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Multiculturalism

THE MULTICULTURAL POLITIC

The Multicultural Politic – Launch Event

With the London Olympics on our doorstep, a wave of complaints around police racism and youth unemployment at an all time high, The Multicultural Politic is hosting a debate on the reality of multiculturalism in Britain today.

We are also using this opportunity to re-launch our blog with a new logo and a strengthened editorial team, during a two-hour plenary and debate at Goldsmiths College in south east London.

SPEAKERS include:

KEN FERO – co-founder of Migrant Media and independent film maker, notably of the 2001 documentary film INJUSTICE, detailing the struggles of those who lost their lives at the hand of the British state. 

ESTELLE DU BOULAY – Works for the independent anti-racist and community campaigning organization: Newham Monitoring Project.

ADAM ELLIOT-COOPER – Associate Editor of Ceasefire Magazine, former member of NUS Black Students’ Campaign and former youth worker

+ SPECIAL GUESTS

The event also aims to provide a forum through which different campaigns and thinkers can meet and discuss action in London and beyond, in order to defend and extend the gains made by migrant communities, sexual minority, feminist and working class movements. 

Venue: Small Hall cinema, Richard Hoggart building (main building),Goldsmiths College, New Cross, London, SE14 6NW 

Drinks & nibbles will be served.
TRANSPORT LINKS:
London overground stations New Cross Gate & New Cross (3 min walk)

——————-

The Multicultural Politic aims to provide a forum through which people from multicultural communities can come together and explore how we can build a more fair, free, equal and democratic world. We aim to serve as an information resource, discussion space and general stimulus for debate in the British political sphere, but also in the international arena.

www.tmponline.org

Twitter:
@MultiPolitic
@justinthelibsoc
@KoosCouvee


Justin Baidoo
Co-Editor of The Multicultural Politic: http://www.tmponline.org
Twitter: @justinthelibsoc


Justin Baidoo
Editor of TMP: http://www.tmponline.org
Twitter: http://twitter.com/justinthelibsoc

**END**

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WAGES OF WHITENESS & RACIST SYMBOLIC CAPITAL

Racism Analysis – Yearbook 1 – 2010: Edited by Wulf D. Hund, Jeremy Krikler, David Roediger

219 pp., 24.90€, ISBN 978-3-643-10949-1 threadstiching, softcover with flaps Lit Verlag | Berlin – Münster – London – Wien – Zurich

CONTENTS:

DAVID ROEDIGER: ACCOUNTING FOR THE WAGES OF WHITENESS: U.S MARXISM AND THE CRITICAL HISTORY OF RACE. 

ANJA WEISS: RACIST SYMBOLIC CAPITAL: A BOURDIEUIAN APPROACH TO THE ANALYSIS OF RACISM. 

WULF D. HUND: NEGATIVE SOCIETALISATION, RACISM AND THE CONSTITUTION OF RACE.

STEFANIE AFFELDT: A PAROXYSM OF WHITENESS: WHITE LABOUR, WHITE NATION 
AND WHITE SUGAR IN AUSTRALIA.

JEREMY KRIKLER: RE-THINKING RACE AND CLASS IN SOUTH AFRICA: SOME WAYS FORWARD. 

DAGMAR ENGELKEN: A WHITE MAN’S COUNTRY? THE CHINESE LABOUR CONTROVERSY IN THE TRANSVAAL.

ELIZABETH ESCH: RACIALIZING TRANSNATIONALISM: THE FORD MOTOR COMPANY AND WHITE SUPREMACY FROM DETROIT TO SOUTH AFRICA.

The essays assembled in this volume shed light on the complex of class and race from which W.E.B. Du Bois saw originating “a sort of public and psychological wage” of whiteness. David Roediger (University of Illinois) preliminarily addresses the evolution of whiteness as a category of critical social analysis. Anja Weib (Universität Duisburg-Essen) explains that the perspective of whiteness studies can be expanded by a modification of Bourdieu’s category of symbolic capital. Wulf D. Hund (Universität Hamburg) pleads for the generalisation of this concept and for its application to an analysis of racism as negative societalisation. Stefanie Affeldt (Universitat Hamburg) specifies the analytic dimensions of the categories ‘racist symbolic capital’ and ‘wages of whiteness’ using the example of the white sugar campaign in Australia. Jeremy Krikler (University of Essex) explores some missing dimensions in the study of race and class in South Africa. Dagmar Engelken (University of Essex) investigates the Chinese Labour Question in South Africa. Elizabeth Esch (Columbia University) examines the ways in which corporate initiatives of the Ford Motor Company in the U.S. and South Africa imagined the assembly line worker as a white citizen and consumer.

Racism Analysis is a research series that explores racial discrimination in all its varying historical, ideological and cultural patterns. It examines the invention of race, the dimensions of modern racism and inquires into racism avant la lettre. The series brings together scholars from various disciplines and schools of thought. A key aim is to contribute to the conceptualisation of racism and to identify the practices of dehumanisation intrinsic to it.

The Racism Analysis Studies will publish monographs as well as anthologies, proceedings and textbooks, thereby assembling contributions committed to various perspectives of a critical research into society. The contributions will delve into examples of racist inclusion and exclusion, or outline specific aspects of the different fields of research into racism.

The Racism Analysis Yearbook will be issued by varying teams of special editors. Each volume will deal with key topics in the debates over racism and will focus on illuminating such topics through the investigation of particular subjects and will refer to the state of scholarly discussion on them.

Check out the book at Lit Verlag’s site: (http://www.lit-verlag.de/isbn/3-643-10949-1)

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Culture

WAGES OF WHITENESS & RACIST SYMBOLIC CAPITAL

(Racism Analysis – Yearbook 1 – 2010) Edited by Wulf D. Hund, Jeremy Krikler, David Roediger

Socialism and Hope

SOCIETY FOR SOCIALIST STUDIES

New Scholars Session
Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences
Fredericton, Canada 31 May – 03 June 2011

Call for Papers

The most recent crisis of capital poses an immense set of challenges. Neoliberalism is deepening, chronic hunger is widespread and ecological degradation continues apace. Opportunities have nevertheless emerged. Student movements are organizing across Europe, the Middle East and the Americas, while creative projects and struggles are proliferating across the world.

To make sense of all of this, the Society of Socialist Studies invites graduate students to submit paper proposals for the New Scholars Session at the 2011 Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences.

Submissions are welcome from those who have yet to complete their Masters degree. Perspectives from a wide array of disciplines and interdisciplinary fields are welcome, including history, political science and sociology, among others. Paper topics are encouraged from socialist, feminist, anti-racist and ecological points of view. Paper proposals could be in any of these areas, as well as on topics relating to the Society’s theme, “Continental Shifts, Divisions, and Solidarities.”

The theme marks an attempt to grapple with global shifting and fragmentation of capital and power. Like other changes in the past, “Continental Shifts, Divisions, and Solidarities” is an attempt to challenge to the ways we understand the world(s) around us. This is a time to rethink established epistemologies, theories and underlying philosophies.

Please submit abstracts (maximum of 100 words) by January 31, 2011 to: Matthew Brett, New Scholars chair, brett.matthew@yahoo.ca   

Contact Matthew for more information, or visit http://www.socialiststudies.ca

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Taweret

POST-RACIAL IMAGINARIES

Darkmatter Journal is Calling for Papers for a …

Special Issue on Post-racial Imaginaries

http://www.darkmatter101.org/

Increasing reference to the notion of ‘post-race’ is suggestive of an emergent discursive framework in critical approaches to race and racism. ‘Post-race’, ‘post-racial’, ‘post-black’, and associated ideas, are being mobilized in various theoretical, cultural and political discourses to describe new racial formations. Post-race requires us to question in new ways the precepts of race thinking, positing the end of race as a point with which to think racial futures. The imprecise nature of much ‘post-’ talk means there has yet to be a rigorous assessment of the significance of post-race and its cognate terms, beyond simple endorsement or dismissal.

This special issue of darkmatter Journal is interested in delineating the contours of the ‘post-racial’ turn by asking: what is the post-racial? What are the conditions of its emergence? What assumptions and claims does it make about the logics of racism? What critical and political work is the term doing? What does the ‘post’ in post-race mean? How is racism theorized in post-race? What is the relationship between colonial history and the post-racial? When and where is the post-racial? Who claims post-raciality?

Given the multiple registers of post-race talk, these fundamental questions might be addressed in relation to:
  – The shifts from race to ethnicity, cultural difference and multiculturalism;
  – The ontology and epistemology of race;
  – Obama and the politics of anti-racism;
  – Utopia and the end of racism;
  – Modernity, history, nation and racial memory;
  – After whiteness;
  – Feminism, sexual politics and multiraciality;
  – Neoliberalism, Marxism and class politics;
  – Globalism, Orientalism, anti/post/de-colonialism;
  – Post-black aesthetics, popular culture and politics;
  – Digitalization, bio-technologies, genetic engineering and racial mutations

Submissions: between 1,500 – 8,000 words are welcome, as are alternative formats such as commentaries, reviews, audio, visual and digital contributions. Please email a 400 – 500 word abstract to submit@darkmatter101.org

Please note: submissions to darkmatter are now subject to external peer review. If your contribution is intended for the less formal (and non-peer reviewed) ‘commons’ section, indicate this on your submission.

For further inquiries about the ‘Post-racial Imaginaries’ special issue, email: editors@darkmatter101.org

Deadline for Abstracts: 1st Feb 2011
Deadline for Articles: 1st Aug 2011
Publication date: Nov 2011

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Dave Hill

STATEMENT AND EDUCATION POLICY MANIFESTO – BY DAVE HILL

Statement and Education Policy Manifesto by Dave Hill

Trade Unionist and Socialist Coalition Parliamentary Candidate for Brighton Kemptown

Details at: http://www.brightontusc.blogspot.com

I have spent my lifetime as a teacher in ‘challenging’ primary and secondary schools, in teacher ‘training’ and in universities trying to tackle inequalities in schooling: inequalities that result in millions of working class children having far less educational opportunities – and subsequently, usually lower paid jobs – than the children of richer parents; especially the 7% who go to private schools – and snap up most of the highest paid, elite, jobs.

The very choice of what and how it should be taught, how and what schooling should be organised, how it should be funded, and where and how the funding should be targeted, and a consideration of ‘who wins and who loses’ through all of the above, are all intensely political. And we want that politics to be in the interests of the millions not the millionaires!

I come from a working class family brought up in some poverty: for example on free School Meals (like a million others!) in St. Martins’ St., off the Lewes Rd., Brighton. I went to Westlain Grammar School, my brothers to under-funded secondary modern schools, such as Queens Park and Moulscoomb. Three times as much was spent on the education of grammar school students than on Secondary Modern students! My children went to local state schools. The inequalities I have witnessed – and lived – as a child, as a teacher and socialist political activist, have led me to spending my life fighting for greater equality in education and society, and against racism, sexism and against homophobia.

What an indictment of our divisive education system that students from private schools are 25 times more likely to get to one of the top British universities than those who come from a lower social class or live in a poor area! And that (in 2008) only 35% of pupils eligible for free school meals obtained five or more A* to C GCSE grades; compared with 63% of pupils from wealthier backgrounds.  This stark education inequality mirrors that in our grossly unequal society.

It is incredible, actually it is only too believable, in Britain today, that the richest section of society has 17 years of healthy life more than the least well-off in society. The minimum wage should be raised by 50%. How can people – decent hard working people like some in my own family, live on take-home pay of less than £200 a week! And there should be a maximum wage, too! Nobody, banker, boss, or buy-out bully, should be on more than £250,000 a year. This figure should reduce progressively so that within 10 years no-one is taking more than four times the average wage, nobody should be creaming off £27 million or £67 million a year for example! Certainly not when there are 4 million children living in poverty! I was once one of them. I was helped by the welfare state. We need our public services.  We need to improve them, not cut them; not attack them.

All three parties, New Labour, Lib Dem, and Tory, dance to the music of big business. All are promising cuts. Whatever they say, those cuts will hit schools, children, and the quality of education in our state schools. Already we are seeing staff cuts and course closures in universities up and down the country. In Brighton, for example, both Brighton and Sussex Universities are promising to cut out the nurseries, and Sussex to chop over 100 jobs. Brighton University is proposing to cut its Adult Ed art courses. Vandalism! Cutting popular and widely used public services!

And don’t believe cuts are necessary. They’re not! Cutting the Trident nuclear submarine replacement programme, bringing troops home from Afghanistan and Iraq, stopping the Identity Card programme, and collecting even some even of the £120 billion in taxes unpaid by the rich… yes, £120 billion!…would mean cuts are not necessary at all!

But you won’t hear that from the other parties, just from Socialists, like the Trade Unionist and Socialist Coalition, and from Respect.

A Socialist Manifesto for Education is:

[1] Cut class sizes (they are currently some of the largest in the rich world- much larger than in private schools for example). According to OECD research Britain is 23rd out of 30 developed countries in terms of large class size. Other countries such as Finland have a maximum class size of 20. Finland is widely seen as providing an extremely high quality of education. For a maximum class size of 20 by 2020 in both primary and secondary schools!

[2] Abolish league tables and abolish SATS (some external testing is necessary, but SATS so very often restricts teaching to ‘teaching to the test’, and results in undue stress (and an increase in bedwetting, compared to the pre-SATS era, for example).

[3] Restore local democratic control of ‘Academies’. They should be run by the democratically elected local councils, and keep to national pay and conditions agreements. Why should rich businessmen and women take control of any of our schools? Let’s keep the added investment- but it’s the government that pays for that added investment anyhow! Let’s keep and enhance the added investment, but distribute it fairly between all schools. Our schools and the children in them are not for sale! Nor, through uneven funding for different types of school (e.g. Academies) should some schools be set up for success at the expense of others being set up (and under-funded) for relative failure.

[4] Private profiteering out of our schools! Bring the education services hived off to private profiteers back into either national or local private ownership! These include Ofsted, Student grants, school meals, cleaning and caretaking.

[5] Free, nutritious, balanced school meals for every child to combat poor diets, obesity, and… yes… for some children… hunger!

[6] Restore free adult education classes in pastime and leisure studies as well as in vocational training/ studies

[7] Restore free, state-funded residential centres and Youth Centres/Youth clubs for our children so they can widen their experiences of life in safe circumstances and enhance their education beyond the confines of the home or city.

[8] For a fully Comprehensive Secondary School system; so that each school has a broad social class mix and mix of ability and attainment levels. 

[9] For the integration of Private schools into the state education system – so that the goodies of the private school system are shared amongst all pupils/ students. All schools to be under democratic locally elected local council control. No to Private Schools. No to religious groups running schools. No to big business / private capital running our schools and children! 

[10] Free up the curriculum so there can be more creativity and cross-subject/ disciplinary work.

[11] Get Ofsted and their flawed tick-box system off the back of teachers. The results of Ofsted are to penalise even the best schools (outstanding in every aspect- other than in SATS attainments) in the poorest areas.

[12] Encourage Critical Thinking across the curriculum. Teach children not ‘what to think’, but ‘how to think’: including how to think critically about the media and politicians.

[13] Teach in schools for ecological literacy and a readiness to act for environmental justice as well as economic and social justice. Encourage children to ‘reach for the stars’ – and to work for a society that lets that happen – a fairer society with much more equal chances, pay packets and power, and about environmental and sustainability issues.  

[14] Proper recognition of all school workers, and no compulsory redundancies. For teachers, secretarial and support staff, teaching assistants, school meals supervisory assistants, caretaking staff, there should be workplace democratic regular school forums in every school. Regarding jobs (for example the threatened job cuts at Sussex University – and the ‘inevitable’ job cuts in every? school after the election – and no compulsory redundancies – any restructuring to be conditional on agreement with the trade unions.

[15] Setting up of school councils – to encourage democratic understanding, citizenship, social responsibility, and a welcoming and valuing of ‘student/pupil voice’.

[16] Ensuring that schools are anti-racist, anti-sexist and anti-homophobic – making sure schools encourage equality, welcoming different home and group cultures. As part of this, anti-bullying practices in every school must be fully implemented, to combat bullying of all sorts, including racism, sexism, homophobia, and bullying based on disabilities. And this should be not just in anti-bullying policies, but also be part of the curriculum too!

[17] An honest sex education curriculum in schools that teaches children not just ‘when to say no’, but also when to say ‘yes’; a programme that is focused on positives and pleasure and personal worth, not on stigmatising sex and sexualities.

[18] No to ‘Faith Schools’ and get organised religion out of schools. If Christians, Jews, Muslims, Hindus, Zoroastrians, or whichever religion wishes to teach religion, let them do it in their own time, places of worship (Saturday/Sunday schools) or in their supplementary or complementary schools. Teach ethics and spirituality by all means, and teach about religions. But no brainwashing. Teach a critical approach to religions.

[19] Broaden teacher education and training so that the negative effects of the ‘technicisation and de-theorising’ of teacher training (that were the result of the 1992/1993 Conservative re-organisation of what was then called teacher education- subsequently retitled teacher training). Bring back the study and awareness of the social and political and psychological contexts of teaching, including an understanding of and commitment to challenge and overturn racism, sexism, homophobia and other forms of underexpectation and discrimination – such as discrimination against working class pupils.

[20] A good, local school for every child. No school closures! “Surplus places” should actually mean lower class sizes! And increased community use of school facilities.

[21] A completely fully funded, publicly owned and democratic education system from pre-school right through to university. Education is a right not a commodity to be bought and sold. So: no fees, like in Scandinavia, Cuba, Venezuela, Bolivia, where education up to PhD level is free. No to university or further education/vocational training fees! And bring in a living grant for students from less well-off backgrounds/ income.

In my jobs, firstly as a teacher, and now as a Professor of Education (and writer/editor of 17 books on education and equality) I have been round hundreds of schools. Many of them are brilliant. Schools in the poorest areas, schools in better off areas! Brilliant. But, with better funding, smaller class sizes, an end to the destructive competition between schools (if every school is a good local school) and with more professional judgement being allowed for teachers- then I look forward to a time when all state schools match the class sizes and results of the currently more lavishly funded private schools’. And working class kids – black, brown, white – get the fair deal currently trumpeted – but in actuality denied – by all three major parties.  

Professor Dave Hill, The Trade Unionist and Socialist Coalition (TUSC) parliamentary candidate for Brighton Kemptown

Professor Dave Hill teaches at Middlesex University and is Visiting Professor of Critical Education Policy and Equality Studies at the University of Limerick, Ireland.

The Brighton Trade Unionist and Socialist Coalition blogspot is at: http://www.brightontusc.blogspot.com

Dave’s Wiki and Publications are at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dave_Hill_(professor)

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Karl Marx

CRISIS AND CRITIQUE: HISTORICAL MATERIALISM ANNUAL CONFERENCE 2010

Central London, Thursday 11th to Sunday 14th November*

Call for Papers

Submission and Abstract Deadline: 1 June 2010

Notwithstanding repeated invocations of the ‘green shoots of recovery’, the effects of the economic crisis that began in 2008 continue to be felt around the world. While some central tenets of the neoliberal project have been called into question, bank bailouts, cuts to public services and attacks on working people’s lives demonstrate that the ruling order remains capable of imposing its agenda. Many significant Marxist analyses have already been produced of the origins, forms and prospects of the crisis, and we look forward to furthering these debates at HM London 2010. We also aim to encourage dialogue between the critique of political economy and other modes of criticism – ideological, political, aesthetic, philosophical – central to the Marxist tradition.

In the 1930s, Walter Benjamin and Bertolt Brecht projected a journal to be called ‘Crisis and Critique’. In very different times, but in a similar spirit, HM London 2010 aims to serve as a forum for dialogue, interaction and debate between different strands of critical-Marxist theory. Whether their focus is the study of the capitalist mode of production’s theoretical and practical foundations, the unmasking of its ideological forms of legitimation or its political negation, we are convinced that a renewed and politically effective Marxism will need to rely on all the resources of critique in the years ahead. Crises produce periods of ideological and political uncertainty. They are moments that put into question established cognitive and disciplinary compartmentalisations, and require a recomposition at the level of both theory and practice. HM London 2010 hopes to contribute to a broader dialogue on the Left aimed at such a recomposition, one of whose prerequisites remains the young Marx’s call for the ‘ruthless criticism of all that exists’.

We are seeking papers that respond to the current crisis from a range of Marxist perspectives, but also submissions that try to think about crisis and critique in their widest ramifications. HM will also consider proposals on themes and topics of interest to critical-Marxist theory not directly linked to the call for papers (we particularly welcome contributions on non-Western Marxism and on empirical enquiries employing Marxist methods).

While Historical Materialism is happy to receive proposals for panels, the editorial board reserves the right to change the composition of panels or to reject individual papers from panel proposals. We also expect all participants to attend the whole conference and not simply make ‘cameo’ appearances. We cannot accommodate special requests for specific slots or days, except in highly exceptional circumstances.

*Please note that, in order to allow for expected demand, this year the conference will be three and a half days’ long, starting on the Thursday afternoon.

Please submit a title and abstract of between 200 and 300 words by registering at: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/conferences/annual7/submit by 1 June 2010

Possible themes include:
        •       Crisis and left recomposition
        •       Critique and crisis in the global south
        •       Anti-racist critique
        •       Marxist and non-Marxist theories of crisis
        •       Capitalist and anti-capitalist uses of the crisis
        •       Global dimensions of the crisis
        •       Comparative and historical accounts of capitalist crisis
        •       Ecological and economic crisis
        •       Critical theory today
        •       Finance and the crisis
        •       Neoliberalism and legitimation crisis
        •       Negation and negativity
        •       Feminism and critique
        •       Political imaginaries of crisis and catastrophe
        •       The critique of everyday life (Lefebvre, the situationists etc.)
        •       The idea of critique in Marx, his predecessors and contemporaries
        •       Art criticism, political critique and the critique of political economy
        •       Geography and crisis, geography and the critique of political economy
        •       Right-wing movements and crisis
        •       Critiques of the concept of crisis
        •       New forms of critique in the social and human sciences
        •       Aesthetic critique
        •       Marxist literary and cultural criticism
        •       Reports on recent evolution of former USSR countries and China

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Imperialism

RACISM IN BRITAIN TODAY

International Socialism Journal Seminar:

Richard Seymour on: ‘Racism in Britain Today’

Richard Seymour, author of The Liberal Defence of Murder and the ‘lenin’s tomb’ blog presents the latest in our series of seminars. 

The electoral success of the fascist British National Party and the emergence of the English Defence League has forced activists in Britain to look again at the issue of racism. Cultural racism and Islamophobia seem to supplant traditional racist ideas based on biology—but what is behind this shift and just how novel is it? Richard Seymour argues that the rise in racism in Britain is driven to a considerable extent by government policies and media reaction, both liberal and conservative.

6.30pm, Friday 26 March, School of Oriental and African Studies, Thornhaugh Street, Russell Square, WC1H 0GX

(Room FG06, Russell Square Campus— Map: http://bit.ly/soasmap)

This seminar is free to attend and open to all. For more information phone 020 7819 1177 or email isj@swp.org.uk

Some of Richard’s earlier articles on racism can be found at the ‘lenin’s tomb’ blog, available online at:  http://leninology.blogspot.com/search/label/racism

Please circulate

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Radical Education against Capital

A RETURN TO EDUCATIONAL APARTHEID? CRITICAL EXAMINATIONS OF RACE, SCHOOLS, AND SEGREGATION

A Critical Education Series

The editors of Critical Education are pleased to announce our second editorial series.  This current series will focus on the articulation of race, schools, and segregation, and will analyze the extent to which schooling may or may not be returning to a state of educational apartheid.

On June 28, 2007, the Supreme Court of the US by a 5-4 margin voted to overturn Jefferson County’s four decade old desegregation plan.  The Meredith case from Jefferson County was conjoined with the Parents Involved in Community Schools case from Seattle, WA, for which a group comprised primarily of white parents from two neighborhoods alleged some 200 students were not admitted to schools of their choice, based on “integration tie-breakers,” which prevented many from attending facilities nearest to their homes.

In Justice Roberts plurality opinion, he argued, “The parties and their amici debate which side is more faithful to the heritage of Brown [v. Board of Education, 1954], but the position of the plaintiffs in Brown was spelled out in their brief and could not have been clearer: ‘The Fourteenth Amendment prevents states from according differential treatment to American children on the basis of their color or race’.  What do racial classifications at issue here do, if not accord differential treatment on the basis of race?”  And, later, “The way to stop discrimination based on race is to stop discrimination on the basis of race.”

Aside from the fact that the plaintiff in the Louisville case ultimately won her appeal in the Jefferson County system, placing her white child into precisely the school she wanted based on her appeal to the district, demonstrating that the system worked, it is the goal of this series to investigate the extent to which Justice Roberts and the other concurring justices have taken steps to erode the civil rights of the racially marginalized in order to serve the interests of the dominant racial group.  It took just a little over 50 years (of monumental effort) to get a case to the Supreme Court to overturn Plessy v. Ferguson. Now, has it taken just a little over 50 years to scale that decision back with the overturning of voluntary desegregation plans in Jefferson County and Seattle School District 1?

In 2003, with a different make-up, the Supreme Court foreshadowed this 2007 verdict by rendering a ‘split decision’ regarding the University of Michigan admission policies. In the Gratz v. Bollinger case, the Supreme Court decided 6-3 that the University of Michigan needed to modify their admission criteria, which assigned points based on race.  However, in the Grutter v. Bollinger case, the Supreme Court decided 5-4 to uphold the University of Michigan Law School’s ruling that race could be one of several factors when selecting students because it furthers “a compelling interest in obtaining the educational benefits that flow from a diverse student body.”

In Jonathan Kozol’s 2005 sobering profile of American education, Shame of the Nation: The Restoration of Apartheid Schooling in America, a lamenting follow-up to his earlier work, Savage Inequalities, he already began to illustrate the retrograde process many public school systems have undergone related to racial balance.  His critique of these pre-Brown-like- segregation systems was balanced, ironically, by rather effusive praise of the Jefferson County system, which attempted to keep this balance in check. Does the 2007 decision remove this one shining example?

Though the course toward educational apartheid may not be pre-destined, what is the likelihood that the “path of least resistance” will lead toward racial separation? How does the lingering legacy of residential segregation complicate this issue?  What connections can we draw to and/or how might further racial segregation exacerbate issues of poverty or unemployment?  Further, where do race and class collide?  And, where is a more distinct analysis necessary? Finally, what can we surmise about the ongoing achievement gap if, in fact, apartheid schooling is afoot?

Undoubtedly, at worst, this decision could prove to be a harbinger for the death of a waning democracy.  Without a compelling public education that helps all our children become critical consumers and citizens, what kind of society might we imagine for ourselves?  At best, though, this decision could marshal the sensibilities of a critical cadre of educators, social workers, health care workers, activists, attorneys, business leaders, etc. to stand in resistance to the injustice that is becoming our nation’s public school system. 

In an LA Times opinion piece a few days before this 2007 decision, Edward Lazarus argued, “Although they may have disagreed about Brown’s parameters, most Americans coalesced around the decision as a national symbol for our belated rejection of racism and bigotry.  Using Brown as a sword to outlaw affirmative action of any kind would destroy that worthy consensus and transform it into just another mirror reflecting a legal and political culture still deeply fractured over race.”  As Allan Johnson (2006), in Privilege, Power, and Difference, claims, there can be no healing until the wounding stops.  Likewise, paraphrasing Malcolm X’s provocation about so-called progress, he reminded us that although the knife in the back of African-Americans may once have been nine inches deep, that it has only been removed a few inches does not indicate progress.  Will this decision plunge the knife further?

Series editors Adam Renner (from Louisville, KY) and Doug Selwyn (formerly of Seattle, WA) invite essays that treat any of the above questions and/or other questions that seek clarity regarding race, education, schooling, and social justice.  We seek essays that explore the history of segregation, desegregation, and affirmative action in the US and abroad.  While we certainly invite empirical/quantitative research regarding these issues, we also welcome more qualitative studies, as well as philosophical/ theoretical work, which provide deep explorations of these phenomena. We especially invite narratives from parents or students who have front line experience of segregation and/or educational apartheid. Additionally, and importantly, we seek essays of resistance, which document the struggle for racial justice in particular locales and/or suggestions for how we might wrestle toward more equitable schooling for all children.

Please visit the Critical Education website for submission criteria: http://www.criticaleducation.org. Also feel free to contact the series editors, Adam Renner (arenner@bellarmine. edu) or Doug Selwyn (dselw001@plattsburg h.edu) with any questions. 

E. Wayne Ross, Professor, Department of Curriculum and Pedagogy, University of British Columbia, 2125 Main Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada, 604-822-2830, wayne.ross@ubc. ca, http://www.ewaynero ss.net

Critical Education: http://www.criticaleducation.org

Cultural Logic: http://eserver.org/clogic

Workplace: A Journal for Academic Labor: http://www.workplace-gsc.com

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

RACISM AND ANTI-RACISM
New Socialist
Issue 65   2009-1


EDITORIAL

Anti-Racism and the Global Economic Crisis

 

THEORY AND HISTORY


Capitalism and racial oppression — David McNally
Glossary of terms — Heidi Mehta
Slavery, settlement and rebellion — Dave Roediger
Canada: a racist history — Harold Lavender
Louis Riél: hero and martyr, rebel and patriot — Adam Barker

POLITICS AND CURRENT FRONTS OF STRUGGLE

Obama’s victory and race and class in America — Malik Miah
The economic crisis and the global south — Adam Hanieh
The Durban declaration: examination and critique — Saron Ghabrasellasie & Natasha Vally
Reflections on the BC treaty process — Adam Barker, Christine O’Bonsawin & Chiinuuks Ogilvie
Jewishness, Israel and Palestine solidarity — Alan Sears
Resource extraction in the Maritimes — Sherry Pictou & Arthur Bull
Racism in toys and media — Susan Ferguson 

MOVEMENT BUILDING AND ORGANIZING

White privilege in queer organizing — Proma Tagore
Racism and democratic unionism in the U.S. — Malik Miah
Roundtable on migrant justice and self-determination

$4.95 at newsstands ($3.00 if purchased at a New Socialist Group event or directly from supporters of the NSG). For a single copy, please send a cheque or money order for $7 made out to “New Socialist” to Box 167, 253 College Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5T 1R5. Contact us for information about bulk orders.

To purchase a subscription, visit: http://newsocialist.org/index.php?id=84

New Socialist

 welcomes comments from readers. Please submit by mail to Box 167, 253 College Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5T 1R5, Canada or by e-mail to magazine@newsocialist.org 

Visit: http://www.newsocialist.org for analysis, ideas, events listings and more!

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

London Education Centre Presents:
Race and Education Conference 2009

 

Race, class and the Education System Empowerment or Entrapment? 

Justin Baidoo – An activist and former teacher involved in campaigns against Academies in Southwark. He will look at how the education system and current education policy fails black & working class students

 

Education or MisEducation? – Addressing the Challenge of Educational Reparations

Esther Stanford – Esther Stanford will explore the praxis of Reparative Educational Reform with reference to developing a 21st Century curriculum. She will highlight the social movements and knowledge creations which have informed recent curriculum changes which claim to be inclusive of the subjugated histories, heritage and knowledge creations of African, African Caribbean and other African descended peoples

 

Alternative approaches to teaching Black History

Martin Spafford – A History teacher in Waltham Forest, a member of the group designing the new History Curriculum and an active member of Black and Asian studies Association 

 

Speakers from Campaigns against Deportation

 

Saturday 31st January, 2pm

West London Trade Union Centre

33/35 High Street

Acton W3 6ND

Tube: Acton Town , Acton Central BR

Buses: 607, 70, 207, E3

 

 Refreshments will be available.

 

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Rikowski web site, The Flow of Ideas is at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Glenn’s MySpace Profile is at: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski