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Daily Archives: April 1st, 2011

Student as Producer

THE BRITISH CONFERENCE OF UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH

 

The British Conference of Undergraduate Research is now only a few weeks away. We have 150 students presenting, which is three times as much as we expected when we started on this project a few months ago. The current list of presentations is here: https://spreadsheets.google.com/ccc?key=0AkU1RS11qSMLdEZib3RHYk1palZuR1p1d0pBdzFfMmc&authkey=CIvg65kE&hl=en#gid=0

Details of the programme times and keynotes are available on the website, www.bcur.org. There is also a short staff conference on undergraduate research which will run concurrently with the main conference: https://docs.google.com/document/d/19UuHjl74uPptqEKEyauKKQkqbfop2HH6T54n-BQ4dlI/edit?hl=en&authkey=CKD1zYYF

This will conclude with a special meeting of the steering group led by Alan Jenkins and Mick Healey. This will be open to members of this group and the staff members attending the conference. Mick and Alan will run the session in the form of a workshop with the aim of exploring the question: ‘How can we progress BCUR next year and thereafter?’ This will take place at 1.30-3.30 on the 20th April (the second day of the conference).

Best wishes

Stuart

Professor Stuart Hampton-Reeves
University of Central Lancashire
Preston
PR12HE
http://www.uclan.ac.uk/nexus/
http://www.britishshakespeare.ws

Nicola Manches, Administration Assistant, SRHE, 44 Bedford Row, London WC1R 4LL, 020 7447 2525

 —END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

The Man in Black

COUNTERFEIT ASYLUM: THE GIFT OF GENDER IN CONFINEMENT

Professor Daniel Moshenberg, Director of the Women’s Studies Program and co-convener of Women in and Beyond the Global, George Washington University in Washington, DC

Tuesday 05 April 2011
Time: 5:00 – 7:00 pm
Venue: FB4.26 (4th Floor Francis Bancroft Building, Mile End Campus), Queen Mary University of London

In the last half-century, the so-called `strong passport’ so-called democracies have turned the application for asylum into a criminal justice procedure. In so doing, these nation-States have redefined citizenship as they have redrawn the maps of national sovereignty. Take, for example, the Lindela Repatriation Centre in Krugersdorp, South Africa. It is a prison filled with people who have committed no crimes but rather are deemed unworthy of citizenship. Seen from the perspective of asylum seekers, the overwhelming majority of whom are Zimbabweans, there is no South Africa, there is no Zimbabwe. There is rather South Africa/Zimbabwe, bound and separated by punctuation, by power, but not by a border. For Zimbabwean women, the life in Lindela, a private prison opened initially by the African National Congress Women’s League, is particular and particularly dire.

A consideration of the political economy of asylum in the UK, US, Canada, South Africa, Australia in the current neoliberal global Moment finds variants of this narrative repeated endlessly. Asylum has come to mean detention. But what is asylum and how has it become part of the global carceral fabric?

Asylum has become part of a political economy of worthy and unworthy citizens. When processed through the prison industrial complex, scholars have tended to use a Foucault – Agamben frame of control and discipline, of bio-politics and bare life. This paper suggests not so much an alternative as a supplementary reading. Historically, asylum was not about states of exception, but rather exceptional states, states capable of responding to a plea of mercy, states capable of bestowing the gift of citizenship on otherwise unworthy people.

Professor Moshenberg proposes to re-read the political economy of worth and unworthy in asylum procedures, when seen from a perspective that centers on Black women asylum seekers. A somewhat Derridean reading of debt cycles, gift cycles, violence, national sovereignty, is merged with a reading, via Marx and Negri (and their readers), of labor, accumulation, surplus, and value. In the end, he argues that Black women asylum seekers are global precarious citizens, are, more precisely, citizens of global precarity.

If you would like to attend please email: a.alele@qmul.ac.uk

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Zombies

COMBINED AND UNEVEN APOCALYPSE: LUCIFERIAN MARXISM

EVAN CALDER WILLIAMS

From the repurposed rubble of salvagepunk to undead hordes banging on shopping mall doors, from empty waste zones to teeming plagued cities, Combined and Uneven Apocalypse grapples with the apocalyptic fantasies of our collapsing era. Moving through the films, political tendencies, and recurrent crises of late capitalism, Evan Calder Williams paints a black toned portrait of the dream and nightmare images of a global order gone very, very wrong. Situating itself in the defaulting financial markets of the present, Combined and Uneven Apocalypse glances back toward a messy history of zombies, car wrecks, tidal waves, extinction, trash heaps, labour, pandemics, wolves, cannibalism, and general nastiness that populate the underside of our cultural imagination. Every age may dream the end of the world to follow, but these scattered nightmare figures are a skewed refraction of the normal hell of capitalism.

The apocalypse isn’t something that will happen one day: it’s just the slow unveiling of the catastrophe we’ve been living through for centuries. Against any fantasies of progress, return, or reconciliation, Williams launches a loathing critique of the bleak present and offers a graveside smile for our necessary battles to come.

Evan Calder Williams is a writer and theorist. He writes the blog Socialism and/or barbarism. He currently resides in Santa Cruz, California, where he is a doctoral candidate in literature.

Socialism and/or Barbarism: http://socialismandorbarbarism.blogspot.com/

See: http://www.zero-books.net/book/detail/814/Combined-and-Uneven-Apocalypse

Book Details:

ISBN:
[978-1-84694-468-0]
Price:
£14.99 || $24.95
Publishing on:
29 Apr 2011
Pages:
261
Format:
Paperback

Endorsement:
Yes, another book about zombies and the end of the world. But this is not just another book about zombies and the end of the world. Like one of the junk-suturing recusants whose philosophy he has been central to constructing, Evan Calder Williams builds something rageful and compelling and quite new out of all this fucking wreckage.— China Miéville

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com