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Daily Archives: June 5th, 2013

Education

Education

TEACHING INCLUSIVELY: CHANGING PEDAGOGICAL SPACES

Date – 9 July 2013: 12.30-16.00 (lunch included)

Venue – SRHE, 73 Collier Street, LondonN1 9BE

Speakers:

Professor Penny Jane Burke, University of Sussex
Professor Gill Crozier, University of Roehampton

Developing inclusive teaching and learning practices in higher education is a key component of widening participation (WP) strategy. Pedagogies in higher education have the potential to contribute to creating inclusive spaces where all students can develop a sense of belonging and fitting in. This is strongly emphasised in the recent HEFCE/OFFA interim report, and is anticipated to form a central dimension of the national strategy for widening participation.

This timely seminar will launch Teaching Inclusively: Changing Pedagogical Spaces, a new continuing professional development resource pack that draws on the key findings of the Higher Education Academy funded project: ‘Formations of Gender and Higher Education Pedagogies (GaP)’. It is designed for lecturers, academic developers, WP directors and managers and policy makers to critically reflect on the complex processes in which inequalities might unwittingly be reproduced through HE pedagogies.  It offers a range of ‘think pieces’ as conceptual tools to help address complex issues of difference, diversity and inequalities and to consider the ways that teaching and learning practices are intimately connected with identity formations and the subtle processes of exclusion and misrecognition within different pedagogical spaces.

The seminar will provide an overview of the key findings of GaP to illuminate the important relationship between widening participation and HE pedagogies. It will introduce Teaching Inclusively and the ways it has been specifically designed to support HE lecturers in contributing to WP through developing inclusive teaching practices.

To reserve a place: http://www.srhe.ac.uk/events/

 

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Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Aesthetics

Aesthetics

MARXISM IN CULTURE SEMINARS – SUMMER TERM 2013

Friday 7th June

17:30-19:30
Room 349 (Senate House, Malet Street, London)

Kate Crehan (City University of New York)

“Art” with a Capital “A” and the Practice of Community Art

For forty years the community arts and public arts group, Free Form Arts Trust, (1970-2010) was a significant player in British community arts, playing a major part in the 1970s struggle to carve out a space for community arts in Britain.  Having turned their back on the world of gallery art, the fine-artist founders of Free Form were determined to use their visual expertise to connect, through collaborative art projects, with the working-class people excluded, as they saw it, by the established art world.  To what extent did these artists succeed in making art for, and with working-class people?  How radical was their rejection the world of gallery art, the world of what the art historian Paul Kristeller calls Art with a capital ‘A’?  And what effect did their turn away from the established art world have on their practice as artists, and on their aesthetic language?

Kate Crehan is Professor of Anthropology at the College of Staten Island and the GraduateCenter, City University of New York.  Her publications include The Fractured Community: Landscapes of Power and Gender in Rural Zambia; Gramsci, Culture and Anthropology (translated into Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Korean and Turkish); and Community Art: An Anthropological Perspective.  She is currently working on a book manuscript exploring Gramsci’s concepts of subalternity, common sense and the organic intellectual.

For further information, please contact Larne Abse Gogarty at larne.gogarty.09@ucl.ac.uk or Chrysi Papaioannou at chrysi_p@yahoo.co.uk.

All welcome!

First published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/next-marxism-in-culture-seminar-friday-7th-june

 

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Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Education Crisis

Education Crisis

POWER AND EDUCATION: VOLUME 5 NUMBER 2 (2013)

Just published at: www.wwwords.co.uk/power/content/pdfs/5/issue5_2.asp

POWER AND EDUCATION
Volume 5 Number 2 2013       ISSN 1757-7438

CONTENTS:

Esther Priyadharshini. Reimagining Knowledge Terrains: the Economic and Social Research Council, governmentalism and the social science landscape

Anna Kirova & Kelly Hennig. Culturally Responsive Assessment Practices: examples from an intercultural multilingual early learning program for newcomer children

Małgorzata Zielińska. Migration and Adult Education: time, place and power – Polish migrants in Reykjavik, Iceland

Alison Healicon. ‘My Dress Is Not a Yes’: subversion and the SlutWalk message

David Rufo. bUzZ: a guide to authentic and joyful creative learning

Jennifer Martin & Tony Lawson. Whose Empowerment? The Dynamics of Power and Choice in Managing Student Access to Personalised Key Stage 4 Options

Rachael Gabriel & Jessica Nina Lester. Community Performances and Performative Texts as Tools for Critical Exploration: the practice of being labeled disabled

Richard Hall. Academic Activism in the Face of Enclosure in the Digital University

 

BOOK REVIEWS
Becoming a Model Minority: schooling experiences of ethnic Koreans in China (Fang Gao), reviewed by Satoshi Sanada
Decolonizing Philosophies of Education (Ali A. Abdi, Ed.), reviewed by Sylvia Rose-Ann Walker
From the Dress-Up Corner to the Senior Prom: navigating gender and sexuality diversity in pre-K12 schools (Jennifer Bryan), reviewed by Gerald Walton

Access to the full texts of current articles is restricted to those who have a Personal subscription, or those whose institution has a Library subscription.

PERSONAL SUBSCRIPTION (single-user access) Subscription to the 2013 volume (including full access to ALL back numbers) is available to individuals at a cost of US$50.00. If you wish to subscribe you may do so immediately at www.wwwords.co.uk/subscribePOWER.asp

LIBRARY SUBSCRIPTION (institution-wide access) If you are working within an institution that maintains a Library, please urge them to take out a subscription so that we can provide access throughout your institution; details of subscription rates and access control arrangements for libraries can be found at www.symposium-journals.co.uk/prices.html

For all editorial matters, including articles offered for publication, please contact p&ejournal@mmu.ac.uk

In the event of problems concerning a subscription, or difficulty in gaining access to the journal articles on the website, please email the publishers at support@symposium-journals.co.uk

 

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Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Social Movements

Social Movements

THE PEDAGOGICAL PRACTICES OF SOCIAL MOVEMENTS

Call for Papers Volume 6 Issue 1 (May 2014)

Interface: A journal for and about Social Movements

The pedagogical practices of social movements

Sara C Motta and Ana Margarida Esteves

In this special issue, we aim to deepen conceptualisations, analysis and practices of critical and radical pedagogies in our struggles for transformation. We seek to explore the pedagogical practices of movements by expanding our understanding of knowledge and how movements learn beyond solely a focus on the cognitive to the ethical, spiritual, embodied and affective.

Our aim is to systematize and document these practices and to provide conceptual, methodological and practical resources for activists, community educators and movement scholars alike. We are really keen to receive creative pieces including longer articles, dialogues, critical reflections on practice/particular projects etc and pieces that use visual art, photography, and video as means of critical reflection.

The May 2014 issue of the open-access, online, copyleft academic/activist journal Interface: a Journal for and about Social Movements (http://www.interfacejournal.net/) invites contributions on the theme of The Pedagogical Practices of Social Movements.

The pedagogical, understood as knowledge practices and learning processes, often takes a pivotal role in the emergence, development and sustainability of social movements and community struggles. In this issue of Interface we seek to explore the pedagogical practices of movements by expanding our understanding of knowledge and how movements learn beyond solely a focus on the cognitive to the ethical, spiritual, embodied and affective. Our aim is to systematize and document these practices and to provide conceptual, methodological and practical resources for activists, community educators and movement scholars alike.

Pedagogical practices can constitute important elements in the process of unlearning dominant subjectivities, social relationships, and ways of constituting the world and learning new ones. They can be central in the ‘how’ of movement construction and community building in spaces such as workshops, teach-ins, and through popular education. They can contribute to the building of sustainable and effective social movements through music, storytelling, ritual or through processes that surround strategy building, the sharing of experiences or simply friendship. They can help activists and organizers to learn through their participation in counter-hegemonic, grassroots initiatives such as community banks, local currencies and workers cooperatives. They can also be important aspects of movement relevant research.

In this special issue of Interface we ask the broad question, ‘What role do pedagogical practices have in the praxis of social movements and their struggle for political change and social transformation?’ The practices we would like to explore include formal methodologies such as Open Spaces for Dialogue and Enquiry (OSDE), participatory action research, as well as methodologies of popular and community education inspired by feminist, Freirean, post-colonial and Gramscian approaches, among others, but also the more informal pedagogical practices which remain under-conceptualized and theorized and which include the role of the affective, the embodied (the body and earth for example) and the spiritual.

However, we also understand the politics and dynamics of movement and community education and learning to be contested terrain. We see how mainstream institutions and actors have co-opted the language and methods of popular education and movement methodologies. These processes of co-optation often neutralize their radical and political potential. We also understand that social movements often end up reproducing, through these practices, inequalities based on factors such as class, gender, race/ethnicity, educational level, expertise and role within movement organizations. Therefore, we would be very interested in receiving contributions based on “insider” knowledge about power dynamics behind knowledge production and learning within social movements (i.e. relationship between experts and non-experts, leaders and other members, impact of gender, class, race, educational level and expertise), and how such power dynamics determine whose “voices” end up being represented in the process and outcome of knowledge leaders and other members, impact of gender, class, race, educational level and expertise), and how such power dynamics determine whose “voices” end up being represented in the process and outcome of knowledge production and learning, and whose voices end up being silenced.

Among the more specific questions we would like to address in the issue are:

 What learning processes and knowledge practices are developed by movements?

 What is the role of formal methodologies and pedagogies in movement praxis?

 What is the role of informal pedagogies of everyday practice in the building of movements, the development of their political projects and fostering their sustainability and effectiveness?

 What is the role of the affective, embodied and spiritual in learning processes?

 What is the role of ethics in movement learning?

 What is the role of counter-hegemonic economic practices, such as those classified as “Solidarity Economy”, in learning processes within social movements?

 In what way do activist researchers contribute to the learning of movements?

 What politics of knowledge underlie the politics of social movements?

 Do the processes of ‘alternative’ education within social movements and collective struggles transform, disrupt or replicate hegemonic social relations?

 What pedagogical and political insights can be gleaned from exploring education for mobilization and social change?

We are very happy to receive contributions that reflect on these questions and any others relevant to the special issue theme and that fit within the journal’s mission statement (http://www.interfacejournal.net/who-we-are/mission-statement/).

Submissions should contribute to the journal’s mission as a tool to help our movements learn from each other’s struggles, by developing analyses from specific movement processes and experiences that can be translated into a form useful for other movements.

In this context, we welcome contributions by movement participants and academics who are developing movement-relevant theory and research. Our goal is to include material that can be used in a range of ways by movements — in terms of its content, its language, its purpose and its form. We thus seek work in a range of different formats, such as conventional (refereed) articles, review essays, facilitated discussions and interviews, action notes, teaching notes, key documents and analysis, book reviews — and beyond. Both activist and academic peers review research contributions, and other material is sympathetically edited by peers. The editorial process generally is geared towards assisting authors to find ways of expressing their understanding, so that we all can be heard across geographical, social and political distances.

We can accept material in Afrikaans, Arabic, Catalan, Croatian, Danish, English, French, German, Hebrew, Hungarian, Italian, Latvian, Maltese, Norwegian, Portuguese, Romanian, Russian, Serbian, Spanish, Swedish, Turkish and Zulu.

Please see our editorial contacts page (http://www.interfacejournal.net/submissions/editorial-contact/) for details of who to submit to.

Deadline and Contact Details

The deadline for initial submissions to this issue, to be published May 1, 2014, is November 1, 2013. For details of how to submit to Interface, please see the “Guidelines for contributors” on our website. All manuscripts, whether on the special theme or other topics, should be sent to the appropriate regional editor, listed on our contacts page. Submission templates are available online via the guidelines page and should be used to ensure correct formatting.

Details: http://www.interfacejournal.net/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/Interface-5-1-CFP-vol-6-no-1.pdf

Sara Motta

Sara Motta

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Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski