Skip navigation

Daily Archives: May 5th, 2011

Money

THE SUBPRIME CRISIS, MONETARY POLICY IMPLEMENTATION AND CHANGES IN MONETARY THEORY

SOAS Seminar Series on Money and Development
Marc Lavoie (University of Ottawa)
“The subprime crisis, monetary policy implementation, and changes in monetary theory”

Chair: Jan Toporowski (SOAS)
Wednesday 11 May at 17.00
Room 116, Main Building
The School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, Russell Square (nearest underground Russell Square)

Marc Lavoie is Professor in Economics at the University of Ottawa. His research interests are in the areas of Post Keynesian theory, Growth, Macroeconomic Theory, Monetary Theory and Policy and the Economics of sports. He has published widely in international journals and is the author of several books, including “Monetary Economics: An Integrated Approach to Credit, Money, Income, Production and Wealth” (with Wynn Godley).

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

 

Japan Crisis

THE JAPAN SOCIETY OF POLITICAL ECONOMY – 59th ANNUAL CONFERENCE

The Japan Society of Political Economy (JSPE)

Declaration on the Tohoku-Pacific Ocean Earthquake and Fukushima Nuclear Accident

The JSPE expresses its deep condolences to the victims of the Tohoku-Pacific Ocean Earthquake and the giant tsunami it triggered. We sympathize with those in the disaster area who are still in distress and appreciate the efforts of those engaged in the disaster response, relief, and recovery in that area. Further, we express our deep concern over the ongoing accident at the First Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant, its spreading radioactive contamination, and the flaws in the present system of nuclear power plants that the accident has revealed.

The JSPE decided to devote a special plenary session to the problems raised by this disaster on the second morning of the 59th JSPE Annual Conference, which is to be held on September 17 and 18 at the Ikebukuro campus of the Rikkyo University, Tokyo (for details http://www.jspe.gr.jp/drupal/en_cfp2011). Yasuo Goto (Fukushima Univ.), Koji Morioka (Kansai Univ.), and Kiichiro Yagi (Setsunan Univ.) were nominated as its organizers. In the proposed plenary session we plan to discuss the problems jointly based on all the comments and proposals that are directed to the organizers of this session. We hope that this discussion will be a step toward the realization of a new concept in the activities of JSPE. We therefore welcome all opinions presented in the spirit of social science, from members as well as non-members, for this special plenary session. Please send your opinion within 200 to 400 words to the JSPE (Jspecice@jspe.gr.jp) by 10 June.

Even though the scale of the earthquake was well beyond anything anticipated, we as social scientists cannot set our judgment aside by saying that this was an “unprecedented natural disaster.” Concerning the temblor alone, a series of questions promptly emerges: Was sufficient forecasting, warning and prevention provided? Wasn’t a more effective relief system that would have avoided the loss of information at the early stage possible? What was the reason for the vulnerability of the lifeline revealed by this disaster? Has an appropriate system of aid and recovery been established? What form should the economic support for relief, maintenance and recovery take? As for the accident at the nuclear power plant in particular, we cannot avoid asking whether the system and policies that have promoted the use of nuclear energy thus far lie behind the occurrence of the disaster and the apparent delay and helplessness in efforts to deal with it. Nuclear energy policy in Japan has been promoted by a closed circle of the government and the so-called “atomic lobby” of politicians, agents of the atomic energy industry including certain scientists and journalists. Along with the measures taken for disaster prevention and response, the system of policy formation as well should be placed under comprehensive and critical examination. Further, we need plans for the maintenance of industry and daily life under the current condition of electric power shortage, for recovery and its concomitant economic burdens, as well as the future renovation of our industrial economy and finances.

As the Japanese term for economy, or keizai, was derived from a classic term for “managing society and salvaging the life of the people” (keisei saimin), political economy as a discipline is concerned with relieving society and the lives of each of its members from distress and restoring their stability. Political economy as a social science emerged when this task shifted from being one of the arts of rule to a constituent of the self-knowledge of civil society. We believe that all of the researchers who together make up the JSPE are in accord in seeking to deal with this disaster from the viewpoint of social scientists, and to consider the problems associated with this disaster as significant challenges for the development of the theory of political economy.

Executive Board of the Japan Society of Political Economy
April 16, 2011

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

 

Globalization

LIBERAL INTERVENTIONSIM AND THE CRISIS OF ACCEPTANCE: FROM PROTECTION TO RESILIENCE

Dear Colleague,

This year’s Annual Lecture of the Queen Mary Centre for the Study of Global Security and Development will be given by Professor Mark Duffield of the University of Bristol. The title of the lecture is ‘Liberal Interventionism and the Crisis of Acceptance: From Protection to Resilience’  and it will take place on May 19, 2011, 6.30pm in Drapers Lecture Theatre(Geography Building), QM Mile End Campus.

Compared to the optimism of the early post-Cold War era, the international aid industry – and with it, the development-security nexus – faces a growing crisis of acceptance. This malaise is reflected in the increasing necessity of constant risk-management within contemporary aid interventions. Since the end of the 1990s, the number of aid workers deliberately killed, injured, or attacked has grown steadily. Incorporated as an extension of Western foreign policy, including playing social advisor to corporate interests in an age of neoliberal excess, for many ‘beneficiaries’ the aid industry’s earlier claims to neutrality and material betterment now count for little. This lecture traces the liberal way of development’s growing crisis of acceptance through its changing approach to risk-management.

From initial attempts to centralise and professionalise risk-aversion, the main outcome of which was the fortified aid compound, the emphasis has now shifted to increasing the resilience of the aid industry. Rather than ‘when to leave’ the aim is now ‘how to stay’. Through the decentralisation, localisation and indigenisation of risk-management, resilience establishes a new and productive relationship to crisis. That is, an opportunity to improve the robustness and fitness of aid agencies. In effectively ignoring the crisis of acceptance, however, rather than addressing the current malaise, resilience promises to dig the bunker deeper.

To book a place go to: http://www.qmul.ac.uk/qmul/events/book.php?id=46553  

Regards,
Rick Saull
*******
Dr Richard Saull,
Senior Lecturer in International Politics,
School of Politics and International Relations
Queen Mary, University of London
Mile End Road
London
E1 4NS
United Kingdom
Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 8597
http://www.politics.qmul.ac.uk/staff/Saull/index.html

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com