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1968

1968

BEFORE ‘68

Conference—”Before ’68: The Left, activism & social movements in the long 1960s”

Conference Dates: 13 and 14 February 2016

Venue: School of History, University of East Anglia, Norwich, NR4 7TJ, UK and hosted by UEA School of History in conjunction with the journal Socialist History and the Institute of Working Class History (Chicago).

The events of 1968, particularly those in France, have achieved a mythical status in both the memory and the historiography of the 1960s. For some, 1968 marked the end-point of a realignment of the European ‘New Left’. For others 1968 represented a student generation in revolt, and many of the first accounts which sought to explain the history and meaning of ’68 were written by that generation.

More recently historians have tried to demythologise ’68, looking both at less ‘glamourous’ locales and at the deeper histories of anti-colonial struggles and worker activism prior to the events of that year. The aim of this conference is to explore the diverse histories of social activism and left politics in Britain and elsewhere, and how they prepared the ground for and fed into ‘1968’.

Themes might include, but are not limited to:

  • Anti-nuclear & peace movements
    Civil Rights struggles
    The Black Power movement
    Anti-colonial politics
    The activities of the Labour movement and the ‘traditional’ Left
    The grassroots activism of the ‘New Left’
    Far Left challenges: Trotskyism & Maoism
    Campaigns around housing and the built environment
    Campaigns around race and discrimination in the workplace and housing
    Solidarity movements with struggles abroad (e.g. South Africa, Vietnam)
    Campaigns for Homosexual Equality
    Second Wave Feminism

We are seeking papers of 5,000 to 10,000 words on any aspects of left activism and social movements in the period preceding 1968 to be presented at the conference. Selected papers will be published in a special issue of the journal Socialist History. Attendance at the conference will be free of charge, but we ask that anyone wishing to attend registers in advance.

Proposals for papers and any enquiries should be submitted to Ben Jones.

Email: b.jones5@uea.ac.uk

Deadline for proposals for papers: 31 October 2015

download (3)

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/call-for-papers-before-9268-the-left-activism-social-movements-in-the-long-1960s-1

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

download (4)

UEA

UEA

BEFORE 68: THE LEFT, ACTIVISM AND SOCIAL MOVEMENTS IN THE LONG 1960s

Weekend Conference: Before 68: The Left, Activism & Social Movements in the Long 1960s

Call for Papers

Dates: 13 and 14 February 2016

Venue: School of History, University of East Anglia, Norwich, NR4 7TJ, UK

Organised and hosted by UEA School of History in conjunction with the journal Socialist History and the Institute of Working Class History, Chicago.

The events of 1968, particularly those in France, have achieved a mythical status in both the memory and the historiography of the 1960s. For some, 1968 marked the end-point of a realignment of the European ‘New Left’. For others 1968 represented a student generation in revolt, and many of the first accounts which sought to explain the history and meaning of ‘68 were written by that generation.

More recently historians have tried to demythologise ‘68, looking both at less ‘glamourous’ locales and at the deeper histories of anti-colonial struggles and worker activism prior to the events of that year. The aim of this conference is to explore the diverse histories of social activism and left politics in Britain and elsewhere, and how they prepared the ground for and fed into ‘1968’. Themes might include, but are not limited to:

  • Anti-nuclear & peace movements
  • Civil Rights struggles
  • The Black Power movement
  • Anti-colonial politics
  • The activities of the Labour movement and the ‘traditional’ Left
  • The grassroots activism of the ‘New Left’
  • Far Left challenges: Trotskyism & Maoism
  • Campaigns around housing and the built environment
  • Campaigns around race and discrimination in the workplace and housing
  • Solidarity movements with struggles abroad (e.g. South Africa, Vietnam)
  • Campaigns for Homosexual Equality
  • Second Wave Feminism

We are seeking papers of 5000 to 10000 words on any aspects of left activism and social movements in the period preceding 1968 to be presented at the conference. Selected papers will be published in a special issue of the journal Socialist History. Attendance at the conference will be free of charge, but we ask that anyone wishing to attend registers in advance. Proposals for papers and any enquiries should be submitted to Ben Jones. Email: b.jones5@uea.ac.uk

Deadline for proposals for papers: 31 October 2015

From UEA website: https://www.uea.ac.uk/history/news-and-events/-/asset_publisher/oAKg6av1Sw6j/blog/weekend-conference-before-68-the-left-activism-social-movements-in-the-long-1960s

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cfp-before-68-the-left-activism-social-movements-in-the-long-1960s

Norwich Cathedral

Norwich Cathedral

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

 

Guy Debord

Guy Debord

THE SOCIETY OF THE SPECTACLE

THE SOCIETY OF THE SPECTACLE by Guy Debord

Newly translated and annotated by Ken Knabb
150 pages. $15.00

Guy Debord was the most influential figure in the Situationist International, the notorious group that helped trigger the May 1968 revolt in France. His book “The Society of the Spectacle,” originally published in Paris in 1967, has been translated into more than twenty other languages and is arguably the most important radical book of the twentieth century. This is the first edition in any language to include extensive annotations, clarifying the historical allusions and revealing the sources of Debord’s
“détournements.”

Contrary to popular misconceptions, Debord’s book is neither an ivory tower “philosophical” discourse nor a mere expression of “protest.” It is a carefully considered effort to clarify the most fundamental tendencies and contradictions of the society in which we find ourselves. This makes it more of a challenge, but it is also why it remains so pertinent nearly half a century after its original publication while countless other social theories and intellectual fads have come and gone.

It has, in fact, become even more pertinent than ever, because the spectacle has become more all-pervading than ever — to the point that it is almost universally taken for granted. Most people today have scarcely any awareness of pre-spectacle history, let alone of anti-spectacle possibilities. As Debord noted in his follow-up work, “Comments on the Society of the Spectacle” (1988), “spectacular domination has succeeded in raising an entire generation molded to its laws.”

The book is now at the printer’s. It will be available March 20. For further information, see http://www.bopsecrets.org/cat.htm

Bonuses for Some

Bonuses for Some

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: https://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

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Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

McKenzie Wark

McKenzie Wark

THE SPECTACLE OF DISINTEGRATION: SITUATIONIST PASSAGES OUT OF THE TWENTIETH CENTURY

By McKenzie Wark

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Published May 2013

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Following his acclaimed history of the Situationist International up until the late sixties, THE BEACH BENEATH THE STREET, McKenzie Wark returns with a companion volume which puts the late work of the Situationists in a broader and deeper context, charting their contemporary relevance and their deep critique of modernity. Wark builds on their work to map the historical stages of the society of the spectacle, from the diffuse to the integrated to what he calls the disintegrating spectacle. THE SPECTACLE OF DISINTEGRATION takes the reader through the critique of political aesthetics of former Situationist T.J. Clark, the Fourierist utopia of Raoul Vaneigem, René Vienet’s earthy situationist cinema, Gianfranco Sangunetti’s pranking of the Italian ruling class, Alice-Becker Ho’s account of the anonymous language of the Romany, Guy Debord’s late films and his surprising work as a game designer.

At once an extraordinary counter history of radical praxis and a call to arms in the age of financial crisis and the resurgence of the streets, THE SPECTACLE OF DISINTEGRATION recalls the hidden journeys taken in the attempt to leave the twentieth century, and plots an exit from the twenty first.

The dustjacket unfolds to reveal a fold-out poster of the collaborative graphic essay combining text selected by McKenzie Wark with composition and drawings by Kevin C. Pyle.

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“Wark’s readable explanation of the movement’s ideas is the best I have read. ” – Edwin Heathcote, In praise of BEACH BENEATH THE STREET, FINANCIAL TIMES

“A playful, smart and occasionally epigrammatic study of the Situationists … this brilliant account is not only an essential work for our own times; it also comes with a cover that, with the minimum of manual dexterity, folds out into a collaborative graphic essay. ” – John Burnside, TIMES LITERARY SUPPLEMENT

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ISBN: 9781844679577 / Hardback / $26.95 / £16.99 / $28.50CAN / 256 Pages

For more information on THE SPECTACLE OF DISINTEGRATION or to buy the book visit:

http://www.versobooks.com/books/1162-the-spectacle-of-disintegration

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Visit Verso’s website for information on our upcoming events, new reviews and publications and special offers: http://www.versobooks.com

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Become a fan of Verso on Facebook

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And get updates on Twitter too!

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Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

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The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

Revolution

REVOLUTION AND COUNTER-REVOLUTION IN EUROPE – BY PIERRE FRANK

 IIRE publishes Pierre Frank’s “Revolution & Counter-revolution in Europe”

Between 1918 and 1968, the forces of revolution and counter-revolution fought a ceaseless battle over Europe’s history. This new issue of the Notebooks for Study and Research, “Revolution & Counter-revolution in Europe” shows how the Moscow-led communist parties led the revolutionary movements to disaster In Germany, Spain, France and elsewhere. The 282 page book is available for 10 euros from the International Institute for Research and Education at: http://bit.ly/PFrank

In the decades after the Second World War, democracy was regularly threatened by right-wing movements which aimed to dramatically constrict democratic rights. This ‘Bonapartism’ continually threatened democracy in France until the 1968 worker- and student-revolt destroyed the foundations of Gaullism. In this book a participant and political leader within the revolutionary movement gives his perspectives on those struggles.

A biographical note by Ernest Mandel, which introduces this volume, explains how over six decades in the workers movement Pierre Frank became perhaps the best-known anti-Stalinist revolutionary in France. He was one of the first to be arrested during the crisis of 1968, when the French section of the Fourth International was banned.

Frank was secretary to Leon Trotsky in the 1930s, a central leader of the Fourth International from the 1940s and, until his death in 1984, editor of its French-language theoretical journal, Quatrième Internationale. His best-known books are “The Long March of the Trotskyists”, also published by the IIRE, and “Histoire de l’Internationale Communiste”, a chapter of which has been specially translated for this volume.

Frank played a special role in the establishment of the IIRE. His substantial collection of books was bequeathed to the IIRE and it remains the largest single collection in the Institute’s library.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

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MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

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Guy Debord

SPECTACULAR CAPITALISM

Spectacular Capitalism Release Party and Presentation 
Saturday June 25th @ 7PM @ X Marks the Bökship (http://bokship.org)
210/ Unit 3 Cambridge Heath Road London E2 9NQ

Over the past forty years the ideas and practices of Guy Debord and the Situationist International have become a constant reference point for those involved in radical politics, the arts, and cultural theory. Despite this ubiquity Debord’s work has been reduced to a palatable cliché rather than being used as a tool for crafting an ongoing practice of critique and engagement. Come on join us to celebrate the release of Richard Gilman-Opalsky’s new book, Spectacular Capitalism: Guy Debord and the Practice of Radical Philosophy, as we excavate this potential from the historical wreckage. 

Drawing on the work of Guy Debord, Gilman-Opalsky argues that the theory of practice and practice of theory are superseded by upheavals that do the work of philosophy. Spectacular Capitalism makes the case not only for a new philosophy of praxis, but for praxis itself as the delivery mechanism for philosophy – for the field of human action, of contestation and conflict, to raise directly the most irresistible questions about the truth and morality of the existing state of affairs.

Commentary and response from Gavin Grindon:

“Richard Gilman-Opalsky’s Spectacular Capitalism rescues Situationist theory and praxis from merely antiquarian and art-historical commentary and puts it in dialogue with the project of a radical philosophy for leaving the 21st century.” – McKenzie Wark, author of A Hacker Manifesto and Gamer Theory

Organized by Minor Compositions (http://www.minorcompositions.info) and the Centre for Ethics and Politics @ Queen Mary, University of London (http://cfep.org.uk)

Spectacular Capitalism: Guy Debord and the Practice of Radical Philosophy
Richard Gilman-Opalsky
http://www.minorcompositions.info/spectacularcapitalism.html
To be released June 2011
ISBN 978-1-57027-228-8

Bio: Richard Gilman-Opalsky is Assistant Professor of Political Philosophy in the Department of Political Science at the University of Illinois at Springfield. He is the author of Unbounded Publics: Transgressive Public Spheres, Zapatismo, and Political Theory (Lexington Books, 2008), as well as numerous articles.

Released by Minor Compositions, London / New York / Port Watson
Minor Compositions is a series of interventions & provocations drawing from autonomous politics, avant-garde aesthetics, and the revolutions of everyday life.
Minor Compositions is an imprint of Autonomedia
www.minorcompositions.info |info@minorcompositions.info

*****

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

A World To Win

STRIKES AND SOCIAL CONFLICTS IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY

International Conference
Lisbon, 17, 18, 19 March, 2011

The twentieth century has been confirmed as the century when the capital-labour conflict was most severe. The International Conference on Strikes and Social Conflicts in the Twentieth Century will host submissions on the strikes and social conflicts in the twentieth century and works on the theoretical discussion on the role of unions and political organizations. We also invite researchers to submit papers on methodology and the historiography of labour.

We welcome submissions on labour conflicts that occurred in factories, universities or public services, on rural and urban conflicts and also on conflicts that developed into civil wars or revolutions. National and international comparisons are also welcome.

After the Russian revolution the relative strengths of capital and labour were never again the same, with a period of revolution and counter-revolution that ended with World War II. Protagonist of the victory over fascism, the labour movement found itself neglected in the core countries under the impact of economic growth in the 1950s and the 1960s. But May 1968 quickly reversed the situation, with a following boom of labour studies during the 1970s. Nevertheless once the crisis of the 1970s was over, capital has regained the initiative, with the deterioration of labour laws, the crisis of trade unions and the subsequent despise in the academy for the study of social conflicts. The recent crisis, however, shows that workers, the ones who create value, are not obsolete. The social movements regain, in the last decade, a central role in the world.

The intensification of social conflicts in the last decade promoted a comeback to the academia of the studies on labour and the social movements. This conference aims to be part of this process: to retrieve, promote and disseminate the history of social conflicts during the twentieth century.

The Scientific Committee
Álvaro Bianchi (AEL)
Raquel Varela (IHC)
Sjaak van der Velden (IISH)
Serge Wolikow (MSH)
Xavier Domènech (CEDIF)

Conference Languages
Conference languages are Portuguese, English, French and Spanish (simultaneous translation Portuguese/English).

Preliminary Program

The Conference will have sessions in the mornings and afternoons. There will be conferences of invited speakers, among other, Marcel van der Linden, Fernando Rosas, Serge Wolikow, Beverly Silver, Kevin Murphy, Ricardo Antunes, Álvaro Bianchi, Dave Lyddon, Xavier Doménech.

During the conference there will be an excursion guided by Professor Fernando Rosas (Lisbon of the Revolutions); a debate about cinema and labour movement and a debate about Crisis and Social Change.

Contact information:

Instituto de História Contemporânea/ Faculdade de Ciências Sociais e Humanas (Universidade Nova de Lisboa), Av. de Berna, 26 C, 1069-061 Lisboa, Portugal. E-Mail: ihc@fcsh.unl.pt

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‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

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Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Utopia

UTOPIA NOW! RADICAL IMAGINATION IN THE WAKE OF HISTORICAL FAILURE

Lecture by Stephen Duncombe
Monday February 14, 2011
Time: 08:30 PM
Location: de Balie (Salon), Kleine-Gartmanplantsoen 10, Amsterdam
Entrance: 5 Euro

Tickets available at the door or order in advance

A co-production of SKOR | Foundation Art and Public Domain and De Balie.

On February 14, the American sociologist and researcher Stephen Duncombe will give a lecture in De Balie in Amsterdam to mark the publication of Open 20, titled The Populist Imagination: On the Role of Myth, Storytelling and Imaginary in Politics.

His presentation explores the possibilities of a new democratic imaginary. Duncombe advocates a dreampolitik that could serve as a counterweight to the nostalgic fantasies that are currently being promoted by right-wing populist movements.

Stephen Duncombe is a professor at the Gallatin School, New York University, where he teaches the history and politics of media.

As a political activist he writes about the intersection between culture and politics. His published works include Dream: Re-imagining Progressive Politics in an Age of Fantasy (2006). Duncombe is co-director of the College of Tactical Culture and of the School for Creative Activism in New York.

This lecture is a prelude to the one-day symposium on Friday March 18, which deals with the roles played by imagination, storytelling and myth creation in politics today. Among the theoreticians, artists and graphic designers who will participate in this symposium are Rudi Laermans, Merijn Oudenampsen, Sarah Farris, Oliver Marchart, Aukje van Rooden, Steve Lambert and John Kraniaukas.

Open Cahier on Art and the Public Domain is iniated by SKOR | Foundation for Art and Public Domain and published in partnership with NAi Publishers. Open 20 was guest-edited by Merijn Oudenampsen and deals with imagination and myths in politics, in populism and beyond.

‘All power to the imagination!’, is a popular slogan identified with the 1968-generation. Now, right-wing populist movements such as the Italian Northern League Party (Lega Nord), the American Tea Party movement, the Dutch Party For Freedom (PVV, led by Geert Wilders) and many others are storming the political stage in Europe and the United States. These groups are using the political imagination to sharpen and fix identities, to appeal to an imaginary past, and to cultivate myths.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

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Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon Profile: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

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Alternative Culture

 

COMMONALITIES CONFERENCE

Please join us for “Commonalities: Theorizing the Common in Contemporary Italian Thought,” a conference sponsored by the journal diacritics. The event, to be held at Cornell University on September 24-25, 2010, will bring together a number of leading thinkers around the theme and question of the common. Participants will include Kevin Attell, Franco “Bifo” Berardi, Remo Bodei, Bruno Bosteels, Cesare Casarino, Roberto Esposito, Ida Dominijanni, Michael Hardt, Antonio Negri (by video conference), and Karen Pinkus. More information can be found at the conference website (www.commonconf.com) or by contacting Professor Timothy Campbell (tcc9@cornell.edu)

Il manifesto
For the better part of a decade the position of Italian thought in the Anglo-American academy has increasingly grown in importance. From issues as far ranging as bioethics and bioengineering, to euthanasia, to globalization, to theorizing gender, to the war on terror, works originating in Italy have played a significant, perhaps even the dominant, role in setting the terms and conditions of these debates. Indeed it might well be that no contemporary thought more than Italian enjoys greater success today in the United States. If twenty years of postmodernism and poststructuralism were in large measure the result of French exports to the United States — Derrida, Lacan, Deleuze, and Foucault — today a number of Italian philosophical exports are giving rise to a theoretical dispositif that goes under a variety of names: post-Marxist, posthuman, or most often biopolitical. Yet the fact that Italian thought enjoys such enormous success in the United States and elsewhere begs an important question, one put to me polemically recently by a prominent Italian philosopher. Is there really such a thing as contemporary Italian thought? And if there is what in the world do its proponents have in common?

By way of responding, it might be useful to recall some details about the recent reception of Italian thought in the American academy. In the aftermath of the end of the postmodern — which a number of American observers savored as spelling the end of the use and abuse of philosophy by large numbers of literary critics — two works appeared in English within a span of three years: Giorgio Agamben’s ‘Homo Sacer’ and Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri’s ‘Empire’. Stepping into the void left by the departure of what in the United States was known as “theory,” these works made a number of bold theoretical claims about the relation between political power and individual life (Agamben) and globalization and collective life (Hardt and Negri), claims that uncannily – sometimes almost prophetically – addressed some of the most pressing issues in our current state of affairs. Equally a number of important works of Italian feminism appeared over roughly the same period. Works by Adriana Cavarero and Rosi Braidotti, among others, deeply influenced a whole generation of American theorists in fields like gender studies, political philosophy, and law. Looking back it’s difficult to overestimate the influence of all these figures when accounting for the intellectual success of Italian thought today. Certainly it became possible for other voices to be heard, Paolo Virno, and more recently Franco Berardi, Roberto Esposito, and Maurizio Lazzarato among others.

But to take up again the question at hand: what do authors as seemingly different as Agamben and Negri, Berardi and Esposito, Braidotti and Bodei, or Cavarero and Virno have in common outside of the mere fact of writing in Italian? Beyond a common language, is there, for example, such a thing as a common Italian philosophical tradition of which they are all a part? Some, most notably, Mario Perniola, would say yes, one found in the elements of repetition, transmission, mixture, and body that together forged an Italian philosophical culture over the last 300 years. Deleuze and Guattari would have said no, arguing that Italy has historically “lacked a milieu” for philosophy. For them the reason for this lack could be found in Italy’s proximity to the Holy See, which continually aborted philosophy across the peninsula, reducing Italian thought to mere rhetoric, philosophy’s shadow, and allowing only for the occasional “comet” to briefly light up the philosophical sky. Yet what if Italian thought today does in fact enjoy a milieu? What “event” or “events” in the recent past might have fashioned a milieu for the emergence of Italian thought? What would the features of that milieu look like?

Undoubtedly, the decade-long Italian 1968 would have played the decisive role. The votes on abortion, the emergence of counterculture and student and feminist movements, and changes in labor and production all deeply changed the space in which politics — as well as philosophy – was practiced. Indeed one of the central features of the Italian 1968 was precisely the emphasis on politics as philosophy and philosophy as a form (among others) of politics. We can see this in the place 1968 and 1977 awarded political militancy; in the increasing prominence given to questions of subjectivization; and more broadly in the birth of new forms of social and political life separated from those that had previously dominated.

Yet Italy’s long 1968 wasn’t enough on its own. It was only with 1989 and the fall of the Berlin Wall that politics and philosophy truly begin to pass intensely into each other, to stay with the language of Deleuze and Guattari. Although it may seem less the case for those writing in Italy, when seen from the outside 1989 was experienced as trauma more in Italy than in the rest of Europe. The result forced a number of thinkers to re-examine the fundamental political and philosophical categories that had underpinned decades if not centuries of thought: what meaning would the end of a certain form of common life have for politics, for philosophy, for culture? Such a calling into question of the previous understanding of the common had the effect of reterritorializing politics and philosophy under new terms and new problematics, one of which will be “life,” broadly speaking. It is only when 1968 is considered as the motor for deterritorialization of the common in political theory and philosophy and 1989 as the turn toward its reterritorialization as newly mapped by (among other things) biopolitical theory that something like a milieu is constructed for contemporary Italian thought.

This is not to say that proponents of Italian thought share the same understanding of the common or even celebrate it. Clearly they do not. Yet the centrality of the common raises a number of questions about Italian thought and Italian public life today. What does it mean to be or have in common in 2010? What are the effects of questioning the weight of shared life and what possible futures are there for the common? How might singularities be thought together so as to create new forms of life and what kinds of co-habitations or contaminations might reinforce these new forms of life? These kinds of questions are ones Italian thought, in all its diversity, has placed at the forefront of contemporary theory, questions that in turn raise fundamental questions about the nature of relationality and of a politics that would seek to strengthen relations and to extend them in order to create yet further relationality. Such is the force of Hardt and Negri’s discussion of the capacity for love near the end of Commonwealth, though one can well imagine others, including a capacity for play, for attention, and for compassion too.

Yet the relationality implicit in these new forms of shared life doesn’t only lead to greater and more positive capacities for relationality among singularities. The deterritorialization of the common as biopolitics, the posthuman or even insurrection by no means conjures away the specter of power; thus with greater capacity on the one hand comes the possibility of more intense and invasive forms of power on the other. The question then becomes: how are new forms of the common that are being forged today — shared singularities, mirror neurons, impersonality – also being reterritorialized and recontained, and by whom? Is it possible that more intense forms of relationality might signal a return to the very terms that earlier critiques of the common had attempted to uncover? On the one hand the recent success of social networking sites like Facebook suggests that new forms of virtual relations involving vast numbers of “friends” are not only possible but involve ever greater exposure to others. On the other hand such exchanges continue to be premised on the notion that my body and my opinions belong to me, what the Invisible Committee unforgetably characterized as treating “our Self like a boring box office,” using whatever prosthesis is at hand “to hold onto an I.” In such a neo-liberal scenario, the circulation of information, of goods, of persons, of persons as goods is taken to mean a return to a common mode of being-together. It’s a film we’ve seen countless times before: the common’s reinscription in contexts less open to affect that are continually based upon a conflation of connnectivity with more open modes of relating.

These questions among others will be the foundation for a two-day conference sponsored by the journal Diacritics to be held on the campus of Cornell University on September 24-25, 2010. The conference, titled “Commonalities: Theorizing the Common in Italian Thought,” will bring together a number of Italian voices so as to think together not only the relation between Italy and the common but to consider emerging forms of the common and common life today as well as consider the efficacy of a term like the common for a progressive (bio)politics. Equally, the event, the first of its kind of recent memory in the United States, is an occasion to register the state of Italian thought today. When seen from the other side of the Atlantic, no other contemporary thought more than Italian seems better suited today to offer what Foucault called an ontology of the present. At a minimum, and pace my doubting Italian philosopher, the editorial and intellectual success of Italian thought merits a closer look.

Featured at the conference will be some of the leading philosophical figures from Italy today, including Franco Berardi, Remo Bodei, Cesare Casarino, Ida Dominjanni, Roberto Esposito, Michael Hardt, and Antonio Negri. The conference will be transmitted over the internet at http://www.commonconf.com. A number of Cornell students will be blogging the conference live over the two days.

Antonio Negri

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

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Jean-Paul Sartre

UNFINISHED PROJECTS: DECOLONIZATION AND THE PHILOSOPHY OF JEAN-PAUL SARTRE
By
Paige Arthur

A major rereading of the life and work of Jean-Paul Sartre, published on the 30th anniversary of his death (April 15, 1980)

Sartre’s anticolonialism proves, in Paige Arthur’s sophisticated rendition, far richer and more complex than snide dismissals of his ‘totalitarian’ impulses have allowed.” –— Samuel Moyn, Columbia University

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In this major rereading of Sartre’s life and work, Paige Arthur traces the relationship between the philosopher’s decades-long commitment to decolonization and his intellectual thought. Where other commentators have focused on the tensions between Sartre’s Marxism and his account of existential freedom—usually to denigrate one in favor of the other—Arthur shows that Sartre’s political engagement with global liberation movements and his philosophical framework were inextricably intertwined.

Closely following the postwar movements for decolonization, and then supporting the war of independence in Algeria, Sartre proposed an influential and uncompromising view of imperialism. Analyzing the Western attitude to the “subhuman” colonial subject, he offered an account of the social constraints applying to both ruler and ruled, and came to argue that political violence—on both sides—was a systematic consequence of the colonial order. Arthur’s rich and nuanced book locates Sartre within the political discussions of his time, while also looking forward to contemporary debates about new forms of imperialism and resistance.

“Since the late 1970s, anti-totalitarian discourse has reduced Sartre to an unwitting casualty of the Cold War split. Now, Paige Arthur counters the hysteria and moralizing of the last thirty years with a carefully reasoned and erudite study that reveals Sartre for what he was: a profound and consistent thinker of liberation and decolonization.”—Kristin Ross, author of May’68 and its Afterlives

“Overcoming today’s amnesia about Sartre as a founding spirit of ‘postcolonialism,’ Paige Arthur shows his relevance for our own encounters with ‘globalization.’”—Ronald Aronson, author of Sartre’s Second Critique and Camus and Sartre

Paige Arthur is Deputy Director of Research at the International Center for Transitional Justice. She has taught at both UC Berkeley and the New School University.

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FOR INTERVIEWS & REVIEW COPIES PLEASE CONTACT CLARA HEYWORTH: clara@versobooks.com

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Clara Heyworth
Publication: 15th April, 2010 clara@versobooks.com
ISBN: 978-1-84467-399-5 Tel. 718-246-8160
20 Jay Street, Suite 1010
Brooklyn, NY 11201
Tel: +1 (718) 246 8160
Fax: +1 (718) 246 8165
Email: clara@versobooks.com
http://www.versobooks.com

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski:

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

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Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

1968

RETHINKING 1968

Forwarded from PhaenEx

http://www.phaenex.uwindsor.ca/

Dear All

PhaenEx has just published its latest Special Topics issue, “Rethinking 1968”, guest edited by Kevin W. Gray. It can be found at http://www.phaenex.uwindsor.ca/ojs/leddy/index.php/phaenex

We invite you to review the Table of Contents here and then visit our web site to review articles and items of interest. Please feel free to share this link with other listserves and colleagues.

Thanks for the continuing interest in our work,

PhaenEx
Vol 4, No 2 (2009)

Table of Contents
http://www.phaenex.uwindsor.ca/ojs/leddy/index.php/phaenex/issue/view/346

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Editorial Introduction: Rethinking 1968 (i-ii)
KEVIN W. GRAY

Articles
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May 1968, Sartre and Sarkozy (1-25)
JEAN-PIERRE BOULÉ

Saving 1968: Thinking with Habermas against Habermas (26-44)
KEVIN W. GRAY

The May 1968 Archives: A Presentation of the Anti-Technocratic Struggle in May 1968 (45-59)
ANDREW FEENBERG

May ’68 and the One-Dimensional State (60-77)
CHRIS REYNOLDS

The Frankfurt School’s Interest in Freud and the Impact of  Eros and Civilization  on the Student Protest Movement in Germany: A Brief History (78-96)
PETER-ERWIN JANSEN

Les événements de Mai  as Theory and Practice (97-129)
ADRIAN SWITZER

Sartre’s Pure Critical Theory (130-175)
JOHN DUNCAN

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Notes on Contributors (176-177)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

NOTE: I have found that the links above do not work. Perhaps you’ll find a way of getting into the journal online! However, I found that the journal’s old web site still works: http://old.library.georgetown.edu/newjour/p/msg03227.html I also discovered that Google’s cache for the PhaenEx site seems to work, at: http://209.85.129.132/search?q=cache:1c0V63XZGgcJ:www.phaenex.uwindsor.ca/+PhaenEx&cd=1&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=uk&ie=UTF-8 – but I still couldn’t get into the ‘Current Issue’ or the ‘Archives’!! The same old error message comes up! Grrr! They need to sort this out!

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

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Jacques Ranciere

THE EMANCIPATED SPECTATOR – JACQUES RANCIERE

NEW TITLE: THE EMANCIPATED SPECTATOR

JACQUES RANCIÈRE

Published 25 January 2010

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“Ranciere’s writings offer one of the few conceptualizations of how we are to continue to resist.”  Slavoj Zizek

“Ranciere is an heir to Foucault.”  Alain Badiou

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AUTHOR EVENTS IN LONDON:

3rd February 2010: ICA / Jacques Ranciere in conversation with Kodwo Eshun, Otolith Group / For more details and to book click here:: http://www.ica.org.uk/The%20Image%20in%20Question+23536.twl

4th February 2010: Whitechapel Gallery / Big Ideas: Jacques Ranciere in conversation with Adrian Rifkin and Andrea Phillips / For more details and to book click here: http://www.whitechapelgallery.org/shop/product/category_id/22/product_id/437?session_id=126278107878a96fc6fd05d128adaed940ce9e71eb1

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“Every spectator is already an actor in her story; every actor, every man of action, is the spectator of the same story.”

A ‘68er whose radical ardour remains undimmed, Jacques Ranciere is one of the most influential and compelling thinkers of our age in France since Foucault and Deleuze, lauded by both art theorists and artists.

Now this leading theorist of the art world returns with the follow-up to his acclaimed manifesto for contemporary art and film, THE FUTURE OF THE IMAGE which located art firmly in relation to politics.

Theorists of art and film commonly depict the modern audience as passive consumers. In response, both artists and thinkers have sought to transform the viewer of art or the spectator into someone involved in the drama before them – seeking to ‘emancipate’ the spectator and make them politically active.

For example, the influential curator of the Tate Britain’s recent exhibition ‘Altermodern’, Nicholas Bourriaud, has championed the notion of a more socially engaged art, where the public are encouraged to participate in an event or artwork. We have seen the influence of such ideas in such projects as Antony Gormley’s ‘One & Other’ that took place on the fourth plinth in Trafalgar Square.

Ranciere turns these ideas over and argues that “Being a spectator is not some passive condition that we should transform into activity. It is our normal situation.” For Ranciere, there is no privileged starting point in art but we should reassess the relations between seeing, doing, speaking: emancipation means blurring these boundaries.

Looking over the tradition of critical art and what the desire to insert art into life has achieved, Ranciere asks, ‘has the militant critique of the consumption of images and commodities has become, ironically, a sad confirmation of its omnipotence?’

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Praise for Jacques Ranciere

“His art lies in the rigor of his argument – its careful, precise unfolding – and at the same time not treating his reader, whether university professor or unemployed actress, as an imbecile.” Kristin Ross

“It’s clear that Jacques Ranciere is relighting the flame that was extinguished for many—that is why he serves as such a signal reference today.” Thomas Hirschhorn

“In the face of impossible attempts to proceed with progressive ideas within the terms of postmodernist discourse, Ranciere shows a way out of the malaise.” Liam Gillick

Praise for HATRED OF DEMOCRACY

“A piercing essay on the definitions and redefinitions of the term “democracy” … the present catastrophe in Iraq provides more than ample proof of Ranciere’s bold assertion that we need to rethink the relationship between democracy and power before setting in motion any more wars in the name of “freedom”.” Times Higher Educational Supplement

“This tastily sardonic essay is partly a scholarly sprint through the history of political philosophy, and partly a very enjoyable stream of insults directed at rival penseurs.” The Guardian

“Ranciere critiques the political stance in the west that pours scorn on mass protests and popular culture at home, yet promotes the spread of democracy by force throughout the world. … But Ranciere eschews polemic in order to show the confusion in our political discourse. He challenges what he sees as the widely held view that democratic life is synonymous with “the apolitical life of the indifferent consumer”.” New Statesman

Praise for THE FUTURE OF THE IMAGE

“A series of gratifyingly knotty and close discussions of 19th- and 20th-century literature, film and painting” The Guardian

“French philosopher Jacques Ranciere is a refreshing read for anyone concerned with what art has to do with politics and society.” J.J. Charlesworth, Art Review

“What we see here is Ranciere developing a unique voice as a political theorist.” Bookforum

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Jacques Ranciere is Emeritus Professor of Philosophy at the University of Paris-VIII.  His books include THE FUTURE OF THE IMAGE, HATRED OF DEMOCRACY, and ON THE SHORES OF POLITICS (all from Verso), THE POLITICS OF AESTHETICS, DISAGREEMENT, THE PHILOSOPHER AND HIS POOR, THE IGNORANT SCHOOLMASTER,SHORT VOYWAGES TO THE LAND OF THE PEOPLE and NIGHTS OF LABOR.

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The Emancipated Spectator Author: Jacques Ranciere / 25 January 2010 / 
Hardback /
978 1 84467 343 8 /£12.99 / $23.95/144 pages / Hardback

For more information visit http://www.versobooks.com/books/nopqrs/r-titles/ranciere_j_emancipated_spectator.shtml

To buy the book in the U.K:
http://www.bookdepository.co.uk/book/9781844673438/The-Emancipated-Spectator
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Emancipated-Spectator-Jacques-Ranci%C3%A8re/dp/184467343X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1264006364&sr=8-1

To buy the book in the U.S:
http://www.amazon.com/Emancipated-Spectator-Jacques-Ranci%C3%A8re/dp/184467343X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1264000587&sr=8-

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ALSO OUT NOW:

New in Paperback

HATRED OF DEMOCRACY

Published 7 December 2009

978-1-84467-386-5 / Paperback /$16.95 /£8.99 / 112 pages

In his new book, Jacques Ranciere examines how the West can no longer simply extol the virtues of democracy by contrasting it with the horrors of totalitarianism. As certain governments are exporting democracy by brute force, and a reactionary strand in mainstream political opinion is willing to abandon civil liberties and destroy collective values of equality, Ranciere explains how democracy—government by all—is the principle that de-legitimates any form of power based on the superiority of those who govern. Hence the fear, and consequently the hatred, of democracy amongst the new powers that be.  HATRED OF DEMOCRACY rediscovers the ever-new and subversive power of the democratic idea.

To buy the book in the U.K:
http://www.bookdepository.co.uk/book/9781844673865/Hatred-of-Democracy
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Hatred-Democracy-Jacques-Ranci%C3%A8re/dp/1844673863/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1264006391&sr=1-2

To buy the book in the U.S:
http://www.amazon.com/Hatred-Democracy-Jacques-Ranci%C3%A8re/dp/1844673863/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1264000236&sr=8-1

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THE FUTURE OF THE IMAGE

Published 23 February 2009

978-1-84467-297-4 / Paperback /$16.95 /£9.99 /152 pages

The leading theorist of the art-world – the adjective ‘Rancierian’ is already in use –returns with his bestselling manifesto on the relationship between art and politics, now in paperback.

To buy the book in the U.K.:
http://www.bookdepository.co.uk/book/9781844672974/The-Future-of-the-Image  
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Future-Image-Jacques-Ranciere/dp/1844672972/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1264006443&sr=1-1

To buy the book in the U.S:
http://www.amazon.com/Future-Image-2009-paperback/dp/1844672972/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1264000279&sr=1-1

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com