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Daily Archives: June 9th, 2011

Anarchism

FUNDING FOR A PhD IN ANARCHIST HISTORY

From: David Berry D.G.Berry@lboro.ac.uk

Opportunity for PhD funding in anarchist history, politics or theory (second round of applications).

Please circulate

Loughborough University’s Department of Politics, History and International Relations (UK) is inviting applications for fully-funded PhD studentships for 3 years (UK or EU fee status). Each studentship is valued at £13,590 plus tuition fees at the UK/EU rate, and are available for PhDs commencing in October 2011. The deadline for receipt of full application is Wednesday, 15 June 2011.

Dr Dave Berry, Dr. Alexandre Christoyannopoulos and Dr Ruth Kinna would like to welcome applications in any area related to anarchist history, politics or theory. Their staff profiles are available at: http://www.lboro.ac.uk/departments/eu/people/index.html.

Dave Berry is a Senior Lecturer in Contemporary European History. He has published primarily on the French anarchist movement, the contemporary alternative left in France and on Daniel Guérin. He is the author of A History of the French Anarchist Movement, 1917-1945 (Greenwood Press, 2002; AK edition 2009) and co-editor of New Perspectives on Anarchism, Labour and Syndicalism (CSP, 2010); he is an associate editor and reviews editor of ‘Anarchist Studies’ and a founder member of the Anarchist Studies Network (Specialist Group for the Study of Anarchism within the Political Studies Association – http://anarchist-studies-network.org.uk/).

Alexandre Christoyannopoulos is a Lecturer in Politics and International Relations. He has published on Tolstoy, non-violence and Christian anarchism, and is the author of ‘Christian Anarchism: A Political Interpretation of the Bible’ (Imprint, 2011), and editor of ‘Religious Anarchism: New Perspectives’ (Cambridge Scholars, 2009). He is the treasurer of the Anarchist Studies Network, an executive member of the Religion and Politics research committee of the International Political Science Association, and a member of a number of related academic associations.

Ruth Kinna is a Senior Lecturer in Politics. She has published on William Morris and Peter Kropotkin, and is the author of ‘Anarchism: A Beginner’s Guide’ (Oneworld, 2005; 2nd edn. 2009) and co-editor, with Laurence Davis of ‘Anarchism and Utopianism’ (Manchester UP, 2009). She is the editor of the journal ‘Anarchist Studies’ and is also a founder member and co-convenor of the Anarchist Studies Network.

The Department is home to an Anarchism Research Group (http://www.lboro.ac.uk/departments/eu/research/ResearchGroups/AnarchismRG/index.html),
and there are currently five PhD students in the Department working on aspects of anarchism: Cris Illiopoulos, working on Nietzsche and anarchism; Saku Pinta; who is completing a dissertation on convergences and divergences between anarchism and Marxism; Sureyyya Turkeli working on the historiography of anarchism; Matt Wilson working on anarchist ethics; and Gwendolyn Windpassinger, working on queer feminist anarchism in Buenos Aires. Dr. Alex Prichard’s research on the political thought of P-J Proudhon was also completed at the Department and his thesis successfully defended in 2008.

If you would like to discuss a possible research project informally, please e-mail Alex (a.christoyannopoulos@lboro.ac.uk), Ruth (r.e.kinna@lboro.ac.uk) or Dave (d.g.berry@lboro.ac.uk).

In order for us to be able to consider your application you will need to complete the standard application form which may be done online, quoting the relevant reference number in respect of the funding (GSS11B). The following list of links will direct you to useful sources of information in regard to your application; and we will require to see a full research proposal together with the necessary supporting documents.

Information about the Department:
http://www.lboro.ac.uk/prospectus/pg/courses/dept/eu/index.htm
http://www.lboro.ac.uk/departments/eu/studying/research/programmes.html

Guidelines for research proposals: http://www.lboro.ac.uk/departments/eu/studying/research/admissions-procedure.html

Information about how to apply: http://www.lboro.ac.uk/prospectus/pg/essential/apply/index.htm

Information for international students: http://www.lboro.ac.uk/international/

Information about fees for international students: http://www.lboro.ac.uk/admin/ar/funding/pgr/international/index.htm

Information about fees for UK/EU students: http://www.lboro.ac.uk/admin/ar/funding/pgr/ukeu/index.htm

University Prospectus: http://www.lboro.ac.uk/prospectus/pg/research/index.htm

**END**

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Karl Marx

MARX’S ‘CAPITAL’ FOR TODAY

Announcing a new series on
Marx’s Capital for Today:  A Reading of Volume One of Capital

Second & Fourth Mondays
June, July & August
6:30-9.00 pm
@ Chicago Public Library
Harold Washington Library Center
400 South State St. Chicago IL
Room 3N-6

Join us for a re-examination of Marx’s analysis of the logic of capital in light of today’s economic and social crises. The focus will be Volume One of Marx’s Capital, in which Marx developed some of his most creative philosophic conceptions. The suggested readings from Marx will be supplemented by selections from Marxism and Freedom, by Raya Dunayevskaya, founder of Marxist-Humanism in the U.S.

Capital is online at http://www.marxists.org/archive/marx/works/1867-c1

Marxism and Freedom is available from U.S. Marxist-Humanists.

Sponsored by the U.S. Marxist-Humanists
Email: arise@usmarxisthumanists.org
http://www.usmarxisthumanists.org
Phone: 773-561-3454
eg/2011/labor donated
*********

Schedule and Readings

June 13th   — The Commodity Form and the Dual Character of Labor

Marx called his analysis of the dual character of labor at the start of Capital his “unique contribution” to the critique of political economy. This meeting will discuss the difference between concrete labor and abstract labor and how it defines the nature of the social relations of modern capitalism.

Suggested readings:
Capital, chapter 1, sections 1 and 2 (pp. 125-137)
Marxism and Freedom, chapter 5 (pp. 81-91)

Leading the discussion: Peter Hudis, General Editor, The Complete Works of Rosa Luxemburg

*********

June 27th — The Forms of Value and the Function of Money

The discussion of the forms of value in section 3 of chapter 1 of Capital, which is the subject of this meeting, is of pivotal importance in disclosing capitalism’s drive to commodify human relations as well as the function of money in the modern world.

Suggesting reading:
Capital, chapter 1, section 3 (pp. 138-163).
Leading the discussion: Anton Evelynov, student activist

*********

July 11th — The Adventures of Commodity Fetishism

The section on “The Fetishism of the Commodity and its Secret” has been widely considered the philosophic core of Capital, in which Marx both pinpoints the reason for capitalism’s persistence and points to its possible transcendence. This meeting will focus on this famous section in light of ongoing debates in radical theory.

Suggesting readings:
Capital, chapter 1, section 4 (pp. 163-177)
Marxism and Freedom, chapter 6 (pp. 92-102).

Leading the discussion: Marilyn Nissim-Sabat, author, Neither Victim nor Survivor: Thinking Toward a New Humanity

*********

July 25th — What is Capital? Why is it the Defining Feature of Modern Society?

Part 2 of Capital, “The Transformation of Money into Capital,” which is the subject of this meeting, discloses the peculiar nature of capital as a social form and how it becomes the universal medium of  social relations in capitalist society.

Suggested readings:
Capital, chapters 4-6, (pp. 247-282)
Marxism and Freedom, chapter 7, section 1 (pp. 103-111).

Leading the discussion: Miguel A. Rodriguez, student at Loyola University; and Ali Reza, Committee in Solidarity with the People of Iran

*********

August 8th — The Domination of “Dead” over “Living Labor”

The subject of this meeting is Marx’s discussion of the relation between the labor process and the valorization process, on the one hand, and constant capital and variable capital, on the other. This relation discloses the law of motion inherent in all forms of capitalism—whether in its “free market” or statist variants.

Suggested readings:
Capital, chapters 7-8, (pp. 283-319)
Marxism and Freedom, chapter 7, section 2 (pp. 112-119).

Leading the discussion: J Turk, U. S. Marxist-Humanists

*********

August 22nd — The Working Day and the Quest for a New Society

Why have automated and computerized forms of labor, which at one time were heralded as leading to a dramatic shortening of the working day, led instead to an increase in the amount of time that many spend at work? To what extent do efforts to shorten the working day and transform conditions of labor point to a possible alternative to the capitalist mode of production? We will explore Marx’s discussion of these issues in the section of Capital on “The Working Day.”

Suggested Readings:
Capital, chapter 10, (pp. 340-416)
Marxism and Freedom, chapter 7, section 3 (pp. 120-125).

Leading the discussion: Eileen Grace, Hobgoblin Collective

 

END***

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

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Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Age of Austerity

CRITICAL THEORY IN AN AGE OF AUSTERITY

Critical Theory in an Age of Austerity
Brunel University, London

Tuesday June 21st
Brunel Lecture Centre
Room 207
12.00-4.30

Critical Theory is closely associated with the work of a generation of postwar social theorists. Figures such as Theodor Adorno drew on earlier critical traditions, most notably Marxism, to provide an original and sophisticated critique of society that included groundbreaking work on popular culture, politics and philosophy. Since then, new and exciting strands of critical theory have emerged to take account of the changing nature of (global) societies.

The aim of this workshop is to explore various strands of critical theory in order to help us make sense of our current age of austerity. We will also discuss the possibilities of establishing a critical theory research network at Brunel.

The workshop brings together academics from across the social sciences and humanities at Brunel and will cover both empirical and theoretical issues such as neoliberalism and culture, the Big Society, refugees, queer theory, deconstruction, politics of in/difference, law and critique, structures of feeling, and critical media studies.

All are welcome!

For further information, contact:

John Roberts (Sociology and Communications): John.Roberts@brunel.ac.uk
Gareth Dale (Politics and History): Gareth.Dale@brunel.ac.uk
Peter D. Thomas (Politics and History): PeterD.Thomas@brunel.ac.uk

Travel directions: http://www.brunel.ac.uk/about/campus/directions/directions

Critical Theory in an Age of Austerity
Programme Sessions:

Tea/coffee – available from 12.00

Introduction – 12.15
Gareth Dale (Politics & History)
John Roberts (Sociology & Communications)
Peter Thomas (Politics & History)

Session 1 – 12.30-1.30
Big, Little, Local, or Global Society? (Chair: John Roberts)
Nadine El-Enany (Law)
Fiona Cullen (Social Work)
Milly Williamson (Screen Media)

Break: 1.30-1.45

Session 2 – 1.45-2.45
Theory in the Humanities: Palintropes, Indifference, Queer (Chair: Gareth Dale)
William Watkin (English)
William Spurlin (English)
Sean Gaston (English)

Break: 2.45-3.00

Session 3 – 3.00-4.00
Critical Media Studies, Social Structures, and Law (Chair: Peter Thomas)
Julian Petley (Journalism)
Mike Wayne (Screen Media)
Craig Reeves (Law)

Conclusion:
Critical Theory at Brunel: Prospects for a Research Network/Centre (general discussion)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com