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Daily Archives: May 22nd, 2015

Living Fire

Living Fire

AN EFFECTIVE RESPONSE TO A DYSTOPIAN VISION

(The Higher, 21 May 2015)

What does the recent election result presage for UK higher education (‘Sector stands by for battles …’ (THE, 14 May)? Evidently, a continuation of recent course and speed, namely:

  • removing the fee cap, thus further stratifying the sector;
  • more deregulation and further pickings for the private providers;
  • breaking up national bargaining on employment terms and conditions;
  • intensifying REF pressure through performance management, thus skewing research to serve a political agenda;
  • further encroachment of income-generating activities; and
  • entrenching the consumerist distortion of the academy through more NSS-style ‘assessments’.

We may expect more commercial and political attacks on academic freedoms; the elimination of academic governance in favour of corporate interests and ‘brand identity’; and further differentiation between colleagues in stable employment and those on casual contracts. The overall effect will be to undermine the universities’ capacity for genuine critical engagement.

In accelerating the end of the idea of a public university, these changes will fundamentally alter the nature of university education in the UK, and what it means to be a scholar and a student. As such, they represent the demise of the UK’s position, whatever its faults, in the world of higher education, learning, scholarship and research

At present, as scholars and academics, we are not in a good position to resist the implementation of this dystopian vision. Our initiatives in the academy (the Council for the Defence of British Universities and the Campaign for the Public University) have done important work to inform staff and students, as well as the general public, of what’s been going on since 2010 but without significant policy effects. Our trade union, the UCU, has impressive policies against the commercialisation of the sector and performance management but has been unable to turn the tide, and it has been weakened by successive defeats on pensions and pay.

There is a clear paradox here since the large majority of us is opposed to this destruction. We have a duty, therefore, to identify what is under threat, and what an effective response might be.

The future of HE in the UK is in the balance. Now is the time to convene to diagnose the problem, to develop a strategy to defend the sector, and to explain this to the wider society. We urge colleagues to plan a London conference in the autumn to resist this impending disaster.

Signed

Tom Hickey (Brighton UCU)
Professor John Holmwood (Nottingham, and Campaign for the Public University, CPU)
Sean Wallis (UCL, and UCU NEC & London Region)
Professor Thomas Docherty (Warwick, and Council for the Defence of British Universities, CDBU)
Professor Martin McQuillan (Kingston, and CDBU)
Professor Howard Hotson (Oxford, and CDBU)
Professor Miriam David (IoE)
Priyamvada Gopal (Cambridge)
Professor Bob Brecher (Brighton)
Adrian Budd (South Bank UCU)
Professor Dennis Leech (Warwick)
Saladin Meckled-Garcia (UCL UCU)
Professor Kate Chedgzoy (Newcastle)
Professor Des Freedman (Goldsmiths UCU)
Professor Jeff Duckett (QMUL)
Professor Lucie Clapp (UCL)
Professor Jane Rendell (UCL)
Professor Melissa Terras (UCL)
Jim Wolfreys (Kings UCU)
Professor Mike Otsuka (LSE)
Professor Richard Farndale (Cambridge)
Professor Patricia Waugh (Durham)
Professor Jane Hardy (Hertfordshire)
Carlo Morelli (Dundee, and UCU NEC)
Professor Malcolm Povey (Leeds)

See: https://heconvention2.wordpress.com/statement

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Philosophy

Philosophy

DOCTORAL SCHOLARSHIPS: PHILOSOPHY AND SOCIOLOGY OF EDUCATION

Appointment: Liverpool Hope University, UK

Please circulate this around your professional networks, and to any MA students who may be interested

There has arisen an opportunity for a fully-funded Doctoral scholarship working with philosophers and sociologists of education in the area of ‘spiritual, moral, social and cultural’ education. The project, which is also the subject of a UK ESRC Large Grant proposal currently under review, aims to explore the complex plurality of structures which set the ethos and value of publicly funded schools in England. Working with colleagues in the philosophy and sociology of education, there is broad scope for the doctoral student to explore questions such as:

  • exploring contested conceptions and definitions of citizenship, community and ‘British values’ in policy and practice;
  • developing culturally sensitive resources to support the development of school governors at the nexus of engagement between community and school leadership;
  • the relationship between religion, community and commonality in the governance and values of education, problematising the faith/state school dichotomy;
  • developing shared models of understanding the National Curriculum goal of the ‘spiritual, moral, social and cultural development’ of young people, identifying points of consensus and disjuncture between practitioners, policy and community;
  • how the discourse of ‘protecting frontline services’ which dominates politics in an age of austerity conceals rapid changes in the support and governance of schools.

The student will be co-located in the Centre for Education Policy Analysis and the Department of Social Science, and will benefit from a confluence of academic expertise in dialogical philosophers, ethnography, local governance, religion in education, moral and character education and post-secularity across the two departments.

The PhD studentship is fully funded for 3 years, covering fees and £13,500/yr stipend. Applications for either September or January start would be considered, but must be received by 25th June to ensure consideration in the first round.

Further information on how to apply is available at: http://www.hope.ac.uk/media/liverpoolhope/contentassets/documents/research/media,47420,en.pdf

I am happy to speak with any potential applicants.

David Lundie
Senior Lecturer in Education Studies, Liverpool Hope University
lundied@hope.ac.uk
0151 291 3783

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Antonio Negri

Antonio Negri

NEGRITUDE, DECOLONIZATION AND THE FUTURE OF THE WORLD

Website: http://www.lse.ac.uk/humanRights/events/2015/Wilder.aspx

Public Lecture Presented by the  Internationalism, Cosmopolitanism and the Politics of Solidarity Research Group

Tuesday 26 May 2015, 6pm -7.30pm

Thai Theatre, New Academic Building, LSE

Speaker: Dr Gary Wilder

Chair: Dr Ayça Çubukçu

Dr Wilder reconsiders decolonization from the perspectives of Aimé Césaire (Martinique) and Léopold Sédar Senghor (Senegal) who, beginning in 1945, promoted self-determination without state sovereignty. As politicians, public intellectuals, and poets, Césaire and Senghor struggled to transform imperial France into a democratic federation, with former colonies as autonomous members of a transcontinental polity. Wilder invites scholars to decolonize intellectual history and globalize critical theory, to analyze the temporal dimensions of political life, and to question the territorialist assumptions of contemporary historiography.

Gary Wilder is Director of the Mellon Committee on Globalization and Social Change, and Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology and the Department of History at The Graduate Center, City University of New York. His latest book is Freedom Time: Negritude, Decolonization and the Future of the World (Duke University Press, 2015)

Ayça Çubukçu (chair) is Assistant Professor in the Centre for the Study of Human Rights and Department of Sociology at LSE. She convenes the Internationalism, Cosmopolitanism and the Politics of Solidarity Research Group

This event is co-hosted by the Centre for the Study of Human Rights, the Department of Sociology, and the Centre for International Studies at LSE (London School of Economics).

This event is open to all with no ticket or pre-registration required. Entry is on a first come, first served.

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Student Debt

Student Debt

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON RESEARCH INTO HIGHER EDUCATION

Call for Papers

Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE)

SRHE Annual Research Conference 9-11 December 2015
SRHE Newer Researchers Conference 8 December 2015
Celtic Manor, Newport in South Wales, United Kingdom

 

Converging Concepts in Global Higher Education Research: Local, national and international perspectives

The Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE) invites research contributions to this international higher education conference. A significant body of research knowledge now exists which informs understandings locally, nationally and internationally and this conference theme examines issues of convergence, divergence and context and their potential impact across issues of policy and practice.

The annual SRHE Conference provides a stimulating international forum for papers of an empirical or scholarly nature relating to research into higher education in the widest sense and from a breadth of different disciplinary perspectives. The conference is highly participative, promoting the dissemination and exchange of ideas in a variety of formats, across a range of research domains.

 

You are invited to contribute to this debate in the following ways:

  • presenting a paper (including work of a conceptual or theoretical nature)
  • forming or participating in a symposium or research directions seminar
  • organising a ‘round table’ discussion
  • submitting a poster on any aspect of your research interests

 

Deadline for paper submissions: Friday 26th June 2015

 

SRHE Newer Researchers’ Conference 8 December 2015

The Call for papers for this one day conference for Newer Researchers will be launched shortly is on the same theme and will take place at the Celtic Manor one day in advance of the SRHE Annual Research Conference. This is an excellent event for postgraduate students and newer researchers, providing the opportunity to present research work in a nurturing environment and participate in seminars and discussions. Closing date for call for papers is Friday 10 July 2015.

Website: http://www.srhe.ac.uk/conference2015/

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/