? This is just one of the many questions we set out to answer in our annual labour issue, which also brings you a report on the sorry state of freelance journalism, a first-hand account of fighting fire in Canada’s Big Wild, an assessment of the prospects for union organizing in tough times, a look at the intersection of neoliberalism and volunteerism in New Orleans, and more.

To subscribe or order a copy of this issue, call 1-866-431-5777 or visit our secure online shop at: http://briarpatchmagazine.com/webstore.

+++++

VIDEO: CF 61 (LOCKED-OUT CADILLAC FAIRVIEW WORKERS) TALK TO THE CROWD AT ST JAMES PARK, TORONTO

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8az_8QpfQtI

CF 61 told the crowd how Cadillac Fairview has attacked the workers to avoid employing older workers. Information sheets being circulated talk about the malls to boycott during the 2009 Christmas Shopping season.

The OCAP TD Centre rally supported the 61 locked out and terminated employees of Cadillac Fairview. The CF 61 are represented by CEP Local 2003. Please visit the story of the workers struggle against the bank and their fight for justice here: ‘Solidarity with Toronto Dominion Centre employees under attack’: http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=104383668872  or visit: http://www.ceplocal2003.org/.

+++++

CANADA/BRAZIL: TELL VALE THAT DIVIDE-AND-CONQUER WON’T WORK

Since being privatized in 1997, the global mining giant Vale has unleashed a vicious attack on workers. The company undermined health and safety standards in Brazil and now it’s set its sights on Canada. In 2009 negotiations with the United Steelworkers (USW), Vale claimed it needed deep concessions – despite making over $13 billion (USD) in 2008 net profits. The company’s strategy is to divide and conquer by undermining seniority and providing lesser benefits to new employees. 3,500 members of the USW rejected Vale’s demands and went on strike in mid-July. Vale has since announced it will hire replacement workers and force other union members to do the work of the striking miners. Meanwhile Vale workers throughout Brazil are struggling to hold on to jobs, earn a living wage, achieve minimum standards for safe working conditions, and guarantee basic labor rights. Vale employees and their unions in Brazil and Canada are fighting back together,
reaching out to workers in a global campaign for fair treatment at Vale.

To read more, click here: http://www.labourstart.org/cgi-bin/solidarityforever/show_campaign.cgi?c=595

+++++

PAY BONANZA CONTINUES FOR BANKERS

By Linda McQuaig – Source: rabble.ca

Some people were outraged last week by a report that a member of the kitchen staff of bailed-out Wall Street firm AIG had received a $7,700 bonus.

Surely that was far less outrageous than the million-dollar bonuses paid to others at AIG who actually carried out the firm’s financial business.

After all, the kitchen helper produced something that at least could be eaten. Apart from perhaps overcooking the Chateaubriand or leaving spots on the champagne glasses, what harm could the kitchen helper have done — compared to driving the world economy over a cliff?

To read more: http://rabble.ca/columnists/2009/10/pay-bonanza-continues-bankers

+++++

JOB POSTINGS

COMMUNICATIONS OFFICER, SOCIAL PLANNING TORONTO (SPT)

Social Planning Toronto (SPT) is a non-profit community organization committed to independent social planning at the local and city-wide levels. We work to improve the quality of life for all people in Toronto through community capacity building, community education and advocacy, policy research and analysis, and social reporting.

SPT has a full-time Communications Officer position available. This position will be of interest to individuals who have a proven track record working in the area of communications focused on community development and action.

This position encompasses the development and implementation of the overall communications, public relations and media strategies of SPT.

Responsibilities include:

* Develop and implement internal and external communication strategies/policies;
* Prepare SPT annual communications plan;
* Design, edit and disseminate all SPT publications, print and promotional materials (e.g. reports, newsletters, journals, periodic publications, brochures, written and electronic bulletins, flyers, press releases, etc.);
* Manage information on the SPT website (using a popular content management platform) including all content both textual and visual;
* Write and develop press releases, articles, speeches, media advisories, media kits, and cultivate media relations;
* Supervise placement students and volunteers as appropriate.

Application deadline is November 22. For a complete copy of the job description and application info visit: http://socialplanningtoronto.org/news/position-opening-communications-officer/

+++++

VOLUNTEER WITH CLIFF- CANADA’S ONLY NATIONAL LABOUR FILM FEST!

The Canadian Labour International Film Festival (CLiFF) is now accepting volunteer applicants to help out with our inaugural festival. Our not-for-profit festival celebrates films about workers, for workers and by workers.

Volunteers can be involved in many aspects of the festival from suggesting recent films for inclusion to helping throw media-related events like the one we are planning for Labour Day! As our festival launch draws closer we will also need people to help distribute leaflets, assemble media kits, as well as helping manage other volunteers. During the festival itself we’ll also need help taking tickets and individuals to act us ushers. There’s a place for everyone.

Upon request, volunteers will receive a letter reflecting their commitment and involvement in the festival. Don’t pass up this unique opportunity to see the inner workings of a festival in its first year!

All volunteers should be: 18 years of age or older willing to attend a mandatory volunteer orientation session, committed, friendly, team players.

The festival launches November 22nd in Toronto and runs until November 29th. It launches country-wide November 28th. We will be holding volunteer orientations sessions in August through the start of November.

Please e-mail us at: festival@labourfilms.ca with the word “Volunteer” in the subject line.

+++++

PROGRAM ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT, CANADA WORLD YOUTH

Type: Definite term contract, part-time: 17.5 hours/week
Organization: Canada World Youth http://www.cwy-jcm.org
Location: Toronto, Montreal or Vancouver, Canada

Main responsibilities: In keeping with Canada World Youth’s policies,

* Plan and support program activities.
* Provide direct administrative and logistical support to the programs.
* Ensure effective communications between the various constituencies of the programs.
* Liaise with volunteers participating in team support activities.
* Perform a number of accounting functions.
* Ensure the layout and production of training and/or information tools.
* Revise and maintain up-dated program-related information systems.
* Write various letters, reports and other documents.

Application deadline is November 10. For the complete job description and application info visit: http://www.planetfriendly.net/gwd.php?id=9594

+++++

JOURNAL ARTICLES

Cities and the making of modern Europe
Friedrich Lenger
Journal of Urban History published 14 October 2009, 10.1177/0096144209349891
http://juh.sagepub.com/cgi/rapidpdf/0096144209349891v1

+++++

Grounding the regime of precarious employment: Homeless day laborers’ negotiation of the job queue
Damian T. Williams
Work and Occupations 2009;36 209-246
http://wox.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/36/3/209

+++++

“The worse you behave, the more you seem to be rewarded”: Bullying in nursing as organizational corruption
Marie Hutchinson, Margaret H. Vickers, Lesley Wilkes, Debra Jackson
Employee Responsibilities and Rights Journal, Volume 21, Number 3 / September 2009
http://www.springerlink.com/content/dt2532t401756817/

+++++

Social inequality, lifestyles and health – a non-linear canonical correlation analysis based on the approach of Pierre Bourdieu
Kirstin Grosse Frie, Christian Janssen
International Journal of Public Health
http://www.springerlink.com/content/u5783l3785780r34/

***END***

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Incident

The Incident

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 18th OCTOBER 2009

 

OUR MANDATE: The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

To change your subscription settings, visit http://listserv.oise.utoronto.ca/mailman/listinfo/csewbroadcast

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

+++++

SOCIAL ECONOMY CENTRE – UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO 2009-2010 LUNCHBOX SPEAKERS’ SERIES

October Speakers’ Panel – Student Co-operatives

When:  Wednesday, October 21, 2009, noon – 1:30 pm
Where:  Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto,
252 Bloor St. West, Toronto, Room 12-199

Speakers:

* Marisa Charland will give an overview of Ontario Student Co-operative Association, the federation that unites all Ontario student co-operatives.
* Debbie McKay will present the development of, and services provided by the Guelph Campus Co-operative enterprise at University of Guelph.
* Andrew Haydon will discuss the challenges in developing the newest student housing co-operative in Ontario, located in Cambridge.

* Sonja Carrière, Education Manager of On Co-op, will moderate this panel.

Bring your lunch and a mug – coffee, tea and water will be provided.

For more information, contact Lisa White at secspeaker@oise.utoronto.ca, or visit our website at http://socialeconomy.utoronto.ca

This event will also be webcast live on the Internet. Please see our website for detailed instructions: http://socialeconomy.utoronto.ca/english/webcast.php

+++++

PEOPLE FOR EDUCATION ANNUAL CONFERENCE

Register now to attend on Saturday November 7, 2009!

Amazing speakers and workshop leaders are looking forward to sharing their expertise with you.

* Meet other parents, principals, school and school board staff from around the province.
* Come and share ideas, raise concerns, find solutions and learn a lot!
* Connect with others who care passionately about our schools.

When: Nov. 7th, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m

Where: York University, Toronto, ON

Cost: $50 and you can save $10 by becoming a member of People for Education (costs $25 but gets you lots of other privileges too!)

To view the registration form, click here: http://www.peopleforeducation.com/registration09 (Fill it out, save to your computer, then email back to jan@peopleforeducation.com)

To view the conference flyer, click here (share this by email – bring a friend or someone from your school): http://www.peopleforeducation.com/conferenceflyer09

To view the agenda and session descriptions, click here: http://www.peopleforeducation.com/conference09/sessionsupdate

+++++

URGENT ACTION: STOP THE U OF T ATTACKS ON ACCESS & EQUITY

October 19 & 21

Students who face barriers to access education are about to be hit even harder. The Transitional Year Program (TYP), a 40 year old access program, is about to face drastic changes that will inevitably destroy it. These changes include taking away TYP’s autonomy by putting it under Woodsworth College, taking away TYP’s independent space, reducing teaching and support staff, and slashing the TYP budget.

We need your support on Monday October 19 and Wednesday October 21. On these dates university bodies will be voting to decide the fate of the program. We need a mass turnout of people to stop these committees from rubber-stamping these heinous changes:

Monday October 19, 3-5pm
Faculty of Arts and Science Council
Munk Centre, Campbell Conference Centre,
1 Devonshire Place (Devonshire and Hoskin)

Wednesday October 2,1 4:30-6pm
Woodsworth College Council
Woodsworth Residence, Waters Lounge
321 Bloor Street (Bloor and St. George)

The University has told students that they are not closing TYP. However, TYP will be unable to serve its mandate and support its students under the proposed move to Woodsworth. Reducing staff, faculty and funding limits the ability of the program to meet the needs of its students. Taking away our space by moving us into a few rooms at Woodsworth further marginalizes us by removing the supportive environment that our home at 49 St. George provides.

The University and TYP administration have been repeatedly asked to consult students through this process. After a battle, the TYP administration began meeting with the Transitional Year Program Preservation Alliance, sharing limited information and calling it consultation. Never have students or the communities TYP serves been allowed input into the process.

The future of these marginalized students is in your hands. Please join us in asking the University of Toronto to reconsider shutting the doors on this essential program.

+++++

THIRD CANADIAN CONFERENCE ON SOCIAL ENTERPRISE

“Living Our Values: Social Enterprise in Action”
November 18-20, 2009

Join hundreds of existing and prospective social enterprise operators from every region in Canada at the Third Canadian Conference on Social Enterprise taking place in Toronto, November 18-20, 2009. The conference will consist of three days of training and work sessions toward a national policy agenda and action plan.

Day 1: Intensive training sessions geared to your stage of planning, development or growth.

Days 2 and 3: Working sessions with fellow practitioners, funders, government officials, network organizations, and supporters designed to create a national policy agenda and action plan for social enterprise in Canada.

The Third Canadian Conference on Social Enterprise is an initiative of the Social Enterprise Council of Canada. For more information on the conference, please email: info@torontoenterprisefund.ca or visit http://www.enterprisingnonprofits.ca/resources/secouncil#CCSE

+++++

WHAT’S WRONG WITH CANADA’S IMMIGRATION SYSTEM?

A Migrant Justice Assembly with Salimah Valiani, Amina Sherazee, Himani Bannerji and David McNally

Friday, October 23
6:00pm
245 Church Street
Room ENG-LG11

* Did you know that in 2008 more temporary workers entered the workforce than permanent residents in to Canada?
* Did you know that Canada has cut its refugee acceptance rate in half over the last 20 years?
* Did you know that there are over half a million people in the country without status, over half in the GTA?

Come and hear about how the broken immigration system is being shattered. Share your own stories. Build relationships. Develop ideas for the way ahead. Come prepared to talk back!

Registration and Refreshments at 6:00; Event starts at 6:30pm sharp.

Read more: http://toronto.nooneisillegal.org/node/336

+++++

NOTES ON NO: ABSTINENCE AND THE PROBLEM OF THINKING IN SEX EDUCATION

CUHI (Centre for Urban Health Initiatives) Youth Sexual Health RIG Seminar Series

With Jen Gilbert, Ph.D., Faculty of Education, York University

Wednesday October 28th, 2009, 1:30-3:00 pm
York University, Room 280N, York Lanes
For Directions: http://www.yorku.ca/yorkweb/maps/keele.htm
Free, all are welcome, please RSVP to adrian.guta@utoronto.ca

This paper explores the problem of prohibition in sex education. Drawing on a two-year study of the language of abstinence in the United States, Dr. Gilbert considers many of the different ways that adults and youth use “no” in sex education. Feminists and other have critiqued the use of “no” as a restrictive and punitive gesture, containing sexuality’s potential in the lives of youth, particularly girls, youth of color, and LGBT youth. While she recognizes the importance of these critiques, she takes a detour through psychoanalytic theories of negation and considers the ways “no” can, often unwittingly, make room for thinking and thoughtfulness.

Please see our website for upcoming seminar summaries and other events: http://www.cuhi.utoronto.ca

+++++

CREATIVE PLACES + SPACES CONFERENCE    
        
Oct. 28-30, 2009

Creative Places + Spaces is a multi-media, interactive, art-infused experience designed to inspire, empower, and connect thinkers, policymakers and practitioners working to build vibrant, dynamic, sustainable and creative places. The conference runs from October 28 – 30, 2009 and is hosted by Artscape.

During Creative Places + Spaces:  The Collaborative City, delegates and speakers together will have the opportunity to hear, see, exchange and practice global perspectives on collaboration and connect them to local opportunities for change. If you are interested in building bridges across boundaries in order to solve problems, generate new ideas, and foster transformation, check out the conference schedule and register today for a crash-course in the global groundswell around collaboration.

To find out more: http://www.creativeplacesandspaces.ca/conference

+++++

THE MAYTREE FOUNDATION: REGISTER FOR THE FIVE GOOD IDEAS FALL 2009 PROGRAM

* Creating an Automatic Marketing Culture

with Donnie Claudino

Thursday, October 22, 2009
12:00 to 2:00 pm

Are you one of those people who rarely forward emails? Yet on that rare occasion, something strikes you as special–and you are inspired to ‘pass-it-on.’ Something about it clicked with you. Perhaps you can’t even explain it; a certain … je ne sais quoi. That ‘something’ is often described by marketers as “stickiness.” Stickiness is typically associated with “Viral Marketing.” But who wants to spread a virus? When we connect with a message, a video, a website–we automatically engage with it, and want to share it. We don’t have to be asked, because it’s automatic. Attend this Lunch & Learn to discover 5 things your organization can do to grow an automatic marketing culture–and have your messages exponentially spread by your constituents.

*Managing Volunteers

with Gail Nyberg, Executive Director, Daily Bread Food Bank

Wednesday, November 18, 2009
12:00 to 2:00 pm

Most non-profit organizations rely on volunteers to not only enhance their programming, but run day-to-day operations. At Daily Bread Food Bank the job of distributing over 15 million pounds or food to over 200 food programs would not get done without the hard work of volunteers. Volunteers help to sort food, participate in events, provide information to the public and run community food banks. Last year, 15,521 volunteers helped Daily Bread with over 107,259 hours of work. Our volunteers do great work, and we are constantly looking at ways to improve our programs and our volunteer opportunities. Come and find out more about what we’ve learned over the years (and are still learning) about how to run a successful volunteer program.

Location for both sessions:

St. Michael’s College – Elmsley Hall, Charbonnel Lounge
81 St. Mary Street
At St. Mary and Bay Streets, two blocks south of Bloor, closest subway access from Bay and Wellesley stations.

Please note that though the sessions are free, registration is required. Brown bag lunches are provided on a first come, first served basis.

Please RSVP to: kvukobratovic@maytree.com

+++++

ECHO AND OWHN WANT TO HEAR YOUR VOICE ON OCTOBER 21, TORONTO

Please join Echo and the Ontario Women’s Health Network and share your views on: The Minister of Health’s 10-Year Mental Health and Addictions Strategy

Date: Wednesday October 21, 2009
Time: 9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Place: Chestnut Conference Centre
89 Chestnut Street, Toronto
(east of University/south of Dundas )

Together we will:

1)   discuss the Minister’s report called Every Door is the Right Door;
2)   prepare comments that will be shared in a report to the Minister of Health;
3)   enjoy a women-friendly day of sharing and conversation to ensure your voices are heard
4)   share a healthy breakfast, lunch and snacks.  

This is an event for community women, service providers & community planners.

Please register by contacting OWHN at 416-408-4840 or by email at: owhn@owhn.on.ca

Please ask about support for childcare and local transportation.

+++++

REPORT LAUNCH: WHY DON’T WE WANT THE POOR TO OWN ANYTHING?

The Metcalf Foundation invites you to the launch of a new report by Metcalf Innovation Fellow John Stapleton:

Why don’t we want the poor to own anything? Our relentless social policy journey toward destitution for the 900,000 poorest people in Ontario

When: Wednesday, October 21, 2009 from 1:00 to 3:00 pm
Where: St. Christopher House – Community Hall
248 Ossington Avenue (Dundas at Ossington), Toronto

This new report explores the issue of the very low levels of savings and assets allowed for people on welfare and some other social security programs. It makes recommendations for reform to rules that are impoverishing people and almost guaranteeing they will grow old in poverty.

Low-income community members may qualify for assistance to attend this event. Please call Rick Eagan at St. Christopher House at (416) 532-4828 ext. 238 for details.

Please RSVP to Heather Dunford at hdunford@metcalffoundation.com or (416) 926- 0366 ext. 33

To view launch details: http://fpyn.ca/system/files/Launch%20invite.pdf

+++++

ORDER NOW! OUR TIMES MAGAZINE SPECIAL FALL ISSUE ON CLIMATE CHANGE

“The division between labour movements and social justice movements is an artificial one that serves to impede our ability to make progressive and sustained change.”
Angela Robertson, Social Justice Activist
“What Binds Us Together”

Here we go again! Our Times’ special fall issue on climate change (Vol. 28 No.5) will be heading to the printer shortly. If you’d like extra copies (more than 20), please let us know as soon as possible.

In this issue we’re featuring the efforts of workers and unions to go green and create long-term sustainable jobs. We’re bringing you a fantastic photostory by B.C. photographer Joshua Berson about the firefighters who fought the massive fires this year in Kelowna. And you’ll hear about the joint efforts of the Highlander Center in Tennessee and Toronto’s Labour Education Centre to build a cross-border, cross-movement dialogue. Of course, we’ll also have great new instalments of our regular columns, including WebWork and the Our Times Tally.

If you think you may want to order extra copies of this issue as an education resource for your workshops, schools, or to include in your conference or convention kits, please contact our business manager by Monday, October 19 at the latest. Telephone: 416-703-7661. Toll-free: 1-800-648-6131. E-mail: office@ourtimes.ca. Discounted prices are available for bulk orders.

Either way, I hope you enjoy the issue and find it of use. Thank you for your support for Our Times.

In Solidarity,
Lorraine Endicott
Editor, Our Times
http://www.ourtimes.ca

+++++

CANADIAN JOURNALISM FOUNDATION FORUM – DIVERSITY IN THE MEDIA: A CASE STUDY

In an effort to bring lessons learned about diversity and programming to a wider audience, CJF Forums presents Joan Melanson, executive producer at CBC Radio, Toronto; and Nick Davis, producer of Metro Morning, in a discussion on reaching out to diverse audiences. Suanne Kelman, a professor at Ryerson’s School of Journalism, will interview the panel.

Date:
Tuesday, October 20, 2009
6:30 PM – 9:00 PM (ET)

Location:
Innis Town Hall
2 Sussex Ave.
Toronto, Ontario M5S 1J5

After the discussion there will be a Q&A with the audience, followed by a cocktail reception.

The event is free, but guests are encouraged to make a $15 contribution to help support CJF programs upon registration.

To register:  http://www.eventbrite.com/contact-organizer?eid=451282799

+++++

BOOK LAUNCH (TORONTO) – HARVEST PILGRIMS: MEXICAN AND CARIBBEAN MIGRANT FARM WORKERS IN CANADA

Between the Lines and the Stephen Bulger Gallery invite you to celebrate the launch of Vincenzo Pietropaolo’s new book of photography. Harvest Pilgrims tells the little-known story of Canada’s migrant workers. The photographs in the “Harvest Pilgrims” collection have been highly acclaimed internationally through many publications and exhibitions, including a travelling show curated by the Canadian Museum of Contemporary Photography that opened in Mexico City. Pietropaolo will present a slideshow of his work on the subject, and talk about the project, which has been 20 years in the making.

Tuesday, November 10th, 2009
7:00 pm to 9:00 pm
Stephen Bulger Gallery
1026 Queen Street West
Toronto, ON

For more information, contact Between the Lines, 1.800.718.7201or email: info@btlbooks.com

About the Book:
Harvest Pilgrims: Mexican and Caribbean Migrant Farm Workers in Canada
Vincenzo Pietropaolo
144 pp | paper | 80 + duotone photos
ISBN 978-1-897071-54-0 | $49.95 | October 2009

+++++

OISE/UT DISABILITY STUDIES SPEAKERS SERIES – “DISABILITY IN DANGEROUS TIMES”

With Dr. Catherine Frazee

Thursday, November 5
3:30 pm
OISE Library, 252 Bloor Street West
Toronto, ON (above St. George Subway stop)

All Welcome, ASL provided

Catherine Frazee, D.Litt., LLD.
Professor of Distinction
Co-director, Ryerson-RBC Institute for Disability Studies Research & Education

Catherine Frazee has been involved in the equality rights movement for many years, most notably during her term as Chief Commissioner of the Ontario Human Rights Commission from 1989 to 1992. Her current work as a writer, educator and researcher focuses upon the rights, identity, experience and well-being of persons with disabilities. Catherine is a committed activist who has lectured and published extensively in Canada and abroad on issues related to disability rights, disability culture and the disability experience. She is currently a member of DAWN Canada’s Equality Rights Committee and serves on the Board of Directors of the Canadian Association for Community Living, where she chairs the Association’s Task Force on Values and Ethics. Catherine was awarded an honorary Doctor of Letters from the University of New Brunswick in October 2002.

For more info, contact Tanya Titchkosky, 416-978-0451 or email: tanyatitchkosky@oise.utoronto.ca

+++++

SOCIAL ECONOMY CENTRE – UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO 2009-2010 WORKSHOP SERIES

October 30: Board-Management Relations
with Vic Murray (Schulich School of Business, York University; School of Public Administration, University of Victoria)

For years, books, articles, websites and consultants have been offering all kinds of advice on how boards ought to operate and relate to the organizations they govern. Yet many boards have a very difficult time living up to these ideals or choose not to even try. Why is this? Is it the fault of the boards and managers? Or is it possible that the advice itself is not always what is needed?

Join us in this workshop to:

* Explore the gaps between the ideal and reality in board governance
* Learn how to develop ways of bringing the ideal and reality closer together
* Learn how to use contingency-based analysis and tailored board development approaches

Date:  Friday, October 30, 2009 – 9:00 am – 4:00 pm.

Cost: $140 + GST; Each additional participant from the same organization will receive a $15 discount, as will those who register for more than one workshop. Student rate available. Refreshments, coffee & tea served, but lunch not provided.

To Register: http://sec.oise.utoronto.ca/english/workshops.php or contact Lisa White at secworkshops@oise.utoronto.ca, 416-978-0022

Location:  Social Economy Centre of the University of Toronto, 252 Bloor St. W. (5th floor), Toronto, ON M5S 1V6, (St. George Subway Station)

+++++

TELELEARNING SESSION 15: POVERTY REDUCTION IN CANADA

1. What are some public policy trends and instruments supporting poverty reduction in Canada?
2. What are some community-based approaches to poverty reduction in Canada?

If you want to know the answers to these questions and more, please join:

Jean Marc Fontan, Professor at UQÀM/Co-director of the Social Economy Community-University Research Alliance in Quebec; and Shauna McKinnon, Director of the Canadian Centre for Policy in an engaging telelearning session hosted by Jessica Notwell, Manager of the Women’s Economic Council.

Call Logistics:

* Session Date: Wednesday October 21st, 2009
* Call begins at 12:00 pm Eastern time, 9:00 am Pacific time
* Call in information will be given upon registration
* Register before October 20 to obtain dial in information and background papers
* This session is in English.

Session Format: 1 Hour
Welcome: 5 min
Presentations: 10 min by each speaker
Discussion: 35 minutes

Registration:
Register by phoning 250-472-4976, or e-mailing sekm@uvic.ca with your name, location, and work or volunteer position.

Limited number of spaces available – Register soon!
(This session is only available to Canadian Residents)

+++++

AUDITOR’S REPORT REINFORCES NEED FOR GREATER PUBLIC CONTROL; LESS PRIVATIZATION: OPSEU

The findings by the Auditor General that greater public oversight would have prevented the spending scandal at eHealth was strongly embraced by the Ontario Public Service Employees Union.

“Let’s hope the Premier and his government learned a valuable lesson today: the more you hand over control of a vital public service like health care to the private sector, the more costs are going to skyrocket at the expense of the tax-paying public,” said OPSEU president Warren (Smokey) Thomas.

“We couldn’t agree more with Auditor General McCarter. The private consultants behind the eHealth spending scandal weren’t able to contain themselves from pinching the public purse for every last dime. That simply wouldn’t happen under a genuine public system with built-in checks, oversight and accountability.”

In his report, the Auditor General specifically pointed to the fact that “there was a heavy, and in some cases almost total, reliance on (private) consultants. By 2008, the Ministry’s eHealth Program Branch had fewer than 30 full-time employees, but was engaging more than 300 consultants …”

Thomas said watching the eHealth scandal unfold was like reading a familiar old story.

He cited the Auditor’s report from 2008 which revealed the privatization of the William Osler Hospital in Brampton cost almost $500 million more than had Ontario used traditional public procurement and financing.

For further information: Greg Hamara, OPSEU Communications, (647) 238-9933 cell

+++++

GROCERY UNIONS JOIN WITH COMMUNITY TO BUILD BETTER SUPERMARKETS

by Tiffany Ten Eyck, Labor Notes

In New York City 11,600 retailers sell food, but fewer than 5 percent of them are grocery stores. In Detroit, more than half the city’s residents live in a “food desert,” where they’re closer to a fast food joint or a convenience store than to a supermarket.

UFCW locals in both cities are building community coalitions to create more and better grocery stores – which they hope, one day, will be union.

To read more: http://labornotes.org/node/2461

+++++

LABOUR BOOK OF THE WEEK – THE KILLING OF KAREN SILKWOOD

It has now been 35 years since the murder of American trade unionist Karen Silkwood.

Silkwood was working at a plutonium processing plant and was killed in a mysterious car crash on her way to deliver important documents to a newspaper reporter.

She had been working on health and safety issues at the plant. She was 28 years old when she died.

To learn more about Karen and to celebrate her life please buy a copy of The Killing of Karen Silkwood — this week’s Labour Book of the Week.

The issues this book explores — whistle-blowers, worker safety, the environment, and nuclear vulnerability — are as relevant today as they were 35 years ago.

To read more: https://ssl30.pair.com/unionist/ccp51/cgi-bin/cp-app.cgi?rrc=N&pg=prod&ref=silkwood&affl=labourstart

***END***

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Radical Pedagogy

Radical Pedagogy

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 12th OCTOBER 2009

 

OUR MANDATE: The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

To change your subscription settings, visit http://listserv.oise.utoronto.ca/mailman/listinfo/csewbroadcast

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

+++++

NOW AVAILABLE! UPDATED & EXPANDED EDITION OF “INTEGRATING EQUITY, ADDRESSING BARRIERS: INNOVATIVE LEARNING PRACTICES BY UNIONS”

The Labour Education Centre is pleased to announce the publication of the updated and expanded new edition of the report “Integrating Equity, Addressing Barriers: Innovative Learning Practices by Unions”.

Available on LEC’s website: http://www.laboureducation.org  Printed copies are available for $10 plus shipping / 25% discount for 10 or more copies.

The second edition features 11 new sketches as well as updates for most of the 35 sketches included in the first edition.

Original 2-4 page “sketches” provide a sampling of programs from different parts of Canada. The 46 sketches include programs from local, provincial and national unions, from central labour bodies at the labour council, regional building trades council, provincial and territorial federation and level of the Canadian Labour Congress. Some are joint union-management initiatives; some are community-sponsored. Each sketch outlines how the program started and evolved, impacts and what’s next, contact information and references. The 190-page report includes an introduction and additional references.

+++++

THE POLITICS OF OLDER ADULT EDUCATION: POSSIBILITIES FOR TRANSFORMATIVE PRACTICE

Marvin Formosa, University of Malta
Wednesday, October 14, 2009
12.00-1.30 pm
Room 7-162, OISE/University of Toronto
252 Bloor St. West, Toronto

In recent decades, late-life learning has developed into a global success story. Whether holding a ‘top-down’ administrative arrangement or embodying a culture of self-help, there can be no doubt as to the triumph of programs in meeting the educational, social, and psychological needs of older persons. However, a cautionary note must be warranted. Research has reported that in many cases programs of older adult education tend to function as yet another euphemism for glorified occupational therapy that is both conservative and oppressive. Moreover, practice models seem to be running the risk of becoming obsolete as societies embark on a ‘late-modern’ (as opposed to a ‘modernist’) model of the life course in which the sequential division between learning, work and retirement is becoming increasingly blurred.

This seminar puts forward the suggestion that older adult education must go through a cultural revolution to remain relevant to current ageing lifestyles as well as become an agent of transformative change. Seven possible directions are outlined: embracing a transformational rationale, ensuring that access overcomes class, gender and ethnic biases to become more equally distributed, guaranteeing that teaching and learning strategies are suited to older persons, promoting ICT knowledge whilst making greater use of e-learning techniques, extending its activities to frail and physically dependent elders including those in residential/nursing homes, and organizing activities that promote intergenerational learning.

Marvin Formosa (European Centre of Gerontology, University of Malta) is currently writing a handbook on ‘Lifelong Learning in Later Life’ (Sense, 2010). He has published on older adult learning in the journals Education and Ageing, Ageing International, Recerca, and Malta Review of Educational Research. His most recent publications include ‘Class Dynamics in Later Life’ and ‘Supporting Family Careers of Older Persons in Europe’. This year, Marvin Formosa is a visiting scholar in the Adult Education and Community Development Program, OISE/UT.

+++++

VINCENZO PIETROPAOLO – HARVEST PILGRIMS EXHIBIT

Launch: Sunday, October 18
1-5 pm
Workers Arts and Heritage Centre
51 Stuart Street
Hamilton, ON
905-522-3003
http://www.wahc-museum.ca

Acclaimed Canadian documentary photographer and social activist Vincenzo Pietropaolo has been photographing migrant agriculture workers and recording their stories since 1984 – in the process travelling to forty locations throughout Ontario and to their homes in Mexico, Jamaica, and Montserrat.

Pietropaolo has borne witness to these “harvest pilgrims” — tens of thousands of migrant workers who arrive in the spring, leave in the fall, are the backbone of the agricultural industry in Canada — yet continue to be denied many of the basic workplace rights that protect other workers in Canada.

Meet the artist at the book launch and photo exhibition of HARVEST PILGRIMS, Sunday October 18.

+++++

TRANSFORMING CRITICAL PEDAGOGY: REFLECTIONS ON THE FREIRE CONFERENCE GATHERING IN SPAIN, OCTOBER 28

*Do you look at the world and feel that things need to change?
* Do you watch the news everyday in sadness and despair waiting for that one news item that would give you hope for the world you live in?
* Do you believe that another world is possible?

Then come join The Transformative Learning Centre at OISE for our 2009-2010 Dialogue Circles Series.

Upcoming events include:

*Transforming Critical Pedagogy: Reflections on the Freire Conference Gathering in Spain, Emear O’Neill, Wednesday October 28
* Buy-Nothing Day, Wednesday November 25
* Inter-faith Dialogue, Wednesday December 16

Everyone is invited!
Hosted in the 7th Floor Peace Lounge at OISE, 252 Bloor St. W (at St. George) from 4:00 to 5:30 pm, last Wednesday of every month, Sept 2009 to April 2010.

For more information, visit the TLC website at: http://tlc.oise.utoronto.ca

+++++

ISRAEL / PALESTINE: FREEDOM OF SPEECH, FREEDOM TO TEACH

A conference on elementary, secondary, and post-secondary education – rights and repression

Friday, October 16, 7:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.
Saturday, October 17, 9:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Steelworkers Hall, 25 Cecil Street, Toronto

Friday, October 16 Panel:
7:00-9:00: Sharing Stories of Repression and Fightback Panelists include Javier Davila, Adnan Husain, Golta Shahidi, and Palestinian educator, Saed Abu-Hijleh

Saturday, October 17 Programme: 9:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

9:00 – 10:30 – Keynote addresses: Yafa Jarrar and Sherene Razack

11:00-12:30 – Sectoral Workshops
*Post-Secondary Faculty – Academic Research, Conferences, Publication and Organizing
*Post-Secondary Faculty -Teaching and the Curriculum
*Elementary and Secondary Teachers – The Classroom, the Curriculum and Finding Spaces within the Union
*Student Organizing
*Community

Lunch – 12:30 – 1:30 – vegetarian with vegan and gluten-free options (included in registration)

1:30 – 2:30 – Legal Context: Know Your Rights as Activists – Yutaka Dirks and Irina Ceric
2:45 – 4:00 – Plenary
4:00 – 4:15 – Closing Comments

Registration: $5–$30 sliding scale (incl. lunch with vegetarian, vegan,and gluten-free options)

For further information and to pre-register, contact us at freedomtoteach.registration@yahoo.ca.

*Organized by Educators for Peace and Justice, Faculty for Palestine, and Students Against Israeli Apartheid*

+++++

INDIGENOUS SOVEREIGNTY WEEK – TORONTO

Forums, art, performances and discussions supporting and celebrating the Indigenous struggle for land and sovereignty on Turtle Island

http://www.defendersoftheland.org/toronto

October 26 – November 1, 2009

Invited speakers include:
* Arthur Manuel, Secwepemc Nation
* Algonquins of Barriere Lake
* Shawn Brant, Tyendinaga Mohawk Territory
* Pauline Shirt, Plains Cree
* Russell Diabo, Mohawk Nation, Kahnawake.
* Grafton Antone, Oneida
* Vicki Monague, Beausoleil FN

Featured events:
* Opening Ceremonies with Men’s and Women’s Drum Circle, Youth slam poetry and speaker
* Dear Harper: A Canadian Colonial History
* Justice Redone
* Struggles for Land
* Haudenosaunee Storytelling
* The Great Indian Bus Tour. Exploring the indigenous history of Toronto
* Building the Circle Stronger: Traditional feast, Sharing Circle and Next Steps meeting
* and more …

Full schedule will be updated shortly. Please visit our website often.

Email iswtoronto@gmail.com for more.

+++++

VIDEO: SOLIDARITY! RESISTANCE! CHANGE! ORGANIZING WORKING CLASS COMMUNITIES

Steve Williams in Toronto, October 2 2009

Steve Williams is co-director of the California based group POWER: People Organized to win Employment Rights, which since the late 1990’s has been one of the most important Worker’s Action Centres in the U.S., and co-authour of the book Towards Land, Work and Power: Charting a Path of Resistance to U.S.-led Imperialism.

* Moderated by Stephanie Ross – Prof. Labour Studies, York University.
* Sam Gindin – Visiting Packer Chair in Social Justice at York University.

A Left Streamed Video: http://www.socialistproject.ca/leftstreamed/

+++++

PLANNING MEETING FOR DAY OF ACTION, CAMPAIGN FOR A POVERTY-FREE ONTARIO 

On behalf of the over 300,000 members of the Canadian Federation of Students-Ontario, we would like to invite your organisation to participate in and help shape the campaign for a Poverty-Free Ontario, bringing students, community and labour organisations together in a united call for the government to invest in people by supporting basic social services and standards. Your organisation has been contacted to participate because you have endorsed the campaign for a Poverty-Free Ontario or have expressed interest in doing so.

On October 15, we will be holding a planning meeting to discuss how we can coordinate our organising and build for the day of action. The planning meeting will be held on:

Thursday, October 15
12 pm
Ryerson Student Center
55 Gould Street, Toronto

We are pleased to invite a representative of your organisation to join us for a catered lunch and a discussion of how to effectively mobilise to challenge our government’s spending priorities and call for investment in people.

Please RSVP soon, and notify us of who is able to attend. We will be following up in the next few days to confirm participation. Please do not hesitate to contact me should you have any further questions or concerns.

In solidarity,
Shelley Melanson
Chairperson Canadian Federation of Students – Ontario
office – 416.925.3825 x 29
cell – 416.882.9927
http://www.cfsontario.ca

+++++

ONTARIO FEDERATION OF LABOUR EMPLOYMENT EQUITY SEMINAR

November 9 & 10
Doubletree International Plaza Hotel
655 Dixon Road, Toronto

Mobilizing for equality rights makes our unions, the trades labour movement and communities stronger and better for everyone. To increase our actions the OFL is holding a seminar on Employment Equity.

Although the Employment Equity legislation was dismantled in 1995 by the Conservative Harris government, the labour movement has continued to push for employment equity gains through collective bargaining over the past decade.

The seminar will assist advocates through political action and collective bargaining, dispel myths and focus on the positive realities of employment equity and help overcome the challenges of implementing employment equity.

The registration fee is $150. The deadline for registration is October 26, 2007.

For more information or to register, contact Catherine Corcoran, Secretary
p: 416-443-7656, f: 416.441.0722, email: ccorcoran@ofl.ca

+++++

FORUM – FROM CRISIS TO JUSTICE: LABOUR AND COMMUNITY WORKING TOGETHER FOR AN EQUITABLE AND INCLUSIVE ECONOMIC FUTURE

Saturday, November 21, 2009
Sheraton Centre Hotel
Toronto, Ontario

The population of Ontario is becoming more diverse. By 2011 most new entrants to the labour force will be peoples of colour. Yet in percentage terms, fewer and fewer peoples of colour are joining unions.

To bring about a deeper familiarity between unions and communities, unions must work in solidarity with peoples of colour on issues that are important to these communities, in order to build long lasting relationships of trust, respect and sustainability.
Why? The survival of the labour movement is at stake.

The Forum will:

* Link activists from unions and community organizations to advance a shared vision for social, economic and environmental justice in our workplaces and in our communities;

* Develop best practices and policies that can be implemented locally, provincially and nationally through collective bargaining and form the framework to lobby for effective provincial and national employment equity and for organizing legislation.

* Increase public awareness of the potential for “green-collar” jobs to provide equitable pathways out of poverty, curb global warming, and transform the economy.

The registration fee is $130 per delegate and cheques are payable to “OFL From Crisis to Justice Forum”. Delegates can register on-line at http://www.ofl.ca
Registration and payment must be received by November 1, 2009.

Additional information and forms can be found on the OFL website: http://www.ofl.ca or contact us directly by calling Paulette Hazel at 416.443.7667 – toll free 1.(800).668.9138 or e-mail phazel@ofl.ca

+++++

HERE’S THE SKINNY ON WHY WAL-MART IS SO EVIL (AND HAS MADE SUCH A KILLING)

By David Moberg, In These Times.

Wal-Mart’s origins in the Ozarks created a patriarchal and religiously-tinged corporate culture that dominated the American marketplace.

http://www.alternet.org/story/143009/here%27s_the_skinny_on_why_wal-mart_is_so_evil_(and_has_made_such_a_killing)

+++++

ORGANIZED AGAINST LABOR: ATTACKS ON UNIVERSITY UNION CENTERS

Source: Inside Higher Education

Conservative group has been filing information requests and complaints against university centers that work with unions; AAUP charges violation of academic freedom.

To read more: http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2009/10/12/labor

+++++

NEW REPORT! ALLIANCES FOR CHANGE: ORGANIZING FOR THE 21ST CENTURY

Workers’ centers, youth-based action groups, and urban justice organizations are among those changing the face of traditional community organizing. Many of these groups engage a range of approaches beyond targeted campaign work from service delivery to media ownership to voter engagement. This report looks at nearly a dozen examples of organizing efforts rising to scale and adapting to the urgent challenges and political opportunities at the beginning of the 21st century.

http://www.buildingmovement.org/news/entry/93

+++++

MICHAEL MOORE WAS RIGHT: PROGRESSIVES DON’T WATCH ENOUGH TV

By Vanessa Richmond, AlterNet.

Why TV is ground zero for understanding American culture — the 9 best shows on air that you should be watching.

http://www.alternet.org/story/143178/michael_moore_was_right%3A_progressives_don%27t_watch_enough_tv

+++++

REPORT – CANADA IS FALLING BEHIND OTHER COUNTRIES ON SOCIAL INNOVATION

Cross-sector collaboration needed to advance social innovation in Canada

October 8, 2009 – Canada is falling behind other countries, such as Australia, the UK and the US in recognizing the value of social innovation (SI) for addressing complex public policy issues.

A new report from Canadian Policy Research Networks (CPRN), Social Innovation in Canada: An Update by Mark Goldenberg, Wathira Kamoji, Larry Orton and Michael Williamson highlights the urgency of the social challenges before us, such as climate change, sustainability, poverty and globalization, particularly in the midst of a global economic downturn, and points to the importance of fostering SI as a solution.

The report notes that while governments in Canada have acknowledged the importance of social capital and the social economy, and have been relatively active in these areas in recent years, Canada has missed opportunities to encourage SI by failing to develop adequate models for public support, engagement and funding. The report calls on Canadian leaders to establish a cross-sectoral national strategy to advance SI in this country.

To read more: http://www.cprn.org/doc.cfm?doc=2057&l=en&utm_source=20091008&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Newsletter

+++++

MURRAY DOBBIN’S BLOG – THE VALUE OF TILTING AT WINDMILLS

It’s easy to get demoralized these days with so much going wrong around the world. So it is incredibly encouraging to see a campaign for justice and workers’ health and safety prevail against supposedly insurmountable odds.

That is how the “odds” would have been described a year and a half ago for anyone musing about taking on the asbestos industry in Quebec.

To read more: http://murraydobbin.ca/2009/10/08/the-value-of-tilting-at-windmills/

+++++

REQUEST FOR PAPERS – COSMOPOLITANISM AND COLLECTIVITY: CULTURAL REPRESENTATIONS VS. THEORIES OF COMMUNITY IN THE 20TH AND 21ST CENTURY

We are inviting paper proposals for an accepted seminar at the 2010 Annual Meeting of the American Comparative Literature Association (New Orleans, April 1-4). Please do not submit proposals directly to the organizers–see specific instructions for online submission below. Papers must be submitted before November 13. Note: seminars at the ACLA are typically held over the course of three days–participants are expected to attend all meetings.

Session description: “Cosmopolitanism and Collectivity: Cultural Representations vs. Theories of Community in the 20th and 21st Century”

This panel intends to interrogate the relationship between collectivity and cosmopolitanism by studying the disjoints between the accounts of both concepts produced by culture on the one hand and theory on the other. The ultimate goal of this panel will be to complicate our understanding of the possibilities and limitations of contemporary forms of collectivity in relation to a renewed interest in the category of the universal in general and concepts such as cosmopolitanism in particular. Furthermore, this panel seeks to trace the historically and materially concrete determinations that link current conceptions of collectivity and cosmopolitanism. However, it strives to do so not by focusing on the harmonic parallels but rather on the contestations and differences between theoretical and cultural versions of thinking/representing the collective.

Proposals should not be submitted directly to the organizers but via the ACLA website prior to November 13, 2009: http://www.acla.org/submit/index.php.

When submitting a proposal, be sure to select the correct title of the seminar to which you are applying in the dropdown menu immediately following the field for the proposal text.

General information about the conference topic and logistics can be found on the ACLA 2010 website: http://www.acla.org/acla2010/

Please feel free to contact us any time with questions or concerns–all best,

Emilio Sauri (University of Illinois at Chicago), esauri1@uic.edu
Mathias Nilges (St. Francis Xavier University, Canada), mnilges@stfx.ca

+++++

CO-OP WEEK: A TIME TO CELEBRATE!    

Co-op Week– October 11-17 — is here, and co-operators across Canada are preparing for next week’s celebrations.

Co-op Week is a time for co-op and credit union members across Canada to reflect on the achievements of the co-operative sector and the contribution our sector has made to the lives of Canadians and their communities.

This year Co-op Week themes focus on the advantages of co-operatives and credit unions in an uncertain economy. Co-op Week 2009 is highlighting three of these advantages:

Co-operatives are…putting people first
Co-operatives are…creating sustainable jobs
Co-operatives are…investing in communities

In addition, International Credit Union Day — which will be celebrated this year on Thursday, October 15 — will have its own theme “Your Money, Your Choice, Your Credit Union”.

A calendar of Co-op Week events activities can be found at http://www.coopscanada.coop/en/orphan/CoopWeekEvents

If your event isn’t listed, please contact Donna Balkan at communications@coopscanada.coop and it will be posted as soon as possible.

+++++

CALL FOR ADVISORS – BEST START RESOURCE CENTRE

Over the past few years, the Best Start Resource Centre (http://www.beststart.org), a program of Health Nexus, has produced a number of brochures and booklets on topics related to preconception, pregnancy and child development. These documents have generally been produced in French and English and have mainly been distributed in Ontario.

Health Nexus (http://www.healthnexus.ca) has recently received funding from Citizenship and Immigration Canada, Ontario Region, to translate eight of their existing resources for the general public into other languages. Our standard resource adaptation process includes input from advisors as well as testing with end users, to ensure that adaptations meet the needs of the various linguistic and cultural groups. To this end, Health Nexus is seeking two Advisors for each of the following languages:

1. Arabic
2. Tagalog (Filipino)
3. Spanish
4. Punjabi
5. Urdu
6. Hindi
7. Tamil
8. Simplified Chinese

At least one Advisor per language will be a service provider working in reproductive health or child development. Advisors will review the identified resources, provide insights on adaptations needed to make the resources linguistically and culturally appropriate, and help ensure proper wording. Advisors will review the completed translations. An honorarium will be provided to each Advisor.

This project begins immediately, and is to be completed by March 31st, 2010.

If you are interested in being an Advisor, please send a brief (300 words or less) letter of interest outlining your background and experience by October 14, 2009 to:

Subha Sankaran
Health Promotion Consultant
Health Nexus
s.sankaran@healthnexus.ca
http://www.healthnexus.ca
http://www.beststart.org

+++++

JOB POSTING: PROJECT COORDINATOR – COLOUR OF POVERTY CAMPAIGN

The Colour of Poverty Campaign seeks to hire an individual committed to racial justice to help coordinate a province wide project to increase awareness of and efforts to mitigate the impact of racialized poverty and racial inequities.  The project aims at building community capacity through various activities in six communities across Ontario, namely, Hamilton, London, Peel, Ottawa, Toronto, and Windsor.

Responsibilities:

* Overall coordination of the project, meeting timelines and deliverables
* Liaison with and support of the six lead partners at the 6 project sites
* Research, writing and development of new tools
* Assist in organizing the web content, working with the webmaster to make the site the go-to site in the province for racial equity work and analysis as it relates to racialized communities, particularly with respect to poverty reduction and eradication
* Help organize training for community animators for the 6 communities
* Help organize the first community meeting in each of the 6 communities

Qualifications:

* Post-secondary degree from a recognized university related to education, social work, political science, community development or interdisciplinary studies.
* Knowledge and experience conducting public education, outreach, community development, and policy analysis
* Experience working with community groups, non-profit agencies, advocacy or activist groups
* Experience with campaign strategy and grassroots mobilization
* Experience in event planning, conducting workshops, training and facilitation
* Ability to take initiative and problem solve with minimal supervision
* Excellent facilitation, organization, writing and communication skills
* Knowledge and understanding of anti-oppression and anti-racism frameworks
* Valid driver’s license and access to a vehicle is an asset
* Must be able to attend meetings on evenings and weekends

Duration: 1 year contract – Full Time 35 hours per week
Salary: $45,000 pa (including statutory benefits)
Deadline for application: November 20, 2009
Anticipated start date: January 2, 2010

Please send cover letter, resume and writing sample in confidence to the Colour of Poverty Campaign Steering Committee c/o the Metro Toronto Chinese and Southeast Asian Legal Clinic at 180 Dundas Street West, Suite 1701, Toronto, Ontario. Fax: (416) 971-9674 or email: goa@lao.on.ca

The Colour of Poverty Campaign is an equal opportunity employer. We encourage applications from members of racialized communities, First Nations People, women, and people with disabilities. We thank all applicants but only those chosen for an interview will be contacted.

+++++

JOB POSTING: KAIROS PARTNERS AND NETWORKS ASSOCIATE

KAIROS, the national social justice of eleven national churches and church related organizations, is seeking a Partners and Networks Associate to join our outreach team.

The Partners and Network Associate works to strengthen KAIROS’ relationships with partners from the Global South, Canadian ecumenical activist networks and the general public. S/he collaborates with partnership staff in coordinating the visits of Southern partners to Canada, and plans special events with partners to engage donors, foundations, government and networks. S/he also facilitates general promotion of KAIROS and promotion and distribution of KAIROS print resources The Partners and Networks Associate is on the front line for information and support to KAIROS activists, and shares reception responsibilities.

If you are a creative, energetic individual with a passion for engaging people in social justice, please apply.

To read the complete posting, click here: http://www.kairoscanada.org/en/who-we-are/job-opportunities/

+++++

ONLINE JOURNAL ARTICLES

* Addressing the underemployment of persons with disabilities: Recommendations for expanding organizational social responsibility
Karen S. Markel, Lizabeth A. Barclay
Employee Responsibilities and Rights Journal
http://www.springerlink.com/content/t0087r34h1000720/

* First approaches toward understanding Mexico City’s culture of consumption
Steven B. Bunker
Journal of Urban History published 8 October 2009, 10.1177/0096144209349894
http://juh.sagepub.com/cgi/rapidpdf/0096144209349894v1

*All the world’s New York, all New York’s a stage: Drama, draft riots, and democracy in the mid-nineteenth century
Hilary Moss
Journal of Urban History published 22 September 2009, 10.1177/0096144209347095
http://juh.sagepub.com/cgi/rapidpdf/0096144209347095v1

* Private equity and American labor: Multiple, pragmatic responses mirroring labor’s strengths and weaknesses
Larry W. Beeferman
JIR 2009;51 543-556
http://jir.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/51/4/543

* Sin city or suburban crucible? Searching for meanings in the new Las Vegas
Lawrence Culver
Journal of Urban History published 15 September 2009, 10.1177/0096144209347100
http://juh.sagepub.com/cgi/rapidpdf/0096144209347100v1

*Book Review: DeRienzo, H. (2008). The Concept of Community: Lessons From the Bronx. Milan, Italy: IPOC di Pietro Condemi
Angela M. Eikenberry
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly 2009;38 905-907
http://nvs.sagepub.com/cgi/reprint/38/5/905

***END***

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Unemployment

Unemployment

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 30th SEPTEMBER 2009

 

OUR MANDATE: The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

To change your subscription settings, visit http://listserv.oise.utoronto.ca/mailman/listinfo/csewbroadcast

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

+++++

FORUM: SOLIDARITY, RESISTANCE, CHANGE: ORGANIZING WORKING CLASS COMMUNITIES

Public forum featuring: Steve Williams, Co-Director and co-founder of the California based group “People Organized to Win Employment Rights (POWER)” and co-author of the book “Towards Land, Work and Power”.
Join us to hear Steve Williams speak about POWER, and organizing working-class communities in the current context of the economic crisis.

Introductions and opening remarks will be made by Sam Gindin, CAW (Retired), and Stephanie Ross, York University. With Q & A.

Friday October 2, 2009
7pm
Ryerson Student Centre
55 Gould Street, Room 115
Toronto

Directions: http://www.oakhamhouse.com/pages/directions.php

In 1997, in the wake of Clinton’s historic attack on social assistance, welfare and public support measures for the poor, activists in the San Francisco area formed POWER: People Organized to Win Employment Rights. Since its inception, POWER members have waged more than twenty campaigns to improve the living and working conditions for welfare workers, domestic workers, low-income tenants and other working class people of color.

Co-sponsored by Socialist Project and Centre for Social Justice
Endorsed by Black Action Defence Committee (BADC), No One Is Illegal (NOII) and Ontario Coalition against Poverty (OCAP)

+++++

STUDENT-LED CONFERENCE PUTS THE PRIDE BACK INTO HEALTH RESEARCH

Research with Pride
Friday, October 2nd, 2009
8:30 am – 4:30 pm
University of Toronto
Dalla Lana School of Public Health
155 College Street, Room 610

In partnership with The 519 Church Street Community Centre, this unique forum will offer the opportunity for students, community members, academics, and allies of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, transsexual, two spirit, and queer (LGBTT2Q) communities to come together to discuss relevant health research, with a specific focus on community-based research (CBR) strategies.

Free. Lunch and snacks provided.

For more information or to register:  http://researchwithpride.org/index.html

+++++

MAKING MUNICIPAL VOTING MATTER

Thursday, October 1
9 am to Noon
89 Chestnut Street
Toronto, Ontario

Elections in Toronto are not meeting our expectations. Voter turn-out is surprisingly low. New faces on City Council are uncommon. And perhaps most importantly, our City Council does not reflect the evolving demographic of Toronto’s population. What are options for renewal?

Join other community organizations and individuals in a discussion about the changes we need to make municipal elections matter in Toronto.

RSVP for this event: http://www.facebook.com/l/2617e;tinyurl.com/lgcywd

+++++

BUILDING THE FUTURE WE WANT: FINDING OPPORTUNITY IN ADVERSITY

Friday, October 2, 2009
9:00 am to 4:00 pm
New College, University of Toronto
$50.00 (includes lunch and refreshments)

The Symposium will bring together a broad range of individuals and organizations to explore the ways in which the current economic and social crisis may provide opportunities to rethink how government, the non-profit sector and business can renew our social safety net for the 21st century.

Panels:

* Ending Poverty
* Social Infrastructure
* Good Jobs
* Social Security and Economic Stabilizers

Register online at http://www.socialplanningtoronto.org/symposium

+++++

SHOVEL READY IS NOT THE WHOLE STORY: OPTIONS AND PRIORITIES FOR AFFORDABLE HOUSING IN THE GTA

Public Forum on Housing

Presented by The Older Women’s Network (OWN) and The Centre for Women’s Studies in Education at OISE, University of
Toronto

Sunday, October 4, 1:30 to 5 pm
OISE Auditorium
252 Bloor Street West (St. George Subway)

Panel Members:

* Heather McGregor, Chief Executive Officer, YWCA Toronto
* Angela Robertson, Executive Director, Sistering – A Woman’s Place
* Michael Shapcott, Director, Affordable Housing & Social Innovation, Wellesley Institute

The Older Women’s Network (OWN) – A Voice for Mid-Life and Older Women – is a not for profit organization incorporated in 1988. In 1997 OWN was instrumental in building a 142 unit Housing Co-op in the St. Lawrence Market area of Toronto.

For more information:  http://www.olderwomensnetwork.org

+++++

A SERIES OF LEARNING CIRCLES: IN CELEBRATION OF THE LIFE AND WORK OF ALAN THOMAS

By the holders of the Alan Thomas Fellowship
of the Carold Institute
In Celebration of the Life and Work of Alan Thomas

Date: Monday October 5, 2009
Time: 6:00 – 8:00 PM
Place: Concordia University
Hall Building 7th Floor
Room H-762
1455 de Maisonneuve Blvd. W.
Montreal

RSVP: 514-848-2424 (2036)
For more information: qaal@alcor.concordia.ca
Admission is FREE
Light Refreshments will be available

+++++

FIRESIDE CHAT ON RACE, GENDER, INCOME VIA TELEPHONE/INTERNET

A special invitation to:
Public health planners and practitioners, policy makers, public health evaluators, community partners working with public health (e.g., NGOs, community health centres, school boards and educational institutions)….

A Fireside Chat – free pan-Canadian discussion via telephone/internet

Thursday October 8, 2009
1:00pm-2:30pm (Eastern Time)
Using an Online Toolkit to Address Social Determinants of Health through Multiple Intervention Programs

For more information and to register:  http://www.chnet-works.ca

Race…gender…income…All of these affect our health. In fact, considerable evidence exists that unequal social conditions contribute significantly to the persistent inequalities in the health of populations, internationally and in Canada.

How can public health programs address these, and other, social determinants of health? How are ‘social determinants’ understood and defined? What information can we draw upon to identify the determinants that we might be able to address? What kinds of interventions might be effective? How can we assess the impact of health interventions on social determinants? Is there any evidence that the social determinants can be altered through public health programming?

If you have ever asked yourself these questions, please join us on October 8. This Fireside chat will focus on using elements of the Multiple Interventions Program Tool Kit, an on-line resource for public health planners, to take into account social determinants of health when planning, implementing, and evaluating multiple intervention programs.

CHNET-works! hosts weekly fireside chats re: community health issues a project of RRASpHIRN, University of Ottawa Population Health Improvement Research Network – Réseau de recherches d’amélioration de la Santé de la population

+++++

WOMEN TOGETHER: ENCOURAGING WOMEN TO TAKE A BIGGER PART IN POLITICS

An evening with:

* Andrea Horwath, Ontario NDP Leader
* Peggy Nash, President of the Federal NDP
* Cheri DiNovo, MPP Parkdale-High Park & ONDP Women’s Critic

Monday October 5 2009
CAW 1285 Hall,
23 Regan Street, Brampton
(McLaughlin & Bovaird– easily reached from the 401, 407 & 410)
6:30PM reception, 7:00PM start
Dinner will be served.

Tickets are $24 or five for $100
$15 for students, or on layoff
Make cheques out to CAW 1285, write Elect Women Together in the memo area, and mail to CAW 1285, 23 Regan Road, Brampton, ON L7A 1B2

All are welcome to attend.

Introducing potential candidates, Party members, supporters, friends and others, to the nuts and bolts of getting elected.

Women Party members who have run for office are asked to share their experience and knowledge.

To order tickets, for more info, or to volunteer: ondpwomen@gmail.com

+++++

DIVERSITY: STRATEGIES FOR A CHANGING WORKFORCE

The Toronto Training Board in partnership with Working Skills Centre and Working Women Community Centre is holding a one-day forum entitled “Diversity: Strategies for a Changing Workforce”.

The Forum is intended to gather “promising practices” related to creating a robust, multi-generational, diverse workplace, something that is essential to Toronto’s ability to attract and retain skilled workers.

If you are unable to attend, please consider finding another representative of your workplace.

Friday Oct. 16
Metro Hall
55 John Street, Room 308
9:00 am – 4:00 pm
Registration: $35 before Oct. 1 and $50 after Oct. 1 (including at door)
Includes breakfast, light lunch and snacks.
To register:  Carmen@ttb.on.ca
For more info:  416-703-7770 x. 519

+++++

FOOD ISSUES PANEL: BROKEN SYSTEM

In conversation with Matt Galloway

How do we rethink our food distribution and quota systems along with various other antiquated food policies in order to rebuild our food systems so that we can help support a model that is based around small-scale local producers, while we ensure that we can provide nutritious and affordable food for all of our diverse communities.

Panelists:

* John Rowe, Farmer
* Debbie Field, Food Activist, FoodShare Toronto
* Ruth Klahsen, Artisan Cheese Maker
* Nick Saul, Food Activist, The Stop Community Food Centre

Tuesday October 20
Hart House, University of Toronto
7 p.m. – 9 p.m.

Free Event

+++++

RISK MANAGEMENT FOR NONPROFITS: NO COST & LOW COST WAYS TO PROTECT YOUR PEOPLE AND REPUTATION

October 15, 2009
8:30am – 12:30pm
Centre for Social Innovation
215 Spadina Ave.
Alterna Boardroom, 4th floor
$73.50 (inclusive of GST)
Coffee and light breakfast will be provided

We’re pleased to announce that the Centre for Social Innovation will be hosting a half-day workshop on effective risk management! Every organization needs to take risks in order to grow and reach the next level, but learning to do it smart is key. Presented by David Hartley, this workshop will help guide you to that place and is geared towards staff members, board members, and key volunteers of small and medium nonprofit organizations.

To register: http://socialinnovation.ca/civicrm/event/info?reset=1&id=8

For questions, please contact Yumi Hotta, Community Animator at yumi@socialinnovation.ca

+++++

FREE FILM FEST SHOWCASES LABOUR

Source: rabble.ca

The Canadian Labour International Film Festival is close to its goal of screening films in 100 communities across Canada. The movies will screen in cinemas, labour halls and living-rooms. There’s still time to get involved. CLIFF board member Raj Virk explains how.

http://rabble.ca/podcasts/shows/redeye/2009/09/free-film-fest-showcases-labour

+++++

MULTI-UNION COALITION AT UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA STRIKES BACK AT DEVASTATING CUTS

By Jack Gerson, Tanya Smith, Labor Notes

Students, faculty, and staff at the University of California’s campuses walked out Thursday to protest hundreds of layoffs, cuts to academic programs and research centers, a staggering 32 percent tuition increase, and the stripping of any pretense of shared governance by placing “emergency” dictatorial powers in the university president’s hands. Photo: andydr

A coalition of unions, faculty, and students gave a sharp rebuke to cuts and corporate giveaways at the renowned University of California system on September 24—the first day back for most UC campuses.

Organizers called picket lines, rallies, and teach-ins on each of the 10 campuses to protest a wave of layoffs, tuition increases, and academic and research program cuts—all steps toward the decimation of public education in California.

To read more: http://labornotes.org/node/2459

+++++

UNIONS MUST MOVE LEFT, THEY HAVE NO ALTERNATIVE – MONTHLY REVIEW

David Bacon (dbacon.igc.org) is a California writer and documentary photographer. He was a union organizer among immigrant workers for two decades. He documents the changing conditions in the workforce, the impact of the global economy, war, and migration, and the struggle for human rights.

To read more: http://www.monthlyreview.org/090928bacon.php

+++++

VIDEO: NAOMI KLEIN VS. ALAN GREENSPAN ON CRONY CAPITALISM IN THE US

Source: http://www.youtube.com
Except from September 24th 2007 Democracy Now! Naomi Klein and Alan Greenspan.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=09zvzzCOB2M

+++++

CANADA MUST FORGE ITS OWN ECONOMIC FATE

Source: murraydobbin.ca

The SPP is dead. Let’s keep it that way.

With virtually no fanfare or media analysis, one of the most transformative agreements ever signed by Canada and the U.S. (and Mexico) is officially dead. The Security and Prosperity Partnership of North America (SPP), the formal expression of a corporate lobbying campaign called deep integration, is no more.

To read more: http://thetyee.ca/Opinion/2009/09/24/EconomicFate/

+++++

VIDEO: FIX EI TOWN HALL – JUDY REBICK – SEPTEMBER 21, 2009

Source: http://www.youtube.com
Author and social justice activist Judy Rebick addresses the “Fix EI” Town Hall Meeting held at Ryerson University in Toronto – September 21, 2009

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PK5rOQpQxVA

+++++

UNION RIGHTS AS HUMAN RIGHTS: BUILDING THE LABOUR MOVEMENT IN MANITOBA

By Errol Black

The Manitoba Federation of Labour (MFL) is holding its annual convention in Brandon October 2 – 4, 2009. There are many important issues to be dealt with however the one issue that should be on the agenda and should be the focus of discussion is the spectre of eroding memberships in trade union organizations, evident in all jurisdictions in Canada.

To read more: http://www.policyalternatives.ca/reports/2009/09/article2314/

+++++

ONTARIO FACULTY RELEASE REPORT ON UNIVERSITIES AND THE RECESSION: PAPER FINDS SERIOUS FINANCIAL IMPACTS ON INSTITUTIONS AND STUDENTS

TORONTO , Sept. 29 /CNW/ – The Ontario Confederation of University Faculty Associations (OCUFA) today released a research report, written by Hugh MacKenzie, analyzing the impact of the recent recession on Ontario’s universities. The report, commissioned by OCUFA, indicates that the economic downturn highlights fundamental problems with how the province funds higher education.

“This paper reveals serious cracks in Ontario’s funding model,” said Professor Mark Langer, President of OCUFA. “The recession starkly illustrates how our institutions are seriously under-funded, and how this under-funding puts serious financial pressure on students and their families.”

The negative effects of the recession are due to policy changes that began in the mid-1990s. After huge cuts to public university funding, institutions were forced to turn to private sources of income such as endowment funds and higher tuition fees. Now, 14 years later, the global financial crisis has significantly reduced the value of endowment funds and pension plans, hurting university revenue. Moreover, record student unemployment has made it even harder for students to pay for Ontario’s already expensive tuition fees. The Government of Ontario’s current tuition policy will allow fees to increase by an average of five per cent in the 2009-10 school year.

OCUFA has recently launched the Quality Matters campaign (http://www.quality-matters.ca) to raise awareness of the need for greater public funding in the university system. This investment will help mitigate the effects of the recession while improving educational quality and controlling tuition fees.

To read the report, please go to http://www.ocufa.on.ca/Publications.researchreports.gk.

Founded in 1964, OCUFA represent 15,000 faculty in 24 faculty associations across Ontario. For more information, please visit the OCUFA website at http://www.ocufa.on.ca

+++++

PODCAST: NAOMI KLEIN INTERVIEWS MICHAEL MOORE

Source: Common Dreams

On September 17, in the midst of the publicity blitz for his cinematic takedown of the capitalist order, Moore talked with Nation columnist Naomi Klein by phone about the film, the roots of our economic crisis and the promise and peril of the present political moment.

To listen to a podcast of the full conversation:  http://www.thenation.com/doc/20091012/moore_podcast

To read an edited transcript of their conversation: http://www.commondreams.org/view/2009/09/25

+++++

VIEWS: MUTUAL AID SOCIETY – INSIDE HIGHER ED

Source: http://www.insidehighered.com

Did humanity evolve with selfish genes? Scott McLemee looks into an alternative theory.

http://www.insidehighered.com/views/mclemee/mclemee260

+++++

JOB POSTING: EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, SISTERING, TORONTO

You will foster learning, innovation, research, and philanthropy across the organization while promoting collaboration throughout Sistering and within the wider community. You will represent our organization to the broader community, build and maintain strong relationships, and ensure our financial health and sustainability. A ‘big picture’ thinker and inspirational leader, you have a graduate degree in a human services field or the equivalent, a proven five-year track record of success as a senior manager, ideally within a diverse, non-profit organization serving marginalized communities, and experience working with a Board of Directors. You have five years of experience in the social services or not-for-profit sectors, strong government and community relations expertise, and advocacy skills to effect change in social policies.

You may be required to work occasional weekends, provide periodic on-call support for weekend drop-in shifts, and travel within the city.

We offer excellent compensation and benefits. Please apply to:
962 Bloor Street West
Toronto, ON M6H 1L6
tel: 416-926-9762
fax: 416-926-1932
e-mail: jkali@sistering.org

Sistering has anti-racism/oppression and employment equity policies and especially encourages Aboriginal women, women of colour, immigrant and refugee women, and women from other disadvantaged groups to apply.

+++++

JOB POSTING: PROGRAM COORDINATOR, MAYWORKS, TORONTO

Deadline: 6:00 p.m. on October 13, 2009

Mayworks Festival of Working People and the Arts seeks a Program Coordinator for the festival events.

For more information on this position: http://www.mayworks.ca/

***END***

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowsk

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Toward Real Education

Toward Real Education

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK UPDATE SEPTEMBER 15 2009

 

OUR MANDATE: The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

To change your subscriptions settings, visit: http://listserv.oise.utoronto.ca/mailman/listinfo/csewbroadcast

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

+++++

RESOURCE AVAILABLE FROM CSEW: ADULT LEARNING AND TECHNOLOGY IN WORKING-CLASS LIFE

By P.H. Sawchuk

Adult Learning and Technology in Working-Class Life explores the everyday learning lives of workers as they cope, use, understand and contest computer technology in their lives.

Cambridge University Press, 2003
Available online from publisher: http://www.cambridge.org

+++++

SEMINAR WITH WADE RATHKE OF ACORN USA

Co-sponsored by Labour Studies (York University) & the Centre for the Study of Education and Work (OISE/UT) Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning (APCOL-CURA) Project

Thursday, September 17, 2009
9:30am – 11:30am
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, Room 12-199
252 Bloor St. West, Toronto, ON
   
Wade Rathke is a co-founder of the Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now (ACORN) and Service Employees International Union (SEIU) Local 100.

Rathke was ACORN’s chief organizer from its founding in 1970 until 2008. He is the publisher and editor-in-chief of Social Policy, a quarterly magazine for scholars and activists, and he is the author of two recently published books. As a student, Rathke organized draft resistance for Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) and later organized welfare recipients in Springfield and Boston, Massachusetts for the National Welfare Rights Organization.

ACORN is the largest organization of lower income and working families in the United States, with 175,000 dues-paying families spread across about eighty-two staffed offices in American cities. The ACORN family of organizations includes radio stations, publications, housing development and ownership (ACORN Housing), and a variety of other supports for direct organizing and issue campaigns, such as Project Vote and the Living Wage Resource Center. ACORN International has offices in Lima, Peru, and Toronto and Vancouver, Canada.

The APCOL Project (2009-2014) is operated out of the Ontario Institute for Education (University of Toronto). Using Action Research methods, its goal is to bring together community organizers, university and college researchers in the Toronto area to document relations between community organizing, the economy and activist development.

For more information on APCOL, contact g.demontmollin@utoronto.ca
For more information on Wade Rathke, go to http://chieforganizer.org/

+++++

FORUM: JOBLESS RECOVERY – BROKEN EI

Who is going to fix EI? As election fever starts to heat up, the Tories are desperate to pretend that they have dealt with the nagging issue of thousands of laid-off workers who can’t get EI benefits.

Registration: 6:00 p.m.
Event starts: 6:30 p.m.

Location: Rogers Communications Centre, Ryerson University, 80 Gould Street (at Church Street), Room 204

Speakers:
Unemployed workers from the GTA;
Judy Rebick, CAW Sam Gindin Chair in Social Justice and Democracy; and
Gilles Paquette, Quebec Federation of Labour/Unemployed Coalition.

Contact: 416-441-3663 ext.224

Organised by the Good Jobs for all Coalition: http://www.goodjobsforall.ca

+++++

BOOK LAUNCH – CITIZEN WEALTH: THE CAMPAIGN TO SAVE WORKING FAMILIES
September 16, 2009
5:30pm – 7:30pm
Hart House (UofT)

Wade Rathke is among the most prolific community and labor organizers of his generation. He is the founder of ACORN USA (Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now, USA), which has worked to build the largest community based organization of low and moderate income families in America fighting for social and economic justice. ACORN CANADA has been a vital partner of the Toronto labour movement in the Good Jobs for All Coalition and the $10 Minimum Wage fight. Wade Rathke will be speaking about lessons learned from a life of community organizing, as well as signing copies of his new book and answering questions. For more information on the book and Wade, please visit here.

To find out more about the book and Wade, click here: http://chieforganizer.org/

+++++

UNITED STEELWORKER RADIO ADS STAND UP FOR SUDBURY, AND ADVERTISE SEPT 19 RALLY

SUDBURY, ON, Sept. 14 /CNW/ – “You know… Sudbury’s a good place to grow up… to raise a family… to retire”, begins the radio ad launched by the United Steelworkers in support of the Vale Inco strike.

The first of four ads goes on to explain: “That’s because we give back to our community when we can. But the Brazilian company Vale could ruin all this.”

In the series of radio ads (two to be launched Monday, Sept 14), the Steelworkers are reaching out to fellow Sudburians to recognize that Vale Inco is not just attacking the compensation of its workers. Vale is also challenging the very quality of life that has been built up over decades in Sudbury.

“The ads remind Sudbury citizens that Vale is massively profitable, currently has huge cash assets, and increased its executive compensation by 121% in the last two years. Yet Vale is demanding drastic concessions from the Sudbury workforce,” said John Fera, President of USW Local 6500.

The ads publicize an International and Community Support Rally that is taking place on Saturday, Sept 19 at 11am at the Sudbury Arena.

The rally will have guests from around the world, including Brazil, Mexico, UK, Switzerland, USA, and others. The rally was the brainchild of international supporters of the Vale Inco strike.

“The international community is closely monitoring the Sudbury strike against Vale Inco in what has become a battle between a massively profitable multinational corporation and a committed workforce joined by a strong union and supportive community,” added Fera.

For further information: John Fera, USW President Local 6500, (705) 675-3381 x238 / (705) 561-3093; Bob Gallagher, USW Communications, (416) 434-2221

+++++

JOSSEY-BASS ONLINE TEACHING AND LEARNING – ONLINE CONFERENCE

The conference comes to you.

The most popular guidebooks on Online Teaching and Learning come to life as an Online Conference. Join us OCTOBER 6-8, 2009. Interact with over 20 authors and hundreds of colleagues, right from your desktop. And every participant receives a choice of 3 books.

To learn more, click here: http://www.onlineteachingandlearning.com/program
To register, click here: http://www.onlineteachingandlearning.com/register

+++++

SEIZE THE MOMENT!

Seize the Moment (STM) is a method of democratic critical thinking used in community building and development for positive social change.

STM is a democratic way for community organisations to do problem solving around issues that affect the communities they serve. Using STM leads to stronger collective abilities to do social analysis for action, more efficient delivery of services to people in need, a more interconnected service and social movement sector, and a more informed and involved public amongst other things.

Based on the process Naming the Moment, an innovative method developed in the 1980s that incorporated the then current learnings from the fields of organizational development, adult education, skills training, conflict resolution, coalition building and more, STM builds on this history and, like its predecessor, builds on the best practices available both in the above-mentioned fields as well as drawing on the unique experiences of participating organizations.

The Catalyst Centre designs and facilitates STM processes in collaboration with a volunteer steering committee (representative of the participating organizations or communities) that shares responsibility for design, outreach and facilitation. Once designed the Catalyst Centre with the steering committee conducts a series of workshops (e.g. five to eight 3-hour evenings over a few months or two to three full days over a weekend or a few half days) to which participating community members and organizations are invited.

For more information, contact The Catalyst Centre at (416) 516-9546, email catalystcentre@web.net, or visit their web site at http://www.catalystcentre.ca

+++++

ONLINE RESOURCES FOR COMMUNITY BUILDING

From COMM-ORG, the On-Line Conference on Community Organizing and Development. The list is moderated and maintained by Randy Stoecker at the University of Toledo.

http://ourblocks.net/neighborhood-resources-from-bill-berkowitz/
http://ourblocks.net/built-environmental-justice/

+++++

THE PROBLEM WITH ECONOMICS

By Duncan Cameron, rabble.ca

What economics has to offer is rich and varied. What has to be avoided is what did in the American profession, and is always a threat to any academic pursuits: conformity to prevailing norms.

To read more: http://rabble.ca/columnists/2009/09/problem-economics

+++++

A LIFELONG SEARCH FOR REAL EDUCATION

by Julia Putnam

Grace Lee Boggs and Jimmy Boggs brought people together to rebuild inner-city Detroit and to teach the things you can’t learn in a classroom. At 94, Grace is still at it.

To read more:
http://www.yesmagazine.org/issues/learn-as-you-go/a-lifelong-search-for-real-education?utm_source=sep09&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=14_Grace

+++++

WHAT ARE YOU DOING FOR CO-OP WEEK? LET CCA KNOW!    

The Canadian Co-operative Association (CCA) wants to know about the activities co-ops and credit unions across Canada are planning for Co-op Week, October 11-17, 2009.

CCA will be posting a day-by-day listing of Canadian Co-op Week events on its website, in an effort to create an inventory of Co-op Week and International Credit Union Day activities taking place across the country.

CCA will be also be hosting a Co-op Week blog in which co-operators and members of the public can write about what co-operatives mean to them.  They are looking for guest bloggers from different parts of the country to talk about their own experiences in the co-operative sector and how their co-ops contribute to the economic and social lives of their communities.

To send in a Co-op Week event listing, or to volunteer to be a guest blogger, contact Donna Balkan, CCA communications manager, at donna.balkan@coopscanada.coop

+++++

FRIENDING A STRIKE

From Insider HigherEd

When Oakland University, in Michigan, and the union that represents 600 of its faculty members failed to reach labor agreement last week, the professors went on strike and the university shut down — while representatives from the opposing sides went behind closed doors in downtown Detroit to negotiate. At the same time, a much larger and more eclectic group began discussing the issue in a space that had no doors — just walls. At Oakland U., the action isn’t just on the picket lines. It’s on Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube.

To read more: http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2009/09/10/facebook

+++++

AGM: METRO TORONTO CHINESE & SOUTHEAST ASIAN LEGAL CLINIC

Tuesday, September 22, 2009
6:00 – 8:00pm
University Settlement House, 23 Grange Road, Toronto

Presentation: The Economic Crisis: What caused it and how does it affect racialized communities and other marginalized groups?, by Jim Stanford, Chief Economist, Canadian Auto Workers

This special presentation is co-sponsored by the Colour of Poverty Campaign

Light refreshments will be served! (No pre-registration required. Just show up!)

+++++

JOURNALISM IS DEAD; LONG LIVE JOURNALISM – HOW THE WEB IS REINVENTING JOURNALISM

Tuesday, September 15, 2009
6:30 PM – 8:00 PM
Innis Town Hall
2 Sussex Ave.
Toronto, Ontario

There’s no debate that journalism is in the midst of an alarming transition. Newspaper circulation figures, advertising revenues, job openings and journalists’ wages have been in a downward slide for several years. At the same time, the internet has given birth to new forms of journalism. Green shoots are emerging in the form of online news gathering and reporting, the rise of social media, citizen journalism and crowdsourced news.

This is where the debate begins. What will these changes mean for democracy? Is there a business model for quality journalism? And what will the jobs of the future look like?

Join Rem Rieder, editor and publisher of the American Journalism Review, in conversation with Ira Basen, CBC writer and producer of “News 2.0: The Future of News in the Age of Social Media”, as they explore these questions and more.

Sponsored by the Canadian Journalism Foundation.

+++++

ONLINE PUBLICATIONS

*The consequences of caring: skills, regulation and reward among early years workers
Patricia Findlay, Jeanette Findlay, and Robert Stewart
Work Employment Society 2009;23 422-441
http://wes.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/23/3/422

*A cross-cultural examination of student volunteering: Is it all about résumé building?
Femida Handy, Lesley Hustinx, Ram A. Cnaan, and Chulhee Kang
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly published 3 September 2009, 10.1177/0899764009344353
http://nvs.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/0899764009344353v1

*A feminine perspective of giftedness
Linda Kreger Silverman and Nancy B. Miller
International Handbook on Giftedness
http://www.springerlink.com/content/u028h31368580278/

*Financialization and changes in the social relations along commodity chains: The case of coffee
Susan A. Newman
Review of Radical Political Economics published 1 September 2009, 10.1177/0486613409341454
http://rrp.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/0486613409341454v1

*The limits of black activism: Philadelphia’s public housing in the depression and World War II
James Wolfinger
Journal of Urban History 2009;35 787-814
http://juh.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/35/6/787

*Satisfaction with spirituality, satisfaction with religion and personal well-being among Spanish adolescents and young university students
Ferran Casas, Mònica González, Cristina Figuer, Sara Malo
Applied Research in Quality of Life, Volume 4, Number 1 / March, 2009
http://www.springerlink.com/content/d5228j0520621383/

***END*** 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk