Skip navigation

Tag Archives: Animation

Work, work, work

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 4th JULY 2010

NEWS & VIEWS

•   CCLA Releases a Preliminary Report of Observations during the G20 Summit
•   In the Aftermath of the G20: Reflections on Strategy, Tactics and Militancy
•   A Public Lesson in Fear and Apathy: Educators Condemn the G20 Attack on Civic Education
•   Another One Bites the Dust: Cornell University may Sever its Contract with Nike
•   Report: Ontario Renters Spending Half of Income on Housing
•   Our Times Sneak Preview 29#3


EVENTS

COME TO CITY HALL – DEFEND TORONTO HYDRO

Tuesday, July 6
2:00 pm onwards
Toronto City Hall

The relentless drive by Bay Street financiers to sell off Toronto Hydro continues. A staff report to the City Council Executive recently recommended asking the provincial government to cancel any taxes that would be paid if the city wanted to sell off its public utility. That would remove a major obstacle to privatization. The executive not only rejected that stupid advice, but Deputy Mayor Joe Pantalone has moved a motion explicitly calling for keeping Toronto Hydro in public hands.

The motion will come to City Council next Tuesday, July 6th, timed for 2:00 pm. Councillors need to see strong public support for keeping Hydro public. We need the galleries packed. Please make every effort to get to City Hall from 2:00 on – the debate won’t be a short one.

To see how Hydro could expand its role to be a key player creating new good green jobs, go to http://www.goodjobsforall.ca

+++++

13TH ANNUAL SOCIAL JUSTICE SUMMER RETREAT:“AFTER THE CRASH: CREATING RESPONSES TO GROWING INEQUALITIES”

Thursday, August 26th to Sunday, August 29rd, Camp Arowhon, AlgonquinPark

Registration is now open!!
Early bird registration available until July 31th, 2010.

The collapse of financial institutions worldwide has thrown economies into prolonged recessions or minimal growth. Jobs have disappeared and lives suddenly and uncontrollably altered. Government revenues have fallen with the decline of economic activity and the loss of jobs. Declining revenues, recent tax cuts and modest spending to create jobs have all produced budgetary deficits… How can we organize to anticipate the coming cuts? How can we build coalitions to protest cuts and the loss of democratic controls?    

There is also a call for workshop proposals. Please visit http://www.socialjustice.org for more information and online registration.

+++++

SEMINAR – PRIVATIZATION OF PUBLIC EDUCATION: CONSEQUENCES FOR CITIZENSHIP AND CITIZENSHIP EDUCATION

Tuesday,  July 27
1:00 – 2:30
CIDE ‘Smart’ Room,  7-105, 7th floor
OISE – University of Toronto
252 Bloor St. West (at St. George subway stn.)

with Professor Orit Ichilov (Tel-Aviv University, School of Education, Israel)

Democratic societies assign public schools a prominent role in the development of citizenship virtues, values, and skills.  By the early 1990s, privatizing public education became a credible policy in many countries. Through the prisms of modern democratic theory and the discourse of rights, Dr. Ichilov argues that the introduction of “market” ethos and practices in public education represents a drift away from the collective mission of public schools in democracy, and subversion of the democratic purposes of education.

Co-sponsored by Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learning and CIDE – the Comparative, International and Development Education Centre

+++++

DAY OF ACTION FOR CIVIL LIBERTIES

Saturday, July 10
1:00 pm- 4:00 pm
Queen’s Park
Toronto, ON

Despite threats of new crowd dispersal weapons and dubious claims that police were granted extraordinary powers of search and arrest, over 25,000 people peacefully marched to question the legitimacy of the G20…Under the pretext of stopping vandalism, the police descended upon peaceful protesters and confused passers-by with force that was disproportionate, arbitrary and excessive, and included raids, rubber bullets, tear gas and pre-emptive detentions. In total, more than 900 people were detained based on dubious charges, in the largest mass arrest in Canadian history.

Demonstrate your opposition to the excessive use of police force and the unprecedented curtailment of civil liberties. Demand an independent public inquiry. Join the Day of Action for Civil Liberties in towns and cities across Canada and Québec on July 10, 2010.

For information or to endorse the day: CivilLibertiesNOW@gmail.com

+++++

TELLING OUR STORIES: DISABILITY SHOULD NOT EQUAL POVERTY

Wednesday, July 7
1:00 to 5:00 pm (previously planned for June 24)
Metro Hall Rotunda, Toronto

We invite ODSP (Ontario Disability Support Program) recipients, family members, and the general public to join us for an afternoon of sharing what it is really like to live on ODSP. The speaking agenda will include a panel discussion on human rights and ODSP, as well as personal stories from four people with direct experience living on ODSP. The event will also include informational displays and an area where you can share your own story. We are also excited to launch the ODSP Action Coalition’s Disability Declaration at this event.

Accessibility accommodations will be provided for those who need them.

To access our flyer with more info, please go here: http://www.odspacti.on.ca/story/join-us-july-7

+++++

NEWS & VIEWS

CCLA RELEASES A PRELIMINARY REPORT OF OBSERVATIONS DURING THE G20 SUMMIT

The CCLA (Canadian Civil Liberties Association) released its preliminary report on the G20 Summit policing and security today, entitled “A Breach of the Peace”. The report is based on the first-hand observations of over 50 human rights monitors that CCLA dispatched to observe the police presence at G20-related demonstrations throughout the week.

It is the opinion of the Canadian Civil Liberties Association that police conduct during the G20 Summit was, at times, disproportionate, arbitrary and excessive. In our view, despite instances of commendable and professional conduct, the policing and security efforts, especially after 5PM on June 26 and June 27, failed to demonstrate commitment to Canada’s constitutional values.

Executive summary: http://bit.ly/9eAL6q
Interim report: http://bit.ly/dijorE

+++++

IN THE AFTERMATH OF THE G20: REFLECTIONS ON STRATEGY, TACTICS AND MILITANCY

by Ritch Whyman, The Bullet

The events at the Saturday G20 demonstration in Toronto last week have provoked a series of responses already. This article is not meant to review the events of the day itself, but to look at the questions raised by the demonstrations and tactics used for the left.

Suffice to say the reaction of the police, in arresting, detaining, and brutalizing nearly 1,000 people in the largest mass arrest in Canadian history, exposes the serious attacks on civil liberties the left faces.

Read more: http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/381.php#continue

+++++

A PUBLIC LESSON IN FEAR AND APATHY: EDUCATORS CONDEMN THE G20 ATTACK ON CIVIC EDUCATION

As educators, we charge the federal and Ontario governments, RCMP, OPP and Toronto Police responsible for G20 security for violating the institution of civic education. Our responsibility as educators is to prepare active citizens with a strong concern for democratic institutions and a sense of duty to participate actively in democratic processes…Democratic participation [was] not only threatened but, in vast numbers, criminalized and punished in a direct attack on democracy during the Toronto G20 summit.

Read more: http://www.petitiononline.com/Educator/petition.html

+++++

ANOTHER ONE BITES THE DUST: CORNELL UNIVERSITY MAY SEVER ITS CONTRACT WITH NIKE

from InsideHigherEd.com

Absent “significant progress” toward the resolution of an ongoing labor dispute in Honduras, Cornell University will follow the University of Wisconsin at Madison’s lead and end its licensing agreement with Nike. The decision, issued by President David Skorton in an internal letter Monday, is being heralded by anti-sweatshop activists as a significant victory in a battle over Nike’s refusal to pay severance to displaced workers in its supply chain.

Read more: http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2010/07/02/nike

+++++

REPORT: ONTARIO RENTERS SPENDING HALF OF INCOME ON HOUSING

Where’s Home? 2010 finds that over 260,000 Ontario households are spending more than half of their income on housing – a level that forces many to make difficult choices between paying the rent and other necessities.

The report, co-authored by Ontario Non-Profit Housing Assocation (ONPHA) and  Co-operative Housing Federation of Canada (CHFC) Ontario Region, studies affordable rental housing across 22 communities in Ontario and highlights the urgent need for increased investment in Ontario’s affordable housing sector.

Press release: http://bit.ly/9WinPp
Full report: http://bit.ly/9x3Ca7

+++++

OUR TIMES SNEAK PREVIEW 29#3

In Our Times’ summer issue (Vol.29 No.3) award-winning Canadian photographer Vincenzo Pietropaolo profiles the work and lives of migrant farm workers. We’re also taking a look at how more and more employers in Canada will be required to keep their workplaces free of psychological harassment. And Ariel Troster from the Public Service Alliance of Canada interviews author Gary Kinsman about how the RCMP purged gay and lesbian workers from the federal public service.

Our WebWork columnist, Derek Blackadder, finds his doubting self swayed by tweets. Sean Cain’s back with another great Our Times Tally. And former elementary school teacher Robert Whitely reviews one of the latest issues of the great Canadian education journal Our Schools/Our Selves. Plus much more. It’s going to be a great issue.

Read more: https://www.securewebexchange.com/ourtimes.ca/Support/

+++++

JOB POSTINGS

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT ANIMATORS

Deadline: July 9, 2010

Toronto Partners for Student Nutrition, through FoodShare, is seeking 5 full time and 2 part time passionate and creative Community Development Animators.

We’re looking for enthusiastic promoters of healthy eating in the school and community with a strong understanding of student and youth nutrition programs to engage and develop community support to establish new and continue existing sustainable meal programs.

For more info: http://www.foodshare.net/upcomingjobs.htm

+++++

COMMUNITY GARDEN COORDINATOR, F/T

Deadline: July 9, 2010

The Stop Community Food Centre uses food and food access as a tool for community development in the Davenport West and Wychwood Heights neighbourhoods of Toronto. The Community Garden Coordinator works as a member of the urban agriculture team to engage community members to participate in community gardening in order to improve participants’ access to healthy food, reduce social isolation, and increase knowledge about how to grow food.

For more info: http://www.thestop.org/jobs

++++++++++++++++++++
++++++++++++++++++++

OUR MANDATE:

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

—END—

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon Profile: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Noir

Noir

FILM NOIR, AMERICAM WORKERS AND POSTWAR HOLLYWOOD

 

New Noir Book:

“Busts This Town Wide Open”: Film Noir, American Workers and Postwar Hollywood

Dennis Broe, University of Florida Press

Order now for a 40% Discount with Code Listed Below

Ever since French critics began using the term film noir in the mid-1940s, a clear definition of the genre has remained elusive. Broe’s interdisciplinary examination is a cogent argument for the centrality of class in the creation of film noir, demonstrating how the form itself came to fruition during one of the most active periods of working-class agitation and middle-class antagonism in American history.

In the 1940s, both radicalized union members and protagonists of noir films were hunted and pursued by the law. The book details how, after World War II, members of the labor movement who waged a series of strikes that paralyzed American industry, including Hollywood, were forced to use extralegal means because of pressure applied by new legislation such as the Taft-Hartley Act. In the same way the film noir protagonist moves further and further outside the law in this period until the films become a lament for a change hoped for but not achieved. The book then marks the sharp distinction between noir and the police procedural where the working class cop, now shorn of his or her radical sympathies, becomes the subject of the film.

A coda describes noir under Reagan and Bush (“A Thousand Points of Dark”) and post-9/11 noir which alternately resists and validates the replaying of the Cold War as the War on Terror.

What the Critics are saying:

‘[This is] an intriguing study of U.S. film noir as a left-wing cultural formation. Broe makes an informative and convincing case for the repressed, often overlooked working class determinants of early noir, and his discussion of individual films is consistently insightful. This is an important addition to the literature on the subject.’ James Naremore, author of More Than Night: Film Noir in Its Contexts

‘With keen insight and a deep appreciation of the politics of film noir, Broe has broken new ground in the interpretation of cinema itself. With this book film noir has found its most astute and informed critic.’ Gerald Horne, author of Class Struggle in Hollywood, 1930-50

‘Broe puts the red back in the black. His book contours amidst the shadows of film noir those battles and tussles of the laboring classes that have too often been written out of film history, as out of the authorized narrative of U.S. history. Through wonderfully synthetic overviews and deft extended readings, a panoply of films is shown to chart in devious and overt ways the ups and down of union power and working class perspectives.’ Esther Leslie, author of Walter Benjamin and Hollywood Flatlands: Animation, Critical Theory and the Avant-Garde

‘[The book is] a bracing alternative history of how noir represented the roiling state of American culture in the 1940s … His categorization scheme will carry great weight in all future discussion of noir’s thematic landscape.’ Donald Malcolm, Noir City Sentinel

For a special 40% discount, until October 1, 2009, call toll free 800-226-3822, or order online at: http://upf.com/book.asp?id=BROEXS07 with discount code NOIR9.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk