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Daily Archives: May 26th, 2015

Celestial Dome Inverted

Celestial Dome Inverted

EMBRACING THE RANDOM: ESSAYS ON THE MUSIC OF TOOL, ESOTERICISM AND CREATIVE EXPRESSION

REMINDER – CALL FOR PAPERS

Essays are invited which examine themes of the esoteric in the interconnected areas of popular culture which include the musical projects of Maynard James Keenan, visionary artwork (especially that inspired by N,N-Dimethyltryptamine (DMT or N,N-DMT)), and spiritual worldviews. This is a collection that proposes to explore these creative forms of expression, with a focus on how they manifest in contemporary Western contexts. Such scholarly analyses of this area of popular culture will add new perspectives and insights into subcultures and lifestyles as well as into the specific art and music scenes.

 

Topics could include, but are not limited to:

 Occult and mystical symbology in the music of Tool

 Essays on Maynard James Keenan’s other bands, A Perfect Circle and Puscifer

 Dreams, visions, and DMT

 Visionary art and spirituality (in Western contexts)

 Entheogens and artistic expression (in indigenous Amazonian Amerindian cultural contexts)

 Judeo-Christianity and the lyrics of Tool

 Mathematics, sacred geometry, the physical universe, cosmology, and the music of Tool

 Analysis of the artwork of Alex Grey

 Lachrymology and pseudo-religions

 Esotericism, altered states of consciousness, and music subcultures

New Materialism

New Materialism

 

Essays are invited from scholars in the disciplines of ethnomusicology, music studies, cultural studies, study of religions, art history, philosophy, psychology, and related disciplines. Cross-disciplinary analysis is welcome. Proposals should take the form of an approximately 300-500 word abstract, a provisional title, as well as a short biography (50-100 words).

All proposals must be received via email by June 15, 2015. Please send all proposals and questions to the editor, Dr Jenny Butler at j.butler@ucc.ie and cc. to butler.jennifer@gmail.com

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

TOOL

TOOL

imagesPOST-SOCIALIST ECONOMIES, NATIONALISTIC CONFLICTS AND LABOUR IN CENTRAL-EASTERN EUROPE AND THE FORMER SOVIET UNION

One Day Workshop at Middlesex University, Hendon, London NW4 4BT

Hosted by the Business School and the Post-Socialist Labour Studies Group.
Friday May 29 2015, from 9.30am to 6pm

For further information, and to register at the workshop, please contact:
Claudio Morrison (c.morrison@mdx.ac.uk) or Elena Karoullas (E.Karoullas@mdx.ac.uk)

A workshop is jointly sponsored by the Royal Economic Society and the London Region of BUIRA (British Universities Industrial Relations Association) will be held under the auspices of the Post Socialist Labour Studies Group at Middlesex University on Friday May 29th 2015. The workshop focuses on ethno-national conflicts in post-socialist and post-soviet states and the political economy of the region, explorin g links between emergent neoliberal forms of capitalism and the rise of radical nationalism. Guest speakers will include practitioners in labour and industrial relations and economic policy from the region as well as academic specialists and labour representatives from countries gravely affected by present and past conflicts such as Ukraine, Russia, Serbia and Bosnia-Herzegovina.

Confirmed participant speakers include:
Dr Claudio Morrison (LWO, Middlesex University); Professor Martin Upchurch (LWO, Middlesex University); Professor John Grahl (Economics, Middlesex University); Dr Daryna Grechyna (Economics, Middlesex University); Kiril Buketov (IUF Uniting Food, Farm and Hotel Workers Worldwide); Volodymyr Ishenko (Center for Social and Labour Research, Kiev); Goran Markovic (East Sarajevo University, Sarajevo Plenum); Filip Ilkowski (Institute of Political Science, Warsaw) Petr Bizyukov (Centre for Social and Labour Rights, Moscow); Veronika Biziukova (Levada analy tical centre, Moscow); Professor Vera Trappmann (University of Leeds) Dr. Jelena Timotijevic (University of Brighton); Dr Jan Fidrmuc (Economics, Brunel University).

Directions to the Hendon Campus
http://www.mdx.ac.uk/get-in-touch/directions-london
Facebook Event: https://www.facebook.com/events/1577293192531879/

 

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/post-socialist-economies-nationalistic-conflicts-and-labour

Modernism

Modernism

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

 

Detroit

Detroit

POWERS AND THE LIMITS OF PROPERTY

A workshop hosted by the Centre for Philosophy and Critical Thought and the Unit for Global Justice, Goldsmiths, University of London

11 June 2015, RHB 142 (10-4) & RHB 308 (4.30-6.45), Goldsmiths, New Cross SE14 6NW
Contemporary philosophy has undertaken sustained interrogations of its relationship to law and, to a lesser extent, capital. This has been less true of its questioning of its relationship to the crucial nexus of law and capital: property. Inversely, while critical legal theory has appropriated a welter of concepts and methods from contemporary philosophy, it has often avoided a sustained critical appraisal of the images of law within philosophy itself, and of the place of property within these.
Responding to a resurgent critical interest in the question of property, and especially to contemporary inquiries into the logics of dispossession that subtend capitalism, this workshop will stage a trans-disciplinary dialogue on the legal and philosophical powers – as well the limits and impasses – of property.
Speakers: Étienne Balibar (Kingston), José Bellido (Kent), Brenna Bhandar (SOAS), Robert Nichols (Humboldt), Alain Pottage (LSE), Stella Sandford (Kingston), Bev Skeggs (Goldsmiths), Alberto Toscano (Goldsmiths), Eyal Weizman (Goldsmiths), Mikhaïl Xifaras (Sciences Po), Hyo Yoon Kang (Kent)
Organised by Brenna Bhandar (Senior Lecturer in the School of Law, SOAS) and Alberto Toscano (Co-Director, Centre for Philosophy and Critical Thought and Unit for Global Justice, Goldsmiths)
All welcome. For further information, contact a.toscano@gold.ac.uk

See: http://www.gold.ac.uk/sociology/research-centres/cpct/

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/powers-and-limits-of-property-centre-for-philosophy-and-critical-thought-goldsmiths-11-june-10-6.45

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Social Class

Social Class

SOCIAL CLASS IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY

AMSTERDAM RESEARCH CENTER GENDER AND SEXUALITY

Conference: ‘Social Class in the 21st Century’

October 22-23, 2015

See: http://arcgs.uva.nl/news-events/events/social-class-conference/social-class-conference/content/folder/social-class-conference.html

Theme

Intersections between class, gender and sexuality revisited

The question of social class has re-emerged as a central concern for the analysis and politics of gender and sexuality in the public sphere in many societies worldwide. The ascent and subsequent crisis of global neoliberalism have been deeply implicated in growing inequalities, which have affected the shape of gender and sexual meanings and relations in fundamental ways.

Confirmed keynote speakers: Professor Cecilia Ridgeway and Professor Anoop Nayak + Roundtable by Professor Gloria Wekker

  • Whereas some women have emerged as highly successful agents in the new global economy, their ascent to wealth and power is almost always contingent upon the labor and ongoing exclusion of other – the working classes, the poor, migrants, and/or women of colour.
  • Similarly, with the introduction of some openly lesbian women and gay men into the cosmopolitan-managerial and so-called ‘creative’ global classes, very particular articulations of LGBTQ identity and culture – mostly middle-class and ‘homonormative’ – have become more visible.
  • At the same time alternative and marginalized expressions of LGBTQ identity have increasingly disappeared from public view. Among other factors, social class has played a key role in these dynamics. While institutional sexism and homophobia have perhaps lessened for social upper classes, the social exclusion of others has increased as the result of growing inequality and precarity.
  • These dynamics call for greater attention to the interconnections between social class, race and ethnicity, and gender and sexuality.

Focus on Class

Contemporary global developments exemplify what has long been seen as a central topic of scholarly inquiry: class and other social and cultural divisions have affected lived experiences and have had an impact on people’s abilities and opportunities, as well as on their constructions of gender and sexual identities, categories, and politics. A focus on ‘inclusion’, equal rights and democratic citizenship runs the danger of obscuring growing structural inequalities. Inside and outside of the academy, intersectional and other new forms of critical analysis have gone a long way in accounting for such inequalities, as well as for the divergent social positioning of actors. Nonetheless, these new approaches have not been productive on all levels of social relations and dynamics. Partly as the result of the crisis of Marxism and the theoretical problems associated with overtly reductive class analyses, the effects of class on gender and sexuality remain under-theorized and have suffered from insufficient empirical investigation.

The dominance of white, middle-class, homonormative, and cisgender LGBTQ cultures and identities in scholarly debates conceals class differences and the dominance of a particular ontology. A focus on class and its interconnection with race, ethnicity, gender and sexuality enables scholars to take seriously the complexities of contemporary gender and sexual dynamics in a global world. Class analysis not only unveils inequality but brings to light difference, distinction and dissent, both between and within social groups. Such an analysis questions the dominance of particular identities, but does not satisfy itself with explanations attributing alternative experiences to essentialized or depoliticized notions of cultural difference.

Dominance of global Western ontologies

A major question that needs to be addressed is the dominance of global Western ontologies in the study of social class. North–south comparisons (as well as comparisons unsettling this binary) will bring fresh insights into the way in which global dynamics have reconfigured relations between classes or the concept of class itself.

For instance, class identification in many parts of the world is a matter of how well connected one is transnationally, resulting in specific forms of gender inequality. Transnational migration also reveals class dynamics in configuration with sexuality, from exploitation and labour rights in migrant sex work to examples of successful transgender migration patterns. Neo-liberalisation is often and rightly so critiqued for creating (more) inequalities, but for some groups in the global South it also implies new opportunities. Recent studies on the global middle classes, for instance, have also emphasized the symbolic meaning of class. Eventually, such studies point out the necessity of questioning how the material and cultural dimensions are dialectically intertwined in the generation of gendered class subjectivities and relations. Exploring the class dynamics of gender and sexuality in and from the global South thus brings new understandings.

Interconnected developments 

Four interconnected developments background our call for a focus on class:

  • Gender and sexuality are often largely absent from class analysis.
  • Class since the 1980s has increasingly been abandoned as a theoretical tool in feminist theory, even though Marxism had informed feminist theory and practice until the 1980s.
  • The central role that queer approaches to social and cultural analysis attributes to choice, change, and the destabilization of categories comes at a cost, namely the lack of attention to more enduring power relations and inequalities.
  • Taking a transnational standpoint will help further theorise the questions of social classes in the 21st century.

Unpacking the concept of class – aim of this conference

The way forward, we suggest, is to start unpacking the concept of class. Interestingly, while most of us recognise immediately the notion of class, definitions of it remain elusive and differ tremendously in their reach and implications.

During this conference we intend to explore various routes to unpack the formulation of class through the prism of gender and sexuality:

  • The first question is the matter of scale: from day-to-day interaction, via various levels to the state, and the transnational level: when does class matter?
  • Hence, what makes class matter?
  • What are the material and/or symbolic characteristics of class and how do they matter?
  • Which social, political or cultural ideas, practices and institutions ‘form’ social class?
  • Last but not least, how can class analysis shed light on gender and sexual relations, and how does gender and sexuality analysis shed light on class?

We invite papers from the wide range of social sciences, including social history, to take up these questions and engage in an interdisciplinary debate.

Call for Papers

We invite papers from the wide range of social sciences, including social history, to take up these questions and engage in an interdisciplinary debate.

Please send:

  • Name of panel for which you are submitting
  • Author name and email address
  • Title
  • Abstract (up to 250 words)

Online form 

Please use the online form below to submit paper proposals for the conference Social Class in the 21st Century. Submission is open from April 15, 2015 until May 29, 2015 Authors will be notified of the decision by mid-June 2015.

Submission of Papers: http://arcgs.uva.nl/news-events/events/social-class-conference/social-class-conference/content/folder/call-for-papers/call-for-papers/call-for-papers/cpitem-2/link/papers.html

Registration and Fees: http://arcgs.uva.nl/news-events/events/social-class-conference/social-class-conference/content/folder/registration/registration.html

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

download (1)

Education for Debt

Education for Debt

THE NEOLIBERAL UNIVERSITY: GENDER, CLASS, AND SEXUALITY

AMSTERDAM RESEARCH CENTER GENDER AND SEXUALITY

Conference: ‘Social Class in the 21st Century’

Panel Call for Papers: Deadline May 29th 2015

Panel on: The Neoliberal University: Gender, Class, & Sexuality

This panel intends to investigate processes of bureaucratization and business-afication of the university and the role that these have in re-shaping the interrelations of class, gender, and sexuality; and the specific ways that the change from educational pedagogy to business model has impacted classed, gendered, and sexual practices and relationships.

The rise of neoliberalism coincided with the increase of enrollments in universities and this panel proposes to investigate these two in relation to each other. The scale of the university has increased in terms of rising numbers of students enrolled. Also, as university has become more accessible to larger numbers of citizens, the importance of higher education as a marker of class has become, relatively, more available.

In the light of these shifts, the question is how the (increasing) importance of the university as a site of emancipation takes on questions of gender norms and practices, as well as forms of sexuality.

On the one hand, universities can be seen as sites of normative structures regarding gender, sexuality, race / ethnicity, class, age and more, shaping normativity from aesthetics to (gendered) harassment on college campuses.

On the other hand, universities have also been the sites for social justice and emancipation, regarding gender and sexuality, by the way of Women’s & Gender studies, LGBT studies and Queer Theory.

This panel seeks to bring together a collection of papers on the role of the neoliberal university in shaping, marking, and creating new expressions and relations of gender, class, and sexuality. In this way, it opens up the discussion to allow for the varied ways that universities implement and allow possibly opposing development of providing spaces for emancipation as well as reproducing normative spaces in terms of gendered, sexualized and classed possibilities.

Papers should seek to elaborate on both theoretical elements and empirical cases (from the Global North and South) and aspects of the role of the university in the 21st Century and its impact on gender, class, and sexuality.

http://arcgs.uva.nl/news-events/events/social-class-conference/social-class-conference/content/folder/panels/panels/panels/content/folder/the-neoliberal-university-gender-class–sexuali.html

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/conference-cfp-the-neoliberal-university

Conference Website: http://arcgs.uva.nl/news-events/events/social-class-conference/social-class-conference/content/folder/social-class-conference.html

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/