Skip navigation

Daily Archives: March 7th, 2015

Aesthetics

Aesthetics

VIOLENCE, REPRESENTATIONS AND SEXUALITY

FIFTH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE OF THE INTERNATIONAL NETWORK FOR SEXUAL ETHICS AND POLITICS – INSEP

CALL FOR PAPERS – INSEP2015

13th ‐ 15th July, 2015, Ghent University, Belgium
Hosted by CEVI – Centre for Ethics and Value Inquiry
Faculty of Arts and Philosophy
Ghent University, Blandijnberg 2
9000 Ghent – Belgium
See: http://www.insep.ugent.be/insep2015/
General Conference Theme – Violence, Representations and Sexuality

The relationship between violence and sexuality is one of the most critical areas of engagement for sex and sexuality research and activism. There continues to be an epidemic of violence against women and children – rape, sexual assault, sexual harassment and abuse – across the globe, manifest in different cultural customs and practices, authority structures, hetero‐patriarchal and hetero‐normative regimes at both national (and supranational in the case of trafficking) and everyday micro levels. This epidemic is often met with: limited regulatory responses suffused with heterosexist assumptions; legal authorities that fail to prioritise or regard it is less important than other criminal activity; indifference; and/or claims that the prevalent cultural milieu makes it impossible to act. While some efforts have been made in North America, Europe and Australasia to effect change, in many parts of the globe sexual subjection and suffering continues to be seen as a normal state of affairs.

Equally, across the globe sexual difference and departures from heterosexuality are met by varying degrees of violence, ranging from physical attack and murder, to prejudicial and pathological assumptions that are present even in the social context of equality and rights discourses. To be different is still to be ‘othered’ to varying degrees, and that ‘othering’ often takes damaging forms of practice against those who present themselves as different.

The cultural and representational contexts are of particular importance here. It is in the representational form that we most saliently see the cultural demarcations of legitimacy and illegitimacy for sex and sexuality. Through representations, tensions are played out in the public arena that are sometimes manifest only in inter‐subjective or hetero‐normative meaning making. In societies where gay men and lesbians are formally recognised, there remains a dichotomy between the ‘respectable’ different that operates within homonormative constraints and lives without troubling heteronormative assumption, and the ‘queer’ whose personal practices challenge or disrupt cultural and social norms as a feature of being themselves. Likewise, the representation of sex in mainstream medias often reinforces particular understandings and meanings suffused with power, presumption and prejudice. Against that, alternate forms of media can play an important role in promote constructive understandings of the relationship between desire, pleasure and healthy satisfaction.

Violence and sexuality also creates a nexus of troubling contradictions. Recently, the fetishisation of ‘Fifty Shades of Grey’, e.g., normalises a commodified and limited exploration of sexual imagination, whilst BDSMers and others who wish to move beyond difference as an adjunct to genito‐centric and penetrative sex remain culturally prejudiced against and subject to different and sometimes punishing pathologies and legal regulatory regimes. Pornography and prostitution represent other areas of contestation. Is pornography or prostitution inherently violent? Or is there room for sufficient levels of agency and choice? The juxtaposition of pain, violence and sex, whether in practice or in representation, whether consenting or not, splits those radical voices who often support sexual freedom. Does violence and sexuality represent a fault‐line for disagreement? Is that disagreement one of language and representation or of power, degradation and its effects? We welcome papers that explore any aspect of the relationship between violence, representation, sexuality and sex. As always, we also welcome other papers that reflect innovative, creative and thought‐provoking work on sexual ethics and politics in general. For this purpose we retain open streams at the conference. Please feel free to email the conference organisers for further inquiries.

Acceptance Policy

The fifth international conference of INSEP welcomes papers, presentations and panels focusing on conceptual and theoretical debates, cultural and political analysis and empirical studies from which conceptual, ethical and political conclusions are drawn.

INSEP seeks to provide a critical and dynamic space for cutting edge thinking, new research and key discussions and debates about issues of sexual ethics or politics, whether conceptual and theoretical discourse, analytical studies or aesthetically or empirically constituted insights. INSEP sees the value in the fullest range of approaches to the study of sexual ethics and politics, including: gendered and feminist perspectives; distinctive lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and transsexual perspectives; queer perspectives; and approaches from more general positions such as liberalism, Marxism and democratic theory.

The 2015 conference seeks to be an inclusive space for discussion, welcoming dialogue and vigorous debate, but not sectarianism. We consider paper proposals and panel proposals from any disciplinary field, and are willing to consider expositions that take less orthodox forms.

To facilitate funding applications ‐ please note INSEP has no funds of its own – we operate a ‘rolling’ process of abstract review and acceptance or rejection, and can provide documentation where it is required to facilitate funding. Our turnaround time for refereeing is 10 days.

Submission & Timeline: Submissions for papers (250 words), panels or workshops (500 word stipulating participants) should reach us by Monday 15 June at the latest. Earlier of course, is better.

Normal acceptance/rejection notification ‐ 10 days. All delegates/paper‐givers must register by Monday 23 June, and we encourage earlier registration when acceptances have been communicated.

Please send abstracts to: insep.network@gmail.com

The conference fee for the full three days is 150 Euros, which includes the conference pack and refreshments. A concessionary rate of 100 Euros is available to students and postgraduates.

INSEP publishes a journal and a book series with Barbara Budrich Publishers. We would anticipate commissioning publications from the conference and, dependent on quality and coherence, may publish a collection based on themes emerging from the conference. INSEP also welcomes submissions to the journal and proposals to the Book Series.

About INSEP

Sexual ethics and politics lie at the heart of how we understand and practice our sexual lives. They form the basis from which we understand and engage with diverse and different sexualities. Both, however, are currently open to question. On the one hand, discussion of sexual ethics has previously been confined to the auspices of an abstract intellectual discourse, effectively separating it from practice. Sexual politics, on the other hand, has seen progressive advances through world‐wide activism by grass‐roots movements, NGOs and national and international agents, but in the push for progress, the space for self‐critique and reflexivity is often eradicated. INSEP wants to activate a critical dialogue between sexual ethics and politics by connecting them and exploring the ways they can contribute to each other. The sexual is political and just as sexual politics could be enriched by emancipatory ethical thinking, sexual ethics should connect with contemporary sexual activism, politics and practices aiming for the realisation of sexual equalities and justice.
For more info on INSEP & the 2015 conference please visit:

INSEP2015: http://www.insep.ugent.be/insep2015/
INSEP – http://www.insep.ugent.be/
Journal INSEP – http://budrich‐journals.de/index.php/insep
Paul Reynolds
Reader in Sociology and Social Philosophy
Edge Hill University, UK
reynoldp@edgehill.ac.uk
Tom Claes
Associate Professor of Ethics
Ghent University, Belgium
Tom.Claes@UGent.be

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Big Data

Big Data

CRITICAL APPROACHES TO BIG DATA

Critical Approaches to Big Data

Part of the Living in the Anthropocene series: http://rethinkingtheanthropocene.blogspot.co.uk/
School of Arts & Creative Industries, London South Bank University
Friday 5 June 2015

The rise of Big Data is changing how we think about the world, or so it is claimed. The advent of ‘algorithmic regulation’ spells the death of politics, but might also allow us to ‘stop wars before they happen’. Datafication enables the rise of new paradigms in the sciences and humanities, but may also entail the ‘end of theory’. Does the rise of data-driven knowledge underscore the need for human interpretation and judgement, or does it confirm the post-humanist rejection of modernist assumptions about how we understand and act to transform the world? Big Data is still an emerging concept and its future uses and implications remain unclear, but this makes the development of critical perspectives more, rather than less, important.

With:

Prof David Chandler: Big Data & Posthumanism
Centre for the Study of Democracy, University of Westminster

Dr Mark Coté: Critically Engaging Big Social Data
Department of Culture, Media & Creative Industries, King’s College London

Prof Phil Hammond: From Computer-Aided to Data-Driven: Journalism & Big Data
School of Arts & Creative Industries, London South Bank University

Dr Athina Karatzogianni: Datafication as Resistance?
Department of Media & Communication, University of Leicester

Dr Nathaniel Tkacz: The Performance Platform
Centre for Interdisciplinary Methodologies, University of Warwick

 

This event is free and open to all but places are limited. Click here to book a free ticket: http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/critical-approaches-to-big-data-tickets-15633371836

Bigger Data

Bigger Data

David Chandler, Professor of International Relations, Director of the Centre for the Study of Democracy, Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Westminster, 32-38 Wells Street, London, W1T 3UW. Tel: ++44 (0)776 525 3073.
Journal Editor, Resilience: International Policies, Practices and Discourses: http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/resi20

Amazon books page: http://www.amazon.co.uk/David-Chandler/e/B001HCXV7Y/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0

Personal website: http://www.davidchandler.org/
Twitter: @DavidCh27992090

Even Bigger Data

Even Bigger Data

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

A World To Win

A World To Win

DEMOCRACY AND CITIZENSHIP

A WORLD TO WIN

This Monday evening, March 9th, starting at 7.00 pm, we have a critical webinar concerning Democracy and Citizenship, coming just two months before the general election.

It discusses how we can become active citizens and make democracy work for us.

The presenter, Cormac Russell, lectured for eight years on active citizenship and democracy at the National College of Ireland.

There is no charge for taking part.

Here’s the link:

Try to log is about five minutes before the webinar starts and you can test the link right now.

Please make every effort to partake and feel free to pass on this information to all your contacts.

 

Visit awtw network at: http://aworldtowin.ning.com/?xg_source=msg_mes_network

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Annihilate Creativity!

Annihilate Creativity!

CULTURAL CAPITAL: THE RISE AND FALL OF CREATIVE BRITAIN

BY ROBERT HEWISON

OUT NOW

“Hewison’s analysis of how a golden age turned to lead is highly authoritative, well argued & conceptually robust.” Guardian

See: http://www.versobooks.com/books/1760-cultural-capital

————

Britain began the twenty-first century convinced of its creativity. Throughout the New Labour era, the visual and performing arts, museums and galleries, were ceaselessly promoted as a stimulus to national economic revival, a post-industrial revolution where spending on culture would solve everything, from national decline to crime. Tony Blair heralded it a “golden age.” Yet despite huge investment, the audience for the arts remained a privileged minority. So what went wrong?

In Cultural Capital, leading historian Robert Hewison gives an in-depth account of how creative Britain lost its way. From Cool Britannia and the Millennium Dome to the Olympics and beyond, he shows how culture became a commodity, and how target-obsessed managerialism stifled creativity. In response to the failures of New Labour and the austerity measures of the Coalition government, Hewison argues for a new relationship between politics and the arts.

————

ROBERT HEWISON is a historian of contemporary British culture. Beginning in 1939 with Under Siege, his series of books presents a portrait of Britain that runs from the perils of wartime to the counterrevolution of Thatcherism in The Heritage Industry. He is an internationally recognized authority on the work of John Ruskin, and has held chairs at Oxford, Lancaster and City Universities. He is an Associate of the think tank Demos, and has written on the arts for the Sunday Times since 1981. He has been a consultant to the Clore Duffield Foundation, the Gulbenkian Foundation, the Arts Council, the Heritage Lottery Fund and the Royal Shakespeare Company, and is on the editorial advisory board of the journal Cultural Trends.

————

“A brilliant analysis of the way that the intrinsic value of art was undermined by a Blair-led government’s attempts to control creative production and turn it into an instrument of social engineering. It is a timely warning about the dangers of political interference and a rallying cry for art to both be publicly supported and maintain a hard won independence. Art needs this independence from power in order to show us to ourselves in ways that the media and politics never do and never can.” – Antony Gormley

“Long Britain’s best chronicler of culture and political policy, Robert Hewison turns his unflinching gaze on the New Labour era, a time of targets, access and excellence for all, complete with the National Lottery, Cool Britannia, the Millennium Dome and the 2012 Olympics. It’s not a pretty sight, and his findings of folly, incompetence and vanity will entertain and disturb readers in equal measure. They should also embarrass any politicians and arts administrators who retain a degree of self-awareness.” – Alwyn Turner, author of A Classless Society

“This is essential reading for anyone who has the slightest interest in the funding of the arts in this country.” – Richard Eyre

————

PAPERBACK: NOVEMBER 2014 / 288 pages / ISBN: 9781781685914 / £14.99 / $24.95 / $28.95 (Canada)

CULTURAL CAPITAL is available at a 40% discount (paperback) on our website, with free shipping and bundled ebook. Purchasing details here:http://www.versobooks.com/books/1760-cultural-capital

————

Visit Verso’s website for information on our upcoming events, new reviews and publications and special offers: http://www.versobooks.com

Sign up for the Verso mailing list:

https://www.versobooks.com/users/sign_up

Follow us online:

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/VersoBks

Twitter: http://twitter.com/VersoBooks

​First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cultural-capital-by-robert-hewison-out-now

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

The Black Rock

The Black Rock

DECOLONIZING THE MIND SUMMER SCHOOL

What is the Decolonizing The Mind Summer School?

From July 19th – July 31st the first edition of the Decolonizing The Mind Summer School will be held in Amsterdam.

The DTM Summer School is an intensive two-week course on the subject of Decolonizing The Mind. The course takes on two interrelated topics:

  • The theoretical framework and methodology of Decolonizing The Mind (knowledge production and the mechanisms of colonizing the mind).
  • Decolonial thinking and the discourse of liberation in social movements in different regions of the world.

 

What is the program?

In the two weeks there are ten sessions (morning lectures and afternoon interactive sessions) devoted to the following topics:

Session 1: Sandew Hira, director of the International Institute for Scientific Research in Holland, gives an overview of decolonial thinking in the last few decades in the academia (postcolonial studies, national liberation discourses, ethnic studies etc.) and the methodology of developing a theoretical framework for DTM based on decolonial concepts.

Session 2: Professor Sabelo J. Ndlovu-Gatsheni, Professor and Head of the Archie Mafeje Research Institute at the University of South Africa, takes on the issue of nationalism and anti-colonial struggles in Southern Africa, including the question of land.

Session 3: Roberto Hernández, lecturer at the San Diego State University in California USA, deals with the persistence and resurgence of indigenous movements, knowledges and practices, which will be the basis for a rethinking of social struggles over land, natural resources and cultural renewal.

Session 4: Stephen Small, professor in the Department of History at the University of Amsterdam, and Associate Professor of African American Studies at the University of California, Berkeley, will go into the different discourses in the Civil Rights Movement in America.

Session 5: Jaya Mehta, senior economist and an activist associated with the Joshi-Adhikari Institute for Social Studies in India, traces the development path traversed by India and China in the transformation from predominantly agrarian economies to industrialised countries that are well integrated into the world economy. She focuses on the philosophy behind the policies of different actors.

Session 6: Abulkasim Al-Jaberi, journalist and activist in Holland, analyzes the effect of the US invasion of Iraq in relation to the historic events unfolding today including the Arab spring and the emergence of ISIS.

Session 7: Arzu Merali, head of the research section of the Islamic Human Rights Commission in London UK, highlights the rise of Islamic political movements in Iran and Turkey – two key players in the Middle East – in their successes and failures.

Session 8: Jeanne Henriquez, independent scholar and activist from Curacao in the Caribbean, deals with the legacy of slavery in the Caribbean and the new social movements associated with it including the movement for pan-Africanism and reparations.

Session 9: Selim Nadi, member of the first decolonial party in France – Parti des Indigènes de la République – goes into the process that Western Europe is going through of a painful confronting with its colonial past right in the heart of the empire. European societies now have to deal with a new generation of young activists who are trying to politicize the postcolonial situation of their countries.

Session 10: Sandew Hira and Ramon Grosfoguel, are giving a lecture in the form of a debate on two discourse of liberation: Marxism and decolonial thinking. They take into account the analysis of the different regional experiences as have been covered in the previous lectures.

 

Other information

The Decolonizing The Mind Summer School is organized by the International Institute of Scientific Research (IISR) headed by director Sandew Hira.

The fee for the Summer School is € 1,000.

If paid before April 1st 2015, then the fee is € 900.

This fee does not include lodging, food and transport.

Download the full 16-page brochure here: http://www.decolonizingthemind.org/download/DTMSM2015Brochure.pdf

Download the application form here: http://www.decolonizingthemind.org/download/DTMSM2015ApplicationForm.doc.

Website: http://www.decolonizingthemind.org

Contact email: info@decolonizingthemind.org

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/first-edition-of-the-decolonizing-the-mind-summer-school-in-amsterdam-july-2015

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Education

Education

HANDBOOK OF GLOBAL EDUCATIONAL REFORM

Call for Chapter Abstracts

Handbook of Global Educational Reform (Wiley-Blackwell, 2017)

This edited volume examines educational reform from a global perspective. Currently, a number of trends are converging to fundamentally reshape the policy and practice of educational development globally. Transnational institutions such as the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), World Bank, World Trade Organization, and powerful transnational corporations such Pearson, Knowledge Universe, and Edison Learning are promoting an interconnected set of global educational reforms that seek to align national systems of education with the demands of transnational capital and ruling economic and political interests. Foremost, neoliberal rationalities and policy prescriptions that take the market as the dominant organizing principle of human and institutional affairs have rapidly expanded. This has functioned to promote standardization across national educational systems and private sector and market-based models of educational policy. In poor countries, private fee for service educational franchises (many of them owned by transnational actors) are being promoted, while in rich countries public educational systems are being defunded, privatized, commercialized, and subject to new forms of corporate managerialism.

The dominance of neoliberal rationalities in public policy over the last three decades has tended to reshape educational systems in ways that undermine democratic social relationships, institutions, and public spheres that foster cultures of dialogue, dissent, and collaboration necessary for democratic life inside and outside of schools. By situating educational reform in terms of the broader structures and ideological contests animating educational policy and practice, this volume is concerned to examine reform without being “reformist.”  That is, we do not see reform of existing institutional arrangements as being the only or central aim of engagement. Rather, this volume situates reform in the service of broad-based social transformation. In short, what is at stake in comprehending educational reform today is setting the agenda for educational and social development that serves the interests of the public, that fosters cultures of questioning, reflection, engaged self-governance, and egalitarian and sustainable forms of living.

We are interested in abstracts of no more than 300 words that explore a variety of theoretical and empirical issues in global education reform from a critical and transformative perspective. We are particularly interested in abstracts that engage issues across Latin America, Africa, Asia, and the Pacific. Areas of investigation include:

1. The historical, ideological, organizational, and institutional foundations of global education reform policies, networks, movements, actors, institutions, and agendas across diverse international contexts highlighting in particular the intersection of reform and new articulations of power, governance, and contestation.

2. How the ideologies and infrastructures underlying reform are deployed as concrete policy and in educational reform trends locally, nationally and globally through case studies of reform initiatives within specific contexts.

3. The new managerialism in educational reform including the standardization of national systems of educational governance, curriculum, teaching, and learning and new systems of privatization, accountability, audit, big-data, learning analytics, biometrics, and new technology-driven adaptive learning models.

4. How practical policy is grounded in particular epistemological assumptions such as positivism, standardization, and instrumentalism that are lived through class, race, gender, sexuality, language, culture, and bodies. In other words, the subjective and intersubjective experiential dimensions of educational reforms.

5. Alternative transformative pathways for global, national, and local educational reform tied to the ethical imperative to reimagine education for human flourishing, justice, ecological sustainability, and equality. Of particular interest is how grassroots movements are involved in contesting dominant reform trends and charting new paths for education and sustainable democratic futures.

If you are interested in contributing to this edited collection that is under contract with Wiley-Blackwell please submit an abstract by June 1, 2015 of no more than 300 words to: globaleducationreform@gmail.com. We anticipate final manuscripts being due June 1, 2016 with early 2017 publication. Manuscripts will be between 8,000-10,000 words.

Information on Co-editors:

Kenneth J. Saltman is Professor of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies at the University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth. His research examines the political economy and cultural politics of public school privatization. He is the author and editor of numerous books on educational policy and politics including Capitalizing on Disaster: Taking and Breaking Public SchoolsThe Gift of Education: Public Education and Venture PhilanthropyThe Edison SchoolsEducation as Enforcement: the Militarization and Corporatization of SchoolsThe Failure of Corporate School ReformThe Politics of Education: A Critical Introduction, and Toward a New Common School Movement.

Alexander J. Means is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Social and Psychological Foundations of Education at SUNY Buffalo State. His research examines educational policy and governance in relation to political economy, urbanization, human security, social inequality, and radical democratic theory and politics. He is the author of Schooling in the Age of Austerity: Urban Education and the struggle for Democratic Life (Palgrave, 2013), which won a 2014 Society of the Professors of Education Book Award, and Toward a New Common School Movement (Paradigm, 2014) with Noah De Lissovoy and Kenneth Saltman. His work has also been published in numerous international research journals such as Critical Sociology, Journal of Education Policy, Educational Philosophy and Theory, Policy Futures in Education, Foucault Studies, Review of Education, Pedagogy, and Cultural Studies, and Critical Studies in Education.

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/