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Daily Archives: December 10th, 2014

The Capitorg

The Capitorg

CYBORGIAN IMAGES

First Issue Call for Articles

Yearbook of Moving Image Studies

Cyborgian Images: The moving image between apparatus and body

Deadline for Articles: December 31, 2014

The double-blind peer-reviewed Yearbook of Moving Image Studies (YoMIS) is now accepting articles from scientists, scholars, artists and film makers for the first issue entitled »Cyborgian Images: The moving image between apparatus and body.

YoMIS will be enriched by disciplines like media and film studies, image science, (film) philosophy, art history, game studies and other research areas related to the moving image in general. Modern perspectives on the structure of moving images exemplify a complex multimodal mechanism that interacts in specific ways with the recipient and various levels of the perception of images. In this case neither moving images nor the subjective reception are passive processes. Movement, time, space and different modalities interact with senses, memories and anticipation and create a complex hybrid structure of medium, recipient and sensory stimulus processing. This refers to the fact, that on the one hand the technological structure of displays and interfaces are relevant, and that on the other hand the role of the lived-body and mind is crucial for an understanding of the effects of the moving images. It is the interaction between the image, the dispositive and the recipient which brings the pictures to life and unfolds its meaning in diverse dimensions. This remark becomeS obvious when looking at the recent evolution in media technologies. New displays and interfaces like the Cinemizer (Zeiss), Oculus Rift (OculusVR) or Kinect (Microsoft) promote the progressive embodiment of the recipient or user by the medium, and, in doing so, they force the amalgamation of the subject of perception with the moving image.

Therefore »Cyborgian Images« addresses the broad field of the relationship between the technological dimension of the medium, its aesthetic and structural impact on the representational status of the moving image and the effect on the bodily level of the recipient, including affective and somatic reactions.

Contributions should be 5000 to 8000 words in length.

Please send your abstract, biographical informations, contact details and your article to Dr. Lars C. Grabbe and Prof. Dr. Patrick Rupert-Kruse via: kontakt@bewegtbildwissenschaft.de.

The official deadline for articles is the December 31, 2014.

If you are interested in contributing an article you will find a style sheet online: http://www.movingimagescience.com

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact the managing editors via mail.

YoMIS: http://www.buechner-verlag.de/index.php/programm/yearbook-moving-image-studies

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Education Crisis

Education Crisis

NEOLIBERALISM AND HIGHER EDUCATION IN LATIN AMERICA

CALL FOR PAPERS

Since the globalization of the neoliberal economic model began during the 1980s, higher education systems have entered a phase of accelerated mercantilization throughout much of Latin America. If the first post-Soviet decade was marked by the new social movements as the main expression of opposition to late capitalism, the second saw uneven but often more prominent student uprisings. The capitalist crisis begun in 2008—variously interpreted as a global financial crisis, a structural or cyclical crisis, or exhaustion of the prevailing model—has accelerated protest. By 2010 secondary or university students had risen en masse against aspects of the neoliberal system in Chile, France and Greece (all 2006); the U.S. (California, 2009); Italy, England and Puerto Rico (2010); and finally, in the context of the Arab Spring, in several countries in the Middle East, starting with Tunisia and Algeria (2010). It is no coincidence that Chile—the world’s first country to adopt the “Chicago Boys” doctrine—has from 2011 been shaken by the largest student mobilizations since the 1960s, contesting the effects of the near-complete privatization of the education system.

Under the promise of democratization of access for the masses to higher education, governments and education corporations on a worldwide scale have transformed an area which was a state responsibility for much of the Twentieth century into one more frontier for the expansion of corporate capital and accumulation of private profit. As the product of neoliberal demands, the expansion of higher education has been accompanied by a transformation of the way the university and other higher education institutions define themselves and justify their existence. In this process, the liberal idea of the university as a space open to free intellectual debate with emphasis on autonomy, research, and contributing to the intellectual and moral formation of the nation has been assailed by market demands which prioritize productivity and performance indicators.

​The meanings and practices associated with this paradigm shift in higher education have permeated the diverse political-economic regions of the planet and have been instrumentalized by governments of both right and left. This has been particularly evident in Latin America, where such policies have combined privatization and government control. In Brazil, for instance, under the same argument of expansion and massification of higher education’s reach, policies quite different in appearance but not necessarily in consequences were tried by the administrations of presidents Fernando Henrique Cardoso and Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva. Instead of promoting the expansion of higher education combining increased privatization with the drastic reduction of the salaries of academic staff and functionaries, and of the maintenance funds of public institutions—as did Cardoso—Lula promoted privatization while also investing in public higher education. Although statistically his government has funded private education even more than his predecessor, Lula’s government protected itself politically with the creation of new public institutions of higher education and the expansion of existing vacancies. But it has rendered such institutions increasingly less autonomous and subject to ever-increasing state control.

The aim of this special issue is to investigate how neoliberalism has transformed the university in Latin America, and concurrent expressions of resistance to this process. In brief: what kind of university has neoliberalism produced, or does it intend to produce? For whom, with whom and for what purposes?

We invite articles that present national or comparative studies panoramically and those that reflect on the new university structure, intellectual mission (e.g., curriculum, research) and/or culture in political, economic, ethnographic or historical perspective.

Topics which are particularly welcome, although not intended to preclude others, are:

  • The conditions of knowledge production under neoliberal policy and practice in Latin America.
  • The university as a new frontier of global capitalism (for example, via for-profit higher education, including on-line course delivery, corporate research agendas, student loans).
  • The instrumentalization of public universities by governments and the state, including transformation into an instrument for policy legitimation and implementation.
  • University autonomy under the pressures of state, national and international sponsoring agencies (Ford, Mellon, Rockefeller, IAF, CNPq, CAPES, etc.), and the effect of those agencies in defining research agendas and reshaping university curriculum.
  • The significance of new modalities of partnership between the public and private sectors.
  • Expanded higher education – democratization or massification? Transformation or reproduction of social hierarchies?
  • Neoliberalism, social inequalities and the university – the effect on university access of social disparities in public and private primary and secondary education; affirmative policies for marginalised or disadvantaged student groups (the poor, black and indigenous peoples.), including responsiveness to their particular intellectual and cultural needs.
  • Student and staff resistance movements; university reform movements; students and anti-neoliberal movements.
  • Universities as political actors including concepts of citizenship and relationship with student and popular movements.
  • The university in countries with anti-neoliberal governments.

Please submit inquiries about possible submissions to the issue editors:

Bernadete Beserra (bernabeserra@gmail.com)

Robert Austin (rwaustin64@gmail.com)

Rémi Lavergne (rfl2009@gmail.com)

Instructions for manuscript submission are available on the LAP website: http://latinamericanperspectives.com/

​Deadline for submission of articles: 30 September 2015

 

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cfp-convocatoria-chamada-para-artigos-neoliberalism-and-higher-education-in-latin-america-ingles-castellano-portugues (Go here for Portuguese version)

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

We Are the Crisis

We Are the Crisis

MARXISM AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS: QUO VADIS?

Call for Papers

Marxism and International Relations Theory: Quo Vadis?

Call for papers for the 9th Pan-European Conference on International Relations

23–26 September 2015, Giardini Naxos, Italy

Marxist thought, along with other dissident approaches, has long constituted a critical source from which crucial interventions into the mainstream theorising in International Relations (IR) have been launched. While in recent years, significant theoretical contributions—ranging from the discussions of ‘new imperialism’ to uneven development and financialisation—have reinforced Marxist frameworks with a broader analytical palette, the disciplinary position of ‘Marxist IR’ as a sub-configuration of IR theory has been challenged by a number of internal critics. Contesting the status of Marxist IR as an antidote to the shortcomings of the mainstream approaches, these sympathetic critics have argued that Marxist IR has failed ‘to develop any adequate critical theory of the political’ (Davenport 2013: 28) and is need of ‘a realist moment’ to bolster its explanatory power (Callinicos 2007: 542). Similarly, some of the most important recent attempts at theorising ‘the international’ have been shaped by a tendency to engage with and adopt the parameters in which neorealism defines the conditions for a unified international theory (Rosenberg 2013). Others, while recognising the contributions of the strong infusion between Marxist IR and historical sociology, have challenged the tendency to focus ‘on the importance in and of themselves of the historical antecedents of contemporary societies’ and tasked the scholars with interrogating ‘the way in which contemporary societies bear the imprint of such historical developments’ (Bruff 2010: 621).

The panel aims to provide a space to engage with these issues, take stock with contemporary theorising in Marxist IR and discuss new research avenues. Possible topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • The role of the Marxist critique in IR and the relationship between Marxism and the mainstream approaches.
  • The promises and limits of the emergent theoretical developments in Marxist IR, such as Political Marxism, Marxist Geopolitics and Uneven and Combined Development.
  • The interactions between Marxism(s) and feminist, postcolonial and anarchist approaches in IR.

Please submit your abstracts (max. 300 words) to Sébastien Rioux(rioux.sebastien@gmail.com) and Cemal Burak Tansel(burak.tansel@nottingham.ac.uk) by 7 January 2015.

For more information, please visitwww.paneuropeanconference.org.

References

Bruff, I. (2010) ‘European Varieties of Capitalism and the International’,European Journal of International Relations, 16(4): 615–638.

Callinicos, A. (2007) ‘Does Capitalism Need the State System?’, Cambridge Review of International Affairs, 20(4): 533–549.

Davenport, A. (2013) ‘Marxism in IR: Condemned to a Realist Fate?’, European Journal of International Relations, 19(1): 27–48.

Rosenberg, J. (2013) ‘Kenneth Waltz and Leon Trotsky: Anarchy in the Mirror of Uneven and Combined Development’, International Politics, 50(2): 183–230.

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Global Capitalism

Global Capitalism

PROGRESS IN POLITICAL ECONOMY

A new blog space *Progress in Political Economy* (PPE) at http://ppesydney.net/ that has been recently launched at the Department of Political Economy at the University of Sydney.

The site has diverse contributions on Marxist political economy including:

Adam Morton on Spaces of Capital and Rosa Luxemburg at http://bit.ly/1pnSpEA;

Martijn Konings on Hoodwinked by Hayek at http://bit.ly/1uqnWML;

Elizabeth Humphrys on Where in the World Does Neoliberalism Come From? at http://bit.ly/Z44Ccl;

Anitra Nelson on The Road to Non-market Socialism at http://bit.ly/1ryf4zl;

Bill Dunn on Understanding Crises at http://bit.ly/1qhVefa

Hugo Radice on Post-capitalist Possibilities after the Crisis at http://bit.ly/1xR1dsv; and

Andreas Bieler on the Struggles over Water Privatization at http://bit.ly/1w1MJX6.

 

Many more articles to come!

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/progress-in-political-economy-new-blog

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com