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Daily Archives: May 19th, 2011

Protest Against Austerity

30 JUNE – STRIKE FOR OUR FUTURE!

Today’s students are tomorrow’s pensioners…

30 June – Strike for our future!

On June 30 nearly a million workers could be on strike together, from the PCS, UCU, NUT and ATL unions. This includes teachers and education workers in schools, colleges and universities.

Workers are striking to stop changes to their pension schemes. Bosses and the government want workers to pay more and receive less. Some workers could lose tens of thousands of pounds that they have already paid in.

Young people who have already been hit by education cuts, tuition fees and the scrapping of EMA would also have to look forward to growing old in poverty. French students took action alongside workers to defend pensions last year. Their slogan was “today’s students are tomorrow’s pensioners.”

Student protests alone caused a major crisis for this government. Students and workers together can take the resistance to cuts even further.

Resources:

Facebook event for 30 June: http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=227447003939150

Strike petition for students: http://educationactivistnetwork.files.wordpress.com/2011/05/30-june-petition.pdf

Strike leaflet for students: http://educationactivistnetwork.files.wordpress.com/2011/05/leaflet-may.pdf

“Strike for our future” poster: http://educationactivistnetwork.files.wordpress.com/2011/05/todays-students-tomorrows-pensioners.pdf

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

John Locke

CRITICAL ENTHUSIASM: CAPITAL ACCUMULATION AND THE TRANSFORMATION OF RELIGIOUS PASSION

 Jordana Rosenberg
Critical Enthusiasm: Capital Accumulation and the Transformation of Religious Passion
Oxford University Press, April 2011

The Atlantic world of the long eighteenth century was characterized by two major, interrelated phenomena: the onset of capital accumulation and the infusion of traditions of radical religious rapture into Enlightenment discourses. In exploring these cross-pollinations, Critical Enthusiasm shows that debates around religious radicalism are bound to the advent of capitalism at its very root: as legal precedent, as financial rhetoric, and as aesthetic form. To understand the period thus requires that we not only contextualize histories of religion in terms of the economic landscape of early modernity, but also recast the question of secularization in terms of the contradictions of capitalism.

Critical Enthusiasm contributes to new directions of scholarship in literary and legal history, secularization studies, and economic criticism. It is unique in producing a model for literary and cultural study that is simultaneously attuned to economic and religious forces. By approaching the history of capitalism through religious debates, Critical Enthusiasm discloses significant intersections of aesthetic form and of financial flows that have been hitherto ignored.

Through chapters that highlight moral philosophy, religious prophesy, early modern statute law, poetry, and political theory, Rosenbergshows that the contested nature of enthusiastic rapture is crucial to understanding the major institutional transformations of early modernity. These transformations–colonial plunder, the rise of finance, the administration of racialized labor, and the legal reform that justified such practices–shaped the period; they also laid the foundation for our contemporary world.

See: http://www.oup.com/us/catalog/general/subject/ReligionTheology/HistoryofChristianity/ReformationCounterReformation/?view=usa&ci=9780199764266

Jordana Rosenberg is Assistant Professor of English at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

European Union

THE EUROPEAN HIGHER EDUCATION AREA: KEY ISSUES AND WAYS FORWARD

Monday 11th July 2011

12.00-4.00pm (lunch inclusive)

Venue: SRHE, 44 BedfordRow, London, WC1R  4LL

Programme:

The French university at the crossroads: between bureaucratic accountability and the quest for excellence

Dr Romuald Normand & Professor Jean-Louis Derouet, Institut Français de l’Education, Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon

French higher education institutions, beyond official rhetoric, remain profoundly divided between the elitism that provides excellence for the few, and the democratisation that is reflected in the massification of higher education. This is illustrated by the expanse between the prestigious and highly selective grandes écoles (the Oxbridge or Ivy League of the French system) and the ‘fac’ – the ordinary universities. Moreover, the paucity of French research and scholarship on higher education means that there is no persistent analytical and potentially critical voice coming from the academy, nor any relevant empirical findings. Changes have, however, occurred within the system with theBolognaprocess, the creation of the National Research Agency, and legislation on university autonomy. Romuald Normand and Jean-Louis Derouet will examine and analyse current tensions and propose ways forward.

The Strange Saga of Policy as Success

Guy Neave, Scientific Director of the Centre for Research in Higher Education Policies (CIPES)Porto,Portugal, and Professor Emeritus of the Centre for Higher Education Policy Studies atTwenteUniversity, theNetherlands

This presentation is not concerned with the Bologna Process so much as an exemplar to examine a broader issue of HE policy as a multi-level process. Who defines success? And at what level – inter-governmental, system or institutional level?  Does success at one inevitably mean success at another?  How is the Bologna Process perceived less by reformers – by the pays politique – as by those who have reform done to them – that is, at institutional level by the pays réel, academics, students and administrators. This presentation draws on findings across seven higher education establishments in four EU member states:Norway,Portugal,ItalyandGermany. It suggests optimism is best when heavily diluted with caution.

The European Higher Education Area (EHEA): is there a future?

Noël Vercruysse, Director, Higher Education Policy Unit, Flemish Belgian Ministry of Education

The implementation of the Bologna Process in the first decade of the 21st century has had a significant impact on European higher education at levels of the system: the government, higher education institutions, academic staff and students. Much has been achieved, but it is certainly an exaggeration to say that we are living in a vibrant and dynamic EHEA. After theLeuvenconference in 2009 the Bologna Process and the EHEA are losing momentum. Why is this, and what can be done about it? Is there still a future for the EHEA, and, if so, what kind of future? Noël Vercruysse will discuss these issues as well as focus on what he considers a main policy priority for the coming years: differentiation and diversity in higher education and the consequent need of good transparency tools.

Event booking details

To reserve a place at this seminar please email Nicola Manches at: nmanches@srhe.ac.uk or telephone +44 (0) 207 4472525. SRHE events are open to all and free to SRHE members as part of their membership package. The delegate fee for non-members is £25 [full time students £20]. Non members wishing to join the Society may do so at the time of registration and the delegate fee will be waived.

Please note that all places–for SRHE members and non members-must be booked in advance and that we have to charge £25 for non-attendance if a place has been reserved but no notice of cancellation/non-attendance given in advance of the day of the event.

(Interested in joining the IIR Network but not able to attend this event? To receive details of future events in this series and to join the mailing list, please email nmanches@srhe.ac.uk)

Yours sincerely

Francois Smit, Society for Research into Higher Education, 44 Bedford Row, London WC1R  4LL, Tel: +44 20 7447 2525, Fax: +44 20 7447 2526

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com