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Anarchism

PhD STUDENTSHIPS AT LOUGHBOROUGH UNIVERSITY: ANARCHIST HISTORY, POLITICS OR THEORY

Loughborough University’s Department of Politics, History and International Relations (UK) is inviting applications for fully-funded PhD studentships for 3 years (UK or EU fee status). Each studentship is valued at £13,590 plus tuition fees at the UK/EU rate, and is available for PhDs commencing in Autumn 2012.

The deadline for receipt of full application is Wednesday, 30 March 2012.

Details are at: http://www.lboro.ac.uk/service/graduateschool/funding/GraduateSchooolStudentships.htm 

Dr Dave Berry, Dr. Alexandre Christoyannopoulos and Dr Ruth Kinna would welcome applications in any area related to anarchist history, politics or theory. Their staff profiles are available at: http://www.lboro.ac.uk/departments/eu/people/index.html.

Dave Berry is a Senior Lecturer in Contemporary European History. He has published primarily on the French anarchist movement, the contemporary alternative left in France and on Daniel Guérin. He is the author of A History of the French Anarchist Movement, 1917-1945 (Greenwood Press, 2002; AK edition 2009) and co-editor of New Perspectives on Anarchism, Labour and Syndicalism (CSP, 2010); he is an associate editor and reviews editor of ‘Anarchist Studies’ and a founder member of the Anarchist Studies Network (Specialist Group for the Study of Anarchism within the Political Studies Association – http://anarchist-studies-network.org.uk/).

Alexandre Christoyannopoulos is a Lecturer in Politics and International Relations. He has published on Tolstoy, non-violence and Christian anarchism, and is the author of ‘Christian Anarchism: A Political Interpretation of the Bible’ (Imprint, 2011), and editor of ‘Religious Anarchism: New Perspectives’ (Cambridge Scholars, 2009). He is the treasurer of the Anarchist Studies Network, an executive member of the Religion and Politics research committee of the International Political Science Association, and a member of a number of related academic associations.

Ruth Kinna is Professor in Political Theory. She has published on William Morris and Peter Kropotkin, and is the author of Anarchism: A Beginner’s Guide (Oneworld, 2005; 2nd edn. 2009) and co-editor, with Laurence Davis of Anarchism and Utopianism (Manchester UP, 2009). She is the editor of the journal Anarchist Studies and is also a founder member and co-convenor of the Anarchist Studies Network.

The Department is home to an Anarchism Research Group and there are currently three PhD students in the Department working on aspects of anarchism: Cris Illiopoulos, working on Nietzsche and anarchism, James Donaghey, working on anarchism and punk and John Nightingale working on anarchist conceptions of solidarity. Sureyyya Turkeli has recently submitted his thesis on the historiography of anarchism and Gwendolyn Windpassinger has completed a dissertation on queer feminist anarchism in Buenos Aires. Two other theses have recently been successfully defended: Saku Pinta’s work on convergences and divergences between anarchism and Marxism and Matt Wilson’s thesis on anarchist ethics. Dr. Alex Prichard’s research on the political thought of P-J Proudhon was also completed at the Department and his thesis was successfully defended in 2008.

If you would like to discuss a possible research project informally, please e-mail Alex at  (a.christoyannopoulos@lboro.ac.uk), Ruth (r.e.kinna@lboro.ac.uk) or Dave (d.g.berry@lboro.ac.uk).

Please note: there is no ring-fenced funding for anarchism research, but applicants interested in anarchism have been successful in past funding rounds and there is good support for postgraduate study. Because competition is very fierce candidates with good masters qualifications and/or publications are likely to be advantaged.  We are happy to advise on draft proposals, where time allows and we encourage informal contact prior to application.

To be considered for an award you will need to complete the standard application form which may be done online, quoting the reference number GSS12B. The following list of links will direct you to useful sources of information in regard to your application.

Information about the Department
http://www.lboro.ac.uk/prospectus/pg/courses/dept/eu/index.htm
http://www.lboro.ac.uk/departments/eu/studying/research/programmes.html

Anarchism Research Group http://www.lboro.ac.uk/departments/eu/research/ResearchGroups/AnarchismRG/index.html.

Guidelines for research proposals
http://www.lboro.ac.uk/departments/eu/studying/research/admissions-procedure.html

Information about how to apply
http://www.lboro.ac.uk/prospectus/pg/essential/apply/index.htm

Information about fees for UK/EU students
http://www.lboro.ac.uk/admin/ar/funding/pgr/ukeu/index.htm

University Prospectus
http://www.lboro.ac.uk/prospectus/pg/research/index.htm 

Dr David Berry, Senior Lecturer, Department of Politics, History & International Relations, Loughborough University, LE11 3TU, GB, +44(0)1509-222988

**END**

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‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

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Anarchism

‘NO MASTER BUT GOD’? EXPLORING THE COMPATABILITY OF ANARCHISM AND RELIGION

Call for Paper Proposals: No Master But God’? Exploring the Compatibility of Anarchism and Religion

ASN 2.0 (‘Making Connections’) Conference
Loughborough University (UK)
3-5 September 2012

Anarchism and religion have long had an uneasy relationship. On the one hand, many anarchists insist that religion is fundamentally incompatible with anarchism, recalling that anarchism calls for ‘no gods, no masters’, pointing to the many cases of close collaboration of religious and political elites in oppressing and deluding the masses, arguing that religious belief is superstitious, and so on. On the other, some religious/spiritual radicals insist that their religious/spiritual tradition cannot but lead to a rejection of the state, care for the downtrodden and the quest for a more just society – despite of, indeed sometimes precisely because of, the acceptance (by some) of a god as ‘master’.

A number of recent publications both in religious and anarchist studies have focused on religious anarchism, but consideration of their compatibility in the first place has been rarer. The aim of this stream of panels is to explore critically and frankly the relationship and tensions between these two notions, with a view to publish its proceedings in a peer-reviewed edited collection. The size of the stream of panels will depend on the number of applicants, but the intention is to foster mutual engagement and collaboration. Proposals are encouraged from sceptical as well as sympathetic perspectives, the aim being to foster critical discussion of these themes.

Questions which may be addressed include (but are not necessarily restricted to):

1.      Is rejection of religion (and/or spirituality) a sine qua non of anarchism?
2.      What do we mean by ‘religion’, ‘spirituality’ and ‘anarchism’ when considering their relation?
3.      What is unacceptable to anarchism about religion/spirituality, and to religion/spirituality about anarchism?
4.      Are some religious/spiritual traditions inherently more compatible with anarchism than others?
5.      Why do religious institutions tend to move away from the often radical intentions of their original prophets and founders? How does this compare to non-religious institutions?
6.      What explains differences in the reception of religious/spiritual anarchism across different contexts?
7.      To what extent can religious/spiritual anarchists’ deification of religious/spiritual notions (such as ‘God’) be compared to non-religious anarchists’ deification of secular notions (such as freedom or equality)?
8.      What role do (and can) religious/spiritual anarchists play in the wider anarchist movement, and in their wider religious/spiritual tradition?
9.      What can religion/spirituality and anarchism learn from one another’s history and ideas?
10.  Is religious/spiritual anarchism really anarchist? Is it really religious/spiritual?

Please send abstracts of up to 300 words (along with name and eventual institutional affiliation) to Dr Alexandre Christoyannopoulos on a.christoyannopoulos@gmail.com by 31 March 2012 at the very latest. Any questions should also be sent to that address.

**END**

 

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

 

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The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Anarchism

ANARCHIST DEVELOPMENTS IN CULTURAL STUDIES

Anarchist Developments in Cultural Studies
Volume 2010.1 – “Post-anarchism Today”

Edited by Duane Rousselle & Süreyyya Evren

We have been witnessing a growing interest in the development of a distinctly ‘anarchist studies’ approach to scholarship. Along with this, divergent disciplines are beginning to take anarchist scholarship more seriously. We are beginning to get the sense that, as anarchists, our work is rapidly coming to be defined as the radical position within various ‘schools’ of radical studies. Within this shift, there has been an expansion within the anarchist rubric toward more vibrant and diverse contributions: non-anarchists are beginning to adopt anarchistic philosophies, anarchists are beginning to appropriate non-anarchist philosophies as their own by reading them through their own selective lens, and anarchist scholars are beginning to draw upon any number of sources and methodologies for their inspiration. As a result, the anarcho-sphere has been witnessing adventurous and refreshing new debates.

We hope to offer a platform for the documentation of these recent developments in anarchist thought and to inspire others to see anarchism in all of its brilliant manifestations by linking these developments under a common tendency. We are inspired by Jesse Cohn’s invitation to an ‘anarchist cultural studies’ wherein he has suggested that “anarchists have pretty much always been interested in and actively theorizing about and investigating the kinds of things that now get called ‘cultural studies’” — we are pleased to offer the space in which you, our friends and comrades, can further explore these investigations.

The most difficult part of this project was simply to begin. But we are happy to share with you all that we have passed that part! The first issue of ADCS, volume 2010.1, “Post-anarchism Today,” includes articles from geology, film studies, sociology and religious studies. The publication of this issue coincides with the release of our new book “Post-anarchism: A Reader” (Pluto Press) and may be thought to include materials that expand upon the discussions included therein.

You may pre-order hard copies of ADCS 2010.1 for yourself or for your (campus and radical) libraries by visiting: http://littleblackcart.com/index.php?main_page=product_book_info&products_id=597.

However, you may also read the first issue on our website at the end of the month in a typographically accurate PDF format and print this out to share with your friends and colleagues by visiting: http://www.anarchist-developments.org.

Our promise to you: we will always keep our journal free and easily accessible online using the highest quality print-ready formats.

We should state at the outset: our journal aims to disrupt the compulsion toward the commodification of radical knowledge. In this regard, our journal will always be freely available to read, download, print, and distribute from our website. Our publication uses open source software (the Open Journal Systems web platform) and fonts, and aims to contribute to the open source movement.

We invite you to pre-order our journal and to watch our website for updates. We also encourage submissions for future issues to Duane.Rousselle@unb.ca.

Thanks goes out to the North American Anarchist Studies Network for providing the needed infrastructure for this project to get off of the ground – we consider ourselves to be working within the Cultural Studies working group of the network and invite others to join the discussions at http://www.naasn.org.

For Anarchy,
Süreyyya Evren
Duane Rousselle

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Anarchism

OPPORTUNITY FOR PhD FUNDING IN ANARCHISM

From: David Berry: D.G.Berry@lboro.ac.uk

Opportunity for PhD funding in anarchist history, politics or theory

Please circulate.

The Department of Politics, History & International Relations at Loughborough University (UK) is inviting applications for studentships (£13,290 per annum stipend for three years, plus tuition fees) to undertake doctoral research from October 2011 in any area related to the Department’s research interests.

Applications should be received by Monday, 7 March 2011. Priority will normally be given to UK/EU applicants. Where appropriate, you will also normally be expected to apply for Research Council studentships.

Dr Dave Berry, Dr. Alexandre Christoyannopoulos and Dr Ruth Kinna would like to hear from anyone interested in studying for a PhD in any area related to anarchist history, politics or theory.

Dave Berry is a Senior Lecturer in Contemporary European History. He has published primarily on the French anarchist movement, the contemporary alternative left in France and on Daniel Guérin. He is the author of A History of the French Anarchist Movement, 1917-1945 (Greenwood Press, 2002; AK edition 2009) and co-editor of New Perspectives on Anarchism, Labour and Syndicalism (CSP, 2010); he is an associate editor and reviews editor of ‘Anarchist Studies’ and a founder member of the Anarchist Studies Network (Specialist Group for the Study of Anarchism within the Political Studies Association – http://anarchist-studies-network.org.uk/).

Alexandre Christoyannopoulos is a Lecturer in Politics and International Relations. He has published on Tolstoy, non-violence and Christian anarchism, and is the author of ‘Christian Anarchism: A Political Interpretation of the Bible’ (Imprint, 2010), and editor of ‘Religious Anarchism: New Perspectives’ (Cambridge Scholars, 2009). He is the treasurer of the Anarchist Studies Network, an executive member of the Religion and Politics research committee of the International Political Science Association, and a member of a number of related academic associations.

Ruth Kinna is a Senior Lecturer in Politics. She has published on William Morris and Peter Kropotkin, and is the author of ‘Anarchism: A Beginner’s Guide’ (Oneworld, 2005; 2nd edn. 2009) and co-editor, with Laurence Davis of ‘Anarchism and Utopianism’ (Manchester UP, 2009). She is the editor of the journal ‘Anarchist Studies’ and is also a founder member and co-convenor of the Anarchist Studies Network.

The Department is home to an Anarchism Research Group (http://www.lboro.ac.uk/departments/eu/research/ResearchGroups/AnarchismRG/index.html), and there are currently five PhD students in the Department working on aspects of anarchism: Cris Illiopoulos, working on Nietzsche and anarchism; Saku Pinta, who is completing a dissertation on convergences and divergences between anarchism and Marxism; Sureyyya Turkeli working on the historiography of anarchism; Matt Wilson working on anarchist ethics; and Gwen Windpassinger, working on queer feminist anarchism in Buenos Aires. Dr. Alex Prichard’s research on the political thought of P-J Proudhon was also completed at the Department and his thesis successfully defended in 2008.

If you would like to discuss a possible research project informally, please e-mail Alex (a.christoyannopoulos@lboro.ac.uk), Ruth (r.e.kinna@lboro.ac.uk) or Dave (d.g.berry@lboro.ac.uk).

For further information about the Department see: http://www.lboro.ac.uk/departments/eu/about/index.html

For more specific information about postgraduate research in the Department, how to apply, etc, see:
http://www.lboro.ac.uk/departments/eu/studying/research/programmes.html

Dr David Berry,
Senior Lecturer,
Department of Politics, History & International Relations,
Loughborough University,
LE113TU GB
+44(0)1509-222988

University & College Union, Loughborough University Branch: http://www.lboro.ac.uk/orgs/laut/index.html

Anarchism Research Group: http://www.lboro.ac.uk/departments/eu/research/ResearchGroups/AnarchismRG/index.html

Association des Amis de Daniel Guérin: http://danielguerin.info/tiki-index.php

Anarchist Studies Network: http://anarchist-studies-network.org.uk/

Reviews Editor, Anarchist Studies: http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/journals/anarchiststudies/contents.html

Dissidences (Bulletin de Liaison des Etudes sur les Mouvements Révolutionnaires): http://www.dissidences.net/

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Anarchism

CONTEMPORARY ANARCHIST STUDIES

LAUNCH OF NEW BOOK SERIES: CALL FOR BOOK PROPOSALS
CONTEMPORARY ANARCHIST STUDIES
CONTINUUM BOOKS

In association with the U.K. Anarchist Studies Network, the North American Anarchist Studies Network, and AK Press

This new book series, the first peer-reviewed English-language series in anarchist studies by a major international academic publisher, seeks to promote the study of anarchism as a framework for understanding and acting on the most pressing problems of our times. To this end, we invite proposals for original manuscripts that exemplify cutting edge, socially engaged scholarship bridging theory and practice, academic rigour and the insights of contemporary activism.

We welcome book proposals on a wide variety of subjects including, but not limited to the following: anarchist history and theory broadly construed; individual anarchist thinkers; anarchist-informed analysis of current issues and institutions; and anarchist or anarchist-inspired movements and practices. Proposals informed by anti-capitalist, feminist, ecological, indigenous, and non-Western or global South anarchist perspectives are particularly welcome. So, too, are projects that promise to illuminate the relationships between the personal and the political aspects of transformative social change, local and global problems, and anarchism and other movements and ideologies. Above all, we wish to publish books that will help activist scholars and scholar activists think about how to challenge and build real alternatives to existing structures of oppression and injustice.

All proposals will be evaluated strictly according to their individual merits and compatibility with the aims of the series. In accord with this policy, we welcome proposals from independent scholars and new authors as well as from those with an institutional affiliation and publishing record. Titles accepted for publication in the series will be supported by an engaged and careful peer review process, including impartial assessments by members of an international editorial advisory board consisting of leading scholars in the field.*

All books published in the series will be publicised widely and distributed internationally via co-operative arrangements among a prominent network of independent academic, activist, and publishing organisations, including Continuum Books, AK Press, the U.K. Anarchist Studies Network, the North American Anarchist Studies Network, and a range of other professional and activist groups and their associated websites and listservs. The general format of the series will be simultaneous hardback and paperback publication, with the latter priced affordably so as to reach as wide an audience as possible. All of the titles in the series will be published under a Creative Commons License (‘copyleft’). This distinctive feature of the series ensures that permission for non-commercial reproduction of the books will be granted by the publishers free of charge to voluntary, campaign and community groups.

We are currently seeking book proposals that fit the description above.

Please send proposals to one or more of the Book Series Editors: Laurence Davis (ldavis@oceanfree.net), Alex Prichard (a.prichard@bristol.ac.uk ), Nathan Jun (nathan.jun@mwsu.edu), and Uri Gordon (uri@riseup.net). Proposal guidelines may be downloaded from the Continuum website: http://www.continuumbooks.com/authors/default.aspx

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William Godwin

ANARCHIST PEDAGOGIES

CALL FOR CHAPTER PROPOSAL SUBMISSIONS

For a book entitled

Anarchist Pedagogies

Editor: Robert Haworth PhD

University of Wisconsin-La Crosse

Overview:

Anarchist movements have a long history of resisting traditional schooling and authoritative pedagogical practices, while at the same time, attempting to construct transformative educative processes. Examples include Francisco Ferrer’s (1913) work entitled, Origins of the Modern School and the creation of the Escuela Moderna schools in Spain, the Modernist Schools in the United States (Emma Goldman, Voltaraine de Cleyre, Alex Berkman and others) during the early 20th century as well as contemporary anarchists who are experimenting in participatory informal learning spaces. These examples are important to acknowledge within radical notions of teaching and learning being that they are experiences that enable activists and scholars to critically re-imagine education and build theories on “how” and “where” individuals experiment in constructing knowledge through differing learning spaces (Coté, Day & Peuter, 2007; de Leon, 2008, Malott, forthcoming).

Moreover, as totalizing efforts of the nation-state continue to develop standardized curriculum, efficiency models and data driven outcomes, anarchist pedagogies attempt to construct ongoing collective learning environments that can be described as ‘disciplined improvisation’ or ‘spontaneous’ in nature (Goldman, 1969; Haworth, forthcoming; Sawyer, 2003; Ward, 1972). Furthermore, these informal learning spaces create new ways of exposing illegitimate corporate and state power, as well as participating in the ‘coming communities’ (Day, 2007).

This edited book calls on international scholars (15 single authored or collectively authored chapters) in anarchist studies to critically reflect on historical and contemporary experimentations in anarchist pedagogies. Scholarly efforts will focus on what we have learned from past anarchist experiences and current transformative learning environments — where individuals are engaged in collective, participatory, voluntary and mutual efforts that contest global capitalist structures.

The edited collection responds to the need to reflect on anarchist pedagogies and will highlight three major themes. Authors in the first section will be encouraged to focus on historical discussions surrounding anarchism and education. The authors will give introspective critiques of historical practices, including theories of teaching and learning and alternatives to compulsory public schools. Authors in the second section will construct philosophical and theoretical frameworks evolving from contemporary anarchists, particularly through individuals participating in cooperatives, independent media collectives, infoshops, political zines, open source projects, DIY, direct action networks and other autonomous and cultural spaces.

Continued efforts to construct theoretical and philosophical discussions surrounding anarchism have also provided opportunities to build affinities and tensions with frameworks outside of anarchist writings (Cohn, 2007). The third section will encompass anarchist theories of teaching and learning. Authors will be asked to construct linkages and apprehensions to theories surrounding critical pedagogies and critical theory, autonomous Marxism, postmodernity and poststruturalism.

Proposed sections:

Forward:

Zack de la Rocha

1) Introduction

2) Section 1: Anarchism & Education: Historical experimentations

a. Anarchist perspectives on education

b. Modern Schools; Spain and the United States

c. Pedagogical practices: teacher/student relationship

d. Issues of the state and compulsory education

e. Connection and/or tensions between progressive education and social reconstruction

f. What have we learned?

3) Section 2: Anarchist Pedagogies in the “here and now”

a. Contesting power through multiple fronts: Movements against neoliberalism and learning through collective processes: Infoshops, cooperatives, autonomous spaces, zines, DIY

b. Teaching and learning in non-hierarchical, mutual and voluntary spaces — issues surrounding race, class, gender, LGBT

c. Technology: Issues surrounding the use of technology: open source, listservs, blogs & discussion boards

4) Section 3: Anarchism: Theoretical Frameworks on Teaching & Learning

a. Affinities: Anarchism & Critical pedagogies. Relationship to Postmodernism and Poststructuralism-Postanarchism

b. Informal learning spaces

c. De-schooling

d. Anarchism & the role of the university

e. Pedagogical practices

Audience:

Anarchist Pedagogies will draw upon and make connection to contemporary anarchist studies literature, particularly in education. The book will be important for scholars in anarchist studies, critical pedagogy, as well as undergraduate students and activists who are interested in building philosophical, theoretical, historical and contemporary discussions and imaginations beyond traditional forms of education.

Timeframe:

1) Proposals due by July 20th, 2010

2) Proposal confirmations: August 20th, 2010

3) Chapter drafts due by October 1st, 2010

4) Editor

5) Review of drafts: November, 2010

Editor will produce a comprehensive introductory and single authored chapter in one of the three sections. The forward will be written by an activist/scholar. Final editing and approval of the formatted version will be submitted December 30th, 2010. Publishing date will be set for early fall, 2011.

Contributors:

Process for submitting proposals:

Interested scholars, researchers, educators, activists and others should send to the editor, by July 20th, 2010, the following:

1) Names, positions, mailing addresses, fax and phone numbers, and email addresses of authors;

2) Title of proposed chapter;

3) Description, of no more than 300 words, of chapter, including type of research, approach, context, connection to the book, and other pertinent information;

4) Biographies of authors of no more than 200 words;

Biography of editor:

Robert Haworth is an Associate Professor in Multicultural Education at University of Wisconsin-La Crosse. He currently serves as the director for the Research Center for Cultural Diversity and Community Renewal. He teaches undergraduate and graduate courses surrounding diversity and education, globalization and neoliberalism. He has published multiple peer reviewed book chapters and presented internationally on anarchism and informal learning spaces, as well as critical social studies education. He co-founded Regeneration TV, along with other research collectives that are directly involved in contesting neoliberal policies at the university level. This is Robert Haworth’s first edited book.

Robert Haworth PhD—Associate Professor University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, haworth.robe@uwlax.edu, 608.385.0891

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Is Black and Red Dead?

 

Call for Papers: Is Black and Red Dead?

 

 

Is Black and Red Dead?
7th – 8th September, 2009

 

 


An academic conference organized and supported by the PSA Anarchist Studies Network, the PSA Marxism Specialist Group, Anarchist Studies, Capital & Class, Critique-Journal of Socialist Theory and Historical Materialism.
 

 


Hosted By: The Centre for the Study of Social and Global Justice, University of Nottingham
 

 


What is the political relevance of the ideological labels “anarchist” and “Marxist” in the contemporary geo-political climate? Despite recurrent crisis, the costs typically borne by the people, neoliberal capitalism continues to colonize the globe in a never ending quest for profit and new enclosures. Meanwhile, an effective political response from the left to the wars, ecological destruction, financial collapse and social problems created by capital and state has so far failed to garner the widespread support and influence it needs. Indeed, the sectarianism of the left may well have contributed to this failure.
 

 


Still, despite fracture, there have always been borrowings across the left. Most recently, post-’68 radicalisms have contributed to a blurring of the divisions between the anarchist and Marxist traditions. Traditionally regarded as hostile and irreconcilable, many of these ideas find expression in the “newest social movements”, taking inspiration from the Situationists, left communists, and social anarchist traditions. The anti-statist, libertarian currents within the socialist movement have repeatedly emerged during periods of acute political and economic crisis, from the council communists to revolutionary anarchism.
 

 


Is this one such historical juncture in which dynamic reconciliation is not only welcomed but vital? To rephrase the question, what can we learn from 150 years of anti-statist, anti-capitalist social movements, and how might this history inform the formulation of a new social and political current, consciously combining the insights of plural currents of anarchism and Marxism in novel historical junctures? Indeed, to what extent have these traditional fault lines been constitutive of the political imagination? The modern feminist, queer, ecological, anti-racist and postcolonial struggles have all been inspired by and developed out of critiques of the traditional parameters of the old debates, and many preceded them. So, to what extent do capital and the state remain the key sites of struggle?
 

 


We welcome papers that engage critically with both the anarchist and the Marxist traditions in a spirit of reconciliation. We welcome historical papers that deal with themes and concepts, movements or individuals. We also welcome theoretical papers with demonstrable historical or political importance. Our criteria for the acceptance of papers will be mutual respect, the usual critical scholarly standards and demonstrable engagement with both traditions of thought.
 

 


Please send 350 word abstracts (as word documents), including full contact details, to: Dr Alex Prichard (ESML, University of Bath): a.prichard@bath.ac.uk  Closing date for receipt of abstracts: 1st May, 2009

 

 

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Currently listening :
Those Who Tell the Truth Shall Die, Those Who Tell the Truth Shall Live Forever
By Explosions in the Sky
Release date: 2001-09-04