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Education Crisis

Education Crisis

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK: UPDATE 25th MARCH 2013

EVENTS

COLOUR OF POVERTY / COLOUR OF CHANGE 2ND PROVINCIAL FORUM: FROM POVERTY TO POWER – RACIAL JUSTICE, MAKING CHANGE

Monday April 29, 6pm to 9pm
Tuesday April 30, 9am to 5pm
Oakham House – Student Campus Centre, Room SCC 115
Ryerson University, 55-63 Gould St, Toronto

Join us on Monday for a welcome to the conference, guest speakers, poetry performances and reception. Then on Tuesday, join us for the all day learning and strategy forum with guest speakers, roundtable discussions and issue focused strategy sessions. Breakfast and lunch will be provided.

Roundtables will include –
– Intersectionality of Oppression
– Political Participation and Representation

Issue focused strategy sessions will include the following topics –
– Employment Equity
– Income Security
– Colours of Politics
– Criminal Justice and Policing
– Immigration Policy and the Changing Face of Canada
– Federal Fiscal Policy
– Education – Access and Opportunities

Everyone welcome !  Free, but please register to reserve your spot soon, click here – http://www.eventbrite.com/event/5698626746

If you hope to attend from outside of the Toronto area and in order to do so would require accommodations, please contact May Lui, Forum Coordinator – frompovertytopower2013@gmail.com  or call and leave us a message at 416-966-3882 – we’ll see if we might be able to help !!

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CALL FOR ABSTRACTS: 20TH CANADIAN CONFERENCE ON GLOBAL HEALTH

Global Health in 2013: Are We Having an Impact?
Canadian Society for International Health (CSIH)
October 27-29, 2013 – Ottawa

Call for abstracts open – now accepting video and documentary submissions!
The deadline is April 30th.

For more information please visit: http://www.csih.org/en/events/conference/ or email us at: ccgh@csih.org

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THE WAY THE RIVER FLOWS: OFL 3RD ANNUAL ABORIGINAL GATHERING

June 14 – 16, 2013
CAW Family Education Centre
115 Shipley Avenue, Port Elgin, ON

The Ontario Federation of Labour (OFL) is holding its 3rd Aboriginal Gathering from June 14-16, 2013. The OFL and its affiliates have a long history of activism and lobbying on Aboriginal, Métis and Inuit issues. This is a Gathering that is reaching out to all people – labour and community, Aboriginal, Métis, Inuit and non- aboriginal – who are concerned and interested in developing action oriented change, justice and reconciliation for Aboriginal Peoples: Idle No More!!!!!! Let us confront the truth and take action while finding peace and solace in the Aboriginal, Métis and Inuit traditional medicines and spiritual teachings.

Registration Fee: $100.00

For more info and to register: http://www.caw.ca/en_about-the-caw-family-education-centre.htm

 

[The link to Port Elgin is not working at the moment. Please visit this link instead: http://ofl.ca/index.php/aboriginal-gathering-2013/]

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ONTARIO MINISTRY OF LABOUR COMMUNITY CONSULTATION ON HEALTH & SAFETY

At the February 15th meeting of the Common Front Steering Committee it was reported that we have a unique consultation opportunity to meet with the Ministry of Labour (MOL) regarding our issues and recommendations as they develop an Integrated Health and Safety strategy for the Province of Ontario. This is important for us because one of the Ministry’s priorities is to focus on vulnerable workers and precarious work.

As we know too well, many of our Common Front partners represent workers in this category of vulnerable workers and/or workers doing precarious work. We have asked the Ministry of Labour for a separate consultation session specifically with our Common Front Partners and they have agreed. This
session will take place:

Wednesday April 17, 2013
10:00 am – 2:00 pm
OFL Building – 15 Gervais Drive, 8th Fl Boardroom
Toronto, ON

We ask that you respond back to us by March 28th whether or not you or your organization would like to participate in this consultation session, as we want to inform the MOL. Space will be limited so please send your RSVP early to Paulette Hazel (phazel@ofl.ca).

We are encouraging you to participate as too often the voices and issues of vulnerable workers are not heard and this is an opportunity to get on-record.

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OISE ADULT EDUCATION & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT SPEAKERS SERIES: TEACHING FOR CRITICAL AWARENESS WITH POST-GRADUATE ADULT EDUCATORS

April 16
2-4 pm
OISE, 252 Bloor St. West, Room 7-105

Speaker: Dr. Tony Brown, University of Technology Sydney (UTS)

In this presentation, Dr. Brown explores the use of film, music, photography and the use of story-making in teaching post-graduate students of adult education.

Often radical and critical educators expect that the gradual elaboration of rational argument about inequality, discrimination, and injustice will explain, convince and win over those who they see as allies and potential supporters. However, students come together in the program with diverse social and educational backgrounds and different work experiences and practices. A pedagogic challenge is how to help students develop deeper awareness, knowledge, and feeling about the world around them? This approach accepts that there are other ways of knowing (Bruner) and so a wider range
of written, visual and oral texts is utilized to work at the cognitive and affective levels.

Dr. Tony Brown is a Senior Lecturer in Organisational and Adult Learning at the University of Technology Sydney (UTS). He has coordinated the Masters programs in Adult Education for the past seven years. Tony’s research has focused on learning in trade unions as a site of organisational and social movement learning, and most recently has been investigating literacy and numeracy practices of production workers in lean manufacturing companies.

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GABRIELLE DE MONTMOLLIN – STEPHEN HARPER HATES ME (ART EXHIBITION)

April 24-May 18
Opening Reception: Saturday April 27, 2-6 pm
Red Head Gallery
401 Richmond Street West, Suite 115
Toronto, Ontario

In a reversal of the 1960’s slogan, “The Personal Is Political” Gabrielle de Montmollin suggests that politics is personal in her new series Stephen Harper Hates Me. Blending news photographs with images borrowed from her drawings and staged photographs Gabrielle shows how Harper’s inimical
attitude towards artists and others he despises has shaped the art she makes and the life she lives. This series of mixed media works on paper is funny, blunt and provocative.

For more info: http://www.redheadgallery.org/

[Note: Gabrielle de Montmollin is Administrative and Communications Assistant of the APCOL project, Centre for the Study of Education & Work.]

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NEWS & VIEWS

THE ROLE OF THE PUBLIC SECTOR AND CAREWORK IN WEALTH CREATION

by Salimah Valiani, Ontario Nurses’ Association

Much like caring work, the role of the public sector in the creation of wealth is regularly undervalued and even disregarded. Due to this, the focus in policy debates is on public sector spending, with the ‘necessary’ conclusion that the amount of spending must be reduced within the context of provincial and federal budget deficits.

An entirely different approach is to begin with the assumption that carework and public services are part and parcel of wealth creation. Using the Statistics Canada database accounting for sales and purchases of all industries in the Ontario economy, a study by the Centre for the Study of Spatial Economics calculates the value of output generated by one dollar of spending in various sectors. This is one way of operationalizing the assumption that public services contribute to the creation of wealth.

The study shows that public spending in the areas of health care, social services and education creates more value added than private sector investment.

Read more: http://www.chnet-works.ca/index.php?option=com_easyblog&view=entry&id=56&Itemid=50&lang=en

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‘RIGHT TO WORK’ IS A LIE

by Paul Kahnert, rabble.ca

The title might sound harsh, but there is no other way to say it. Creating legislation that takes away human rights in the workplace, and claiming that it is giving you rights, is deliberately dishonest. What it’s really about is greed and low wages.

There has been much written and much hand wringing lately about social inequality and the ever growing gap between the haves and the have-nots. There is more wealth now than there has ever been. We don’t have a deficit problem. We have a distribution of wealth problem. “Right to Work”
legislation will make that gap much, much worse.
Read more: http://rabble.ca/news/2013/03/right-work-lie

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BOOK LAUNCH VIDEO – BOOM, BUST AND CRISIS: LABOUR, CORPORATE POWER AND POLITICS IN CANADA

Over the past decade, Canadians have experienced wild economic swings: an economic boom followed by massive layoffs in traditional industries and a wrenching economic crisis. What have these changes meant for Canadian workers? Bad jobs? Weaker unions? Worsening health? If so, why?

Boom, Bust, and Crisis addresses these questions by surveying how work has changed across Canada, from the auto and steel industries of Ontario, to the tar sands of Northern Alberta and First Nations casinos in Saskatchewan.

Introduction by Stephanie Ross, and presentations by:
– John Peters — editor of Boom, Bust and Crisis
– Peter Graefe — “Wither the ‘Quebec Model’? Boom, Bust, and Quebec Labour”

Watch the video: http://www.socialistproject.ca/leftstreamed/ls167.php

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ENDING THE DUES CHECK-OFF: FORCING UNION RENEWAL?

by Sam Gindin, The Bullet

The spread of the notoriously misnamed ‘right-to-work’ legislation in the U.S. — most notably in Michigan, the home of the iconic sit-down strikes and effective birth of modern American-Canadian trade unionism — has given confidence to union-bashers in Canada to follow suit. ‘Right-to-work’ has of course nothing to do with guaranteeing anyone a job and everything to do with trying to undermine unions. Its essence is that even if the majority of workers overcome management opposition and establish a union, and even if all workers benefit from what the union negotiates and the union is (as is the case in the U.S.) compelled by law to represent all workers, workers can — unlike taxes — choose to be free riders and not pay dues.

On the other hand, significant sections of the left have long argued that legislative protections were a double-edged sword, contributing to the institutionalization, bureaucratization, and downfall of the labour movement. If unions were forced to constantly meet their members face-to-face and had to convince each individual to pay dues — as opposed to employers collecting the dues via their payroll systems and sending them on to the union — might it, the argument goes, act as an inadvertent blessing? Might it ultimately renew the labour movement?

Read more: http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/785.php

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CLASSISM EXPOSED: TALES FROM THE PINK GHETTO

by Cari Gulbrandsen

My own experiences related to classism are set in the administrative world of work. Frankie Valli once crooned, “If you go for your diploma, you can join the steno pool.” As I suspect many would agree, the administrative dimension of the work world is indeed a “pool,” where undercurrents of classism swirl quietly even when the waters on the surface are apparently calm. I want to share my anecdotes for administrative workers everywhere.

Read more: http://www.classism.org/tales-pink-ghetto

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MANAGEMENT WAGE INCREASES DWARF OTHERS

by Doug Allan, Leftwords

Earlier I noted that while the provincial government was imposing concessions (and, yes, of course, wage freezes) on unionized public sector workers, the Conference Board of Canada was predicting 2.7% increases for non-union employees in Ontario in 2013 (up from 2.6% actual increases in 2012).

Now, Statistics Canada data suggests this may be part of a long term trend. Data in a new report indicates that in Canada between 1998 and 2011 the hourly wages of full time management occupations went up 34.7% in real terms (i.e. after accounting for inflation). 

Read more: http://ochuleftwords.blogspot.ca/2013/03/management-wage-increases-dwarf-others.html

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ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK, OISE/UT):

Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education. For more information about this project, visit http://www.apcol.ca

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Capitorg

THE ETHICS OF WIDENING PARTICIPATION SEMINAR SERIES

UALL Widening Participation and Social Inclusion Network

Convenor: Annette Hayton, Head of Widening Participation, Goldsmiths, University of London

SRHE: Access and Widening Participation Network

Convenor: Penny-Jane Burke, Roehampton University

 

Venue: SRHE, 44 Bedford Way London WC1R 4LL

Date: Thursday 14th July 2011

From 1pm- 4pm (lunch available from 12:30pm)

 

The Ethics of Widening Participation Seminar Series

 

Ethical dilemmas in widening participation: issues of pedagogy and identity

Dr Jacqueline Stevenson, Leeds Metropolitan University

For more than a decade various governmental policy initiatives have been implemented in the UK to increase the number of students attending higher education. However, whilst these initiatives have been widely critiqued there has been almost no consideration as to the ethical implications of widening participation. This is a significant omission since both WP policy and practice give rise to serious ethical concerns, not least being whether we should continue to increase access to HE at all knowing that many widening participation students are more likely to drop out, get worse degrees, graduate with higher levels of debt and be less employable post-graduation than their peers. Drawing on issues of pedagogy, student support and both staff and student identities, this presentation will act as a ‘think-piece’ offering an opportunity to consider the implications of widening participation from both an ‘ethics of justice’ and ‘ethics of care’ perspective. 

 

Widening Participation and the Capability Approach

Dr Michael F. Watts, University of Cambridge

This paper uses the capability approach to address the ethics of the widening participation agenda.  The capability approach de-emphasises the significance of commodities (including educational commodities) in favour of the opportunities they enable in pursuit of the good life.  It demands a context-based understanding of how the socio-cultural circumstances of young people influence the real opportunities they have to recognise the value of and engage with higher education.  This more nuanced engagement with the concept of well-being recognises that the inevitability of human diversity generates different realisations of the good life.  It also enables engagement with the adaptation of preferences that continue to bedevil attempts to increase access to higher education.  The focus on freedom, illustrated here with reference to a number of empirical studies, frames a more just approach to widening participation that is concerned with what young people have rather than what they lack. 

 

 

Event booking details

To reserve a place at this seminar please email Nicola Manches at: nmanches@srhe.ac.uk or telephone +44 (0) 207 4472525.   Please include the name of your institution and whether you are an SRHE or UALL member.

Cost:

SRHE members: free

UALL members: £25

All Non members: £40

Payment can be made by cheque (made payable SRHE and sent to SRHE, 44 Bedford Way London WC1R 4LL ) or phone through with credit card details.  Please note that places must be booked in advance and that a £25 for non attendance if a place has been reserved but no notice of cancellation/non attendance given by 7 July 2011.

Yours sincerely

Francois Smit

Society for Research into Higher Education

44 Bedford Row

London WC1R 4LL

Tel: +44 20 7447 2525

Fax: +44 20 7447 2526

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Incident

The Incident

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 18th OCTOBER 2009

 

OUR MANDATE: The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

To change your subscription settings, visit http://listserv.oise.utoronto.ca/mailman/listinfo/csewbroadcast

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

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SOCIAL ECONOMY CENTRE – UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO 2009-2010 LUNCHBOX SPEAKERS’ SERIES

October Speakers’ Panel – Student Co-operatives

When:  Wednesday, October 21, 2009, noon – 1:30 pm
Where:  Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto,
252 Bloor St. West, Toronto, Room 12-199

Speakers:

* Marisa Charland will give an overview of Ontario Student Co-operative Association, the federation that unites all Ontario student co-operatives.
* Debbie McKay will present the development of, and services provided by the Guelph Campus Co-operative enterprise at University of Guelph.
* Andrew Haydon will discuss the challenges in developing the newest student housing co-operative in Ontario, located in Cambridge.

* Sonja Carrière, Education Manager of On Co-op, will moderate this panel.

Bring your lunch and a mug – coffee, tea and water will be provided.

For more information, contact Lisa White at secspeaker@oise.utoronto.ca, or visit our website at http://socialeconomy.utoronto.ca

This event will also be webcast live on the Internet. Please see our website for detailed instructions: http://socialeconomy.utoronto.ca/english/webcast.php

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PEOPLE FOR EDUCATION ANNUAL CONFERENCE

Register now to attend on Saturday November 7, 2009!

Amazing speakers and workshop leaders are looking forward to sharing their expertise with you.

* Meet other parents, principals, school and school board staff from around the province.
* Come and share ideas, raise concerns, find solutions and learn a lot!
* Connect with others who care passionately about our schools.

When: Nov. 7th, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m

Where: York University, Toronto, ON

Cost: $50 and you can save $10 by becoming a member of People for Education (costs $25 but gets you lots of other privileges too!)

To view the registration form, click here: http://www.peopleforeducation.com/registration09 (Fill it out, save to your computer, then email back to jan@peopleforeducation.com)

To view the conference flyer, click here (share this by email – bring a friend or someone from your school): http://www.peopleforeducation.com/conferenceflyer09

To view the agenda and session descriptions, click here: http://www.peopleforeducation.com/conference09/sessionsupdate

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URGENT ACTION: STOP THE U OF T ATTACKS ON ACCESS & EQUITY

October 19 & 21

Students who face barriers to access education are about to be hit even harder. The Transitional Year Program (TYP), a 40 year old access program, is about to face drastic changes that will inevitably destroy it. These changes include taking away TYP’s autonomy by putting it under Woodsworth College, taking away TYP’s independent space, reducing teaching and support staff, and slashing the TYP budget.

We need your support on Monday October 19 and Wednesday October 21. On these dates university bodies will be voting to decide the fate of the program. We need a mass turnout of people to stop these committees from rubber-stamping these heinous changes:

Monday October 19, 3-5pm
Faculty of Arts and Science Council
Munk Centre, Campbell Conference Centre,
1 Devonshire Place (Devonshire and Hoskin)

Wednesday October 2,1 4:30-6pm
Woodsworth College Council
Woodsworth Residence, Waters Lounge
321 Bloor Street (Bloor and St. George)

The University has told students that they are not closing TYP. However, TYP will be unable to serve its mandate and support its students under the proposed move to Woodsworth. Reducing staff, faculty and funding limits the ability of the program to meet the needs of its students. Taking away our space by moving us into a few rooms at Woodsworth further marginalizes us by removing the supportive environment that our home at 49 St. George provides.

The University and TYP administration have been repeatedly asked to consult students through this process. After a battle, the TYP administration began meeting with the Transitional Year Program Preservation Alliance, sharing limited information and calling it consultation. Never have students or the communities TYP serves been allowed input into the process.

The future of these marginalized students is in your hands. Please join us in asking the University of Toronto to reconsider shutting the doors on this essential program.

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THIRD CANADIAN CONFERENCE ON SOCIAL ENTERPRISE

“Living Our Values: Social Enterprise in Action”
November 18-20, 2009

Join hundreds of existing and prospective social enterprise operators from every region in Canada at the Third Canadian Conference on Social Enterprise taking place in Toronto, November 18-20, 2009. The conference will consist of three days of training and work sessions toward a national policy agenda and action plan.

Day 1: Intensive training sessions geared to your stage of planning, development or growth.

Days 2 and 3: Working sessions with fellow practitioners, funders, government officials, network organizations, and supporters designed to create a national policy agenda and action plan for social enterprise in Canada.

The Third Canadian Conference on Social Enterprise is an initiative of the Social Enterprise Council of Canada. For more information on the conference, please email: info@torontoenterprisefund.ca or visit http://www.enterprisingnonprofits.ca/resources/secouncil#CCSE

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WHAT’S WRONG WITH CANADA’S IMMIGRATION SYSTEM?

A Migrant Justice Assembly with Salimah Valiani, Amina Sherazee, Himani Bannerji and David McNally

Friday, October 23
6:00pm
245 Church Street
Room ENG-LG11

* Did you know that in 2008 more temporary workers entered the workforce than permanent residents in to Canada?
* Did you know that Canada has cut its refugee acceptance rate in half over the last 20 years?
* Did you know that there are over half a million people in the country without status, over half in the GTA?

Come and hear about how the broken immigration system is being shattered. Share your own stories. Build relationships. Develop ideas for the way ahead. Come prepared to talk back!

Registration and Refreshments at 6:00; Event starts at 6:30pm sharp.

Read more: http://toronto.nooneisillegal.org/node/336

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NOTES ON NO: ABSTINENCE AND THE PROBLEM OF THINKING IN SEX EDUCATION

CUHI (Centre for Urban Health Initiatives) Youth Sexual Health RIG Seminar Series

With Jen Gilbert, Ph.D., Faculty of Education, York University

Wednesday October 28th, 2009, 1:30-3:00 pm
York University, Room 280N, York Lanes
For Directions: http://www.yorku.ca/yorkweb/maps/keele.htm
Free, all are welcome, please RSVP to adrian.guta@utoronto.ca

This paper explores the problem of prohibition in sex education. Drawing on a two-year study of the language of abstinence in the United States, Dr. Gilbert considers many of the different ways that adults and youth use “no” in sex education. Feminists and other have critiqued the use of “no” as a restrictive and punitive gesture, containing sexuality’s potential in the lives of youth, particularly girls, youth of color, and LGBT youth. While she recognizes the importance of these critiques, she takes a detour through psychoanalytic theories of negation and considers the ways “no” can, often unwittingly, make room for thinking and thoughtfulness.

Please see our website for upcoming seminar summaries and other events: http://www.cuhi.utoronto.ca

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CREATIVE PLACES + SPACES CONFERENCE    
        
Oct. 28-30, 2009

Creative Places + Spaces is a multi-media, interactive, art-infused experience designed to inspire, empower, and connect thinkers, policymakers and practitioners working to build vibrant, dynamic, sustainable and creative places. The conference runs from October 28 – 30, 2009 and is hosted by Artscape.

During Creative Places + Spaces:  The Collaborative City, delegates and speakers together will have the opportunity to hear, see, exchange and practice global perspectives on collaboration and connect them to local opportunities for change. If you are interested in building bridges across boundaries in order to solve problems, generate new ideas, and foster transformation, check out the conference schedule and register today for a crash-course in the global groundswell around collaboration.

To find out more: http://www.creativeplacesandspaces.ca/conference

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THE MAYTREE FOUNDATION: REGISTER FOR THE FIVE GOOD IDEAS FALL 2009 PROGRAM

* Creating an Automatic Marketing Culture

with Donnie Claudino

Thursday, October 22, 2009
12:00 to 2:00 pm

Are you one of those people who rarely forward emails? Yet on that rare occasion, something strikes you as special–and you are inspired to ‘pass-it-on.’ Something about it clicked with you. Perhaps you can’t even explain it; a certain … je ne sais quoi. That ‘something’ is often described by marketers as “stickiness.” Stickiness is typically associated with “Viral Marketing.” But who wants to spread a virus? When we connect with a message, a video, a website–we automatically engage with it, and want to share it. We don’t have to be asked, because it’s automatic. Attend this Lunch & Learn to discover 5 things your organization can do to grow an automatic marketing culture–and have your messages exponentially spread by your constituents.

*Managing Volunteers

with Gail Nyberg, Executive Director, Daily Bread Food Bank

Wednesday, November 18, 2009
12:00 to 2:00 pm

Most non-profit organizations rely on volunteers to not only enhance their programming, but run day-to-day operations. At Daily Bread Food Bank the job of distributing over 15 million pounds or food to over 200 food programs would not get done without the hard work of volunteers. Volunteers help to sort food, participate in events, provide information to the public and run community food banks. Last year, 15,521 volunteers helped Daily Bread with over 107,259 hours of work. Our volunteers do great work, and we are constantly looking at ways to improve our programs and our volunteer opportunities. Come and find out more about what we’ve learned over the years (and are still learning) about how to run a successful volunteer program.

Location for both sessions:

St. Michael’s College – Elmsley Hall, Charbonnel Lounge
81 St. Mary Street
At St. Mary and Bay Streets, two blocks south of Bloor, closest subway access from Bay and Wellesley stations.

Please note that though the sessions are free, registration is required. Brown bag lunches are provided on a first come, first served basis.

Please RSVP to: kvukobratovic@maytree.com

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ECHO AND OWHN WANT TO HEAR YOUR VOICE ON OCTOBER 21, TORONTO

Please join Echo and the Ontario Women’s Health Network and share your views on: The Minister of Health’s 10-Year Mental Health and Addictions Strategy

Date: Wednesday October 21, 2009
Time: 9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Place: Chestnut Conference Centre
89 Chestnut Street, Toronto
(east of University/south of Dundas )

Together we will:

1)   discuss the Minister’s report called Every Door is the Right Door;
2)   prepare comments that will be shared in a report to the Minister of Health;
3)   enjoy a women-friendly day of sharing and conversation to ensure your voices are heard
4)   share a healthy breakfast, lunch and snacks.  

This is an event for community women, service providers & community planners.

Please register by contacting OWHN at 416-408-4840 or by email at: owhn@owhn.on.ca

Please ask about support for childcare and local transportation.

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REPORT LAUNCH: WHY DON’T WE WANT THE POOR TO OWN ANYTHING?

The Metcalf Foundation invites you to the launch of a new report by Metcalf Innovation Fellow John Stapleton:

Why don’t we want the poor to own anything? Our relentless social policy journey toward destitution for the 900,000 poorest people in Ontario

When: Wednesday, October 21, 2009 from 1:00 to 3:00 pm
Where: St. Christopher House – Community Hall
248 Ossington Avenue (Dundas at Ossington), Toronto

This new report explores the issue of the very low levels of savings and assets allowed for people on welfare and some other social security programs. It makes recommendations for reform to rules that are impoverishing people and almost guaranteeing they will grow old in poverty.

Low-income community members may qualify for assistance to attend this event. Please call Rick Eagan at St. Christopher House at (416) 532-4828 ext. 238 for details.

Please RSVP to Heather Dunford at hdunford@metcalffoundation.com or (416) 926- 0366 ext. 33

To view launch details: http://fpyn.ca/system/files/Launch%20invite.pdf

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ORDER NOW! OUR TIMES MAGAZINE SPECIAL FALL ISSUE ON CLIMATE CHANGE

“The division between labour movements and social justice movements is an artificial one that serves to impede our ability to make progressive and sustained change.”
Angela Robertson, Social Justice Activist
“What Binds Us Together”

Here we go again! Our Times’ special fall issue on climate change (Vol. 28 No.5) will be heading to the printer shortly. If you’d like extra copies (more than 20), please let us know as soon as possible.

In this issue we’re featuring the efforts of workers and unions to go green and create long-term sustainable jobs. We’re bringing you a fantastic photostory by B.C. photographer Joshua Berson about the firefighters who fought the massive fires this year in Kelowna. And you’ll hear about the joint efforts of the Highlander Center in Tennessee and Toronto’s Labour Education Centre to build a cross-border, cross-movement dialogue. Of course, we’ll also have great new instalments of our regular columns, including WebWork and the Our Times Tally.

If you think you may want to order extra copies of this issue as an education resource for your workshops, schools, or to include in your conference or convention kits, please contact our business manager by Monday, October 19 at the latest. Telephone: 416-703-7661. Toll-free: 1-800-648-6131. E-mail: office@ourtimes.ca. Discounted prices are available for bulk orders.

Either way, I hope you enjoy the issue and find it of use. Thank you for your support for Our Times.

In Solidarity,
Lorraine Endicott
Editor, Our Times
http://www.ourtimes.ca

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CANADIAN JOURNALISM FOUNDATION FORUM – DIVERSITY IN THE MEDIA: A CASE STUDY

In an effort to bring lessons learned about diversity and programming to a wider audience, CJF Forums presents Joan Melanson, executive producer at CBC Radio, Toronto; and Nick Davis, producer of Metro Morning, in a discussion on reaching out to diverse audiences. Suanne Kelman, a professor at Ryerson’s School of Journalism, will interview the panel.

Date:
Tuesday, October 20, 2009
6:30 PM – 9:00 PM (ET)

Location:
Innis Town Hall
2 Sussex Ave.
Toronto, Ontario M5S 1J5

After the discussion there will be a Q&A with the audience, followed by a cocktail reception.

The event is free, but guests are encouraged to make a $15 contribution to help support CJF programs upon registration.

To register:  http://www.eventbrite.com/contact-organizer?eid=451282799

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BOOK LAUNCH (TORONTO) – HARVEST PILGRIMS: MEXICAN AND CARIBBEAN MIGRANT FARM WORKERS IN CANADA

Between the Lines and the Stephen Bulger Gallery invite you to celebrate the launch of Vincenzo Pietropaolo’s new book of photography. Harvest Pilgrims tells the little-known story of Canada’s migrant workers. The photographs in the “Harvest Pilgrims” collection have been highly acclaimed internationally through many publications and exhibitions, including a travelling show curated by the Canadian Museum of Contemporary Photography that opened in Mexico City. Pietropaolo will present a slideshow of his work on the subject, and talk about the project, which has been 20 years in the making.

Tuesday, November 10th, 2009
7:00 pm to 9:00 pm
Stephen Bulger Gallery
1026 Queen Street West
Toronto, ON

For more information, contact Between the Lines, 1.800.718.7201or email: info@btlbooks.com

About the Book:
Harvest Pilgrims: Mexican and Caribbean Migrant Farm Workers in Canada
Vincenzo Pietropaolo
144 pp | paper | 80 + duotone photos
ISBN 978-1-897071-54-0 | $49.95 | October 2009

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OISE/UT DISABILITY STUDIES SPEAKERS SERIES – “DISABILITY IN DANGEROUS TIMES”

With Dr. Catherine Frazee

Thursday, November 5
3:30 pm
OISE Library, 252 Bloor Street West
Toronto, ON (above St. George Subway stop)

All Welcome, ASL provided

Catherine Frazee, D.Litt., LLD.
Professor of Distinction
Co-director, Ryerson-RBC Institute for Disability Studies Research & Education

Catherine Frazee has been involved in the equality rights movement for many years, most notably during her term as Chief Commissioner of the Ontario Human Rights Commission from 1989 to 1992. Her current work as a writer, educator and researcher focuses upon the rights, identity, experience and well-being of persons with disabilities. Catherine is a committed activist who has lectured and published extensively in Canada and abroad on issues related to disability rights, disability culture and the disability experience. She is currently a member of DAWN Canada’s Equality Rights Committee and serves on the Board of Directors of the Canadian Association for Community Living, where she chairs the Association’s Task Force on Values and Ethics. Catherine was awarded an honorary Doctor of Letters from the University of New Brunswick in October 2002.

For more info, contact Tanya Titchkosky, 416-978-0451 or email: tanyatitchkosky@oise.utoronto.ca

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SOCIAL ECONOMY CENTRE – UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO 2009-2010 WORKSHOP SERIES

October 30: Board-Management Relations
with Vic Murray (Schulich School of Business, York University; School of Public Administration, University of Victoria)

For years, books, articles, websites and consultants have been offering all kinds of advice on how boards ought to operate and relate to the organizations they govern. Yet many boards have a very difficult time living up to these ideals or choose not to even try. Why is this? Is it the fault of the boards and managers? Or is it possible that the advice itself is not always what is needed?

Join us in this workshop to:

* Explore the gaps between the ideal and reality in board governance
* Learn how to develop ways of bringing the ideal and reality closer together
* Learn how to use contingency-based analysis and tailored board development approaches

Date:  Friday, October 30, 2009 – 9:00 am – 4:00 pm.

Cost: $140 + GST; Each additional participant from the same organization will receive a $15 discount, as will those who register for more than one workshop. Student rate available. Refreshments, coffee & tea served, but lunch not provided.

To Register: http://sec.oise.utoronto.ca/english/workshops.php or contact Lisa White at secworkshops@oise.utoronto.ca, 416-978-0022

Location:  Social Economy Centre of the University of Toronto, 252 Bloor St. W. (5th floor), Toronto, ON M5S 1V6, (St. George Subway Station)

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TELELEARNING SESSION 15: POVERTY REDUCTION IN CANADA

1. What are some public policy trends and instruments supporting poverty reduction in Canada?
2. What are some community-based approaches to poverty reduction in Canada?

If you want to know the answers to these questions and more, please join:

Jean Marc Fontan, Professor at UQÀM/Co-director of the Social Economy Community-University Research Alliance in Quebec; and Shauna McKinnon, Director of the Canadian Centre for Policy in an engaging telelearning session hosted by Jessica Notwell, Manager of the Women’s Economic Council.

Call Logistics:

* Session Date: Wednesday October 21st, 2009
* Call begins at 12:00 pm Eastern time, 9:00 am Pacific time
* Call in information will be given upon registration
* Register before October 20 to obtain dial in information and background papers
* This session is in English.

Session Format: 1 Hour
Welcome: 5 min
Presentations: 10 min by each speaker
Discussion: 35 minutes

Registration:
Register by phoning 250-472-4976, or e-mailing sekm@uvic.ca with your name, location, and work or volunteer position.

Limited number of spaces available – Register soon!
(This session is only available to Canadian Residents)

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AUDITOR’S REPORT REINFORCES NEED FOR GREATER PUBLIC CONTROL; LESS PRIVATIZATION: OPSEU

The findings by the Auditor General that greater public oversight would have prevented the spending scandal at eHealth was strongly embraced by the Ontario Public Service Employees Union.

“Let’s hope the Premier and his government learned a valuable lesson today: the more you hand over control of a vital public service like health care to the private sector, the more costs are going to skyrocket at the expense of the tax-paying public,” said OPSEU president Warren (Smokey) Thomas.

“We couldn’t agree more with Auditor General McCarter. The private consultants behind the eHealth spending scandal weren’t able to contain themselves from pinching the public purse for every last dime. That simply wouldn’t happen under a genuine public system with built-in checks, oversight and accountability.”

In his report, the Auditor General specifically pointed to the fact that “there was a heavy, and in some cases almost total, reliance on (private) consultants. By 2008, the Ministry’s eHealth Program Branch had fewer than 30 full-time employees, but was engaging more than 300 consultants …”

Thomas said watching the eHealth scandal unfold was like reading a familiar old story.

He cited the Auditor’s report from 2008 which revealed the privatization of the William Osler Hospital in Brampton cost almost $500 million more than had Ontario used traditional public procurement and financing.

For further information: Greg Hamara, OPSEU Communications, (647) 238-9933 cell

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GROCERY UNIONS JOIN WITH COMMUNITY TO BUILD BETTER SUPERMARKETS

by Tiffany Ten Eyck, Labor Notes

In New York City 11,600 retailers sell food, but fewer than 5 percent of them are grocery stores. In Detroit, more than half the city’s residents live in a “food desert,” where they’re closer to a fast food joint or a convenience store than to a supermarket.

UFCW locals in both cities are building community coalitions to create more and better grocery stores – which they hope, one day, will be union.

To read more: http://labornotes.org/node/2461

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LABOUR BOOK OF THE WEEK – THE KILLING OF KAREN SILKWOOD

It has now been 35 years since the murder of American trade unionist Karen Silkwood.

Silkwood was working at a plutonium processing plant and was killed in a mysterious car crash on her way to deliver important documents to a newspaper reporter.

She had been working on health and safety issues at the plant. She was 28 years old when she died.

To learn more about Karen and to celebrate her life please buy a copy of The Killing of Karen Silkwood — this week’s Labour Book of the Week.

The issues this book explores — whistle-blowers, worker safety, the environment, and nuclear vulnerability — are as relevant today as they were 35 years ago.

To read more: https://ssl30.pair.com/unionist/ccp51/cgi-bin/cp-app.cgi?rrc=N&pg=prod&ref=silkwood&affl=labourstart

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Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk