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Daily Archives: April 11th, 2011

Revolution

WITNESSES TO PERMANENT REVOLUTION: THE DOCUMENTARY RECORD

AVAILABLE IN PAPERBACK FROM HAYMARKET BOOKS

Edited and translated by Richard B. Day and Daniel Gaido
http://www.haymarketbooks.org/pb/Witnesses-to-Permanent-Revolution

Also available through Amazon.com

The theory of permanent revolution has long been associated with Leon Trotsky. Though he was the most brilliant of its proponents, these newly translated documents, most of them available in English for the first time, demonstrate that Trotsky was only one of several leading figures of international Marxism engaged in a debate, sparked by the first Russian Revolution in 1905, about the form workers’ struggle would take in less developed countries. Among the figures included in these discussions were Karl Kautsky, Rosa Luxemburg, Franz Mehring, Parvus, and David Ryazanov

Richard B. Day is Professor of Political Economy at the University of Toronto, Canada. He has published extensively on Soviet economic and political history, including Leon Trotsky and the Politics of Economic Isolation.

Daniel F. Gaido is a researcher at the National Research Council (Conicet) in Argentina. He is the author of The Formative Period of American Capitalism and is currently working on a book on the history of German social democracy

Praise for Witnesses to Permanent Revolution:

“Since the world is again in the midst of an economic crisis, the arguments here are not without contemporary relevance, even if from today’s perspective it is a polemic where everybody is right. Summing up: recommended.” —A. Ezergailis, Choice

“Sometimes reading debates between figures on the left, involving historical references readers may not be familiar with, can be a daunting or even demoralising experience. But the brilliant and precise annotating of this collection, along with a short introduction to each piece, makes every article accessible to a wide range of readers…Day and Gaido have done a fantastic service with this immense collection. Witnesses to Permanent Revolution is a fascinating and thought provoking book and one that genuinely sheds new light on past debates about socialism that can help to inform the future.” —Esme Choonara, International Socialism

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Bonuses for Some

THE POLITICS OF EQUALITY: AN INTRODUCTION

Now in print from Zed Books: The Politics of Equality – An Introduction, by Jason C. Myers
See: http://www.zedbooks.co.uk/book.asp?bookdetail=4389

Why are socialists, communists and social democrats concerned with the distribution of wealth? Why do they place so much importance on public goods such as education and health care? To what extent does democracy matter to socialist ideologies?

In The Politics of Equality, Jason C. Myers sheds new light on questions like this, providing a readable, contemporary introduction to egalitarian political philosophy. Concentrating on ideas and values rather than on the rise and fall of parties and movements, the book offers crucial insights into a vital tradition of political thought and how it is key to our understanding of contemporary debates from Obama’s plans for a national health care programme to the recent global wave of economic state regulation.

This is essential reading for anyone interested in constructing a more just society.

Jason C. Myers is Professor of Political Science at California State University, Stanislaus. He is the author of Indirect Rule in South Africa (University of Rochester Press), as well as numerous articles on ideology and political theory. 

Praise for The Politics of Equality

‘Myers’ Politics of Equality is a thoughtful, learned, simply-written attempt to revive a strain of political theory generally considered refuted by events: communism, socialism, social democracy, and related theories of social equality. It is, perhaps, time for such an attempt. No important political theory remains refuted for long–certainly not by events. Myers’ contributes to the revival of social-egalitarian theory in three ways: a) by making a strong case for the attractiveness of the ideal (a society of equal freedom); b) by suggesting reasonable means to approach that ideal; and c) perhaps most important, by pointing out how little the events of the la st hundred years actually count against either the ideal or the means he suggests. It’s a book that should enliven a discussion dead for too long, as good for the classroom as for circulation among thinking classes.’ – Michael Davis, Illinois Institute of Technology

‘Overuse has made it easy to forget the transformative, everyday makeup of concepts like “freedom” and “justice.” But the fabric of modern life (the 8 hour workday; vacations, public schools, sidewalks, safe food and water) is a legislated, created product, no less a result of human design than a building or a city. The Politics of Equality offers a readable entry into the history of egalitarian political theories invaluable for students of political science, economics, or anyone interested in how id eas are transformed into politics – and eventually, reality.’ – John Bowe, Author of Nobodies: Modern Slave Labor in America

‘Jason Myers’ The Politics of Equality is insightful, historically informed, and ideologically balanced, a commanding discourse on the theory and practice of democracy.’ – Michael Parenti, author of Contrary Notions and God and His Demons

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Education

RESEARCH IN COMPARATIVE AND INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION – VOLUME 6 NUMBER 1 (2011)

Now available at: www.wwwords.co.uk/rcie/content/pdfs/6/issue6_1.asp

RESEARCH IN COMPARATIVE AND INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION
Volume 6 Number 1 2011   ISSN 1745-4999

SPECIAL ISSUE
Girls and Young Women’s Education and Empowerment in Marginalized Regions of the World
Guest Editors: VILMA SEEBERG & KAREN MONKMAN

Karen Monkman. Introduction. Framing Gender, Education and Empowerment

Halla B. Holmarsdottir, Ingrid Birgitte Møller Ekne & Heidi L. Augestad. The Dialectic between Global Gender Goals and Local Empowerment: girls’ education in Southern Sudan and South Africa

Joan DeJaeghere & Soo Kyoung Lee. What Matters for Marginalized Girls and Boys in Bangladesh: a capabilities approach for understanding educational well-being and empowerment

Vilma Seeberg. Schooling, Jobbing, Marrying: what’s a girl to do to make life better? Empowerment Capabilities of Girls at the Margins of Globalization in China

Kristen J. Molyneaux. Uganda’s Universal Secondary Education Policy and its Effect on ‘Empowered’ Women: how reduced income and moonlighting activities differentially impact male and female teachers

Sofie Haug Changezi & Heidi Biseth. Education of Hazara Girls in a Diaspora: education as empowerment and an agent of change

Payal P. Shah. Girls’ Education and Discursive Spaces for Empowerment: perspectives from rural India

Supriya Baily. Speaking Up: contextualizing women’s voices and gatekeepers’ reactions in promoting women’s empowerment in rural India

Mary Ann Maslak. Education, Employment and Empowerment: the case of a young woman in northwestern China

Joshua A. Muskin, Abdelhak Kamime & Abdellah Adlaoui. Empowered to Empower: a civil society-government partnership to increase girls’ junior secondary school outcomes in Morocco

Access to the full texts of articles is restricted to those who have a Personal subscription, or those whose institution has a Library subscription. However, all articles become free-to-view 18 months after first publication.

CALL FOR PAPERS: For all editorial matters, including articles offered for publication, please contact the Editor, Professor David Phillips (david.phillips@education.ox.ac.uk). Full details concerning the submission of articles can be found at www.wwwords.co.uk/RCIE/04.html

PERSONAL SUBSCRIPTION. Subscription to the 2011 issues (this includes access to ALL PAST ISSUES) is available to private individuals at a cost of US$50.00. If you wish to subscribe you may do so immediately at www.wwwords.co.uk/subscribeRCIE.asp

LIBRARY SUBSCRIPTION (institution-wide access). If you are working within an institution that maintains a Library, please urge your Librarian to take out a subscription so that we can provide unrestricted access throughout your institution; details of subscription rates and access control arrangements for libraries can be found at www.symposium-journals.co.uk/prices.html

In the event of problems concerning subscription, or difficulty in gaining access to the journal articles on the website, please email the publishers at support@symposium-journals.co.uk

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SOUTH AFRICA TODAY: HOW DO WE CHARACTERISE THE SOCIAL FORMATION?

The 2011 ILRIG April Conference
Community House, Salt River, Cape Town
29 and 30 April 2011

Since 2007 ILRIG has been hosting an annual conference in April, either on behalf of, or in partnership with, the Rosa Luxemburg Foundation. It is our intention to continue this tradition of conferences in April as an interface between critical analysts showcasing their work and activists in the labour and social movements debating the nature of the current juncture and strategic challenges facing our movements. In 2010 we looked at the causes and consequences of the global capitalist crisis and the possibilities for developing anti-capitalist alternatives.

In 2011 we have decided to call for papers and to invite participants on the question: how do we characterise the Social African social formation today?

2011 is the 17th year of the achievement of democracy in SA. But in that time, instead of the mass struggles of the 1970s; 1980s and early 1990s leading to radical transformation we have seen a decline in the extent and depth of those struggles and the triumph of a neo-liberal order. South Africa has joined the BRICS as an aspiring power, South African corporations have become global players, the composition of the ruling class is still overwhelmingly white and we are now the most unequal society in the world. At the same time we have an ex-liberation movement in government, carried there by the struggles of a black working class majority and with a ruling Alliance which includes the biggest trade union federation and a long standing Communist Party. More recently we have seen the rise of movements and community-based activists who have waged struggles quite relentlessly for some 5-10 years – serving as a source of optimism and renewal on the left and yet not galvanising into a social force capable of speaking in its own name, let alone challenging the neo-liberal order. We have also seen a readiness of some organised workers to strike and test the limits of the partnership that comprises the ruling tripartite Alliance.

Part of the many challenges facing activists today is characterising what the nature of the new order is in South Africa today – unlike in the apartheid period where the nature of that order was starkly apparent. This means that activists battle with the tension between the legitimacy of their cause and the legitimacy of the liberation credentials of the current government and its associated democratic institutions in the state.

On the left, in the broadest sense, this tension has been variously characterised as “a society carrying out transformation against residual apartheid forces”; a victim of global forces imposing neo-liberalism “from the North”; a developmental state; a natural consequence of a nationalist or a social democratic project triumphing over a more radical alternative; and even the triumph of neo-apartheid.

How do we characterise this social formation? What configuration of social forces led to this conjuncture and what are the strategic, programmatic and organisational consequences of taking one characterisation over another? How does one’s choice/s inform how one sees international solidarity in Africa and the wider world today?

The conference will consist of two components:
1. Inputs by speakers on the basis of draft papers submitted by interested activists and analysts – South African and international, and
2. Workshopped and parallel sessions in which ILRIG facilitators engage the issues raised
at facilitated sessions using educational methodologies

Themes:
1. The recent evolution of the capitalist class in SA, its relations to other capitals globally, its “racial” and gendered make-up; its mode of accumulation and its relation to the state
2. The recent evolution of the ANC, the changing social composition of its cadre, its relations to the state and to the capitalist class, and to the dominated classes.
3. The working class of SA today and its changing “racial” and gendered nature as well its re-composition across both the sphere of production and reproduction; its consciousness and struggles and how do these impact, or otherwise, on various organisations today.

To this end ILRIG is inviting papers from any interested person.

! Final papers must be submitted by 21 April 2011 Where possible, ILRIG will provide travel and accommodation for successful candidates. All communication must be directed to Russell Dudley ilrigaprilconference@gmail.com or 084-915 9709

Publication
After the Conference the papers will be published in an annual journal to be edited, published and distributed by the conference hosts.

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Children at Work

GLOBAL STUDIES OF CHILDHOOD – VOLUME 1 NUMBER 1 (2011)

Now available at: http://www.wwwords.co.uk/GSCH/content/pdfs/1/issue1_1.asp

GLOBAL STUDIES OF CHILDHOOD
Volume 1 Number 1 2011         ISSN 1463-9491
Nicola Yelland & Sue Saltmarsh. Editorial

Alan Prout. Taking a Step away from Modernity: reconsidering the new sociology of childhood

Karen Wells. The Politics of Life: governing childhood

Sue Saltmarsh. Bus Ride to the Future: cultural imaginaries of Australian childhood in the education landscape

Hillevi Lenz Taguchi. Investigating Learning, Participation and Becoming in Early Childhood Practices with a Relational Materialist Approach

Claudia Mitchell. What’s Participation Got to Do with It? Visual Methodologies in ‘Girl-Method’ to Address Gender-Based Violence in the Time of AIDS

Mark Vicars. Artful Practices: identities at work in play

COLLOQUIA

Annie Hau-nung Chan. A Culture of Protection: the establishment of a sex offenders’ register in Hong Kong

Rajani M. Konantambigi. Concerns of Childhood in India

BOOK REVIEW

Governing Childhood into the 21st Century: biopolitical technologies of childhood management and education (Majia Holmer Nadesan), reviewed by Kerry Moakes

Access to the full texts of current articles is restricted to those who have a Personal subscription, or those whose institution has a Library subscription. However, all articles become free-to-view 18 months after publication.

PERSONAL SUBSCRIPTION. Subscription to the 2011 issues is available to private individuals at a cost of US$50.00. If you wish to subscribe immediately you may do so online at:  www.wwwords.co.uk/subscribeGSCH.asp

LIBRARY SUBSCRIPTION (institution-wide access). If you are working within an institution that maintains a Library, please urge them to take out a subscription so that we can provide access throughout your institution; details of subscription rates and access control arrangements for libraries can be found at www.symposium-journals.co.uk/prices.html

For all editorial matters, including articles offered for publication, please contact the Editors at GSCH@ied.edu.hk

In the event of problems concerning a subscription, or difficulty in gaining access to the journal articles on the website, please email the publishers at support@symposium-journals.co.uk

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HIGHER EDUCATION FUNDING POLICY SEMINAR

SRHE Higher Educational Policy Network

Higher Education Funding Policy: A historical and contemporary analysis

Tuesday 17th May, 4-6.30pm at London Metropolitan University, 166-220 Holloway Road, London, N7 6RP (Room No BEL1-09 in the main Tower Building)

This seminar focuses on the very topical issue of higher education funding policy, offering an opportunity to bring a historical perspective to current policy developments and to consider the potential impacts both locally and globally. The speakers are:

Professor Claire Callender, Birkbeck College and Institute of Education, University of London.

A critical assessment of the Government’s reforms of student funding – all change or no change?

This paper will examine how student financial support has changed over time and critically analyse the Government’s planned reforms, locating them within a historical policy perspective.

Dr Vincent Carpentier, Institute of Education, University of London

Public-private substitution of funding and provision in higher education: national and global implications

This paper will explore the historical connections and tensions between funding, equity and quality policies in HE with a particular focus on the origins and implications of public-private funding in the global context.

Tea and coffee will be available at 4pm and the event will start at 4.15. At 6pm, there will be an opportunity to continue informal discussions of the issues raised in both papers over a glass of wine or juice.

For further details about the Higher Education Policy Network, please contact the network convenor: Professor Carole Leathwood, Institute for Policy Studies in Education, London Metropolitan University, c.leathwood@londonmet.ac.uk.

*****

Network Events are free to SRHE members as part of their membership package.

Delegate fees for non members: £25 (students £20).                                                                                                                                  

To register for this event please contact nmanches@srhe.ac.uk

Details of further meetings can be found on our website www.srhe.ac.uk

Many thanks

Nicola Manches, Administration Assistant, SRHE, 44 Bedford Row, London WC1R 4LL, 020 7447 2525

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World Crisis

INTERNATIONAL SOCIALISM JOURNAL – ISSUE 130

Now Out

See: http://www.isj.org.uk

Analysis

The return of the Arab revolution
Alex Callinicos

Engels on the power of nature

The return of fear
Iain Ferguson

Tunisia: the people’s revolution
Chamseddine Mnasri

Act One of the Egyptian Revolution
Philip Marfleet

Social media and social movements
Jonny Jones

The origins of the united front policy
John Riddell

The Tories, Eton and private schools
David Renton

I love the sound of breaking glass: the London crowd, 1760-2010
Keith Flett

Feedback

Facing the crisis: the strategic perplexity of the left
Stathis Kouvelakis

Sexuality, alienation and capitalism
Sheila McGregor

Counterpower, participatory democracy, revolutionary defence: debating Black Flame, revolutionary anarchism and historical Marxism
Lucien van der Walt

The social roots of “impairment”
Lee Humber

Book reviews

We want rebel music
Lee Billingham

Natural’s not in it
Martin Empson

State of the union
Chris Bambery

Forgotten famine
John Newsinger

Africa’s opening
Andy Wynne

Pick of the quarter
This quarter’s selection

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Books

REBEL, RANK AND FILE

NEW TITLE FROM VERSO
Edited by AARON BRENNER, ROBERT BRENNER and CAL WINSLOW
—————————–
“Extraordinary reflections….this collection dramatically reasserts the role of rank-and-file revolt in shaping American labor history and offers rich lessons to contemporary rebels.” Mike Davis

“Truly shines … By uncovering the hidden history of the 1970s, REBEL RANK AND FILE reminds us that there is another path to union renewal—a path firmly rooted in the workplace and motivated by visions of transforming society.”
– Joe Burns, IN THESE TIMES
—————————–
From the mid-1960s to 1981, rank-and-file workers in the United States engaged in a level of sustained militancy not seen since the Great Depression and World War II. Millions participated in one of the largest strike waves in US history. There were 5,716 stoppages in 1970 alone, involving more than 3 million workers. Contract rejections, collective insubordination, sabotage, organized slowdowns, and wildcat strikes were the order of the day.
Workers targeted much of their activity at union leaders, forming caucuses to fight for more democratic and combative unions that would forcefully resist the mounting offensive from employers that appeared at the end of the postwar economic boom. It was a remarkable era in the history of US class struggle, one rich in lessons for today’s labor movement.

The labor struggles in this period have been somewhat overlooked by historians, making this the first in-depth and comprehensive account. The period included strikes which had a significant and lasting impact, such as the Memphis sanitation workers strike which broke the back of racial inequality in the workplace, and the West Virginia coal miners strike which forced the passage of Black Lung legislation.

The struggles in this time also blazed a trail for a new radical and grassroots trade unionism which incorporated demands for racial and sexual equality and challenging entrenched bureaucracies within the union movement itself. The challenge to union bureaucracies led to some remarkable episodes, such as the attempt by UAW leaders to break a wildcat strike at Chrysler’s Mack Avenue stamping plant in Detroit by mobilizing one thousand armed officials and loyalists.

The struggles in this period challenge common assumptions about the US working class – that it is naturally conservative, nationalistic and inward looking. It recaptures a time when millions of ordinary working people engaged in militant action against workplace exploitation, racism and sexism. The book also includes a number of remarkable photographs of the those involved in the struggles by the veteran photojournalist Earl Dotter, a sample of which can be viewed at www.earldotter.com .
——————————-
REBEL, RANK AND FILE contains contributions from, in addition to the editors, Judith Stein, Kim Moody, Frank Bardacke, Paul J. Nyden, Dan La Botz, Marjorie Murphy, A. C. Jones, Kieran Taylor, Dorothy Sue Cobble and Steve Early.
——————————-
Praise for REBEL RANK AND FILE:

“An important collection … honest and thoughtful.”
– WORLD WIDE WORK

“This is an unusually high-quality effort, with an all-star cast of authors, which should attract wide interest.”
– Nelson Lichtenstein, Professor of History at University of California Santa Barbara

“Bracing and often electrifying … A primer and a call to arms for a radical rank-and-file politics.”
– Michael Watts, Professor of Geography and Development Studies at UC Berkeley
———————————
Aaron Brenner is President of Rank & File Enterprises, a financial and labor research firm. Robert Brenner is Director of the Center for Social Theory and Comparative History at UCLA. He is the author of THE BOOM AND THE BUBBLE, MERCHANTS AND REVOLUTION, THE ECONOMICS OF GLOBAL TURBULENCE. Cal Winslow is Director of the Mendocino Institute and Fellow in Environmental Politics, UC Berkeley.
———————————
ISBN: 978 1 84467 174 8 / $29.95 / £19.99 / CAN$37.50 / Paperback / 432 Pages
———————————
For more information and to buy the book visit:
http://www.versobooks.com/books/282-rebel-rank-and-file
———————————
Become a fan of Verso on Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Verso-Books-UK/122064538789

And get updates on Twitter too!
http://twitter.com/VersoBooksUK

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Books

FOUNDATIONS OF CRITICAL MEDIA AND INFORMATION STUDIES

A New Book by Christian Fuchs

Foundations of Critical Media and Information Studies. New York: Routledge. ISBN 978-0-415-58881-2. 384 pages. Rouledge Advances in Sociology No. 52, 2011

More information: http://fuchs.uti.at/books/foundations-of-critical-media-and-information-studies/

Available from the same author: “Internet and Society: Social Theory in the Information Age” (Paperback 2011) http://fuchs.uti.at/books/internet-society/

Foundations of Critical Media and Information Studies lays down foundations for the analysis of media, information, and information technology in 21st century information society, as well as introducing the theoretical and empirical tools necessary for the critical study of media and the information society.

Reasons for reading this book:
* To find out more about critical theory today: The book updates critical theory for 21st century information society.
* To acquire tools for critical analyses: The book introduces methodological and theoretical tools for studying media, information technology, and the information society in a critical way.
* To read more about a critical theory of media and the information society: The book explains the foundations of a critical theory of media, information, information technology, and the information society.
* To find out more about how power structures frame the media and the Internet: The book provides a power structure analysis of the media and the Internet.
* To engage with alternative media and the alternative Internet: The book identifies alternative potentials of the media, culture, and the Internet.

Contents

1 Introduction

PART I: Theory

2 Critical theory today
3 Critical media and information studies
4 Marx and critical media and information studies

PART II: Case studies

5 The media and information economy and the new imperialism
6 The new crisis of capitalism and the role of the media and information economy
7 Participatory web 2.0 as ideology

PART III Alternatives

8 Alternative media as critical media
9 Conclusion


Professor Christian Fuchs
Chair in Media and Communication Studies
Department of Informatics and Media
Uppsala University
Kyrkogårdsgatan 10
Box 513
751 20 Uppsala
Sweden
christian.fuchs@im.uu.se
Tel +46 (0) 18 471 1019
http://fuchs.uti.at
http://www.im.uu.se
NetPolitics Blog: http://fuchs.uti.at/blog
Editor of tripleC: http://www.triple-c.at
Book “Foundations of Critical Media and Information Studies” (Routledge 2011)
Book “Internet and Society” (Paperback, Routledge 2010)

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Capitalist Crisis

BUSINESS AS USUAL: THE ECONOMIC CRISIS AND THE FAILURE OF CAPITALISM

Business as Usual: The Economic Crisis and the Failure of Capitalism
Paul Mattick
Paperback
978 1 86189 801 2
March 2011
£12.95
200 x 120 mm
128 pages

See: http://www.reaktionbooks.co.uk/book.html?id=451
 
‘Paul Mattick says the recession isn’t just a financial crisis; it manifests a truth about the socioeconomic system in which we live.’ –- Irish Times

‘This lucid and thoughtful study is not just another important contribution to the rapidly expanding literature on the current economic crisis, though it is that as well. With historical depth and penetrating analysis, it seeks to reveal what is “wrong with the mainstream approach to understanding current economic affairs” . . . It provides a grimly realistic picture of what may lie ahead unless there is a radical transformation of the social order from production for profit to pursuit of human ends, based on “shared social decision-making outside the constraints of the business economy,” hence a major step towards true democracy.’ – Noam Chomsky

‘Business as Usual is a superb achievement. In this highly accessible book, Paul Mattick offers an outstanding theoretical and empirical account of the ongoing crisis, its devastating implications for the majority, and a brilliant indictment of the failures of mainstream economics at the levels of theory and policy guidance. It also shows how and why these dismal failures should no longer deter the search for transformative alternatives.’ – Alfredo Saad-Filho, SOAS, University of London

‘For anyone who is unsatisfied with the usual explanations of the current economic crisis – greed and fraud, deregulation, financialization, etc. – and is looking for a deeper explanation, this book is for you. Mattick demonstrates (without jargon and with great clarity) that the root causes of the current crisis lie in the fundamental nature and dynamics of capitalist economies, and places this crisis within the illuminating historical context of recurring capitalist crises since the early 19th century.’ – Fred Moseley, Professor of Economics, Mount Holyoke College

‘This is a fine book. It argues against the illusion that the current crisis is just a bonfire of contingent market forces, exposes economics as the dismal science that it is, and opposes the idea that capitalism is not some sort of economic mechanism that, if expertly regulated by those in the know, works well for the benefit of all. Mattick has to be congratulated not just for writing an immensely rich account of the current crisis but, also, for doing so with immense historical insight, theoretical cunning, and astute political judgement.’ – Werner Bonefeld, University of York

The general consensus is that the world’s economic difficulties can be traced to a crisis in the financial system. Initially brought on by the collapse of the subprime mortgage market in the USA, it spread through a financial landscape defined by high levels of debt and speculative risk. Some point to the dangers of collapse inherent in the modern financial system, while others blame long-term imbalances in the world economy between low-investment, high-consumption areas like the USA and rapidly developing regions such as China and South Asia.

In Business as Usual Paul Mattick explains the recession in jargon-free style, without shying away from serious analysis. He explores current events in relation to the development of the world economy since the Second World War and, more fundamentally, looks at the cycle of crisis and recovery that has characterized capitalism since the early nineteenth century. Mattick situates today’s crisis in the context of a capitalism ruled by a voracious quest for profit. He places the downturn within the context of business cycles and uses this explanation as a springboard for exploring the nature of our capitalist society, and its prospects for the future.

A clear and readable account of the successes and the inherent limits of government attempts to stabilize the economy, Mattick ultimately reveals how today’s downturn is not simply the effect of a financial crisis, but that it manifests a truth about the nature of the social and economic system in which we live.

Paul Mattick is Professor of Philosophy at Adelphi University, New York. He is former editor of the International Journal of Political Economy, author of Art in its Time (2003), and co-author of Art Works: Money (2004).

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World Crisis

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 10th APRIL 2011

EVENTS

POPULAR EDUCATION: LEARNING TO ORGANIZE FOR CHANGE

Popular Education: Learning to Organize for Change is designed to build your understanding and experience in processes to lead groups in social justice education and activist organizing. If you are an educator, community organizer or worker looking for an experiential process to help you build greater consciousness in groups and lead others to act, this course could be for you.

After exploring an overview of popular education principles, you will participate in hands-on approaches and tools for; bringing groups together, creating spaces for dialogue, analysing the situation you hope to change, planning and taking action and evaluating group processes. In the final two evenings of the course, we will focus on specific feedback and problem solving to help each participant use popular education relevant to their own context. All participants will have the opportunity to present possible workshop processes, activities or dilemmas so that the group can offer their ideas and support. No experience necessary, but experience is welcome!

Dates and Times: (attendance for each day required for the certificate)
Saturday June 25th:  10:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m.
Sunday June 26th:  10:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m.
Wednesday June 28th:  6:00-9:00 p.m.
Thursday June 29th:  6:00-9:00 p.m.

Cost: $203.40 (Cdn). Scholarships and bursaries are available. Email heather.read@utoronto.ca to inquire.

To register: http://www.oise.utoronto.ca/tlc/Summer_Institute/Registration.html
CODE SI-009 W
Deadline June 21

About the Facilitator: Christine McKenzie is a popular educator who has developed and facilitated anti-oppression organizing processes with diverse groups in Canada and Central America for the past 15 years. She has led popular education trainings with groups such as the Canadian Auto Workers Union, Equitas International Centre for Human Rights Education, and the Girls Action Foundation, among others.

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SANCTUARY SCHOOLS FORUM

Saturday May 7th
10am – 1pm
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE), Room 2-211
252 Bloor St. West
Toronto

Our schools, and especially our students and their parents, are increasingly under attack. Teachers have a unique and special responsibility to ensure that our schools can be places of sanctuary where we can all create the socially just and equitable communities we expect and deserve.

Often teachers find ourselves working in isolation from our colleagues, from the communities we work in, and from the lives of our students and their families. The Sanctuary Schools Forum will be an opportunity to break this isolation, and connect teachers to each other as well as to the social movements being led by our students and their communities.

Forum topics:        
* Gender Based Violence & Supporting LGBTQ2 Youth and their Families
* Don’t Ask Don’t Tell: Keeping Students Safe from Deportation
* Protecting Students from Police in Schools
* Movement Building: Mobilizing Teachers to Resist Neo-Liberalism

Child care provided upon request.
Organized by Educators for Peace & Justice and No One Is Illegal

Register at: http://bit.ly/SanctuarySchoolForum

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BEARING WITNESS, CREATING HOPE: 10 YEARS OF RABBLE.CA

April 18, 2011
7:00pm – 11:00pm
The Gladstone Hotel
1214 Queen Street West
Toronto

rabble.ca invites you to join us in celebrating 10 years of rabble.ca, April 18th at the Gladstone Hotel in Toronto!

Join moderator and rabble founder Judy Rebick, and special guests for a panel discussion on the state of Canadian left politics, historical memory, and the upcoming federal election, and stay on after for a reception and party featuring Toronto’s criticaly acclaimed LAL and dancing with DJ b#!

Can’t join in person? This event will also be streamed live: http://rabble.ca/rabbletv

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EXHIBITION – EDWARD BURTYNSKY: OIL
Opens Saturday, April 9

Institute for Contemporary Culture
Roloff Beny Gallery, Level 4
Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto

Ryerson Gallery and Research Centre, Scotiabank CONTACT Photography Festival and Scotiabank Group present Edward Burtynsky: Oil, hosted by the ROM’s Institute for Contemporary Culture. The exhibition features fifty-three beautiful and provocative large-format photographs by internationally renowned Canadian artist Edward Burtynsky. His images explore the hotly-debated effects of oil extraction, our international dependency on the substance, and with an unflinching eye, Burtynsky presents us with the reality of oil production as its role in our civilization undergoes massive transformation.

Read more about the exhibition: http://www.rom.on.ca/exhibitions/special/oil.php

Related Event at the ROM:
Downstream: The Oil Sands Industry and the Athabasca River April 13, 7-8 pm

Learn of the controversy over the role of pollution from the oil sands industry in causing cancer deaths in Fort Chipewyan on the Athabasca River in Alberta.
http://www.rom.on.ca/programs/lectures/index.php?ref=showinfo&program_id=6839

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RICE (RESEARCHING INTERNATIONAL & CONTEMPORARY EDUCATION) SYMPOSIUM – THEORIZING INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION: (SHIFTING) CONTEXTS, CONCEPTS, METHODS

Friday, April 15, 2011
Faculty of Education – Althouse College
University of Western Ontario
London, ON

Featuring Keynote Speaker Dr. Jane Kenway, Monash University, Australia

We are anticipating a thought-provoking, discussion-rich day. To see more details and to register please go to: http://www.edu.uwo.ca/research/cie/rice/symposiumDetails.html

If you are planning on coming to the event, a couple of important notes:
– We have had some technical difficulties with the registration process, but the system is now fixed. If you have already registered please do so again as we might not have received your submission.
– Once you register please mail in your cheques as soon as possible (according to the details on the website) so they we can better organize the catered lunch and drinks.
– Check out the website for more details in early April for a suggested format on how you can contribute your research in our last informal sharing session and also to read invited paper submissions (will be posted by April 8) that will be discussed during session ii of our symposium.

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WORKERS’ ASSEMBLY COFFEEHOUSE: PUBLICATIONS, MOVEMENT BUILDING, AND RADICAL TRANSFORMATION

Thursday, April 21
7:30 pm
Reagle Beagle
335 Bloor St West (east of Spadina), back room
Toronto

This forum brings together a multi-generational panel of activists who have been involved in publishing movement publications on the political left, from the older and more well-established to more recent projects. By sharing their experiences and reflecting on both the significance and challenges of this work – from political to financial – it is our hope that we can develop and expand on our analysis of the important role such publications play for advancing our struggles, as places for dialogue and debate, educating, agitating and organizing, as well as for strategizing and visioning otherwise.

Speakers:
– Clare O’Connor, Upping the Anti and UofT OPIRG
– Chanteal-Lee Winchester, UofT OPIRG – Action Speakers Louder
– Noaman Ali, Basics
– Paul Kellog, Former Editor of Socialist Worker
– Leo Panitch, Socialist Register
– Mick Sweetman, Linchpin

For more info: http://www.workersassembly.ca

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NEWS & VIEWS

VIDEO: RAISE WELFARE AND DISABILITY RATES, RESTORE THE SPECIAL DIET!

It has been 16 long years since Mike Harris cut welfare and froze disability. McGuinty’s Liberals have been in power for half that time and done nothing to deal with poverty. In fact people are worse off today. It would take a 55% increase to bring benefits to pre-Harris levels. If benefit levels were restored to the same level of spending power as they had in 1994, a single person on Ontario Works would now be receiving $904 a month instead of the miserable $593 now being issued.

Now as the economy continues to slump and the need is greater than ever, this government is destroying the vital Special Diet Allowance that has enabled people to survive…The new Special Diet comes into affect on April 1st, 2011 and all those who are not eligible under the new program will be cut off by July 31st.

Watch the video: http://www.socialistproject.ca/leftstreamed/ls98.php

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MINISTERS OF EDUCATION CELEBRATE INTERNATIONAL ADULT LEARNERS’ WEEK

TORONTO, April 8 /CNW/ – Ministers of education joined this week with Canadians to celebrate International Adult Learners’ Week (IALW 2011).

First established in 2000 by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), IALW serves to raise awareness of the importance of adult learning and its integral role in the lifelong learning process.

Read more: http://news.morningstar.com/all/canada-news-wire/20110408C2581/ministers-of-education-celebrate-international-adult-learners-week.aspx

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AGAINST CATASTROPHISM

By Doug Henwood, Left Business Observer

This is the text of my introduction to a panel on catastrophism that (Catastrophism and the Crisis of the Left) I MC’d at the Left Forum, March 19, 2011, at Pace University, New York.

Events in Japan have gotten me thinking about crises in general. At first, I thought that it might promote the realization that finding clean, renewable forms of energy may the most urgent task facing us today. But then I thought back a bit to other energy-related crises. One of my beefs with the peak oilers, aside from the empirical one in which I suspect that they’re just wrong about hydrocarbon production, is that impending scarcity doesn’t make people more amenable to rational argument—it inclines them to desperate measures.

Read more: http://lbo-news.com/2011/04/08/against-catastrophism/

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A NEW TRADE UNIONISM IN THE MAKING?

From The Bullet

A trade unionism that is able to facilitate and express the practical knowledge of its members, as workers and as citizens, is critical to the renewal of public services and for confronting a global politics of austerity. Hilary Wainwright has been at the forefront of such attempts to forge a new public sector unionism for some time. She has attempted to link the struggle over the state with the building of the popular power and democratic capacities necessary for a renewal of unionism, and also the socialist project.

We are at the beginning of what will likely prove to be a long phase of public sector struggle in Canada and the U.S. The Bullet publishes here a recent contribution by Wainwright to the debate on union renewal. There is a need for many more such interventions, from a variety of perspectives, from militants and activists in North America as part of the coming battles against the ruling classes’ attempts to forge a new ‘age of austerity’.

Read more: http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/488.php

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CORPORATE INCOME TAXES, PROFIT, AND EMPLOYMENT PERFORMANCE OF CANADA’S LARGEST COMPANIES

By David Macdonald, Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives

This study tracks 198 companies on the S&P/TSX composite from 2000 through 2009 and finds those companies—Canada’s largest corporations—are making 50% more profit and paying 20% less tax than they did a decade ago.

However, in terms of job creation, they did not keep up with the average growth of employment in the economy as a whole. From 2005 to 2010, the number of employed Canadians rose 6% while the number of jobs created by the companies in the study grew by only 5%. In essence, the largest beneficiaries of corporate tax cuts are dragging down Canadian employment growth.

Read more: http://www.policyalternatives.ca/publications/reports/corporate-income-taxes-profit-and-employment-performance-canadas-largest-compa

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NEW RESEARCH PAPER – HEALTH AND HEALTH CARE NEEDS IN RURAL AND NORTHERN ONTARIO: A HOLISTIC NURSING PERSPECTIVE

I would like to bring your attention to a newly released research paper I’ve written through my work with the Ontario Nurses’ Association, which is the RN union in Ontario. The paper is called “Health and Health Care Needs in Rural and Northern Ontario: a holistic nursing perspective.” The paper has a feminist analysis of health issues, as well as insight from front line nurses, among other elements. It can be found at: http://www.ona.org/political_action/submissions_to_government.html#ruralandnorthernhealthcare

Salimah Valiani, PhD
Policy Analyst/Economist
Communications and Government Relations Team
Ontario Nurses’ Association

(END)
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ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK, OISE/UT):

Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

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