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Daily Archives: June 4th, 2011

Children at Work

MATERIALIST READINGS OF CHILDREN’S LITERATURE AND CULTURE

Call for Papers

Materialist Readings of Children’s Literature and Culture: Classic and Contemporary Essays

Call for papers for an edited collection tentatively titled Materialist Readings of Children’s Literature and Culture: Classic and Contemporary Essays.  This collection will consist primarily of new analyses, but will also include previously published essays in order to chart the development of materialist criticism of children’s literature, culture, and film.   

Topics may include but are not limited to the following:

• The way in which children’s literature supports or, conversely, challenges class hierarchies, especially as they intersect with gender, sexuality, and race/ethnicity

• The “political unconscious” in works of children’s literature

• Cognitive mapping

• Class conflict in children’s literature and film

• Depictions of the working class, labor history, socialism, and revolution

• Children’s literature and the left

• Materialist-feminist criticism and children’s literature and culture

• Materialist analyses of post-colonial children’s literature and culture 

• The political economy of children’s literature and culture

Please direct inquiries and submissions to the editor, Dr. Angela Hubler, atahubler@ksu.edu.  500 words abstracts, brief biography, and short C.V. are due by September 18th, 2011.  Complete essays must be submitted as an attachment in Microsoft Word, following MLA guidelines for citation and format, by November 18th, 2011.  A potential publisher has expressed interest, and a proposal will be submitted after abstracts are received. 

Editor Angela Hubler is Associate Professor in Women’s Studies atKansasStateUniversity, where she teaches courses in feminist theory, female adolescence, and women’s writing and culture.  Her recent publications analyze literary representations of collective political action in literature for children and adults. Her essays have been published in The Lion and the Unicorn, Children’s Literature Association Quarterly, Critical Survey, Papers on Language and Literature, Women’s Studies Quarterly, the National Women’s Studies Association Journal, and edited collections.  

 

**END**

 

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

 

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Digitisation Perspectives

EPHEMERA – VOLUME 10 NUMBERS 3 – 4

The Digital Labour Group in the Faculty of Information and Media Studies at the University of Western Ontario and /ephemera: theory and politics in organization/ are pleased to announce the arrival of Volume 10: 3-4:

*** Digital Labour: Workers, Authors, Citizens ***

Edited by Jonathan Burston, Nick Dyer-Witheford and Alison Hearn

ephemera: http://www.ephemeraweb.org/

Born out of the conference of the same name held in the fall of 2009 at the University of Western Ontario, this special double issue of / ephemera / addresses the implications of digital labour as they are emerging in practice, politics, policy, culture, and theoretical enquiry. As workers, as authors, and as citizens, we are increasingly summoned and disciplined by new digital technologies that define the workplace and produce ever more complex regimes of surveillance and control. At the same time, new possibilities for agency and new spaces for collectivity are borne from these multiplying digital innovations.

This volume explores this social dialectic, with a specific focus on new forms of labour. Papers examine the histories and theories of digital capitalism, foundational assumptions in debates about digital labour, issues of intellectual property and copyright, material changes in the digital workplace, transnational perspectives on digital labour, the issue of free labour and new definitions of work, and struggles and contests on the scene of digital production.

Contributors include Brian Holmes, Andrea Fumagalli and Cristina Morini, David Hesmondhalgh, Ursula Huws, Barry King, Jack Bratich, Enda Brophy and many others.

This issue also contains vital contributions from union and guild activists hailing from the Canadian Media Guild (CMG), the Screen Actors Guild (SAG), the American  Federation of Television and Radio Artists (AFTRA), the University of Western Ontario Faculty Association and the Canadian Association of University Teachers (CAUT).

The Digital Labour Group: Jonathan Burston, Edward Comor, James Compton, Nick Dyer-Witheford, Alison Hearn, Ajit Pyati, Sandra Smeltzer, Matt Stahl, Samuel E. Trosow.

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com