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Daily Archives: January 2nd, 2012

Time

THE REVOLUTION OF TIME IN A TIME OF REVOLUTION

Call For Papers
As editors of a book proposal accepted for publication by Cambridge Scholar Publishing, we announce a call for submissions to a collection of essays exploring the connection between concepts of time and social change. The volume will have a strong focus on interdisciplinarity, the fusion of theory with practice, and presenting possibilities for ways in which the consideration of alternative notions of time could bring about social change. Thus it is not only practical philosophy papers that we invite, but also contributions from fields such as literary studies, media studies, cultural studies, gender studies, postcolonial studies, sociology and political science.

The Revolution of Time in a Time of Revolution
The year 2011 marked a global turn in acts and ideas about revolution. Western culture and media categorized uprisings in Egypt, Libya, Yemen and other nations as “the Arab Spring.” Yet revolution does not take part only on the national stage: radical social change is constantly being called for globally on the levels of gender, race and class, reflecting a future-oriented view of time that aims to change the thrust of history.

Merely looking into the future is itself a limited way of evaluating approaches through which we can create a more just society. Philosophers have long critiqued the patriarchal, linear notion of time reflected in national narratives and teleological worldviews, which often function only to reinforce the status quo. Marx himself calls for an end to temporal limitations, while Negri considers the possibilities of kairos time, and Deleuze and Guattari the importance of becoming, expanding into Agamben’s and Benjamin’s notions of messianic time.

Time is thus not simply socially constructed notions of linear clock time and teleological conceptions of history, but rather time is an encounter that differs according to human experience. Julia Kristeva’s work on women’s time, for example, outlines the cyclical temporalities and specific subjectivities unique to women, while Robert Levine suggests that climate can have an effect on the pace of life in  various countries, although postcolonial writers have critiqued this perspective as at least uninformed if not racist. Literary, postcolonial and media studies conceive time as something that can be reversed or stopped altogether, portraying history as plural and emphasising the subversive and oppressive facets of time ideologies. 

Nations are held together by popular conceptions of shared times which often function to exclude minorities and repress their actual histories, while class antagonisms are partly characterised through ideas of productive time and leisure time.

The breaking and rupture of such a standardized conception of time which remains that of Western Modernity is the task of the essays being collected in this work, seeking “to brush history against the grain” as Benjamin would have it. Non-Western belief systems have also put forward alternative conceptions of time. Indigenous cosmologies, for instance, portray time as cyclical, while Buddhism separates time into tiny moments or even offers possibilities of transcending time. Literary, postcolonial and media studies conceive time as something that can be reversed or stopped altogether, portraying history as plural and emphasising the subversive and oppressive facets of time ideologies.

The Revolution of Time in a Time of Revolution is interested in the intersection between theory and practice, including case studies that consider ways in which ideologies of time and alternative temporalities can be useful for solving conflicts and overcoming stereotypes created around questions of gender, race, ethnicity and socio-economic inequality. Time-perception is often used as a tool for marginalisation, but the alternative temporalities of the subaltern may also provide a way out of current restrictive policies around the world. The focus of the collection will be on time as an element of radical activism: how can visions of the future and the past, embodied time, untimely time, protest time and political time be implemented both theoretically and practically in order to change the way in which time functions as a vital element of social, political and cultural revolution?

As a thread that connects human life on so many levels, time is at once both subtle and dominating, reminding us that the moment of change must be seized before time itself, our creation, escapes us, or that to enact change we must escape or recreate time, or do something totally new with time. There has never been a better time to consider how both ancient and modern, philosophical and aboriginal conceptions of time and temporality might be employed in a quest to reconcile alternative  histories, and to bring about radical social change.

Please email expressions of interest in the form of an abstract (up to 500 words) with “Time and Revolution book proposal” in the subject line, as an attachment to Cecile Lawrence at (clawren1@binghamton.edu) by the 8th of January 2012, with a c.c. to Natalie Churn at messiahy@hotmail.comand, Christian Garland atchristiangarland@hotmail.com

Please send your completed submission as a Microsoft Word document by Sunday, the 31st of January 2012.

Contributions should be written in Times New Roman and follow the Chicago referencing style or we won’t consider them. Authors of accepted papers will receive a short guide to the specific Chicago method to be used for references. If your article includes images, please let us know in advance. Papers should be no more than 3,000  words in English or approximately 20 double spaced pages, inclusive of notes and bibliography, prepared for anonymous review, must be the original work of the author, and previously unpublished. Please also include a brief biographical statement of no more than 50 words.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.
Co-editors Cecile Lawrence, Natalie Churn and Christian Garland.
https://sites.google.com/site/timeandrevolutionbookproject/

**END**

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a new song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Karl Polanyi

TWELTH INTERNATIONAL KARL POLANYI CONFERENCE

Twelfth International Karl Polanyi Conference
Karl Polanyi and Latin America

National University General Sarmiento Los Polvorines­Buenos Aires, Argentina November 8­9, 2012
Co-organized by the Conurbano Institute, National University General Sarmiento, Argentina and the Karl Polanyi Institute of Political Economy, Concordia University, Canada

CALL FOR PAPERS
At the present time, can nations and peoples defend their sovereignty and protect their societies from subordination to global capital and dependence on economic and political centers?

In Latin America, in particular, there is evidence of encouraging signs:
a) National-popular processes supported by new social movements that question the neoliberal economic rationale and in some cases propose new paradigms: socialism for the XXIst century, vivir bien/ buen vivir, that give priority to guaranteeing the livelihood of all citizens, respecting cultural diversity and harmony with nature.
b) Interstate forms of solidarity (UNASUR, CELAC)1 to resist North American hegemony that increases the capacity for greater autarchy and sovereignty to confront the economic, political, and cultural
domination of the neoliberal project and the continuous commodification of all aspects of life.
c) The search for new frameworks of social and political thought, particularly the so-called “decoloniality” that converges with important historical trends in the region. Others include the theology and pedagogy of liberation, dependency theory, new variants of socialism, the peasants’ movement, the worldview of indigenous peoples, the contemporary feminist struggle against patriarchy and the struggle for the rights of nature.

In Polanyi’s terms, are these processes temporary responses to the crisis of the world capitalist order, or true “counter-movements” that challenge neoconservative projects and the dominant neoliberal paradigm? If so, can they lead to the re-embedding of the economy into more just and democratic societies? Can this be a historic turning point that could spread to other societies that have experienced capitalist development and now confront problems of their own and of the planet, resulting in another “great transformation”, or an “another globalization”? Is there a risk that the latent global crisis will push democracy inLatin America and other regions of the world towards new forms of fascism?

Given the structural failure of the global market to provide workers with dignified wages – the erosion of the social foundations of life as foreseen by Marx and Polanyi – and inspired by the Union of South American Nations , Community of Latin American and Caribbean States, the World Social Forum’s slogan that “another world (and another economy) is possible”, civil society organizations and increasingly governments in Latin America, are developing initiatives to promote new forms of self-managed and associational work and to revitalize indigenous communal activities. What is the transformational potential of these tendencies? How can the popular masses protect themselves when the management of the global capital crisis is focused on the interests of core countries? Is it sufficient to promote associationalism and redistribution, or is it necessary to reinvent the State? In particular, should generalized cash income transfers to individuals or families that broaden redistribution, a concept central to Polanyi, become a new right of citizens to basic income, thereby reducing indigence and poverty? Could we thus achieve a just society without transforming the relationship between the state, the economy, and society as well as the socioeconomic models that today reinforce the concentration of economic power?

The ecological crisis – the erosion of the natural foundations of life also foreseen by Marx and Polanyi – has led to a multiplicity of local and global movements to defend the balance with nature lost to global market forces. Is it possible to include our long-term concern about the planet in the short-term agendas of governments oriented to legitimize themselves through elections or the struggle of popular social movements for survival? If the possibility of unlimited growth is ruled out (which was one of Polanyi’s concerns), can the new movements for responsible consumption contribute to building “another economy”?

Regardless of the nomenclature – social economy, solidarity economy, community economy, popular economy, social and solidarity economy, to name a few – new initiatives are emerging in both the North and in the South. Are they similar in scope and in scale in the center and in the periphery? What role does planning and restructuring of national or regional economies play in an era of globalization (greater autarchy, as in food sovereignty)? Can new forms of reciprocity and fair trade (truly non commoditized) be amplified at the international level? How plausible is the convergence and complementarities between these movements for another economy in the North and in the South?

The resonance of Karl Polanyi’s ideas on these issues is recognized by scholars across disciplines. Since the 2012 international conference is being held in Latin America, it will address other issues that are important for Polanyi scholars:

Why did Polanyi not include the colonization process of America and the co-constitution of America and Europe in his reconstruction of the process of evolution of the market and capitalism, that are at the core of decolonial thought today?

Why did Polanyi not show any interest in the issue of development, the paradigm for social transformation in this region that dominated the twentieth century?

What can we obtain by combining Marx’s approach to the modes of production, ever present in the social sciences and in the history of this region, with Polanyi’s patterns of integration?

Are there important and relevant differences between the liberalism to which Polanyi referred to and the neoliberalism of today?

How can we interpret Polanyi’s analysis of religion in terms of Latin American liberation theology?

Can we apply Polanyi’s analysis of corporatism to the present structure of Latin American societies?

How can we compare Polanyi’s analysis of the crisis of international capitalism with the contemporary global crisis and, in particular, with reference to governance and interstate relations?

As in all previous International Polanyi Conferences, papers on the life and work of Karl Polanyi are welcome as well as papers from academics and /or professionals on the contemporary relevance of Karl Polanyi’s thought.

Simultaneous interpretation (Spanish / English) will be available.
Abstracts (maximum 250 words) should be sent before March 15th, 2012 to: polanyi@alcor.concordia.ca

Conference Organizing Committee:
Honorary Chairperson: Kari Polanyi Levitt, Mc Gill University, Canada
José Luís Coraggio, National University General Sarmiento, Argentina
Margie Mendell, Concordia University, Canada
Jean­Louis Laville, Conservatoire national des arts et métiers (CNAM, Paris), France
Antonio David Cattani, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

Registration Fees:
Non­Latin Americans:
Registration fee: $250 US – Meals: $50 US (Two lunches and coffee breaks)
Latin Americans:
Registration fees: $150 US – Meals: $50 (Two lunches and coffee break)
Students:
Registration Fee: $50 US – Meals: $50 (Two lunches and coffee break)

**END**

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a new song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Dialectics of Class Struggle in the Global Economy

THIRD CONFERENCE OF THE IESE

*Call for Papers for the 3rd Conference of IESE*
*”Mozambique: Accumulation and Transformation in a Context of International Crisis”*
*Maputo, 4-5 September 2012*

IESE (Instituto de Estudos Sociais e Económicos) hereby announces that it will hold a conference on the theme:

*“Mozambique: Accumulation and Transformation in a Context of International Crisiss”, in Maputo, on 4-5 September 2012.*

Nowadays the international crisis is an omnipresent theme in news items, in analyses and in debates on public policies, options and priorities, and on corporate strategies, modes of production, appropriation, distribution and use of surplus, but also on the implications of climate change, the possibility and meaning of the Development State, and the sustainability of the Welfare State. Economies with noteworthy economic growth (such as that of Mozambique and of several other countries in sub-Saharan Africa) have been rather ineffective at reducing poverty, vulnerability and real inequality, in modifying productive structures, in reallocating income between social groups, and in reducing patterns of dependency and instability. At the same time, we witness the emergence of new forms of political organisation and new dynamics of demonstrations and expressions of social struggle outside of the formal institutional framework, related with waves of unemployment and social frustration, particularly among young people. Are we looking at a crisis caused by “failings of the State” reflected in lack of fiscal discipline, failure of the social protection model, and/or by deregulation of finance capital? Or is this a crisis of the social mode of accumulation and capitalist reproduction which, naturally, is of a political nature and has political implications and also affects models and options of the State and of representation, affirmation and political struggle?

Through this conference, IESE intends to introduce new perspectives and approaches, based on a political economy analysis, with relevance forMozambique.

Without prejudicing other relevant questions, the papers proposed should seek to develop problematics related with the following interrogations:
– How are the various dimensions of the crisis characterised, how do they relate to each other and reinforce each other, and what impact do they   have on the options for social, economic and political transformation and  transition? To what extent the crisis is one of financialization of global   capitalist patterns of accumulation and what are the implications for transition and transformation?
– To what extent does emerging from the crisis require fundamental changes in the political and economic patterns of production, accumulation, reproduction and redistribution of wealth, in what directions could such changes occur, and through what political processes could such a transition develop?
– What are the relevance, tendencies and dynamics of foreign investment and its relationship with natural resources and domestic processes of capital accumulation, and what are the implications for transition and transformation? What is the role of emerging economies in this process and what are the challenges and opportunities that they represent in the process of change?
– What role can education play in the dynamics of crisis and change?
– What challenges and pressures for employment and urbanisation emerge from these processes of crisis and change, and what implications do they have for options of social and economic transformation?
– How are the crisis of social security models and the social inequalities that this crisis reveals (with regard to the control, appropriation and redistribution of surplus) characterised, and how do they
  tend to develop? What economic, social and political implications can flow from them? Is this a demographic crisis or a crisis of the mode of accumulation (or both)?
– How can social and economic pressures affect these mass social movements, and what impact can such movements have on future options? How to characterise these movements in Europe, the USA, the Middle East, sub-Saharan Africa and North Africa? What do they have in common and in what ways are they different? And what lessons are emerging from these processes?
– How do climate change, and the social pressures resulting from it, contribute to and how are they affected by the other dimensions of the crisis, and what impact do they have on the options for political, economic and social transformation?

***
Researchers interested in presenting papers at the conference are invited to send a summary of their themes (in Portuguese or English), in no more than 750 words to conferencia.crise@iese.ac.mz. The summary should indicate the theme, the problematic, the methodology and the basic sources of information, as well as information on the institutional position of the candidate and his/her contact details. The proposals may be individual or collective. All proposals will be considered and submitted to a jury for selection.

The themes should be relevant forMozambique, although they can have generic theoretical or methodological foci, or may be based on case studies from other countries. In addition to their presentation at the conference, the approved papers will be published by IESE in its series of “conference papers” and later some of them will be selected for publication in a book.

IESE may bear the transport and accommodation expenses for some participants.

For any further information, please contact IESE at the address conferencia.crise@iese.ac.mz.
Important deadlines to bear in mind:
– Summaries of the proposed papers should be submitted to IESE by 10 April 2012.
– IESE will inform the candidates as to whether their proposals have been approved by 15 May 2012.
– The definitive texts of the papers approved for the conference should be delivered to IESE by 5 August 2012.

The Director of IESE

 

**END**

 

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

 

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

 

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a new song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski