Skip navigation

North Atlantic Oscillation

North Atlantic Oscillation

PARIS, CAPITALISM AND MODERNITY SEMINAR

We are currently soliciting paper proposals for our seminar titled “Paris, Capitalism and Modernity in France from the 17th through the 19th centuries” at the American Comparative Literature Association (ACLA) 2014 Annual Conference, New York University, New York City, NY, March 20-23, 2014. The conference theme is “Capitals.”

We have space for up to twelve participants in our seminar. Proposals of up to 250 words should be submitted by midnight, Thursday November 1, 2013, at the following link:  http://www.acla.org/submit/.

Please ensure you select our seminar in the drop-down list.

Our seminar theme is the history and representation of capital, capitalism and/or the French capital as a economic center in French modernity, defined in economic terms by the rise of a society dominated by market institutions in a period from the seventeenth through the nineteenth century. The full description of our seminar can be found below, and at the following link: http://acla.org/acla2014/paris-capitalism-and-modernity-in-france-from-the-17th-through-the-19th-centuries/

Please also do not hesitate to contact us personally if you are interested.

Best wishes,
Andrew Billing (abilling@macalester.edu) and Juliette Cherbuliez (cherbuli@umn.edu).

Seminar Title: Paris, Capitalism and Modernity in France from the 17th through the 19th centuries

The theme of this seminar is the history and representation of capital, capitalism and/or the French capital as a economic center in French modernity, defined in economic terms by the rise of a society dominated by market institutions in a period from the seventeenth through the nineteenth century. Participants are invited to take as points of departure Walter Benjamin’s famous nomination of Paris as the “capital of the nineteenth century” in view of its phantasmagoric celebration of market society and commodity fetishism, and Jean-Jacques Rousseau’s well-known description in “La Nouvelle Héloïse” of the French capital as “the city in the world in which fortunes are most unequal, and in which reign at the same time the most sumptuous elegance and the most deplorable misery.” Both Rousseau and Benjamin identify a Paris simultaneously exemplary and exceptional as a site for the concentration of wealth and economic power and the display of commodification and inequality. Our panel will explore or contest this and other specificities of Paris and French capitalism in modernity.

We welcome proposals that engage with literary and aesthetic representations of capital, capitalism and/or the French capital, e.g. Molière, Rousseau, Mercier, and Balzac; with French economic thought as elaborated in diverse modes throughout this period from the physiocrats through Fourier, Saint-Simon, Bastiat and Proudhon; and with the contestation of capital and capitalism during the Revolution, the Commune and other significant historical moments. Panelists are also encouraged to explore economic relations and exchange between Paris and France’s colonies during this period.

First published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cfp-acla-seminar-on-paris-capitalism-and-modernity

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: