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Daily Archives: March 22nd, 2011

Karl Marx

REFORM COMMUNISM

Call for Papers:

One-day seminar/workshop on: “Reform communism” since 1945 in comparative historical perspective.

Saturday 22 October 2011.

Organised by UEA School of History in conjunction with the journal Socialist History
Venue: School of History, University of East Anglia, Norwich, NR4 7TJ.

The collapse of the USSR and the Eastern bloc in the wake of Gorbachev’s perestroika seemed to show that communism was essentially unreformable. It could be preserved, dismantled, or overthrown, but it could not be reconstructed as a viable alternative to capitalism, free from the defects of its Leninist-Stalinist prototype.

Prior to 1989-91, however, reform communism was a live political issue in many countries. At different times in countries as diverse as Yugoslavia, the USSR, Czechoslovakia, Western Europe, Japan, and China, the leaderships of communist parties themselves sought to change direction, re-evaluate their own past, correct mistakes and so on with the aim of cleansing, strengthening and improving communism, rather than undermining or dismantling it. In countries ruled by communist parties this process usually involved political relaxation and an easing of repression, and was often accompanied by an upsurge of intellectual and cultural ferment.

The aim of this seminar is to consider reform communism as a distinct phenomenon, which can usefully be distinguished from, on the one hand, mere changes of line or leader without any engagement with a party’s own past and the assumptions which underpinned it, and on the other, dissenting and oppositional activity within and outside parties which failed to change the party’s direction.

This seminar will explore different experiences of reform communism around the world after 1945 in a comparative context. 

Examples might include:
·        Tito and Titoism
·        Khrushchev and “de-Stalinisation”
·        Kadarism and the “Hungarian model”
·        Eurocommunism and ideas of socialist democracy
·        The Prague Spring
·        The Deng Xiaoping reforms in China
·        Gorbachev’s perestroika

We are seeking papers of 5000 to 10000 words on various experiences or aspects of reform communism in history, to be presented at the seminar. Selected papers will be published in 2012 in a special issue of Socialist History (http://www.socialist-history-journal.org.uk) devoted to the subject.

Proposals for papers should be submitted by 1 July 2011 to Francis King (f.king@uea.ac.uk) and Matthias Neumann (m.neumann@uea.ac.uk) at School of History, UEA, Norwich NR4 7TJ.

Attendance at the seminar is free of charge, but space is limited. Please e-mail us if you are interested in attending.

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Chinese Revolution

Raya Dunayevskaya

DEMOCRATIC ALTERNATIVES TO CAPITALISM: MARX’S WRITINGS ON EXISTING CAPITALISM – PART 2
Saturday, April 2, 2011
1:00-3:00 PM
Community Room A, Westside Pavilion, Los Angeles

(Westside Pavilion is at Pico & Westwood Boulevards; Community Room A is on east side of the mall, third floor, behind food court; free parking in mall lot)

Speakers:
Kevin Anderson, author of Marx at the Margins
Dale Parsons, labor activist

Why have automated and computerized forms of labor, which at one time were heralded as leading to a dramatic shortening of the working day, led – in addition to persistent unemployment, even in non-recessionary times — to an increase in the amount of time that so many who do have jobs spend at work? To what extent do machinery and technology hinder or assist the effort to transcend the alienation that characterizes much of present-day society? To what extent does the development of the productive forces under capitalism create a basis for a new society free of alienation and overwork? We will explore Marx’s discussion of these issues – and that by the Marxist-Humanist philosopher Raya Dunayevskaya — in the section on machinery of the Grundrisse, his most important critique of political economy in the years before he finished Capital.

Suggested readings:
Karl Marx, Grundrisse,” pp. 699-712
Raya Dunayevskaya, “The Automaton,” Philosophy and Revolution, pp. 68-76

Marx’s Grundrisse is now online: http://www.marxists.org/archive/marx/works/1857/grundrisse/index.htm

Sponsored by US Marxist-Humanists on the West Coast
More information: arise@usmarxisthumanists.org and http://www.usmarxisthumanists.org/

Future Meetings (same time and location):

May 14: PART 3: on Marx’s discussion of free and associated labor in the section on commodity fetishism in Capital.

June 11, PART 4: on Marx’s discussion of from each according to their abilities and each according to their needs – and the steps to get there – in Critique of the Gotha Program.

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

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Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Children at Work

BRIDGING THEORY AND PRACTICE: PARTNERSHIPS AND COLLABORATION IN CHILDHOOD SERVICES

CALL FOR PAPERS

SPECIAL ISSUE
Bridging Theory and Practice: Partnerships and Collaboration in Childhood Services
Guest Editor: ESTHER CHAN, Hong Kong Institute of Education

Partnerships and collaborations between the professions, families and communities are an increasingly important dimension of policy landscapes internationally. Across a range of disciplinary fields whose practitioners work with and on behalf of children, there is an expectation that professional knowledge and service are at their most effective when there is meaningful collaboration with stakeholders.

This has important implications for pre-service education and professional development, as well as for the day-to-day working lives of practitioners working to support children in family and community settings, education, allied health services and the social service sectors. It also raises significant questions about the ways in which partnerships are established and maintained, as well presenting a range of challenges and opportunities pertaining to the future of professional engagement with stakeholders.

This special issue of the new journal Global Studies of Childhood (www.wwwords.co.uk/GSCH) will make a critical contribution to understanding the ways in which practitioners engage with children, families and communities in a variety of contexts. This will involve describing and interrogating current projects, as well as problematizing the issues around partnerships and collaborations. For example, papers may consider the tensions around policy rhetorics that invite partnerships and then are selective in their application of the initiatives to suit personal or political imperatives.

Contributors might consider the following issues and questions: Is collaboration with stakeholders’ project currently an essential element in the process of educational reform? When partnerships and collaborations are instigated, what is the impact on professionals, teachers, children as well as parents? In what way is practice and policy in a given area shaped by the voices of a variety of stakeholders? In what ways can professional educators and/or practitioners work with communities to meet children’s needs?

Contributors are advised to read the ‘How to Contribute’ guidelines on the GSCH website before submission: www.wwwords.co.uk/gsch/howtocontribute.asp

Submissions are due by 30 September, 2011 and should be submitted via email to the Guest Editor: Esther Chan (echan@ied.edu.hk)

TIMELINE
May 31, 2011 – expression of interest with 300 word abstract
September 30, 2011 – Manuscript submission
October – November 2011: Selection Review process
December 2011: Feedback to authors
January 31, 2012: Final papers due
Publication March 2012

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com