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Education Not for Sale

Education Not for Sale

DEMOCRACY AND DECENCY: WHAT DOES EDUCATION HAVE TO DO WITH IT?

CALL FOR CHAPTER PROPOSALS

FOR A BOOK ENTITLED

DEMOCRACY AND DECENCY: WHAT DOES EDUCATION HAVE TO DO WITH IT?

EDITORS: PAUL R. CARR, P. L. THOMAS, BRAD PORFILIO & JUIE GORLEWSKI

PUBLISHER: INFORMATION AGE PUBLISHING

Democracy can mean a range of concepts, including freedoms, rights, elections, governments, processes, philosophies and a panoply of abstract and concrete notions that can be mediated by power, positionality, culture, time and space.

Democracy can also be translated into brute force, hegemony, docility, compliance and conformity, as in wars will be decided on the basis of the needs of elites, or major decisions about spending finite resources will be the domain of the few over the masses, or people will be divided along the lines of race, ethnicity, class, religion, etc. because it is advantageous for maintaining exploitative political systems in place to do so. Often, these frameworks are developed and reified based on the notion that elections give the right to societies, or segment of societies, to install regimes, institutions and operating systems that are then supposedly legitimated and rendered infinitely just simply because formal power resides in the hands of those dominating forces.

The book is interested in advancing a critical analysis of the hegemonic paradigm described above, one that seeks higher levels of political literacy and consciousness, and one that makes the connection with education. What does education have to do with democracy? How does education shape, influence, impinge on, impact, negate, facilitate and/or change the context, contours and realities of democracy? How can we teach for and about democracy to alter and transform the essence of what democracy is, and, importantly, what it should be? We are particularly interested in the notion of decency in relation to democracy, and underpinned by forms of meaningful, critically-engaged education.

Is it enough to be kind, nice, generous and hopeful when we can also see signs of rampant, entrenched and debilitating racism, sexism, poverty, violence, injustice, war and other social inequalities? If democracy is intended to be alegitimating force for good, how does education inform democracy? What types of knowledge,experience, analysis and being are helpful to bring about newer, more meaningful and socially just forms of democracy?

Some of the themes to be explored might include:

  • peace, peace education and democracy
  • media, media literacy and democracy
  • pedagogy and education for democracy
  • curriculum and education for democracy
  • race, anti-racist education and democracy
  • poverty, class and education for democracy
  • environment and ecology within the context of democracy and education
  • the meaning of kindness in relation to democracy and education
  • what is decency within the context of democracy and education?

If you are interested in submitting a chapter, please submit the following to paul.thomas@furman.edu  by September 30, 2014:

[1] a 400-word summary of your proposal, including:

Title

Focus and research questions

The connection to the subject of the book

The theoretical and/or conceptual framework

The major themes to be explored

Other pertinent information

[2] 8 keywords for the chapter

[3] a 100-word biography for each author

 

Process:

Call for Proposals (August 25, 2014)

Receive Proposals (September 30, 2014)3)

Communicate with contributors regarding decision on proposals (October 15, 2014)

First complete draft of 5,000 words due (January 15, 2015)

Comments from editors regarding first draft to contributors (Februrary 15, 2015)

Final complete draft due to editors (April 1, 2015)

Review by editors, and follow-up with contributors (May 1, 2015)

Liaison with publisher for final editing and proofing (May 15, 2015)

Publication (Summer 2015)

 

For all other inquiries about this book, please contact Paul R. Carr at prcarr@gmail.co

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Heather Brown

Heather Brown

MARXISM AND FEMINISM: WAS MARX A ‘CLASS DETERMINIST’?

MARX ON GENDER AND THE FAMILY: A CRITICAL STUDY

Marx on Gender and the Family: A Critical Study
By Heather A. Brown
Haymarket Books, 2013
232 pp.

Review by Barry Healy

September 1, 2014 – Links International Journal of Socialist Renewal – http://links.org.au/node/4028

For the most part the Marxist movement has a had a troubled relationship with the women’s liberation movement. While some Marxists (such as those organised in Australia’s Socialist Alliance) have no problem with feminism, others have choked on the thought of a rebellious movement that does not fit neatly into their paradigm of a workers-led revolution.

It was not always so. Between 1917 and 1927, the heyday of the Russian Revolution, the Soviet government passed many laws to give equality between men and women. For example, abortion became free and legal and anti-homosexual laws were repealed.

After the degeneration of the revolution into Stalinism things became very different. As Leon Trotsky put it, the bureaucracy “began singing panegyrics to the family supper and the family laundry, that is, the household slavery of women”.

Capital punishment was restored for abortion, thus, Trotsky said, “returning women to the status of pack animals”.

In lock-step, the world’s self-described communist parties, the most powerful left segments of the working class, advanced reactionary ideas about women’s place in the world and the revolutionary movement. Women were to be auxiliaries to male revolutionaries, they said, and bountiful mothers within happy families.

Stalinism promised a sort of “trickle down” socialism. First the (male) workers would benefit, then others. Unfortunately, some Trotskyists, in their anxiety to be more “pro-worker” than the Stalinists adapted versions of that approach.

Was Marx a class determinist?

Given all that, various feminist thinkers have had an, at best, ambiguous relationship with Marxism. Some have woven elements of Marxism together with, say, psychoanalytical theory to overcome what they see as Karl Marx’s, at best, gender blindness. They erected an alternative theory of patriarchy, which stands timelessly above society, dictating the unfolding of history.

To what extent can this conflict be attributed to Karl Marx himself? Was his a dour vision of human liberation where stalwart, proletarian men would achieve socialism and, under their paternal gaze, women and others would then step forward to take control of their own destinies?

US socialist Heather Brown has performed a great service in this short, yet detailed survey of all of Marx’s writings on women and gender – including some that have never before been published in any language. Marx did not just analyse economics and history, she demonstrates, he interrogated all forms of literature (even police files) to tease out the threads of social oppression.

She asks if there is “the possibility of a Marxist feminism that does not lapse into economic determinism or privilege class over gender in analysing contemporary capitalist society?” She compares and contrasts Marx with a wide range of feminist writers, and says that there is enough in Marx indicating “the interdependent relationship between class and gender without fundamentally privileging either in his analysis”.

While Marx was a product of his Victorian times and never developed an explicitly unified theory on women’s liberation, she shows that throughout his life he thought about the matter. Based on this, Brown argues that “there are a number of potential starting points for a less deterministic and less gender-blind form of Marxism”.

The diverse — and surprising — nuggets that Brown has unearthed reveal that Marx’s thoughts have a refreshingly modern feel. She demonstrates that as he evolved as a thinker his insights became more penetrating. Moreover, he incorporated his ideas into his political activity.

Early writings

Marx was contemporary with other socialists who thought that women are naturally inferior to men. However, from his earliest writings, Marx dismissed the entire notion that “nature” is static. In his 1844 Economic and Philosophical Manuscripts he pointed out that nature and culture are dialectically linked and mutually condition each other.

More than that, the Manuscripts say that the position of women can be used as a measure of the development of a given society. He was not calling for men to liberate women, he was arguing that in going beyond capitalism our society will have to develop new relations that transcend alienation.

That the family form is not a “natural” social arrangement is further elucidated in The German Ideology (co-authored with Engels). The implication is that women’s oppression can be ended as society changes and women can enter more into the world of work.

Following another line of thought in The Holy Family, Marx criticises a novel by French writer Eugene Sue called Les Mysteres de Paris. Sue created a character called Fleur de Marie who is saved from her life of prostitution by a prince and enters a convent, where she dies shortly afterward.

Marx reacted sharply to Sue’s Catholic moralising about prostitution and sexuality in general. “Despite her situation”, Brown writes, “Marx does not see her a merely a powerless victim, but as possessing agency”.

Marx saw Fleur de Marie as an example of the yearning to be fully human and he slams the paternalistic prince for failing “to grasp the general condition of women in modern society as an inhuman one”.

As part of his journalism Marx translated into German writings by Jacques Peuchet on suicide. Peuchet was the French police archivist and his writings on unusual cases were very popular (inspiring, among other things, Alexander Dumas to write The Count of Monte Cristo).

Marx chose parts of Peuchet dealing with the suicide of middle-class women. Marx’s personal leanings come through via the parts he chose to delete and in subtle additions of his own comments.

These show Marx as far removed from a doctrinaire, class-bound theorist. Michel Lovy also reviews these writings in the March 2002 Monthly Review where he says Marx demonstrates an “understanding of the evils of modern bourgeois society, of the suffering that its patriarchal family structure inflicts on women, and of the broad and universal scope of socialism”.

Lovy points out that the most interesting part of this writing is that Marx focuses on women “driven to desperation and suicide by bourgeois society”. Peuchet’s accounts demonstrated to Marx that even members of the bourgeoisie are alienated.

Brown says Marx argues in these writings for total social transformation, because “economic levelling or redistribution are not enough to create a better society, so long as capitalist social relations remain in place”.

The family and its discontents

The alienation that drives some to suicide is to be found in the family sphere as well as the public, Marx says. But more than just pointing to the social causes of individual despair, Marx goes so far as to see suicide as a form of resistance in an oppressive society!

He was not recommending suicide, rather he was reading into it the signs of resistance as much as it was a symptom of misery.

Most tellingly, Marx writes that the French Revolution did not topple all tyrannies. “The evil which one blames on arbitrary forces exists in families, where it causes crises, analogous to those of revolutions”. He does not state it, but that analysis extends out into the future socialist revolution, contra Stalinism.

The bourgeois family is famously lambasted in The Communist Manifesto, where Marx and Frederick Engels mock bourgeois pretentions and argue that the very conditions that had produced the bourgeois family were disappearing among proletarians. Accordingly, the father’s role and power was diminished, opening up the opportunity for a different form of the family.

Brown points to a number of references to women in Capital, Marx’s magnum opus and in his earlier draft material for Capital. In particular, Marx discusses the way that capitalists delighted in drawing women and children into factories because, as specially oppressed people, they could be paid less.

However, Marx saw the dialectical aspects of this process. As women became proletarians they gained power in their private lives and moved out of the control of their fathers and male relatives. This process can be observed today, for example, in the international call centres that have been established in India.

Marx recognised all the pain and tribulations in this. The long hours and shift work undermined traditional family structures and many people suffered. However, women’s economic power led towards an egalitarian form of the family with men.

While not delving deeply into it, in Capital Marx critiques the notion of productive and unproductive labour under capitalism. For the bourgeoisie, only labour that gives them profit through the creation of surplus value is productive. But Marx says that is one-sided as the production of use values is important as well.

That opens up the question of women’s labour in the home, which is essential to the very existence of labour. Marx never took up the question of wages for housework but his ideas regarding women’s independence showed an evolution over time.

Development of Marx’s thinking

When writing about the Preston strikes in 1853-54, Marx was uncritical of the strikers’ demand for a family wage, which implies women as dependent appendages of men. By the 1860s however, he was arguing for equal status for women within the structures of the First International.

This reflected his general thinking about the equality of women. “From the beginning of the First International to the end of his life”, Brown writes, “Marx supported incorporating women in the workforce as equals”.

In 1858, Marx returned to the oppression of women in bourgeois families when he wrote about the case of an English aristocrat, Lady Bulwer-Lytton, who, following the breakdown of her marriage, was declared insane at the instigation of her estranged husband. As in his earlier ruminations about suicide, Marx is clearly describing the bourgeois family as a site of oppression of women.

Those pieces, which were written for the New York Herald Tribune, also contain traces of a critique of the use of labelling mental illness as a tool of social control.

After the heroic spirit shown by women in the Paris Commune Marx demonstrated a keener appreciation of the demands of women. In France the paternalistic ideas of Proudhon were still in evidence in the labour movement. But, in opposition, Marx wrote in 1880 that “the emancipation of the productive class is that of all human beings without distinction of sex or race”.

Marx’s notebooks from the final years of his life contain some of the most interesting developments of his thought. He was reading about the development of many societies, including Indonesia, native American groups, Russia, ancient Greece and India. In these notes are scattered thoughts about the role of women in the historical process.

After Marx’s death Engels discovered these notes, especially those on Henry Morgan’s Ancient Society, the pioneering work of anthropology. Using these, Engels produced The Origin of the Family, Private Property and the State, in which he argues that men and women had lived in equality in pre-class society. Engels, taking Morgan at face value and going further, describes the rise of class society as bringing about the “world historic defeat of the female sex”.

Brown, however, finds a more nuanced appraisal of Morgan in Marx. Marx did not accept Morgan uncritically, he compared and contrasted him with other writers. Also, his underlining and emphasises show that he was far less condescending towards women than Morgan.

Brown says that Engels “provides a deterministic assessment of the beginning of class and gender-conflict”. Engels emphasises the role of men’s need to transfer property rights to their children as central to the oppression of women, whereas, Brown says, for Marx women’s oppression involves far more than that.

Brown highlights Marx’s dialectical method in being vital in understanding gender and the family. She says that Marx did not apply ahistorical philosophical categories to reality, he empirically analysed the world and utilised categories that he discovered there.

“While Marx’s theory remains underdeveloped in terms of providing as account that includes gender as important to understanding capitalism”, Brown says, “his categories, nonetheless, lead in the direction of a systematic critique of patriarchy as it manifest itself in capitalism since he is able to separate out the historically-specific elements of patriarchy from a general form of women’s oppression, as it has existed throughout much of human history”.

This short, comprehensive handbook will no doubt provide the basis for a new wave of feminist engagement with Marxism and is a clarion call for all those who regard themselves as Marxists to re-evaluate their ideological conceptions.

Heather Brown allows us all to read Marx with new eyes.

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Childhood

Childhood

FREE MINDS, FREE PEOPLE

National Conference

Oakland, CA, USA

July 9 – 12, 2015

Free Minds, Free People is a national conference convened by the Education for Liberation Network that brings together teachers, high school and college students, researchers, parents and community-based activists/educators from across the country to build a movement to develop and promote education as a tool for liberation.

Read more about our mission and goals.

We are extremely excited to announce that the next Free Minds, Free People will take place in Oakland, CA, July 9 – 12, 2015!

Our last conference in Chicago was a huge success! About 1,000 people from across the country came together and enjoyed nearly 100 workshops, panels and assemblies.  For those who were at the Chicago conference last year, you may remember the awesome turnout of folks from California and the Bay Area who presented and participated in that conference. They are taking that energy and commitment to FMFP and putting it on full blast to host our next conference.

We’ll plan to see you July 9 – 12, 2015 in Oakland, CA – mark your calendar, start organizing to participate, and spread the word!

FMFP: http://www.fmfp.org/

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

 

Education System

Education System

INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION RESEARCH SEMINAR ON MARXISM, CRITICAL PEDAGOGY AND EDUCATION

Wednesday 9th July 2014 3.00pm-7.30pm

Anglia Ruskin University, Chelmsford, England

Department of Education

International Education Research Seminar on Marxism, Critical Pedagogy and Education

 

(Followed by social event / eating out near Chelmsford Station

Room: SAW 005 or other room (tbc)

 

Introduced by Alpesh Maisuria (University of East London, England) and Professor Dave Hill (Anglia Ruskin University, England)

 

SPEAKERS:

Dr. Ayse Elitok (Adnan Menderes University, Aydin, Turkey)`Village Institutes’ in Turkey- the development of secular education in rural Turkey and their demise in the face of landlord and religious opposition’

Dr. Tom Griffiths (Newcastle University, NSW, Australia) `Critical Education and World-Systems Analysis’

Dr. Lilia Monzo (Chapman University, Orange, California, USA) A Critical Pedagogy for Democracy: Confronting Higher Education’s Neoliberal Agenda with a Critical Latina Feminist Episteme

Dr. Paolo Vittoria (Universidade do Rio de Janeiro, Brazil) Popular Education and Social Change in Latin America: another school is possible?

 

For information: paulette.luff@anglia.ac.uk or dave.hill@anglia.ac.uk

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academic.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

International Conference on Critical Education

International Conference on Critical Education

Childhood

Childhood

CONFERENCE ON THE NATURE AND VALUE OF CHILDHOOD

16-17 May 2014

University of Sheffield, UK

Currently there is widespread philosophical interest in children’s rights, parental rights and duties, and wider issues concerning good parenting and the social organisation of childrearing. Yet, to fully address these topics one needs to assume an answer to the question of ’What is a child?’ To know who owes what to children in any detail, we need to know what distinguishes childhood from adulthood, and to answer questions about the relative value of childhood and adulthood in the overall life of a human being.

This conference brings together philosophers interested in a cluster of questions that have not been sufficiently discussed so far, but which are starting to draw philosophical attention: What is childhood? Is childhood good intrinsically, or only as preparation for adulthood? If it is intrinsically good, does it have special value – would it be a loss, from the perspective of an entire human life, if one missed out on childhood? Are there any ‘intrinsic goods of childhood’, and what are they? Do we owe children things that are different in nature from the things owed to adults?

 

PAPERS:

Monika Betzler (Berne) ‘Good childhood and the good life’

Teresa Blankmeyer Burke (Gallaudet): ‘The Nature and Value of a Deaf Childhood’

Samantha Brennan (Western Ontario) ‘Trust, time, and play: Three intrinsic goods of childhood’

Matthew Clayton (Warwick) ‘Dignity as an ideal for children’

Jurgen De Wispelaere (McGill) ‘Political rights for Rugrats: Children in the democratic state’

Timothy Fowler (Bristol) ‘Variety is the spice of life?: On the possible significance of their being intrinsic goods of childhood’

Colin Macleod (Victoria) ‘Just schools and good fun: Non-preparatory dimensions of educational justice’

Serena Olsaretti (ICREA/Pompeu Fabra University) ‘Egoism, altruism and the special duties of parents’

Norvin Richards (Alabama) ‘The intrinsic goods of childhood’

Judith Suissa (London) ‘Narrativity, childhood and parenting’

Patrick Tomlin (Reading) ‘Saplings or caterpillars?: Trying to understand children”

Daniel Weinstock (McGill) ‘On the complementarity of the ages of life: Why we wouldn’t want adulthood without childhood, or childhood without
adulthood’

 

The conference will take place on the 16th and 17th of May 2014 at the University of Sheffield, Jessops West Exhibition Space.

Registrationhttp://onlineshop.shef.ac.uk/browse/extra_info.asp?compid=1&modid=2&catid=8&prodid=259

For more details get in touch with the organisers: Anca Gheaus (a.gheaus@sheffield.ac.uk) or Lindsey Porter (l.porter@lancaster.ac.uk)

The conference is sponsored by the Society for Applied Philosophy, The Mind Association and The Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain.

Thanks to Pedagogy & the Inhumanities for alerting me to this interesting and important conference: http://benjaminpedagogy.wordpress.com/2014/02/25/conference-the-nature-and-value-of-childhood/Glenn Rikowski

 

**END**

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: https://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

 

 

Education Crisis

Education Crisis

FORUM FOR PROMOTING 3-19 COMPREHENSIVE EDUCATION – VOLUME 56 NUMBER 1 (2014)

Just published online at: www.wwwords.co.uk/forum/content/pdfs/56/issue56_1.asp
[printed copies will be posted late-February]

FORUM: for promoting 3-19 comprehensive education
Volume 56 Number 1, 2014, ISSN 0963-8253

ADVENTURES IN EDUCATION

Patrick Yarker. Editorial. Adventures in Education OPEN ACCESS

Deb Wilenski. ‘We’re a little bit lost aren’t we?’: outdoor exploration, real and fantastical lands, and the educational possibilities of disorientation

Mary Jane Drummond. Learning from Children: learning from Caroline Pratt (1867-1954). Early Progressives in Early Years Education

Jenifer Smith with Rebecca Griffiths. Writing Spaces, Professional Places: how a teachers’ writing group can nurture teaching identities

David Hewgill. My NQT Year: a primary teacher’s account of his first year of teaching

Rachel Marks. The Dinosaur in the Classroom: what we stand to lose through ability-grouping in the primary school

Vicky Grube. Beautiful Nonsense: children’s authentic art-making and Deleuzian difference

Jane McGregor. In Progress Internationally: student voice work in four countries

Roger Holdsworth. Spaces for Partnerships. Teach the Teacher: student-led professional development for teachers

Jean Courtney. Ontario’s Student Voice Initiative

Emily Nelson. Enacting Student Voice through Governance Partnerships in the Classroom: rupture of the ordinary for radical practice

Alison Cook-Sather. Student–Staff Partnerships as Transformational: the ‘Students as Learners and Teachers’ program as a case study in changing higher education

Rami Abu Zarad. A Teacher’s Retrospective View of the Syrian Educational System

Mike Cole. Comprehensive Education Bolivarian-style: the alternative school in Barrio Pueblo Nuevo, Venezuela

Tony Cotton. A Matter of Ideology: a response to the Draft Primary Mathematics Programmes of Study

Trevor Fisher. What Is To Be Done? Possibilities for the Counter-offensive

John Yandell. Classrooms as Sites of Curriculum Delivery or Meaning-making: whose knowledge counts?

Robin Alexander. The Best That Has Been Thought and Said?
Access to the full texts of articles is restricted to those who have a Personal subscription, or those whose institution has a Library subscription. Open access for articles more than 3 years old.

PERSONAL SUBSCRIPTION Subscription to the three printed 2014 issues (including online access to ALL back issues, from Volume 1, 1958, to the present day) is available to private individuals at a cost of US$70.00 (approximately £43.00). If you wish to subscribe you may do so immediately at www.wwwords.co.uk/subscribeFORUM.asp

LIBRARY SUBSCRIPTION (campus-wide access) If you are working within an institution that maintains a library, please urge your Librarian to take out a Library subscription so we can provide full access throughout your institution.

For all editorial matters, including articles offered for publication, please contact the Editor, Professor Clyde Chitty, 19 Beaconsfield Road, Bickley, Bromley BR1 2BL, United Kingdom (clydechitty379@btinternet.com).

In the event of problems concerning a subscription, or difficulty in gaining access to the journal articles on the website, please contact the publishers at info@symposium-books.co.uk

 

**END**

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The New Left Book Club: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/2014/01/05/the-new-left-book-club-call-for-papers/

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: https://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

ARUANGLIA RUSKIN UNIVERSITY, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION, CRITICAL EDUCATION AND JUSTICE (CEJ) and EARLY CHILDHOOD RESEARCH GROUP (ECRG) RESEARCH SEMINARS

SEMESTER 2: ALL WELCOME – OPEN INVITATION

Wednesdays 4.30-6.30 Room: Sawyers 005

We will try, for each session have a sort of open house of 45-60 minutes, whereby research students can have 20-25 minute slots to bounce ideas, report back / present to the attendees. Sometimes these student presentations will be scheduled, at other times there will open discussion.

Semester 2 / Trimester 2 /Spring Term 2014

 

8 January 2014 Joint ECRG and CEJ research seminar

Dr Leena Helavaara Robertson (Middlesex University) on an aspect of Early Years/ Social Constructivism/ Critical Multilingualism, or, Conflicting Ideologies in Early Years Education

*15 January 2014 CEJ research seminar

a) Preparing for the ICCE and BERA conferences: series of mini-presentations by possible participants

b) Linda Akomaning and Amal Hussein

5 February 2014 Joint ECRG and CEJ research seminar

b) Doctoral Student presentations/ Discussions: Polina Chrysochou and Sharon Howden plus 2 ECRG doctoral/ conference presentations

*12 February 2014 ECRG led research seminar- and also CEJ led research seminar

Dr. Maria Nikolakaki (University of the Peloponessus, Corinth, Greece). Critical Pedagogy

Preparing for the ICCE and BERA conferences: series of mini-presentations by possible participants, in the two research cluster groups and by doctoral students within the two research clusters. Open to other doctoral and pre-doctoral students).

5 March  2014 Joint ECRG and CEJ research seminar-

a) Alpesh Maisuria (University of East London)

b) Doctoral Student Presentations/ Discussions

*12 March 2014 CEJ led research seminar-

a) Dr. Glenn Rikowski (Flow of Ideas) – ‘Crisis and Education’

b) Doctoral Student presentations/ Discussions : Polina Chryssochou, Sharon Howden

2 April 2014 Joint ECRG and CEJ research seminar

Presentations in preparation for the BERA and ICCE conferences

Trimester 3 /Summer Term

7 May 2014 Joint ECRG and CEJ research seminar

Presentations in preparation for the BERA and ICCE conferences

21 May 2014 CEJ led research seminar-

Deirdre O’Neill (University of Ulster/ InsideFilm, http://www.insidefilm.org/) Film, Prisons, Social Class and Critical Pedagogy

4 June 2014 Joint ECRG and CEJ research seminar

a) Final Preparations for the ICCE and BERA conferences: series of mini-presentations by possible participants

b) Doctoral/ Student presentations/ Discussions: Alison Feist, Samya Cook and Alan Bradwell on progress the EdD Dissertation and Linda Akomaning on her PhD progress

*11 June 2014 ECRG led research seminar- and also CEJ led research seminar

Preparing for the ICCE and BERA conferences: series of mini-presentations by possible participants, in the two research cluster groups and by doctoral students within the two research clusters. Open to other doctoral and pre-doctoral students).

2 July 2014 Joint ECRG and CEJ research seminar

Doctoral Student and Staff Research Presentations and Discussion

Possible other Forthcoming CEJ speakers …

Spyros Themelis (University of East Anglia, Norwich),

Nicki Spawls (Middlesex University),

Grant Banfield (Flinders University, South Australia)

Preparing for the BERA (British Education Research Association) annual conference  at the London Institute of Education, Sept 2014) and preparing for the 4th ICCE (International Conference on Critical Education) conference being held Jun23-26 at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece. A series of very mini-presentations by CEJ and ECRG members in preparation for BERA 2014 and ICCE 2014

The joint cluster will organise two or three symposia for / including/ comprising ARU colleagues at BERA 2014 (in London) 23-25 Sept. 2014 and at the ICCE (in Thessaloniki, Greece) 23-25 June 2014, and at various of the joint cluster sessions (CEJ-EYRG) colleagues will be able to present ideas, drafts, problems at the regular fortnightly Weds pm (4.40-6.30) sessions in a supportive and non-intimidating atmosphere.

Many thanks. Dr Paulette Luff (co-convenor, with Dr Chris Such) Early Childhood Research Group (ECRG), and Professor Dave Hill (co-convenor with Polina Chrysochou) Critical Education and Justice Research Cluster (CEJ)

For information: paulette.luff@anglia.ac.uk or dave.hill@anglia.ac.uk

Dave Hill

Professor Dave Hill

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Critical Education

Critical Education

JOURNAL FOR CRITICAL EDUCATION POLICY STUDIES – VOLUME 11 NUMBER 4 (2013)

JCEPS: http://www.jceps.com

The Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies (JCEPS) is a peer-reviewed international scholarly journal published by The Institute for Education Policy Studies (IEPS). The free, online version is published in association with the University of Athens (Greece). The print version (available on subscription or purchase – click on the Subscriptions and Purchasing link is published by IEPS). JCEPS will have three issues per annum, as from 2013. The journal website is www.jceps.com Enquiries should be addressed to dave.hill@ieps.org.uk or naomi.hill@ieps.org.uk

The Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies (JCEPS) seeks to develop Marxist and other Left analysis of education. JCEPS seeks and publishes articles that critique global, national, neo-liberal, neo-conservative, New Labour, Third Way, postmodernist and other analyses of policy developments, as well as those that attempt to report on, analyse and develop Socialist/ Marxist transformative policy for schooling and education from a number of Radical Left perspectives. JCEPS also addresses issues of social class, ‘race’, gender, sexual orientation, disability and capital/ism; critical pedagogies, new public managerialism and academic / non-academic labour, and empowerment/ disempowerment.

 

CONTENTS

Volume 11, Number 4:
November 2013

Curry Malott, Dave Hill, Grant Banfield: Neoliberalism, Immiseration Capitalism and the Historical Urgency of a Socialist Education

Mark Cresswell, Zulfia Karimova, Tom Brock: Pedagogy of the Privileged: Elite Universities and Dialectical Contradictions in the UK

José García, Noah De Lissovoy: Doing School Time: The Hidden Curriculum Goes to Prison

Roberto Ribeiro Baldino, Tânia Cristina Baptista Cabral: The productivity of students’ schoolwork: an exercise in Marxist rigour

Brad J. Porfilio, Debangshu Roychoudhury, Lauren Gardner: Ending the ‘War Against Youth:’ Social Media and Hip-Hop Culture as Sites of Resistance, Transformation and (Re) Conceptualization

Nisha Thapliyal: Reframing the public in public education: The Landless Workers Movement (MST) and adult education in Brazil

Dimitris Tsoubaris, Aleksandros Georgopoulos: Gauging the Potential of Socially Critical Environmental Education (EE): Examining Local Environmental problems through children’s perspective

Selda Polat: Neo-liberal education policies in Turkey and transformation in education

Dereje Tadesse Birbirso: Technology for Empowering or Subjugating Teachers: Analysis of Ethiopia’s Education Reform Discourse Practice

Sara Zamir, Tamar Horowitz: The manifestation of the value of patriotism among Israeli trainee teachers – natives and immigrants: how will they educate their pupils in the light of this value?

Ulas Ozer: The Song of the Other/ Public Space as a Learning Environment and Gypsy Musicians in Turkey

Alan Hodkinson: Inclusion ‘All present and correct?’ A critical analysis of New Labour’s inclusive education policy in England

 

Capitalist Nightmare

Capitalist Nightmare

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Education and Economy

Education and Economy

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON CRITICAL EDUCATION – IV 

Education Crisis

Education Crisis

ICCE IV

23-26 June 2014

Thessaloniki

Greece

Critical Education in an Age of Crisis

Conference website: http://www.eled.auth.gr/icce2014/

CALL FOR PAPERS

IV International Conference on Critical Education

The outbreak of the economic, social, and political crisis is affecting education at a global scale. The crisis, in tandem with the dominant neoliberal and neoconservative politics that are implemented and promoted internationally as the only solution, redefine the sociopolitical and ideological role of education. Public education is shrinking. It loses its status as a social right. It is projected as a mere commodity for sale while it becomes less democratic and critical.

Understanding the causes of the crisis, the special forms it takes in different countries and the multiple ways in which it influences education, constitutes important questions for all those who do not limit their perspectives to the horizon of neoconservative, neoliberal and technocratic dogmas. Moreover, the critical education movement has the responsibility to rethink its views and practices in light of the crisis as well as the paths that this crisis opens for challenging and overthrowing capitalist domination worldwide.

The International Conference on Critical Education, which was held in Athens in 2011 and 2012 and Ankara in 2013, provides a platform for scholars, educators, activists and others interested in the subject to come together and engage in a free, democratic and productive dialogue. At a time of crisis when public education is under siege by neoliberalism and neoconservatism, we invite you to submit a proposal and to attend the IV International Conference on Critical Education to reflect on the theory and practice of critical education and to contribute to the field.

Keynote Speakers:

Ayhan Ural (Gazi University, Turkey)

Dave Hill (Anglia Ruskin University, Chelmsford, UK)

George Grollios (Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece)

Glenn Rikowski (Flow of Ideas) on ‘Education and Crisis’

Grant Banfield (Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia)

Guy Senese (University of North Arizona, USA)

Hasan Huseyin Aksoy (Ankara University, Turkey)

Kostas Skordoulis (National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece)

Lois Weiner (New Jersey City University, USA)

Panayota Gounari (University of Massachusetts, Boston, USA)

Panayotis Sotiris (University of the Aegean, Mitilini, Greece)

Periklis Pavlidis (Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece)

Ravi Kumar (SouthAsianUniversity, New Delhi, India)

Tasos Liambas (Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece)

ICCE IV

ICCE IV

 

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Education Crisis

Education Crisis

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Education Crisis

Education Crisis

Education

Education

A CHILD’S WORLD – THE NEXT STEPS

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS

Dear Colleague

On behalf of the conference organisers and speakers, we would like to invite you to participate in the following international conference

A Child’s World – Next Steps

International Conference: 25-27th June, 2014

Venue: Aberystwyth University, Penglais Campus, Aberystwyth, Wales, UK

Organised and hosted by the School of Education and Lifelong Learning, Aberystwyth University www.aber.ac.uk/sell

For further enquiries, please do not hesitate to reply to this e-mail address:-  achildsworldconference@aber.ac.uk

Key Speakers include:

Huw Lewis AM, Minister for Education & Skills, Welsh Government (Invited & TBC)

Professor David Reynolds, Southampton Education School, Southampton University. He is currently Senior Policy Advisor to the Welsh Assembly Government.

Professor Rebecca Wallace, Judge of the First tier Tribunal, Research Professor of International Human Rights and Justice, The Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen

Professor David Wray, Professor of Literacy Education, University of Warwick, Coventry

Other speakers to follow

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS

The School of Education and Lifelong Learning kindly invites you to participate in the International Conference: A Child’s World – Next Steps, taking place on 25-27 June 2014 at the Penglais Campus of Aberystwyth University, Wales, UK.

‘A Child’s World – Next Steps’ Conference has been devised to build on the success of the 2012 conference ‘A Child’s World: Working Together for a Better Future’, focusing on new concepts in Raising Standards, Curriculum Development and Safeguarding Children, with the aim of enabling collaboration, creating effective policy and sharing best practice in childhood studies within an international strategic dimension.

Focused primarily at an educational research and professional audience, the findings will be relevant across a range of disciplines, including governmental policy formulation, social care, and operational delivery of public services. The wide ranging scope of the conference will be highly applicable for international, national, regional and local government, along with education professionals and will be of direct interest to the general public.

It is intended that selected papers will be published in an edited book, providing the opportunity to identify and share best practice amongst subject professionals.

The School of Education and Lifelong Learning welcomes and invites submission of abstracts for presentation and dissemination at the conference on the following themes:

SAFEGUARDING CHILDREN  

Children’s Rights and Voice

Leadership and Management

Training and Professional Development for all stakeholders involved with children

CURRICULUM

Transition Across Phases

Technology Enhanced Learning

Learner Engagement & Support

RAISING STANDARDS

Numeracy and Literacy

Addressing Underachievement

Training and Professional Development for all stakeholders involved with children

 

Abstracts should outline the issue addressed, methods and approaches, results and conclusions. The School of Education and Lifelong Learning welcomes the submission of abstracts in English or Welsh.

The form for submitting abstract proposals can be reached through the following hyperlink: http://www.aber.ac.uk/en/sell/conference2014/abstract-sub/

Presentations must not exceed 20 minute duration.

Abstract Submission Details

 Summary:

 no more than 100 words

 Title: 

 no more than 30 words

 Issue Addressed: 

 no more than 100 words

 Methods and Approaches:     

 no more than 100 words

 Results: 

 no more than 100 words

 Conclusions:

 no more than 100 words

 

The initial closing date for abstract submission is Friday 29 November 2013

Proposals will be reviewed against the following criteria

          Relevance to the conference aims

          Clarity and coherence of the proposal

All accepted conference papers will be published in Conference Proceedings

 

REGISTRATION FEES: Further details will be available soon

http://www.aber.ac.uk/en/sell/conference2014/

Flyer:  A Childs World – Next steps.docx

 

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

Archive

Archive

FORUM FOR PROMOTING 3-19 COMPREHENSIVE EDUCATION – ARCHIVE

FORUM: for promoting 3-19 comprehensive education

Every issue of FORUM from its first issue in 1958 is now freely available online at www.wwwords.co.uk/forum/content/maincontents.asp

For over fifty years FORUM has been in the thick of the struggle for comprehensive education in Britain.  Back in the Autumn of 1958 the inaugural issue declared that the journal would concern itself with four principal areas: the new types of school being developed around the country, the steps modern schools were taking to transcend their limitations, the attempt to re-think the way pupils were organised (which meant the movement away from streaming), and new approaches to the content of education.  The journal would provide a basis of facts and ideas, and a locus for lively discussion and the exchange of experiences.  Its pages would be steeped in the issues and questions of the day, for they would be written by those working in the new schools and committed to the new trends in education.

Now the FORUM archive offers readers the chance freely to access every single article ever published in the journal since its inception.  As well as scholarly pieces by writers such as Brian Simon, Michael Armstrong and Constance Rosen, readers will find first-hand accounts of classroom experience by teachers (for example: ‘teaching unstreamed English’ or ‘introducing Nuffield Science into school’).  They will find analysis of the politics of educational change from commentators as acute as Caroline Benn, Robin Pedley and Clyde Chitty.  They will find opinion and discussion pieces by teachers and academics, evidence presented to public commissions (notably the Plowden Committee), critical symposia, case-studies, book-reviews, even a range of adverts for educational books and materials.  ‘Forward Trends in the Treatment of Backward Children’, anyone?

FORUM declared itself a journal by and for teachers, administrators, advisers, parents, governors and councillors.  Their words, and the words of academics, fill the pages of the archive.  Politically engaged, always internationalist (for a while the journal even boasted an American correspondent), rooted in real classrooms and schools, and enduringly at the leading-edge of progressive educational change, the archive is a testimony to victories and defeats as experienced by those who participated in the struggle, and continue to do so.  Multi-racial and anti-racist education, testing and teaching, education 16-19, the 1988 Education Reform Act, assessment, provision for the rising-fives, new technologies in school, the reflective practitioner…  Decade by decade, such sub-headings indicate the wealth of material accessible now at www.wwwords.co.uk/forum/content/maincontents.asp

The Editorial Board of FORUM, and their publishers, are immensely grateful to Angela Cutts, Librarian at the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge, and to her colleagues, who so kindly (and very bravely) allowed their stock of printed back numbers to be copied to create this archive.

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski
 

Education Crisis

Education Crisis

VOICES FOR SOCIAL JUSTICE IN EDUCATION: A LITERARY ANTHOLOGY

*Call for Submissions*

*Voices for Social Justice in Education: A Literary Anthology*
Editors: Julie Landsman, Rosanna Salcedo, & Paul Gorski
Deadline for submissions: Midnight, January 15th , 2014

What we are looking for: Poetry (including spoken word), creative non-fiction, memoir, short stories, images of visual art, and other types of writing or visual art that paint a picture of what justice and injustice look like in our schools.

Please read this Call for Submissions fully and, if you choose to submit one or more manuscripts, email them as Word documents, */following the specifications below/*, to: *voices@edchange.org*

Stories make meaning for us. We can read “scholarly” articles, abstract theories, or collections of research and all of this is important. However, it is the stories, the poems, the music, the memoir, the essays, the fiction, that bring to life all of the information, all of the declarations about what is good, what is not working, what is needed. In this /Voices for Social Justice in Education/ anthology we desire writing that brings the reality of schooling to life. We want poems about 3rd period physics, short stories about recess in the second grade one hot spring afternoon. We want memoir about your best and worst teachers. We want essays about what is working now, at this moment, in your classroom—what makes a difference in the lives of your students, what is making your school a place that students want to be or don’t want to be. We want to know in vivid language, be it from memories or journal entries, in the form of spoken word or in a carefully constructed short story, what social justice means in schools today. What are your hopes and how do they play out? What matters to you when you walk in the door of your building, when you stand up in front of class, when you are late for your last class of the day?

We are writers ourselves. We love language and we know how powerful it can be, how it can move people, to reach those who can make change. We want your words, your language, your passion to help provoke that change.

Guidelines and Specifications for Contributors:
(1) Poets may submit up to 5 poems at once; please submit each in a separate document with your full contact information on /each one /(see #4 below)
(2) Prose writers may submit up to 15 pages
a) Times New Roman 12-pt font
b) Double-spaced
(3) Images of visual art should be submitted in .pdf or .jpg format
(4) Include author/artist name(s) and email address(es) /on each piece submitted/
(5) Remember, we are looking for work explicitly about /social justice in education and schools/, so great work about social justice that is not explicitly relevant to education schools will not be considered

*/Please feel free to share this Call for Submissions widely!/*

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski