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Daily Archives: February 1st, 2012

David Harvey

DAVID HARVEY: READING MARX’S ‘CAPITAL’ VOLUME II

Rading Marx’s Capital Vol II – Class 1, Introduction
http://davidharvey.org/2012/01/marxs-capital-vol-2-class-01/

This is the first class of a free semester-long open course consisting of a close reading of the text of Marx’s Capital Volume II (plus parts of Volume III) in 12 video lectures by Professor David Harvey. David Harvey is a Distinguished Professor at the CUNY Graduate Center in the Anthropology and Geography PhD programs. This course was taught at Union Theological Seminary in Spring 2011, and was attended by graduate students and activists from across New York City.

Subsequent videos will be available every one to two weeks. Initially the videos will be available only on YouTube. Additional file formats and podcasts will be available soon.

The page numbers Professor Harvey refers to are valid for the Penguin Classics editions of Capital Volumes II and III.

Thanks to the over 300 small donors who made this project possible

Reading Marx’s Capital Volume II with David Harvey is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.

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Help Make the Capital Lectures More Accessible
Oct 21st, 2011 by process

Do you have a few minutes to spare to help make the Capital lectures available to speakers of languages other than English? We are making good progress in the Capital Lectures Transcription and Translation Project. We are now focused on correcting the English transcription of the first five lectures. To help, go to this site and choose one of the first five lectures. Watch the lecture in YouTube with closed captions turned on (just click the CC button in the lower right of the window), and correct any errors you find on our wiki.

After this is complete, volunteer translators will begin translating the subtitles into other languages. We already have volunteers ready to begin translating into Brazilian Portuguese, Catalan, Chinese, Dutch, French, German, Greek, Italian, Korean, Persian, Slovene, and Spanish. We just need a little help making sure we have an accurate English transcript for them to work with.

If you are a native English speaker or equivalent, please help this project here. Thank you!

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‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski
The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk
MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski
Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com
Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com
Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

 

Aesthetics

RADICAL POLITICAL RHETORIC

Radical Political Rhetoric 

Coordinators: James Martin & Alan Finlayson

‘Political activity’, claims Jacques Rancière, ‘makes understood as discourse what was once only heard as noise’. Central to radical politics, then, are inventive rhetorical practices: mobilising critique, disrupting dominant forms of discourse and generating new forms of argumentation to win new audiences. But what are the contemporary sources for a radical political rhetoric? Who performs radical critique and how?  In what respects does the current crisis demand inventive rhetoric and to whom should these arguments be directed? Should radical politics be conceived as an argumentative practice at all? Can occupations and demonstrations effectively persuade and mobilise opinion? When does protest stop being just ‘noise’?

We invite papers to explore the rhetorical styles and substance of radical politics. Proposed papers may cover (but are not limited to) the following topics:

·      The philosophical sources, grounds and premises of radical rhetoric; their limitations and advantages

·      The stylistic forms of argumentation and communication

·      The audiences of radical political argument

·      Practical examples of inventive forms of critique and persuasion

·      Reflection on the rhetorical contexts and modalities of political critique

·      The place of emotions and affect in political communication

·      Democracy and rhetorical subjectivity

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Professor James Martin

Goldsmiths,UniversityofLondon

Email: j.martin@gold.ac.uk

Web: www.gold.ac.uk/politics/staff/martin/

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‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Hegel

THE METAPHYSICS OF BRITISH HEGELIANISM 

‘The Metaphysics of British Hegelianism’ – 16th April 2012

A one day conference at Christ’s College, Cambridge, supported by the Cambridge Philosophy Faculty, and the Centre for Idealism and the New Liberalism at the University of Hull.

British Hegelianism, or British Idealism, was an especially productive period in British metaphysics. Its proponents – including T. H. Green, Edward Caird, F. H. Bradley, Harold Joachim, Bernard Bosanquet, D. G. Ritchie, Samuel Alexander and J. M. E. McTaggart – discussed a wide range of metaphysical issues including idealism, monism, theism, free will, fundamentality, the nature of truth, the existence of relations and the reality of space and time. Many of these topics are of particular importance to contemporary metaphysics. This conference will discuss these issues and raise contextual questions, investigating the philosophical influences at work on particular metaphysicians. Hegel is the foremost of a large pantheon of further influences, which also includes Plato, Spinoza, Locke, the Cambridge neo-Platonists and Lotze. Indeed, one might question the appropriateness of labelling the movement at all, given that neither ‘British Hegelianism’ nor ‘British Idealism’ provide perfect labels: there are Hegelians who are not idealists, and idealists who are not Hegelians.

British Hegelianism has been neglected but the last few years have seen an increasing wave of interest in the subject, as evidenced not least by Robert Stern’s ‘Hegelian Metaphysics’, William Mander’s ‘British Idealism’ and Imprint Academic’s new monograph series ‘British Idealist Studies’. This conference will provide a venue for furthering that interest, featuring many of the eminent scholars in the area. The talks will be as follows.

Keynote: Professor Robert Stern (Sheffield) Determination is negation: The adventures of a doctrine from Spinoza to Hegel to the British Idealists

Dr. Giuseppina D’Oro (Keele) Varieties of Idealism

Dr. William Mander (Oxford) T. H. Green’s Metaphysics of Free Will

Emily Thomas (Cambridge) Space, Time, and Samuel Alexander

Professor David Boucher (Cardiff) Oakeshott and Idealist Metaphysics

Dr. Colin Tyler (Hull) T. H. Green and the Metaphysics of the Self

The conference will take place in the Lloyd Room, Christ’s College,Cambridge; it will run from 10am to 6pm. The conference will include coffees and lunch. Conference attendees are asked to register and pay a £10 fee to cover costs before April 7th. Cheques should be made out to ‘Christ’s College’, and addressed to the care of the conference convener Emily Thomas at Christ’s College, St Andrew’s Street, Cambridge CB2 3BU.

Any queries should also be directed to Emily at aeet2@cam.ac.uk

**END**

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski