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SALVAGE

SALVAGE

SALVAGE

Salvage is a new quarterly magazine of politics, arts, culture and polemic. But magazines don’t come cheap…

For Issue 1 we’re asking for your help. For more information visit:

Salvage: https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/salvage–3

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Issue 1 featuring Laura Oldfield Ford, Trish Kahle, Magpie Corvid, Rosie Warren, Joana Ramiro, Benjamin Kunkel, Alberto Toscano, Neil Davidson, China Mieville and more.

£10 / ISSN 2058-6361 / 1st May 2015

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The crisis of capitalism has been a crisis of its opposition. We stand in the rubble of the post-Left. The implosion has brought no victors but the predators…

With the financial crisis of 2008, it appeared to many that the neoliberal project would finally be laid to rest. The early signs – from Iceland to Greece, the Arab uprisings to Occupy – pointed to a renewed and reinvigorated left with the potential to break free from the ossified dogmas of the past and challenge the economic and political orthodoxy. Yet, seven years later and the neoliberal corpse staggers on while the Left, notwithstanding a few real glimmers of embattled hope, such as Syriza’s victory, lurches from one catastrophe to the next

Salvage Magazine is a new quarterly magazine of politics, art, culture and polemic aimed to debris neoliberalism. Founded in 2014 by Editors Rosie Warren and Jamie Allinson, Art Editor China Miéville, and Contributing Editors Richard Seymour, Charlotte Bence and Magpie Corvid, Salvage has drawn inspiration from the rise of intellectually, politically and culturally engaged publications on both sides of the Atlantic in the past decade,including Jacobin, Strike, n+1, New Inquiry and The White Review. ‘Intellectual and committed without being academic, dogmatic or philistine – and believing that serious content deserves the best design – its aim is to engage with the most pressing political and cultural questions of the day while advancing engagement and discussion on the left

Stridently internationalist and fearlessly political, Salvage issue 1 will feature a range of new and established writers, poets, activists and artists. It will include essays from some of the biggest names on the left: Magpie Corvid whores Marxism; Joana Ramiro reports from Greece; Jamie Allinson accelerates; Benjamin Kunkel defends the money-form; Rosie Warren objectifies women; China Miéville waxes Dystopian; Richard Seymour dissects Farrageism; Trish Kahle damns Missouri; Pablo Mukherjee submerges Modi; Alberto Toscano translates the forgotten genius of Salvage-Marxism; Kunle Wizeman is interviewed about the Nigerian political scene; Neil Davidson uncovers the Neoliberal gravediggers of capital; Morgan Merteuil builds the industrial struggle; Gareth Brown and Nicholas Beuret walk with the dead; Mark Bould roasts Milton Friedman; Mary Robertson rehouses Engels; Daniel Hartley communizes the Anthropocene.

With the poetry of:

Caitlin Doherty

Kunle Wizeman

With the artwork of:

Season Butler

Karen Mirza

Laura Oldfield Ford

With future projects by:

Jordan/a Rosenberg, Rob Knox, Charlotte Bence and many more.

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Of the £10,000:

£5000 will go on our first print run

£800 will pay our writers and artists

£3000 will pay our designer, Rupa, our accountant, Sylvia, and our videographer, Becky.

£1000 will pay the wages for a part-time admin assistant, John, at London living wage

£200 will pay for tote bags and merchandise

Anything we raise above £10,000 will help to pay for our launch and future events, and allow us to subsidise the next print run so that we can sell Salvage at the lowest price possible.

 

We will give you things for your donations.

 

£10 gets you

the first issue of Salvage & named thanks on our website

 

£15 gets you

the first issue of Salvage & named thanks on our website

& a tote bag

 

£20 gets you

the first issue of Salvage & named thanks on the website

& your issue signed & personalised by the founders

 

£25 gets you

the first issue of Salvage & named thanks on the website

& your issue signed & personalised by the founders

& a tote bag

 

£35 gets you

the first issue of Salvage & named thanks on the website

& your issue signed & personalised by the founders

& a tote bag

& a Salvage keyring

 

£60 gets you

the first issue of Salvage & named thanks on the website

& your issue signed & personalised by the founders

& a tote bag

& Salvage keyring

& named thanks on the inside

& a one year subscription to Salvage (four issues)

 

£150 gets you

(x 50)

The first issue of Salvage & named thanks on the website

& your issue signed & personalised by the founders

& a tote bag

& named thanks on the inside

& lifetime subscription to Salvage

or

(x 3)

The first issue of Salvage & named thanks on the website

& your issue signed & personalised by the founders

& a tote bag

& named thanks on the inside

& a one year subscription to Salvage (four issues)

& one of three dirty stories written by Magpie Corvid written for and about YOU

 

£300 gets you (x 3)

the first issue of Salvage & named thanks on the website

& your issue signed & personalised by the founders

& a tote bag

& named thanks on the inside

& a one year subscription to Salvage (four issues)

& one advance copy of Three Moments of an Explosion, China Miéville’s forthcoming short-story collection (publishing in July 2015)

 

£1000 gets you (x 1)

the first issue of Salvage & named thanks on the website

& your issue signed & personalised by the founders

& a tote bag

& named thanks on the inside

& a one year subscription to Salvage (four issues)

& a one-of-a-kind copy of the Subterranean Press limited edition of Perdido Street Station personally ‘Salvaged’ by China Miéville

 

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/salvage-new-magazine-of-left-politics-art-culture-looking-for-funding

Salvaging, Steven Wilson: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gl2OJe5TwdQ

Salvage Too

Salvage Too

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

 

 

THE GLASS FORTRESS

THE GLASS FORTRESS

THE GLASS FORTRESS

A free adaptation of Zamyatin’s prospective novel “We”, this concept album will take you in the wake of D–503 and I–330, two freedom-and-passion loving people.

A Dystopia tinged with Revolutionary Romanticism, first of its kind.

Album available from January 15th 2015

 

Rémi Orts

Brave New World, 1984, The Wall, Equilibrium and more recently The Hunger Games, modern culture is haunted by the spectre of extremely well-organized societies whose apparent perfection conceals dark dictatorial worlds.

If this formal exercise is known to all, what is the intimate origin, the true source of its inspiration?
In fact, everything comes from a small Russian sci-fi novel published in 1920 by Yevgeny Zamyatin, “We “.

Rémi Orts Project and Alan B wish to pay tribute to this counter-utopia, first of its kind, by revisiting it in their concept album, “The Glass Fortress”.

Let yourself be taken in the wake of Daniel and Iris, two human beings opposed in every way, that nonetheless will rejoin in the same destiny, the choice of Life, even at their own peril…

Adapted from this album, a short film, innovative and moving, will be released in April 2015 with the collaboration of the talented photographer, Fanny Storck.

Lyrics : Alan B
Music : Rémi Orts
Photos : Fanny Storck
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cPuAwNUSLI8&list=PL5KtMvKvWwKDcTibMWVLeKg5YoHuCsZZ-&index=1

See: http://www.remiorts.com/index.php/albums-remiorts/41-remi-project/96-the-glass-fortress

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Social Imaginaries

Social Imaginaries

SOCIAL IMAGINARIES

A NEW JOURNAL AT: http://www.zetabooks.com/journals/social-imaginaries.html

Issue 1 (May, 2015)

 

Table of Contents (with Abstracts)

 

1. Editorial by the Social Imaginaries Editorial Collective

 

2Social Imaginaries in Debate by Suzi Adams, Paul Blokker, Natalie J Doyle, John Krummel, and Jeremy C A Smith

Investigations into social imaginaries have burgeoned in recent years. From ‘the capitalist imaginary’ to the ‘democratic imaginary’, from the ‘ecological imaginary’ to ‘the global imaginary’ – and beyond – the social imaginaries field has expanded across disciplines and beyond the academy. The recent debates on social imaginaries and potential new imaginaries reveal a recognisable field and paradigm-in-the-making. We argue that Castoriadis, Ricoeur, and Taylor have articulated the most important theoretical frameworks for understanding social imaginaries, although the field as a whole remains heterogeneous. We further argue that the notion of social imaginaries draws on the modern understanding of the imagination as authentically creative (as opposed to imitative). We contend that an elaboration of social imaginaries involves a significant, qualitative shift in the understanding of societies as collectively and politically-(auto)instituted formations that are irreducible to inter-subjectivity or systemic logics. After marking out the contours of the field and recounting a philosophical history of the imagination (including deliberations on the reproductive and creative imaginations, as well as consideration of contemporary Japanese contributions), the essay turns to debates on social imaginaries in more concrete contexts, specifically political-economic imaginaries, the ecological imaginary, multiple modernities and their inter-civilisational encounters. The social imaginaries field imparts powerful messages for the human sciences and wider publics. In particular, social imaginaries hold significant implications for ontological, phenomenological and philosophical anthropological questions; for the cultural, social, and political horizons of contemporary worlds; and for ecological and economic phenomena (including their manifest crises). The essay concludes with the argument that social imaginaries as a paradigm-in-the-making offers valuable  means by which movements towards social change can be elucidated as well providing  an open horizon for the critiques of existing social practices.

 

3. Introduction to Castoriadis’s “The Imaginary As Such” by Johann P Arnason

 

4. The Imaginary As Such by Cornelius Castoriadis (translated by Johann P Arnason)

This text is a draft introduction to a planned work on imagination in society and history. It begins with reflections on the abilities and activities that set human subjects apart from other living beings and thus at the same time enable the ongoing creation of society and history. This is to be understood as an exploration within the “order of facts”, on the level of anthropological preconditions. The most elementary precondition is the human capacity to add an “unreal extension” to reality, and thus to put the latter at a distance; considered as an activity, this is what defines the imagination, but considered as a dimension of human existence, it is the realm of the imaginary. The two concepts are strictly complementary. To clarify their role in the proposed rethinking of social-historical being, we must link them to closer analysis of the latter’s two main components, representing and doing. On both sides, Castoriadis emphasizes the imaginary element as a decisive point against empiricist and rationalist reductions. Representing is as irreducible to perception as it is to thinking, and taking the argument one step further, both perception and thinking can be shown to be dependent on the imaginary. Similarly, on the level of doing, human action can neither be understood as a response to given needs nor as an application of pre-given representations; its creative potential presupposes an imaginary horizon. Finally it is argued that language – closely related to both representing and doing- has an imaginary dimension, central to the emergence and the enduring innovative capacity of meaning. The basic flaw of structural linguistics was its refusal to take the imaginary source into account.

 

5. Introduction to Nakamura Yūjirō and his Work by John Krummel

 

6. “The Logic of Place” and Common Sense by Nakamura Yujiro (translated by John Krummel)

The essay is a written version of a talk Nakamura Yūjirō gave at the Collège International de Philosophie in Paris in 1983.  In the talk Nakamura connects the issue of common sense in his own work to that of place in Nishida Kitarō and the creative imagination in Miki Kiyoshi. He presents this connection between the notions of common sense, imagination, and place as constituting one important thread in contemporary Japanese philosophy. He begins by discussing the significance of place (basho) that is being rediscovered today in response to the shortcomings of the modern Western paradigm, and discusses it in its various senses, such as ontological ground or substratum, the body, symbolic space, and linguistic or discursive topos in ancient rhetoric. He then relates this issue to the philosophy of place Nishida developed in the late 1920s, and after providing an explication of Nishida’s theory, discusses it further in light of some linguistic and psychological theories. Nakamura goes on to discuss his own interest in the notion of common sense traceable to Aristotle and its connection to the rhetorical concept of topos, and Miki’s development of the notion of the imagination in the 1930s in response to Nishida’s theory.  And in doing so he ties all three—common sense, place, and imagination—together as suggestive of an alternative to the modern Cartesian standpoint of the rational subject that has constituted the traditional paradigm of the modern West.

 

7. Interpreting the Present – a Research Programme by Peter Wagner

Sociologists have increasingly adopted the insight that “modern societies” undergo major historical transformations; they are not stable or undergoing only smooth social change once their basic institutional structure has been established. There is even some broad agreement that the late twentieth century witnessed the most recent one of those major transformations leading into the present time – variously characterized by adding adjectives such as “reflexive”, “global” or simply “new” to modernity. However, neither the dynamics of the recent social transformation nor the characteristic features of the present social constellation have been adequately grasped yet. Rather than assuming a socio-structural or politico-institutional perspective, as they dominate in sociology and political science respectively, this article concentrates on the way in which current social practices are experienced and interpreted by the human beings who enact them as parts of a common world that they inhabit together. It will be suggested that current interpretations are shaped by the experience of the dismantling of “organized modernity” from the 1970s onwards and of the subsequent rise of a view of the world as shaped by parallel processes of “globalization” and “individualization”, signalling the erasure of historical time and lived space, during the 1990s and early 2000s. In response to these experiences, we witness today a variety of interconnected attempts at re-interpretation of modernity, aiming at re-constituting spatiality and temporality. The re-constitution of meaningful time concerns most strongly questions of historical injustice, in terms of the present significance of past oppression and exclusion and in terms of the unequal effects of the instrumental transformation of the earth in the techno-industrial trajectory of modernity. The re-constitution of meaningful space focuses on the relation between the political form of a spatially circumscribed democracy and the economic practices of expansionist capitalism as well as on the spatial co-existence of a plurality of ways of world-interpretation.

 

8. Introduction to Johann P Arnason’s “The Imaginary Dimensions of Modernity” by Suzi Adams

 

9. The Imaginary Dimensions of Modernity by Johann P Arnason (translated by Suzi Adams)

This paper discusses the formation of Castoriadis’s concept of imaginary significations and relates it to his changing readings of Marx and Weber. Castoriadis’s reflections on modern capitalism took off from the Marxian understanding of its internal contradictions, but he always had reservations about the orthodox version of this idea. His writings in the late 1950s, already critical of basic assumptions in Marx’s work, located the central contradiction in the very relationship between capital and wage labour: Labour power was not simply transformed into a commodity, as Marx had argued; rather, the instituted attempt to treat it as a commodity was a contradiction in itself, between the subjectivity and the objectification of labour. Castoriadis then moved on to link this claim to Weber’s analysis of  the interconnections between capitalism and bureaucracy. The main contradiction of modern capitalism, whether wholly bureaucratized as in the Soviet model or increasingly bureaucratized as in the West, now seemed to be a matter of  incompatible systemic imperatives: the need to control and to mobilize the workforce. Finally, difficulties with this model – and with the revolutionary expectations based on it – led to a more decisive break with classical theories and to the formulation of a bipolar image of modernity, where the vision of an autonomous society is opposed to the logic of calculation and domination, embodied in capitalist development. On both sides there is an imaginary component, irreducible to empirical givens or systemic principles. In this regard, Castoriadis remained closer to Weber than to Marx, but he also anticipated, in a distinctive way, later emphasis on the cultural dimension of modernity, and more specifically the notion of modernity as a new civilization.

 

10. Introduction to Marcel Gauchet’s “Democracy: From One Crisis to Another” by Natalie J Doyle

 

11. Democracy: From One Crisis to Another by Marcel Gauchet (translated by Natalie J Doyle)

Democracy is in crisis. This crisis is the paradoxical outcome of its triumph over its erstwhile rivals. Having prevailed over the totalitarian projects of the first half of the 20th Century it has developed in such a way that it is now undermining its original goals of individual and collective autonomy. Modern liberal democracy – the outcome of an inversion of the values of tradition, hierarchy and political incorporation – is a mixed regime. It involves three different dimensions of social existence, political, legal, historical/economic, and organizes power around these. A balance was achieved after the upheaval of World War II in the form of liberal democracy, on the basis of reforms which injected democratic political power into liberalism and controlled the new economic dynamics it had unleashed. This balance has now been lost. Political autonomy, which accompanied modern historicity and its orientation towards the future, has been overshadowed by economic activity and its pursuit of innovation. As a result, the very meaning of democracy has become impoverished. The term used to refer to the goal of self-government, it is now taken to be fully synonymous with personal freedom and the cause of human rights. The legal dimension having come to prevail over the political one, democratic societies see themselves as “political market societies”, societies that can only conceive of their existence with reference to a functional language borrowed from economics. This depoliticisation of democracy has facilitated the rise to dominance of a new form of oligarchy.

 

12. Modern Social Imaginaries: A Conversation by Craig Calhoun, Dilip Gaonkar, Benjamin Lee, Charles Taylor and Michael Warner (edited by Dilip Gaonkar)

The conversation seeks to extend and complicate Charles Taylor’s (2004) account of three constitutive formations of modern social imaginaries: market, the public sphere, and the nation-state based on popular sovereignty in two critical respects. First, it seeks to show how these key imaginaries, especially the market imaginary, are not contained and sealed within autonomous spheres. They are portable and they often leak into domains beyond the ones in which they originate. Second, it seeks to identify and explore the new incipient and/or emergent imaginaries vying for recognition and demanding consideration in the constitution (as well as analysis) of contemporary social life, such as the risk-reward entrepreneurial culture.

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Vampyrica John-Paul Van-Huysse

Vampyrica
John-Paul Van-Huysse

SUBREALISM

Subrealism:  One Day Conference on Ettingerian Studies, Friday 10 October 2014, Aula Maxima, Maynooth University, National University of Ireland

Details: http://subrealismtheworkofbrachalichtenbergettinger.wordpress.com/conference/

This one-day conference features invited presentations on recent shifts in Ettingerian studies focusing particularly on gender studies, sexuality studies, queer theory, literature, ethics, aesthetics, art practice, psychoanalytic practice, political science  and philosophy.

 

For information on the work of Bracha L. Ettinger, see:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bracha_L._Ettinger

http://www.mamsie.bbk.ac.uk/documents/Giffney_Mulhall_ORourke.pdf

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Bracha-L-Ettinger/46707662527

 

For more on Speculative Realism see Michael O’Rourke’s introduction, Specrealisms, at Academia: https://www.academia.edu/9566568/Specrealisms

 

CONFERENCE SCHEDULE

Session 1: 10.00-11.15am

Graham Price: ‘Deconstruction and the Art-Encounter-Event’

Moynagh Sullivan: ‘An Ear to the Earth’:Matrixial Gazing in Tim Robinson’s Walk-Art-Text Practice’

Tea Break: 11.15-11.30am

Session 2: 11.30am-12.45pm

Noirin MacNamara: ‘Matrixial Theory and la démocratie à-venir’

Michael O’Rourke: ‘Specrealisms’

Lunch: 12.45-1.45pm

Session 3: 1.45-3.15pm

Medb Ruane: ‘Writing Art, Talking Psychoanalysis: sketches from a Bracha Ettinger notebook’

Paula McCloskey: ‘Artificial intelligence, art and affect: Exploring the matrixial possibilities in Micha Cárdenas Becoming-Dragon and Lise Autogena and Joshua Portway, Black Shoals Stock Market Planetarium’

Elena Marchevska: ‘The last place where we were together…’

Tea Break: 3.15-3.45pm

Session 4: 3.45-5.00pm

Dimitra Douskos: ‘Translating into French, translating into language’

Tina Kinsella: ‘Surrealism to Subrealism’

Aesthetics

Aesthetics

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Russell Brand

Russell Brand

THE READING AGENCY LECTURE 2014: RUSSELL BRAND

Russell Brand to give The Reading Agency Lecture

Russell Brand will deliver The Reading Agency Lecture on 25 November 2014, 7.00-8.00pm.

See: http://readingagency.org.uk/news/media/russell-brand-to-give-the-reading-agency-lecture.html

The Reading Agency Lecture will take place in The Logan Hall at the Institute of Education, 20 Bedford Way, London WC1H 0AL

You can buy tickets for the lecture from Eventbrite.

Tickets are priced at £20 and £10 for concessions (under 24s).

The lecture was initiated by The Reading Agency in 2012. It aims to provide a platform for leading writers and thinkers to share original, challenging ideas about the future of reading in the UK.

Russell Brand will deliver ‘a manifesto on reading’ which will be in part personal, sharing his own experience of books and reading while growing up in the UK; and it will be in part as a public figure, sharing his views on the status of reading and storytelling in our national culture and why reading is important for young people – especially boys – in the UK today.

Russell Brand says:

“Writing is the most intimate medium. Right there in the brain, in the swamp of fear and desire. I like splashing about in there, stirring up sediment, doing the breaststroke. In this lecture I will try and drag this metaphor out for an hour.”

Further information: http://readingagency.org.uk/adults/get-involved/002-events/russell-brand-a-manifesto-on-reading.html

‘The Bookseller’: http://www.thebookseller.com/news/russell-brand-give-reading-agency-lecture

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.co.uk

 

Glenn Rikowski’s latest paper, Crises in Education, Crises of Education – can now be found at Academia: http://www.academia.edu/8953489/Crises_in_Education_Crises_of_Education

Glenn Rikowski’s article, Education, Capital and the Transhuman – can also now be found at Academia: https://www.academia.edu/9033532/Education_Capital_and_the_Transhuman

Philosophy and Romanticism

Philosophy and Romanticism

ROMANTIC REMAINS

 

MICHAEL NICHOLSON (CHAIR)

SPECIAL SESSION – NASSR 2015

North American Society for the Study of Romanticism

 

Remain(s):

To be left behind after the removal, use, or destruction of some part, number, or quantity.

To continue in the same place or with the same person; to abide, to stay.

The survivors of a war, battle, or other destructive event.

A relic of some obsolete custom or practice; a surviving trait or characteristic.

A part or the parts of a person’s body after death; a corpse.

The literary works or fragments (esp. the unpublished ones) left by an author after death

[OED]

 

Romantic culture’s most familiar rhetorics of revolution are progressive, teleological, messianic, and apocalyptic. Building upon the etymology of the term “remain(s)” as a term that denotes survival and persistence as much as death and decay, “Romantic Remains” will consider the whole range of “remain(s)” in relation to “rights” (political, cultural, literary, scientific, environmental, corporeal, and otherwise). This panel will therefore theorize the era’s less critically prominent forms of protest such as stasis, resistance, delay, disappearance, survival, and/or endurance. In a moment whose most prominent poetic works, embodied individual lives, and grand political narratives focus on vigor, life, growth, evolution, and development — Wordsworth’s “Bliss was it in that dawn to be alive,” Barbauld’s “Little Invisible Being Who is Expected Soon to Become Visible,” and Shelley’s “Life, Joy, Empire, and Victory”—who or what gets left behind? What radical possibilities lie on the other side of Romanticism’s forward thinkingforms of enthusiasm, passion, utopianism, and optimism?

As the necessary consequence of works such as Wordsworth’s Tintern Abbey and Volney’s Ruins, Romantic critics have always taken an interest in Europe’s physical remains. Yet in our present moment of environmental catastrophe and ruin, a diverse array of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century scholars have drawn new attention to the possibilities and anxieties of contingent, biodegradable, unhurried, and uncertain forms of existence and aesthetics: Kevis Goodman and Jonathan Sachs (slow time), Jonathan Bate and James C. McKusick (Romantic ecology and green writing), Paul Fry (ontological radicalism), Anahid Nersessian (nescience), Anne-Lise François (recessive agency), Timothy Morton (dark ecology), and Jacques Khalip (anonymity and dispossession). In its focus on natural rhythms, formal omissions, and vanishing acts rather than developmental narratives or confident subjects, this panel will turn toward a critique of the idea that Romanticism always proceeds though rapid movement and productive presence. With this end in mind, we will study the period’s conservationist energies in the realms of ontology, politics, and aesthetics—how the positions of remaining behind, moving slowly, and entirely disappearing often allowed Romantic writers to contest the excesses of an increasingly accelerating age focused on imperial expansion, economic development, and sociocultural improvement.

Papers may consider “Romantic Remains” in relation to a wide range of formal, historical, theoretical, and critical concerns, that might include:

–necromanticism / material remains: corpses, ruins, relics, residues, wastes, wrecks, dust, rubble, and debris

–formal remains: elegies, epitaphs, scraps, elisions, gaps, fragments, caesurae, ellipses, and repetitions

–biological / natural processes: decomposition, defilement, deterioration, erosion, putrefaction, and decay

–the poetics of nostalgia / memory and ephemerality / forgetting

–outmoded, suspended, superseded, and left over genres, modes, and personae

–spatial remains: localism, dispossession, immovability, and immobility

–temporal remains: anachronism, haunting, and gradualism

–textual / authorial negotiations of invisibility, abjection, anonymity, disappearance, obscurity, and reanimation

–memorialization and categories of identity such as gender, race, class, sexuality, and disability

–biodegradable / sustainable aesthetics

–scientific and antiquarian analyses of extinction, rebirth, evolution, and survival

–the ruins of Romantic criticism and theory / the remains of Romantic literary history / the afterlives of Romantic writing

 

General Call for Papers: http://nassr2015.wordpress.com/cfp/

Special Sessions Call for Papers: http://nassr2015.wordpress.com/sessions/

 

GENERAL CALL FOR PAPERS:

North American Society for the Study of Romanticism (NSSR)

The 23rd Annual NASSR Conference Winnipeg, Manitoba, August 13-16, 2015

Sponsored by University of Manitoba and The University of Winnipeg, NASSR 2015 will meet at the historic Fort Garry Hotel near The Forks in downtown Winnipeg, Manitoba, from August 13 to 16, 2015.

The theme of the conference is “Romanticism & Rights,” broadly construed to include:

  • Human Rights (racial, indigenous, economic; right to freedom and autonomy [slavery])
  • Animal Rights; Natural Rights, Nature’s rights (the environment)
  • Sexual Rights (alternative genders, women’s rights, procreative rights)
  • Author or Authorial Rights (intellectual property, copyright)
  • State/Sovereign Rights
  • Children’s Rights
  • Right to be heard; Freedom of Speech
  • The Right to Philosophy / Thinking
  • Right to Religion
  • Rights and Wrongs
  • The Right to Die
  • What is left of Rights?

For information on the 2015 NASSR call for papers, including special sessions, click on the “Call for Papers” menu item above.
Conference Co-Chairs:
Michelle Faubert, University of Manitoba
Peter Melville, The University of Winnipeg

Conference Committee:
Linda Dietrick, The University of Winnipeg
Murray Evans, The University of Winnipeg
Joshua D. Lambier, Western University
Dana Medoro, University of Manitoba
Pam Perkins, University of Manitoba
Kathryn Ready, The University of Winnipeg
Armelle St. Martin, University of Manitoba
Contact NASSR 2015: nassr15@umanitoba.ca

NASSR Main Website: http://publish.uwo.ca/~nassr/

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.co.uk

 

Glenn Rikowski’s latest paper, Crises in Education, Crises of Education – can now be found at Academia: http://www.academia.edu/8953489/Crises_in_Education_Crises_of_Education

 

Glenn Rikowski’s article, Education, Capital and the Transhuman – can also now be found at Academia: https://www.academia.edu/9033532/Education_Capital_and_the_Transhuman

Vampyrica John-Paul Van-Huysse

Vampyrica
John-Paul Van-Huysse

VAMPYRICA

A NOVEL BY JOHN-PAUL VAN-HUYSSE

 

Vampyrica: Sometimes fantasy can be fatal

Paperback: 274 pages

Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (27 Oct 2014)

Language: English

ISBN-10: 1503003434

ISBN-13: 978-1503003439

 

Also available on Kindle

Vampyrs are very real. Not the undead creatures of legend but real men and women drawn together by their shared fascination with the sensual and erotic activity of blood drinking. They’re everywhere, including the small university town of Midhampton where Vicky and her new best friend Keith have just moved. But the Vampyrica are into more than just kinky games, led by the mysterious D there is a plan in place and, unfortunately for Vicky and Keith, it revolves around local students. Vicky and Keith, along with their tutor Professor Fathon are soon caught up in the fatal fantasy. How do they face somebody like D and his minions? And what if they come across the vampyr Eve, for whom the Vampyrica is no longer an erotic club but an inescapable trap?

At Amazon.co.uk: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Vampyrica-Sometimes-fantasy-can-fatal/dp/1503003434/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1415742981&sr=1-1

At Amazon.com: http://www.amazon.com/Vampyrica-Sometimes-fantasy-can-fatal/dp/1503003434/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1415743749&sr=1-1

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.co.uk

Education Crisis

Education Crisis

LOOKING FOR THE PROLETARIAT

Looking for the Proletariat : Socialisme ou Barbarie and the Problem of Worker Writing

By Stephen Hastings-King

Looking for the Proletariat is a contribution to understanding the implosion of the Marxist Imaginary. The implosion is staged in terms of the first English-language history of the French revolutionary group Socialisme ou Barbarie from 1949 to 1957. It explains why Socialisme ou Barbarie was the only Marxist organization interested by worker experience and how the group’s anti-Leninist position on organization led it to privilege first-person worker narratives in order to understand worker experience and its revolutionary possibilities. Using the only first-person accounts of working-class experience in French industry of the 1950s, the book explores the disintegration of collective investment in the Marxist Imaginary that unfolded at Renault’s Billancourt factory in the aftermath of the Hungarian Revolution and the contexts that shaped it.

See: http://www.brill.com/products/book/looking-proletariat

First published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/new-from-brills-historical-materialism-book-series-looking-for-the-proletariat-by-stephen-hastings-king

 

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Aesthetics

Aesthetics

THE MEDES

the medes is a volunteer collective of academic writers, artists, photographers and videographers advocating for social change

About

the medes [thəmēds]

We are an online multimedia publication that seeks to bring honest reporting and emotive art together through innovative media to promote social equality within our community.

Founded in Denver, Colorado in early 2012, the medes is a project of the nonprofit organization, Media Action Network (MAN) and was originally started out of frustration with the lack of coverage in mainstream media on the myriad of social justice issues facing our communities today.

We are run entirely by a volunteer collective. This collective consists of a wide-variety of contributors: writers, researchers, graphic designers, artists, photographers, and videographers. By blending the academic pursuit of social equality with artistic ability, we focus on social justice both from a written and visual perspective. We seek to bring awareness to the gamut of issues – including many in the human rights and environmental categories – which receive little to no attention through conventional media outlets.

the medes is run entirely on volunteer time and donation dollars.  If you would like to be a part of this effort in any form other MAN projects, please visit our contact page or our donate page.

the medes: http://themedes.org/

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Knowledge

Knowledge

STUDENTSHIPS IN ENGLISH LITERATURE, CULTURAL STUDIES AND DRAMA

The School of the Arts, English and Drama at Loughborough University invites applications from outstanding current M.A. students to undertake research for the degree of PhD.

Two fully funded PhD studentships are available in the Department of English and Drama. The Department offers an exciting interdisciplinary research environment and we welcome the submission of high-quality proposals focusing on topics related to literary and cultural studies, creative writing, publishing and scholarly communication, linguistics, drama, theatre and performance studies.

The studentships will be paid for a period of up to three years, starting in October 2014, and will cover tuition fees at the UK/EU rate, and provide a tax-free stipend of £13,863. Please note that studentships are open to UK/EU students only.

For further details of the Department’s current research and information about how to apply please go to: http://www.lboro.ac.uk/departments/english-drama/postgraduate-research/newphdstudentshipsannounced/

Please note that the deadline for applications is Monday 2 June 2014.

Initial queries should be sent to Dr Jenny Fry (j.fry@lboro.ac.uk) <mailto:j.fry@lboro.ac.uk>) or Mrs C.J. Flynn (C.J.Flynn-Ryan@lboro.ac.uk) <mailto:C.J.Flynn-Ryan@lboro.ac.uk>).

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Nietzsche

Nietzsche

TRISTANO

By Nanni Balestrini

——————-

This book is unique as no other novel can claim to be: one of 109,027,350,432,000 possible variations of the same work of fiction. A love story with infinite possibilities

AVAILABLE NOW: http://www.versobooks.com/books/1518-tristano

——————-

Inspired by the legend of Tristan and Isolde, Tristano was first published in 1966 in Italian. But only recently has digital technology made it possible to realize the author’s original vision. The novel comprises ten chapters, and the fifteen pairs of paragraphs in each of these are shuffled anew for each published copy. No two versions are the same. The random variations between copies enact the variegations of the human heart, as exemplified by the lovers at the center of the story.

The copies of the English translation of Tristano are individually numbered, starting from 10,000 (running sequentially from the Italian and German editions). Included is a foreword by Umberto Eco explaining how Balestrini’s experiment with the physical medium of the novel demonstrates ‘that originality and creativity are nothing more than the chance handling of a combination’.

——————-
Read Nanni Balestrini’s interview with Lizzy Davies in THE GUARDIAN here
http://www.theguardian.com/books/2014/feb/13/nanni-balestrini-tristano-novel-technology

——————-

“The emotional highs and lows of the story are all the more touching for being framed within Balestrini’s subtle, understated language.” – Juliet Jacques, NEW STATESMAN

http://www.newstatesman.com/culture/2014/02/nanni-balestrinis-tristano-love-story-100-trillion-possible-plotlines

“Balestrini’s experiment focuses on attacking the twin myths of the creative genius and culture as property.” – RHIZOME

“Goodbye Gutenberg. Many alternative ways of spreading the adventure of literature are emerging. This exercise by Balestrini is absolutely central.” – LA STAMPA

“Finally the historical impasse between literature and new media… turns into an opportunity to create something radically new.” – Aldo Nove, IL SOLE 24 ORE

“Balestrini has created with Tristano a kind of poetry of the language … promoting language to the role of protagonist, that is of hero, and where in traditional novels language voices the hero’s thoughts and actions, in this new Tristano language voices itself and celebrates its wide number of opportunities and movements.” – Angelo Guglielmi, L’UNITA

“The most impressive feat of publishing in ages.” – BLACKWELL’S OXFORD

——————-

Nanni Balestrini was born in Milan in 1935 and was a member of the influential avant-garde Gruppo 63, along with Umberto Eco and Eduardo Sanguineti. He is the author of numerous volumes of poetry, including ‘Blackout’ and ‘Ipocalisse’, and novels such as ‘Tristano’, ‘Vogliamo Tutto’, and ‘La Violenza Illustrata’.

During the notorious mass arrests of writers and activists associated with Autonomy, which began in 1979, Balestrini was charged with membership of an armed organization and with subversive association. He went underground to avoid arrest and fled to France. As in so many other cases, no evidence was provided and he was acquitted of all the charges.

He currently lives in Rome, where he runs the monthly magazine of cultural intervention ‘Alfabeta2’ with Umberto Eco and others.

——————-

Paperback, 128 pages / ISBN: 9781781681695 / February 2014 / $25.00 / £14.99 / $28.00CAN

To learn more about TRISTANO and to purchase the book visit  http://www.versobooks.com/books/1518-tristano

——————-

Visit Verso’s website for information on our upcoming events, new reviews and publications and special offers: http://www.versobooks.com

Become a fan of Verso on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/VersoBks

And get updates on Twitter too! http://twitter.com/VersoBooks

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: http://independent.academic.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Culture

Culture

ENERGY, ENVIRONMENT, CULTURE – CALL FOR PAPERS

The Institute on Culture and Society: The Banff Centre for the Arts — June 13-17, 2014

The Institute on Culture and Society (ICS) invites the submission of papers on topics related to Marxism, critical theory, and Marxist views of literature. Submissions are welcome from all humanities and social scientific perspectives. Full submission details can be found at the end of this call.

Supplementing an ongoing engagement with Marxism, ICS 2014 welcomes submissions on this year’s special topic: “Energy, Environment, Culture” (EEC). This topic aims to facilitate discussion that moves beyond standard disputes over energy politics in Canada in order to develop sophisticated knowledge about the global relations, ecological realities, social reproduction, and community impacts of energy.

From debates on harnessing wind and solar power to the environmental effects of the tar sands, energy and power have a complex and under theorized connection to culture, politics, and society. Energy is understood in economic terms as the name for an input into market activity that can take a variety of forms and which is necessary for steady-state growth. In environmental thought, too, energy serves as a placeholder for a range of activities, practices and objects with inconsistent theoretical and scientific content. In both cases, energy is seen as fundamental to social life, even if the depth of its significance to the operations of society, and its role in implementing and maintaining particular sets of relationships across diverse communities, is poorly understood. What insights can Marxism lend ecology? Further, what insights can a Marxist-Feminist political economy develop in ecological thought? Approaching these problematics from a humanities perspective, we suggest innovative workshop, panel, and paper proposals on any of the following:

Energy and Globalization
 – regional economies, energy distribution, and the political climate of international markets
– the transnational and global relationship between eastern, western and northern economies in Canada vis-à-vis Pacific and Southern American partners and cultures
– cultural symptoms of energy and globalization or internationalism
– cultural and environmental interactions in energy intensive regions
– the interregional and provincial flows created by energy infrastructures and cultural development

Energy and Ecology
– updates to the established approach to energetics
– “New Materialisms” and the renewed interest in non-human agency in ecological research
– redirections of familiar environment vs. economy binary
– the diverse materialisms that link economics, energy, and ecology

Ecology and Marxist Feminism
 – practical, community- driven knowledges about energy systems and sustainability
– primitive accumulation (as an ongoing process coterminous with capital accumulation), gender, and the environment
– the work of Mariarosa Dalla Costa, Maria Mies and Silvia Federici
– capitalism, gender, and ecology
– social reproduction and/as energy
– the new work on gender and reproduction coming out in the journals Endnotes and Lies

ICS is run in consecutive sessions to encourage a developing conversation and increase potential research outputs and collaboration. Toward this end, participants are strongly encouraged to stay for the entirety of the conference. Significant subsidies will be available to graduate students and the underemployed.

We welcome submissions of papers, panels, pecha kucha presentations, roundtables, reading groups, and more. Please submit proposals of no more than 400 words in length, including title and affiliation, to mlgics2014@gmail.com. Panel or roundtable proposals should be introduced by a 100 word rational. If geared towards a specific stream, submissions should indicate which stream it most strongly relates to.

All submissions must be received by the 14th of March, 2014.

Please let us know if you would be interested in having childcare arranged.

The Banff Centre is a world-renowned facility supporting the creation and performance of new works of visual art, music, dance, theatre, and writing.

ICS 2014 is sponsored by ARIEL, Mediations, Reviews in Cultural Theory, the Marxist Literary Group, The University of Alberta (U of A) Faculty of Arts, U of A English and Film Studies, U of A Kule Institute for Advanced Study, ConcordiaUniversity, St. Francis Xavier, YorkUniversity, and the Banff Centre.

 

The Banff Centre: http://www.banffcentre.ca/

 

**END**

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: https://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski