Skip navigation

Daily Archives: January 19th, 2015

Co-operationCO-OPERATIVES AND THE WORLD OF WORK

Call for papers

ICA-ILO International Research Conference

Cooperatives and the World of Work

Antalya, Turkey

9-10 November, 2015

 

Abstracts: February 15, 2015

Notification of acceptance: April 15, 2015

Early bird registration: September 15, 2015

 

Conference Objectives

The International Co-operative Alliance Committee on Cooperative Research (ICA CCR) and the International Labour Organization (ILO) will host a research conference on 9-10 November 2015 in Antalya, Turkey. The conference will bring together researchers, students, practitioners, advocates, policy makers and representatives of employers’ and workers’ organizations working in areas of cooperative enterprises and social and solidarity economy organizations, as well as labour research and themes related to the world of work.

The ILO/ICA research conference will be an opportunity, among others, to:

  • Bring cooperative researchers and labour researchers together around the themes of world of work;
  • Raise visibility and interest in research on decent work (job creation, rights at work, social protection, social dialogue) in the world of cooperatives, to encourage more systematic and effective engagement with world of work issues;
  • Raise visibility and interest in qualitative and quantitative research on cooperative enterprises among labour economists and researchers; and
  • Establish contacts and potentially a research network around cooperatives and the world of work.

 

Conference Background

The crisis in the world of work, which ranges from unemployment to unfairness and inequality in the labour market, the widespread lack of social protection and the impact of climate change along with food and fuel crises, has generated growing interest of policy makers in the cooperative enterprise model. Across continents, cooperative enterprises have been established to confront the crises and have grown both in membership and return at such times.

Today when cooperative principles are put into action, they continue to show their relevance and value [1]. Worker cooperatives are emerging as a way to rescue failing enterprises, and legislation is often following to catch up with the economic realities in a number of countries. Consumer and producer cooperatives as well perform functions that improve the standard of living of workers and they are often cited as “best places to work”.

The cooperative form of enterprise and organization is growing and fulfilling a range of social, economic and environmental functions and responding to the needs of their members. They are increasingly being established among vulnerable categories of workers such as migrant workers, people with disabilities, and workers in the informal economy (for example, street vendors, waste pickers, home-based, domestic, construction and transport workers); as well as in innovative sectors, including social care cooperatives (for elderly, disabled and child care), tourism cooperatives, and renewable energy production and distribution cooperatives.

As global attention focuses on the challenges of sustainable development, from the world of work perspective, cooperative enterprises are well-placed to be leaders to advance the decent work dimension of a just transition. Nevertheless, although their role as key building blocks for a jobs-oriented recovery strategy may seem obvious, evidence-based policy in that regard requires further research and statistics to track the quantity and quality of the jobs created [2].

The cooperative movement must be in a position to articulate and measure the forms of value that cooperatives produce in leveraging more and better jobs, so key questions are:

  • What impact do the ownership structure and the active participation of workers and members in cooperatives have on the productivity of such enterprises?
  • What impact does broadening ownership have on job quality and working conditions?
  • What is the record of cooperatives on labour compliance?
  • What is the qualitative and quantitative contribution of cooperative enterprises to advancing full and productive employment and decent work, in particular for vulnerable groups?

 

Message from Guy Ryder, ILO Director-General, on International Cooperative Day 2013

http://www.ilo.org/global/about-the-ilo/who-we-are/ilo-director-general/statements-and-speeches/WCMS_216859/lang–en/index.htm

As global attention focuses on the challenges of sustainable development, from the world of work perspective, cooperative enterprises are well-placed to be leaders to advance the decent work dimension of a just transition. Nevertheless, although their role as key building blocks for a jobs-oriented recovery strategy may seem obvious, evidence-based policy in that regard requires further research and statistics to track the quantity and quality of the jobs created.

The cooperative movement must be in a position to articulate and measure the forms of value that cooperatives produce in leveraging more and better jobs, and in this respect crucial issues are:

  • What impact do the ownership structure and the active participation of workers and members in cooperatives have on the productivity of such enterprises?
  • What impact does broadening ownership have on job quality and working conditions?
  • What is the record of cooperatives on labour compliance?
  • What is the qualitative and quantitative contribution of cooperative enterprises to advancing full and productive employment and decent work, in particular for vulnerable groups?

 

Notes:

[1]. Message from Guy Ryder, ILO Director-General, on International Cooperative Day 2013

http://www.ilo.org/global/about-the-ilo/who-we-are/ilo-director-general/statements-and-speeches/WCMS_216859/lang–en/index.htm

[2]. Guy Ryder’s opening remarks to the UNRISD Conference on Social and Solidarity Economy held in May 2013 in Geneva. http://www.ilo.org/global/about-the-ilo/who-we-are/ilo-director-general/statements-and-speeches/WCMS_212653/lang–en/index.htm

 

Conference Topics

The conference will address, but is not limited to, the following research areas:

  • Cooperatives and labour law compliance
  • Cooperatives and trade unions
  • Cooperatives and employers’ organizations
  • Cooperatives and employment creation
  • Cooperatives and child labour
  • Cooperatives and forced labour
  • Cooperatives and formalizing the workers in the informal economy
  • Cooperatives and decent work in the rural economy
  • Cooperatives and youth employment
  • Cooperatives on women’s economic empowerment and gender equality
  • Cooperatives and labour statistics
  • Cooperatives and codes of conduct
  • Cooperatives and labour legislation and policies
  • Cooperatives and productivity
  • Employment in cooperatives across value chains
  • Cooperatives and social protection
  • Cooperatives and social dialogue
  • Innovation in cooperatives (social, organizational and technical)
  • Enterprise restructuring and worker cooperatives
  • Cooperatives and labour in socialist and transition economies
  • Theoretical advancements on cooperatives and labour issues
  • Comparative performance of worker cooperatives and (non-cooperative) employee owned firms
  • Cooperatives and human development and education/training

 

Call for Papers

We invite practitioners, researchers, and policy makers in the cooperative and social and solidarity economy to submit an abstract no longer than 300 words on the listed topics, or other topics related to cooperatives and the world of work. Proposals for presentations or for panels (up to six participants) and sessions (three or four presenters of research papers on a common theme) are welcome.

The abstracts should be submitted by email to: coop@ilo.org no later than February 15, 2015.

The email communications should indicate ICAILO2015 and the family name of the corresponding author in the subject area (eg. ICA-ILO2015 – Smith).

The message should indicate clearly the type of proposal – paper abstract, panel, or a session. A panel or session proposal needs to include names of all presenters, as well as abstracts of all three (or maximum four) papers for a session.

 

Young scholars programme (YSP)

Young/new researchers (graduate students, doctoral and post-doctoral students, and new scholars within two years of receiving their degrees) are invited to submit their proposals as indicated in the above Call for Papers, also indicating their wish to participate in the ‘Young scholars programme’. Depending on interest, a decision about the exact shape of the program will be made with inputs from the applicants.

This may be a pre-conference workshop for new scholars, related to the themes of the conference, or a discussion forum related to their research.

Deadline to express interest in YSP to be submmited by email to: snovkovic@smu.ca by February 15, 2015.

Limited space.

Young scholars will also be eligible for a reduced registration fee. Financial travel support is possible, but it will depend on the number of applicants and available resources. More details will be available on the conference website closer to the date.

 

Websites: http://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/groups/public/—ed_emp/—emp_ent/—coop/documents/event/wcms_310424.pdf

http://ccr.ica.coop/sites/ccr.ica.coop/files/attachments/Call%20for%20Papers%20Coop%20and%20WoW%20Final2.pdf

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

KRISIS

KRISIS

NEVER WORK

Cardiff University Conference

Friday 10 July 2015

Call for Papers

“A corpse rules society – the corpse of labour.” – Manifesto Against Labour, Krisis-Group

Since the 1970s modern societies have been increasingly faced with social issues caused by a reliance on a form of life that technological development is making redundant: work. Competition drives companies to eject human beings from the labour process even while it relies on those people as consumers and producers of value. Equally, more human beings than ever before depend upon the capitalist production process for their survival, yet at this historical juncture it appears no longer to have need of them. It is this contradiction that some contemporary social critics have diagnosed as the basis of a crisis of civilisation through which we are currently living. The symptoms of this crisis are manifold and, one can argue, affect every aspect of society: privatisation, financialisation and economic crises, mass unemployment, the casualisation of labour and austerity programmes, regional conflict, the rise of political extremism, growing wealth inequality, individualisation, school shootings and the ever-growing number of people suffering from narcissistic personality disorders, to name but a few.

Despite the sheer scale of problems that society currently faces, the dominant social discourse has rarely considered that a crisis of the very categories of capitalist society could be the source of the problem. Work, in particular, is central to modern notions of individual and collective identity, of morality and even of human nature. It is the means through which individuals are expected to realise themselves and to gain access to social wealth. It is perhaps for this reason that, while work is often seen as central to resolving the current crisis – either through calls for higher wages and the right to work or through attacks on immigrants and the unemployed – it is rarely seen as the problem in itself. The aim of this conference is therefore to ask what might a critique of work usefully offer us in addressing contemporary social issues and, if one will allow it, the possibility of a greater crisis of modern civilisation.

Contributors might consider:

  • What kinds of critique of work are necessary, on the basis of what criteria and in the name of what alternatives?
  • What hampers such a critique and how can we remove, go around or through these barriers?
  • What critical theories can usefully contribute to a contemporary critique of work?
  • How can contemporary social movements benefit from a critique of work?
  • How might a theoretical critique of work manifest itself practically and how might critiques of work in practice inform theoretical critiques?
  • What lessons can we learn from historical and contemporary social movements against work?
  • What might a critique of work tell us about the political, economic and psychological forms and changes that society is currently experiencing?
  • What are particularly unexamined aspects of the critique of work that need addressing?
  • How widespread and persistent are critiques of work in contemporary social movements and what kinds of critique of work have they developed?
  • What useful relationship might the critique of work have with critiques of the state, patriarchy, politics and other social forms?
  • What alternatives to work still exist, have existed and might exist?

 

Confirmed keynote speakers will be: Anselm Jappe (author of Guy Debord, Les Aventures de la marchandise, Crédit à mort) and Norbert Trenkle (author of Die Große Entwertung, Dead Men Working). Both of our keynotes are members of the wertkritik, or “critique of value”, school of Marxian critique.

Abstracts of 350 words, with a small bio, should be sent to Dr Alastair Hemmens (hemmensa@cardiff.ac.uk) by 20 February 2015.

The conference itself will take place at Cardiff University, Wales, on 10 July 2015.

This research is funded by the Leverhulme Trust Early Career Fellowship: Dr Alastair Hemmens, “‘Ne travaillez jamais’: The Critique of Work in Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century French Thought, from Charles Fourier to Guy Debord.”

Website: http://www.marblepunk.com/2015/01/never-work-cardiff-university.html

Robert Kurz

Robert Kurz

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Manifesto Against Labour

Manifesto Against Labour

 

Antonio Gramsci

Antonio Gramsci

PAST AND PRESENT: PHILOSOPHY, POLITICS, AND HISTORY IN THE THOUGHT OF ANTONIO GRAMSCI

International Conference

18-19 June 2015

King’s College London

Speakers: Fabio Frosini (Urbino), Alex Loftus (KCL), Peter Thomas (Brunel); including contributions and chairing from: Carl Levy (Goldsmiths), Magnus Ryner (KCL), Anne Showstack Sassoon (Birkbeck), Leila Simona Talani (KCL), Cosimo Zene (SOAS).

The legacy of the Italian theorist Antonio Gramsci (1891-1937) has been widely acknowledged as one of the most significant intellectual contributions of the twentieth century. Even as the historical events of his life have faded from living memory, Gramsci’s thought has increased in influence and become diffused amongst a multitude of disciplines in the academic firmament; from philosophy to history and geography, through cultural theory and subaltern studies, to international relations, linguistics, critical legal studies and beyond.

In light of the widespread and heterogeneous deployments of his ideas, it seems apt and necessary to return to the texts themselves: Gramsci’s pre-prison and his prison writings, both the Prison Notebooks and the Letters from Prison. The aim of this conference is to bring together a new generation of scholars working on Gramscian themes in order to engage closely with his writings.

Working in collaboration with experienced Gramsci scholars, this conference is the first initiative of a group of early-career researchers and graduate students. Through a combination of panels and workshops, the conference will provide participants with the opportunity to present their work and to receive constructive feedback in a friendly and stimulating environment.

The two-day international conference also aims to contribute to the process of building links between Anglophone and international, in particular Italian, Gramsci scholarship. The organizers hope to create a network through which to share research and encourage interactions between researchers from different countries working on Gramscian thought and related topics. It is proposed that an edited collection of essays will be published as a product of the conference and further engagements.

Gramsci’s perspective is marked by a profound sense of the manifold connections between the explanation of the past and the analysis of the present. Our intention is collectively to investigate the rich potentialities of the theme ‘Past and Present’ in his thought. Participants are invited to explore the conceptual laboratory of Gramsci’s historical-political narration, as well as his endeavour to theorize the unity of theory and practice. This nexus between ‘explication’ of the past and strategic ‘analysis’ of the present is characteristic of the originality of Gramsci’s approach to the ‘question of theory’. More broadly, the conference aspires to study the way in which Gramsci’s historical perspective intermingles with his engaged concern for the future of a ‘big and terrible’ world, in the sense that might today be called ‘global history’.

Gramsci’s ability to dialectically unite seemingly opposed elements (i.e. civil society and the state, structure and superstructure, the spatial elements of historicism, or vice versa the multiple temporalities going across the political space) illuminates the capacity of his thought to stimulate critical renewals in various domains of thought. Further investigation of this critical project reveals the aspect of ‘reciprocal translatability’ that Gramsci identifies between different facets of the knowledge of reality as ‘philosophy’, ‘politics’ and ‘economics’. The conference aims to explore the ongoing elaboration of this ‘homogeneous circle’ (Notebook 4, § 46), that is, the constitution of Gramsci’s conception of the world and its relation to history, understood as a unitary and dynamic process.

Consequently, we encourage paper proposals that analyze Gramsci’s thought (either the prison or his pre-prison writings) from political, philosophical, economic, and historical points of view, whilst evoking the connections between these different dimensions. Inter-disciplinary papers that focus on the reappraisal of Gramscian concepts in the contemporary world (within cultural theory, post-colonial studies, International Relations, geography, history of science, etc.) are also welcome.

Suggested topics include, but are not limited to: the Marxian legacy and the philosophy of praxis; Gramsci and global history: the ‘integral historian’; the Gramscian analysis of modernity: crisis, hegemony and passive revolution; the Party and the role of the traditional and organic intellectuals; Gramsci and pragmatism: language, truth, ideology; Anti-economism and Gramsci’s critical economy; Gramscian cultural writings; Centre and periphery; From ‘subaltern social groups’ to global subalternity.

Speakers will have to cover their trip and accommodation expenses.

Abstracts of no more than 400 words should be sent by Friday 23rd January 2015 to: gramsciconference2015@gmail.com

Supported by:

–         Department of European Studies, King’s College London

–         Department of Geography, King’s College London

–         International Gramsci Society

–         International Gramsci Society – Italia

–         Ghilarza Summer School – Scuola internazionale di studi gramsciani

Organizing committee:

Francesca Antonini (Università di Pavia, Italy)

Aaron Bernstein (King’s College London)

Lorenzo Fusaro (Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana (UAM), Mexico)

Robert Jackson (Manchester Metropolitan University)

 

For further information, please contact gramsciconference2015@gmail.com

Website: http://gramsciconference2015.blogspot.co.uk/

 

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/past-and-present.-philosophy-politics-and-history-in-the-thought-of-gramsci-international-conference-18-19-june-2015-king2019s-college-london

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Education Crisis

Education Crisis

UNICONFLICTS

UNICONFLICTS In Spaces of Crisis: Critical Approaches In, Against and Beyond the University

International Open Gathering

11–14 June 2015

At the Department of Architecture, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece

Encounters and Conflicts in the City

Details: http://urbanconflicts.wordpress.com/

 

Calling

The group “Encounters and Conflicts in the City” calls radical research groups, critical workshops and researchers, students and collectives that are placed in, against and beyond the neoliberal university in an open gathering on the 11-14th June 2015 at the Department of Architecture at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki.

Through this gathering, we aim to create a public space of dialogue transcending divisions among academic and scientific disciplines and to critically approach the urban issues of the era of crisis, through a dialectic, intersectional and postcolonial approach.

The central questions that we wish to raise are two:

  1. What is the role of knowledge, of the university and of researchers in the era of crisis?
  2. What are the critical epistemological and methodological tools for studying the spatial expressions of the ongoing crisis at multiple scales?

Within this context, we seek to examine the ongoing crisis not just as an over-accumulation crisis but also as a crisis of social disobedience and of the inability of the circulation of capital, patriarchy and nationalism. Moving against the mystification of the crisis, we are interested in critical approaches that focus on the spatialization of social relations and examine the spaces of dissent. Particularly, we wish to examine the articulations, the limits, the contradictions and the dialectic relation of commons, enclosures, inclusion, exclusion, insurgency and counter-insurgency as well as their hybrid intermediate forms, which emerge in and through physical space, modes of communication and the constitution of communities. Overall, we aim to break the North/South or East/West dichotomies and to focus on the fields of gender, race, class and culture.

Building on the critical evaluation of social relations, the circulation of social struggles and subjects and communities in motion, we search for their contentious spaces and their spatial transformations, limits, possibilities and contradictions in the era of crisis. Moreover, understanding education as a unity of theory and practice, we seek these epistemological and methodological tools that emerge from and aim to the deepening and the circulation of social struggles and social movements. In the context of today’s global and local crisis, we note that while a plethora of social struggles and insurgencies emerge, the academic research often appropriates and commercializes their ideas. It is exactly here that we identify the dead-end.

Hence, we seek to surpass the so called academic activism and to set as a main target of this open gathering the critical examination of the following:

A. The role of knowledge and of researchers in the university and in social movements

The neoliberal University and the educational system constitute strategic mechanisms for the production and reproduction of social relations. In particular, within a dynamic process of neoliberalization, the university studies are intensified and are linked more and more to the labour market. Within this context, we wish to examine issues such as the production of knowledge, knowledge as a common, the neoliberalization of the University, the new educational enclosures and the concept of Anti-university.

The transformation of knowledge into private property and consequently into a commodity creates new enclosures in the field of knowledge. These new enclosures in neoliberal education are expressed both through the commodification of the physical space of the universities and through the objectification of human abilities. Some indicative examples are the increase of studying costs, the studying loans, the control of access to information, the commercialization of academic papers and books, the securitization of the University space, the criminalization and the rhetoric against student mobilizations, the suppression of the struggles of university employees and the restriction of the freedom of speech.

However, since 1960s and 1970s, the universities are spaces of collective emancipatory movements, of social struggles and of radical experiments of self-organization for the production of knowledge. As a response to these movements, since 1980s, a number of educational reforms have been introduced. These reforms seek to promote the marketization of the university, aiming to produce the appropriate competitive workforce and to supress student movements.

Yet, during the last decade, many dynamic student movements have emerged in France (2006), Greece (2006-2007), the USA (2009-2010), the UK (2010), Italy (2010-2011) and so on, which targeted the enclosure of knowledge and were connected and inspired many other urban social movements.

 

Axes of Discussion

A.1 Social education and emancipatory movements in the universities

-Student movements: limits and contradictions, connection with other urban movements, confrontation of their suppression and criminalization

-Perspectives of a radical pedagogy towards the knowledge as common

-Ideas and practices of free–‐autonomous universities beyond the education of the neoliberal university

A.2 Control and commodification of knowledge

-Public, state and private education in the neoliberal era

-Politics of knowledge enclosures and copyrights

-The suppression of academic freedom and of the freedom of speech

-Knowledge as private property and commodity for the production of value and surplus value

-Student loans and study costs as mechanisms of disciplining

-The cultural politics of the neoliberal university

-Paid and unpaid work at the University

A.3 The role of the researcher

-Lifelong education, competitiveness and the precarious status of the researcher

-The researcher as producer of dominant discourses and her/his role in the reproduction of power

-Competitiveness, academic carrie and academic divisions and hierarchies

-The biopolitical character of the neoliberal education and the construction of new identities

-Education as praxis, understood as a unity of theory and practice

-Researchers, networks and groups against and beyond the neoliberal university

 

B. Critical epistemological and methodological tools for the study of the crisis’s spatial expressions at multiple scales

Against the privatization and commodification of the academic knowledge and the intended hegemony of the neoliberal perspectives, we seek those critical epistemological tools of knowledge production that encourage social emancipation.

During the last years, urban movements and a plethora of visible and invisible practices of resistance and emancipation offer a variety of tools for the destabilization of the dominant ideologies, ways of disaggregation of power, negotiation of contradictions and visibility of differences. In parallel, today there is the urgent need for the promotion, circulation and deepening of these critical perspectives and their linking to social struggles. Thus, we aim to discuss epistemological and methodological tools, such as the following:

B1. Dialectic critical urban theory

Which are those critical approaches that assist us to perceive and examine the multiple dimensions of urban space? How do dialectic approaches and critical urban theory contribute to the understanding of the spaces of social movements and the spaces of capital, racism and patriarchy?

B2. Intersectionality and urban space in the era of crisis

How does intersectionality contribute to the study of the urban space? Which are the intersectional crossings of the multiple systems of domination, oppression and discrimination such as race, class, gender, ethnicity, sexuality, religion, dis/ability, age, cast, language, culture, body size, education level or citizenship?

B3. Cultural and postcolonial approaches

How do cultural and postcolonial studies contribute to the understanding of urban space and the conceptualization of body, identity and modes of communication. How does the criminalization and the suppression of alternative modes of culture, information and lifestyle operate as mechanisms of control, disciplining and normalization? What is the role of social media in the communication of social struggles? We seek the expression of the ongoing crisis through the spaces of architecture, art, media, and internet.

 

Within the above context, we call critical research groups, workshops, collectives and individuals to participate in a gathering during 11-14 June 2015. If you would like to participate, please provide us with your abstract (300 words) by 1 March 2015 at the latest, to the following e-mail: urbanconflicts@gmail.com

Participation is free and we will try to provide accommodation for as many participants as possible.

 

“Encounters and conflicts in the city” group

Costas Athanasiou, Eleni Vasdeki, Elina Kapetanaki, Maria Karagianni, Matina Kapsali, Vaso

Makrygianni, Foteini Mamali, Orestis Pangalos, Haris Tsavdaroglou

Thessaloniki

Thessaloniki

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Crisis

Crisis

Monsters

Monsters

GODS AND MONSTERS: HISTORISIZING RITUAL, PUBLIC MEMORY, AND THE RELIGIOUS IMAGINATION

Call for Papers!

History Students Association Conference 2015

In his seminal essay The Great Cat Massacre, Robert Darnton gave a sage bit of advice to academics who study culture : “When you realize that you are not getting something—a joke, a proverb, a ceremony—that is particularly meaningful to the natives, you can see where to grasp a foreign system of meaning in order to unravel it.”

The monster is a construct and a projection, always interpreting the moment in which it is created. So too we see constructions of self in cultural phenomena as diverse as comic book heroes, ghost stories, fertility rituals, hagiography-even the villainization of the “other” informs the moment in which it enter public consciousness.

It is in this spirit that the 2015 History Students Association Conference at San Francisco State University is seeking papers that explore the intersection between humanity and its constructs.

How does ritual inform mentality? What can the supernatural tell us about historic truth and memory? How can we interpret stories so as to better understand the storyteller? How does politicization shape religious experience? How does the demonization of the other inform cultural fear? What do the fantastic elements interwoven with oral histories help us to discover about cultural norms?

Cross disciplinary submissions from film studies, literature, religious and ethnic studies, art history, and anthropology are encouraged.

Submission Guidelines: Please submit abstracts of 300 words or less to: hsa@mail.sfsu.edu

Please include the title of the submitted paper, your name, affiliated institution, field of study, and contact information. The deadline for submissions is FEBRUARY 13, 2015. If selected, final papers will be due to your panel chair no later than MID MARCH, 2015. Conference will be held April 25, 2015 at San Francisco State University.

Recent works that resonate with the spirit of the conference include:

Louise White’s monograph published in 2000, Speaking with Vampires: Rumor and History in Colonial Africa serves as a cogent example of how tales of the fantastic can be examined and interpreted to allow us to better understand the mentalities of discursive or liminal groups.

Stefan Goeble’s brilliant book on medievalism published in 2007, The Great War and Medieval Memory: War, Remembrance and Medievalism in Britain and Germany, 1914-1940, looks at how elements of medieval chivalric culture were interpreted in war memorials, interpreting iconography to uncover how communal memory functions in the search for historical continuity in the face of such horrific events.

 

HSA Conference website: http://history.sfsu.edu/content/hsa-2015-conference

WW2download

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

BlackMetaldownload

Black Metal Theory

Black Metal Theory

POLITICS AND BLACK METAL

Helvete: A Journal of Black Metal Theory

ISSUE 4 “POLITICS AND BLACK METAL” CALL FOR PROPOSALS

Call for Papers and Art

Proposals due August 1 2015.
Expectant publication, winter 2015

The complex subject of politics and black metal, directly and para-musically, has long been brushed up against within black metal theory work, but rarely unfolded at length. We would like to reserve this issue of Helvete as a forum to begin to address and perhaps even articulate some of these discussions.

While some may insist that black metal (as a diverse field of culture and music) exists outside of politics or cannot be described politically, it frequently sparks political repercussions, and its history courts political controversy. These include headline grabbing moments such as Varg Vikernes’s arrest in 2013 by the French government on accounts of suspicion of planning a terrorist attack; Norway’s implementation in 2011 of black metal education within its foreign diplomats; Nachtmystium’s forced cancellation in 2009 of a concert at Scion Rock Fest in Atlanta, Georgia; Inquisition’s forced cancellation in 2014 of their Vienna, Austria concert due to alleged connections to NSBM; and the complete ban on black metal in Malaysia in 2006. Most recently, Behemoth‘s recent encounter with Polish and Russian authorities has been well documented in the mainstream press. It may seem that the proposition that black metal is apolitical is itself a (privileged) political position.

The editors of Helvete are accepting proposals for essays that focus on politics and black metal. Contributors are encouraged to suggest topics such as Black Metal’s interactions with nation, race, linguistic, gender, religion, and culture. Special consideration will be given to the explorations of the negotiations that the individual makes within the city or community, using black metal as a verb rather than a noun.

In honor of this issue’s intent, and the innate politics of language, starting with Issue 4, Helvete will begin taking multi-lingual submissions. Please contact the editors for more details.

Helvete is an open access electronic and print journal dedicated to continuing the mutual blackening of metal and theory inaugurated by the Black Metal Theory Symposia. Not to be confused with a metal studies, music criticism, ethnography, or sociology, black metal theory is a speculative and creative endeavor, one which seeks ways of thinking that “count” as black metal events—and, indeed, to see how black metal might count as thinking. Theory of black metal, and black metal of theory. Mutual blackening. Black metal as a language of contemporary art practices a transmodality between sound and vision, mutually blackening both art and metal, and thus pushing the limits of contemporary academic genres by definition.

Essay proposals may be sent to the editors at helvetejournal@gmail.com
Art proposals may be sent to helvetejournalart@gmail.com
For detailed guidelines, see the Submission Checklist on our website: http://helvetejournal.org/forthcoming/submission-checklist/

Helvete

Helvete

Helvete: http://helvetejournal.org/

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Black Metal Theory

Black Metal Theory