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Daily Archives: January 13th, 2012

Antonio Negri

TO FORM, DE-FORM AND INAUGURATE: ANTONIO NEGRI

http://www.courtauld.ac.uk/researchforum/events/2012/spring/feb08_AntonioNegri.shtml

RESEARCH FORUM SPRING TERM 2012
FORMARE, DEFORMARE, INAUGURARE / TO FORM, DE-FORM AND INAUGURATE
Wednesday, 8 February 2012
18.00, Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre

Speaker(s): Antonio Negri
Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission
Organised by: Jacopo Galimberti

N.B. This lecture will be delivered in Italian with accompanying text displayed in English

In his texts of the 1950s, the French philosopher Maurice Merleau-Ponty assigns artistic creation an ontological value, while at the same time qualifying its power: the artistic creation is a consistent deformation rooted in a subjective experience, but without positing a ‘stable’ subject (who creates and is in their turn caught within the internal movement of creation, who constructs and is at the same time constructed – this is the chiasmus upon which our ontological difference is based); it proceeds through ‘imbalances’ of the prosaic world order: displacements, lines of force, inaugurations, processes of emptying and psychological investment – by means of that activity going beyond the distinction between transformation and invention which Merleau-Ponty would term ‘prose’. His 1950s texts also, however, voice the need for a translation of the same analysis from the sphere of the artistic creation into that of politics. By which forces or energies and along which breaking lines should this translation take place? And then: from within the flesh of the world, in virtue of which inauguration?

Antonio Negri (1933) was Professor of Theory of the state atPadua University (Italy) and Director of the Padua University Political Science Institute. He subsequently taught inFrance, atParis VIII University, Ecole Normale Supérieure and Collège International de Philosophie. He has published several books on the history of modern philosophy (particularly on Spinoza and Marx) and numerous essays dealing with juridical and political theory, notably a trilogy, written together with Michael Hardt: Empire (Harvard U.P., 2000), Multitude (Penguin Books, 2004) and Commonwealth (Harvard U.P., 2009).

**END**

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

 

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub,Bangor, northWales)  

 

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a new song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Marx's Grave

MARX AND ALIENATION – BY SEAN SAYERS

Marx and Philosophy Society

Book launch: Sean Sayers, Marx and Alienation: Essays on Hegelian Themes (2011)  http://www.palgrave.com/products/title.aspx?pid=414685

Saturday February 4, 2012, 2-6pm, at theLondonKnowledge Lab,23-29 Emerald Street,LondonWC1

Andrew Chitty and Meade McCloughan will present responses to the book, with Sean Sayers in turn replying.

Earlier versions of some of the chapters can be found via Sean Sayers’ webpage: http://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/philosophy/staff/sayers/index.html

Attendance is free and open to all. To register e-mail Meade McCloughan: m.mccloughan@ucl.ac.uk

Directions and map: http://tinyurl.com/ywmsvc  Tube stations: Holborn andRussell Square.

Marx and Philosophy Society: http://www.marxandphilosophy.org.uk/

 

**END**

 

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

 

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a new song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Socrates

ELEVENTH ANNUAL MEETING OF THE INTERNATIONAL SOCIAL THEORY CONSORTIUM

CALL FOR PAPERS
17-20 May, 2012 — Flagler College, St. Augustine, Florida

THEORY AND POLITICS: BETWEEN THE GLOBALIZATION OF MODERNITY AND STRUGGLES FOR FREEDOM AND CHANGE

The conference will focus on the tensions between two dimensions of social theory: as an academic discourse with analytical intent, and as a form of political action. In particular, our goal is to highlight 
the position of social theory between:
– Theory construction—as a social-scientific practice that is both normatively oriented and historically self-reflexive, i.e. willing and able to recognize its embeddedness in the social process; and
– Progressive politics—as it is inspired by the prospect of qualitative social change, and thus, oriented toward the transformation of the object of social theory.

In order to do so effectively, social theorists need to avoid detached, unengaged, ‘un-dialectical’ conceptions of our responsibility as confined to observation, along with forms of activism that lack reflexivity and awareness of the mediated nature of modern social life—as a result constituting political practice without theory. While social practice without theory is blind, social theory without practice is hollow.  Yet when and how does social practice truly require input from social theory? As Hegel’s employment of the image of the Owl of Minerva suggests, whose flight begins at dusk, does theory have a tendency to arrive on the scene too late…when the work of revolution-nary change already has been completed? Is it not that theories are becoming outdated due to revolutionary change? Then again, is such critical self-constraint itself overly hasty? Is social theory not in fact capable of providing a robust normative standard to evaluate the status and progress of revolutions and social change? Should it not aspire to critically accompany or reflect on social and historical change? If the relation between theory and politics is an open one, how do we need to reconfigure the relation between (social) theory and (progressive) action, especially after the financial crash of 2008 and following the Arab Spring? Are recent developments within the Western world indicators for another democratic Spring? Are claims and movements for economic justice and accountability, as they currently are being articulated in the US, in Europe, in Israel, and word-wide, signs of a new revolutionary spirit and indicators of a new cosmopolitan public sphere? Or could they be the opposite—symptoms of the decline of such center-pieces of modernity as democracy and individual autonomy? After all, the Arab Spring may not lead to greater democracy, but a resurgence of Islam. At the same time, theorists like Colin Crouch and John Keane warn that we may be going through the terminal phase of western democracy, whose inability to confront 21st-century challenges is becoming ever more apparent.

The conference poses such questions, in the framework of the overarching query about the relation between theory and politics—as provocative, open, challenging inspirations for a most diverse set of 
possible inquiries:
– Theoretical and meta-theoretical essays about theory and politics are as much part of this as cultural and critical inquiries into contexts of political action and agency;
– New developments fusing theoretical traditions are as much welcome as are works that analyze the conflicting interstices between concrete local actions and the larger theoretical and symbolic underpinnings of these movements;
– Works on the grounds of normative commitments are as much needed as empirical/discursive deconstructions of existing imaginaries and socio-political beliefs and assumptions.

Papers are invited that speak to the topic from:
– Classical & contemporary social theory: working with our inheritance
– Methodology of Critical Theory
– Literary methods and Social Theory
– The interpretive tradition, depth hermeneutics & analysis
– The performative aspects of public life
– Media power and image magic
– Psychoanalytic method and social theory
– Phenomenology, hermeneutics, and critical hermeneutics
– Epistemologies and philosophies of knowledge today
– Asian philosophies and methods
– Socrates, Plato, and working with the Greeks today
– Political anthropology and reflexive historical sociology

ORGANIZING COMMITTEE:
Mel Barber – Convener Associate Professor of Sociology, Flagler College, St. Augustine, Florida
Harry F. Dahms Sociology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville (hdahms@utk.edu)
Kieran Keohane, Sociology, University College, Cork, Ireland (k.keohane@ucc.ie)
Bert Koegler, Philosophy, University of North Florida, Jacksonville (hkoegler@unf.edu)

Please submit abstracts by March 1, 2012 to Mel Barber at:  mbarber265@aol.com

Web-site:  http://www.cas.usf.edu/socialtheory/data/istcpaper.pdf

 

**END**

 

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

 

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a new song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski