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Daily Archives: July 13th, 2014

Capitalist Crises

Capitalist Crises

CRISIS AND SOCIAL CHANGE: TOWARDS ALTERNATIVE HORIZONS

Cambridge Sociology Conference

September 26-27, 2014

Crisis and Social Change: Towards Alternative Horizons
Call for Papers: Deadline Monday July 21st.
Organized by the Department of Sociology, Cambridge University
Venue: Faculty of Human, Social, and Political Sciences, Free School Lane, Cambridge, CB2 3RQ

This conference moves beyond crisis as a category of diagnosis and critique to explore alternative horizons, raising fundamental questions about the nature and extent of ruptures and continuity in the contemporary social world.

Among the multiple horizons in view, we are motivated by the generational need to draw upon the legacies of critique, while shifting toward the production of alternative futures.

From diagnosis to treatment. From deconstruction to reconstruction. From negation to vision. From crisis to progress. Such is the responsibility of our Age, from which positive social change might rise.

We welcome contributions from researchers, activists, artists, and professionals from across the world on the following topics, though this list is by no means exhaustive, and we are keen to receive contributions on other topics aligned with the conference theme:

*   CRITICAL AND EMPANCIPATORY THOUGHT AND ACTION
*   SOCIAL TRANSFORMATION AND CITIES
*   ALTERNATIVE ECONOMIC PRACTICES
*   WORK AND LIFE
*   MEDIA
*   EDUCATION
*   REVOLUTIONS AND SOCIAL PROTEST
*   (POST) DEMOCRACY
*   ENVIRONMENT

We have also introduced a soapbox session within the Conference programme and encourage speakers to participate. For the natural orators out there, the soapbox session provides you with the opportunity to stand up for 2 minutes and air your fiery, risky, extravagant and controversial views on the following question: WHAT IS RADICALISM?

The conference is organized by PhD students from the Department of Sociology, University of Cambridge. To give attendees time to explore the city’s history and socialise, the conference will be held over two days.

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS:
We are pleased to announce our three distinguished keynote speakers
– Professor Greg Philo (School of Social and Political Sciences, University of Glasgow),
– Professor Emeritus Goran Therborn (Faculty of Human, Social and Political Sciences, University of Cambridge)
– Professor Ted Benton (Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Essex)

PLENARY PANELS:
The conference will also host two plenary panels on the following themes:

Plenary panel 1: The Great Recession and Varieties of Social and Political Responses

Chair: Professor Andrew Gamble
Dr. Rowan Williams (tbc)(Master of Magdalene College, Cambridge), Professor Larry King (Dept. of Sociology, Cambridge), Professor John Kelly (Dept. of Management, Birkbeck), and Dr. Jeff Miley (Dept. of Sociology, Cambridge)

Plenary panel 2: Mobilisation, Social Change and Revolution
Chair: Barrister Dexter Dias QC
Professor P.G Klandermans (Dept. of Applied Psychology, University of Amsterdam), Emeritus Reader in Sociology Dr. David Lane (Dept. of Sociology, Cambridge), Professor Jane Wills (Dept. of Geography, Queen Mary University of London) and Dr. Manali Desai (Dept. of Sociology, Cambridge)

HOW TO SUBMIT:
Paper presentation: abstract (300 word max.) and biography (100 word max.)
Poster presentation: abstract (300 word max.) and biography (100 word max.)
Soap box presentation: abstract (100 word max.) and biography (100 word max.)

SUBMISSION DEADLINE:
The deadline for the submission of abstracts is Monday, July 21st 2014. There is no
registration fee.
All abstracts must be submitted by visiting the Ex Ordo abstract submission system (you will be required to setup an account first): http://csc2014.exordo.com/
Successful applicants will be informed by July 31st, 2014.
The selected applicants are expected to submit an outline of their presentation (or the power
point slides) by September 1st, 2014

PUBLICATION AND AWARDS:
Awards will be given for Best Paper, Best Poster and Best Soap Box Presentations at the end of the Conference in recognition of originality and excellence. The Organising Committee also plans to publish selected papers of the highest quality in a special issue of a UK journal or as an edited volume.

FURTHER INFORMATION:
For further details on our distinguished keynote speakers and plenary panelists please visit: http://www.towardsalternativehorizons.wordpress.com,

Email the organising committee at: towardsalternativehorizons@gmail.com

Or visit our Facebook page: www.facebook.com/events/850509748311055

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Future PresentTHE PAPERS OF THE RED ARMY

The University of Nottingham, UK, would like to offer to another library the microfilm collection “Papers of the Red Army” (for a brief description, see below).

The collection is complete (76 reels), although one box if missing.  The collection duplicates existing holdings in our library.

Libraries interested in further details should please contact Carol Hollier at carol.hollier@nottingham.ac.uk.

*************
The Papers of the Red Army:  Political and Internal Intelligence Reports, 1918-1921

From the Russian State Military-Historical Archive (RGVIA)

From the time of its establishment, the Red Army served the particular political needs of the Soviet state. During the Civil War (1918-1921), the army conducted extensive intelligence operations not only of counter-revolutionary forces but of their own ranks as well. This recently declassified collection contains unfiltered, unedited intelligence reports — many of them handwritten — from Red Army operatives throughout the country. Included are traditional operational and intelligence reports and evaluations. Of particular interest are the political intelligence reports. These contain surveys of civilian attitudes and assessments of the mood and circumstances of Red Army troops. These reports provide extraordinary opportunities for the scholar to examine the nature of the Soviet military’s apparatus of surveillance, as well as the extent and nature of opposition, both small and large, to the Communist regime.

76 microfilm reels.

***********************

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Labour

Labour

REFRAMING LABOUR AND WORKERS’ RESISTANCE FOR THE 21st CENTURY

Call for Papers

Working USA special issue

Issue Editors:

Maurizio Atzeni, Loughborough University, UK; m.atzeni@lboro.ac.uk

Immanuel Ness, Brooklyn College, CUNY, New York City; manny.ness@gmail.com

Interpretations of global labour in the age of neoliberal capitalism urgently demands robust and critical historical and comparative analysis. For decades, research on labour collective organisation has focused almost exclusively on workers collectively employed on a stable basis in industrial settings or in the public sector, defended by collective bargaining, represented by trade unions and inserted within relatively stable systems of industrial relations. This view however it has always failed to take into account the transformative potentialities of that vast, rich and meaningful array of ‘precarious’ work experiences and relations that allow the production and re-production of capital as a whole.

Women’s labour in the sphere of social reproduction, low-waged workers who work outside conventional work as subcontractors in global production chains or in the informal economy of the global cities or as crowd workers in the digital economy, migrant workers whose exploited work often lays at the margin of legality, new groups of dispossessed people forced into the labour market, are categories of workers traditionally excluded and neglected by the labour relations literature as labourers; often considered unproductive, unregulated, and thus unrepresentable. Considering the speed of development and intensity of integration of global capitalist processes and the political turn to neoliberalism, which have brought about new (or refreshed old) paradigms to increase workers’ productivity and profits, absent has been the signal importance of these ‘invisible’, precarious workers, today representing not just the vast majority of workers in the global South but also increasingly shaping the social landscape of cities across the world.

Broadening research on this underworld of precarious and not represented workers is important to understand one fundamental dimension of the process of capital accumulation in the global age but it also helps to address deep theoretical concerns, put in evidence by heterodox Marxist currents across the social sciences, originating from the use of narrow conceptions about work and workers:

  • The conventional notion of the working class, based on the industrial, waged worker, has been questioned for not considering how different labour regimes co-exist and contribute to the development of capitalism as a system, especially women engaged in social reproduction.
  • The social organisation and militancy of workers it has been reduced to workers’ resistance to official strikes organised by representative trade unions, the ‘institutionalised form of resistance’, leaving aside the rich history and tradition of workers’ self-organisation. This remains crucial today in framing precarious workers organisation and in setting possibilities for transformative agency.
  • Geographically research concentrated on struggles at the workplace without considering the linkages of these with broader struggles over workers’ daily lives.

In the past 30 years, one sided views of labour has been explicitly based on the political role assigned to the industrial workers. Either from a revolutionary or a reformist perspective this particular section of the working class was considered central to any transformative politics. The advent of neoliberalism has swept away many of the elements upon which this centrality was built, leaving a tabula rasa, politically and theoretically speaking. From an empirical point of view, diversity, heterogeneity, unevenness, unpredictability characterise most workers’ struggles of the 21st century.

Against this theoretical and empirical gap in knowledge, the aim of this special issue is twofold.

It aims to offer insights on the daily lives, organization and resistance of precarious workers, intending these in broader terms, as employed in a range of different sectors, geographical and spatial landscapes, economic environments, and regulatory employment regimes.

It aims to produce new knowledge into the connections between these different workers’ struggles and the specific socio-economic, historical and productive context in which have developed.

Within these aims and considering the scope of the journal, we seek submissions from any social sciences discipline concerned with the study of workers and labour using a range of empirical and methodological analyses. The editors however would especially welcome papers that reach theoretical insights in addressing the relevance of certain groups of workers’ experiences or develop their arguments through comparative/historical analysis; focus on global cities and diverse employment regimes, workplaces and daily lives experiences; consider the experiences of workers in strategic sectors of the economy (distribution, transportation, knowledge economy); search for connections of workers struggles in different locations across the global production chain;  or offer insights on new forms of organizing and resistance

 

DUE DATE FOR ABSTRACTS OF 750-1000 WORDS: 15 September 2014

WORD LENGTH: 6000-10,000 words

DUE DATE FOR FINAL SUBMISSION: end March 2015

PUBLICATION DATE: September 2015

INCLUDE NAME, AFFILIATION

WE ENCOURAGE PHD STUDENTS AND ESTABLISHED SCHOLARS TO CONTRIBUTE

 

First published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/call-for-papers-reframing-labour-and-workers2019-resistance-for-the-21st-century

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk