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Daily Archives: February 11th, 2011

Education Crisis

NEW FRONTS IN THE FIGHT FOR EDUCATION

1. Thursday 24th February: Day X4

Walk out for education

Today’s papers have been full of reports that Oxford and Cambridge are set to charge the maximum £9,000 tuition fees and speculation that other universities could soon follow suit. An education from a top university could soon cost over £30,000 in fees alone. Leading vice-chancellors have already publicly urged MPs to back huge rises in tuition fees, a measure they believe is ‘reasonable’ – but these same Vice Chancellors are some of the highest paid bosses in the public sector with most receiving more than £200,000 a year.

The Vice Chancellors’ lobby group Universities UK will be holding its Spring Conference on Thursday 24th February – and students will be taking to the streets in protest for Day X4. Walkouts and protests in London will converge in a mass picket of the Universities UK conference, and this will be replicated by campus protests across the country.

For more information download the flyer to or join the event on Facebook (and invite all your friends):

* Flyer for LONDON

* Flyer for OUTSIDE LONDON

Event page on FACEBOOK

2. Support the Strike

Students and staff unite for education

Last term students walked out and occupied to try and defeat the introduction of tuition fees and abolition of EMA. This term it could be our lecturers who take action. Every UCU member in Higher and Further Education is being balloted over strike action to defend jobs, pay and pensions.

The experience at King’s, Sussex and Leeds last year shows that when students come out and mobilise in support of strike action by staff it creates a united defence of education that can win real results. We encourage all student supporters of EAN to do everything they can to get their classmates to support the strike.

EAN strike leaflet

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Taiwan

TAIWAN JOURNAL OF SOCIOLOGY OF EDUCATION – VOLUME 10 NUMBER 2 (DECEMBER 2010)

The Taiwan Journal of Sociology of Education, Vol.10 No.2 (December 2010) is now out.

Contents

Research Papers:

Whose Version of Civic Education? Alternative Discourses and Practices of Non-governmental Organizations in Hong Kong, Thomas Kwan-choi Tse (pp.1-39)

The Relationship between Team Performance of Excellent Teachers and Their School Culture: A Cases Study of Ta-I Elementary School, Hsin-Hsiang Lee (pp.41-83)

Is More Always Better? The Influence of Schooling, Seniority, and Enterprise Size on Career Mobility, Chih-Chia Chuang (pp.85-123)

The Rationale of Community University Movement: Rethinking the Approaches to Knowledge Emancipation, Tien-Chien Lee (pp.125-152)

Taiwan Association for the Sociology of Education

Website: http://140.133.8.179/~social/English/html/engindex.html

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Sociology

Russian Revolution

CONFERENCE ON WAR, REVOLUTION, CIVIL WAR: EASTERN EUROPE 1917-23

UCD CENTRE FOR WAR STUDIES

War, Revolution, Civil War: Eastern Europe 1917-23
25-26 March 2011

Venue: Clinton Institute, Seminar Room
University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland
Friday, 25 March 2011

13:00 Registration
13:30  Welcome and Introduction

13:45 – 15:30   Panel 1: The War as Imperial Challenge – Russia
Chair: Nikolaus Katzer (German Historical Institute Moscow)

Semen Gol’din (Hebrew University Jerusalem): The Jewish Policy of Military and Civilian Authorities as a Case Study of the Systemic Crisis in the Russian Empire, 1914-1917

Alexander Semyonov (Smolny Institute St. Petersburg/ Ab Imperio) World War as the Civil War and Civil War as the World War: The Radicalization of Political Visions in the War Time Russian Empire

Boris Kolonicky (European University St. Petersburg) “Nicolas the 3rd”: Images of the Commander in Chief Grand Duke Nikolaj Nikolaevich (1914-1915)

15:030– 16:00   COFFEE BREAK

16:00 – 17:30 Panel 2:  Revolution and Civil War – Russia
Chair: Katja Bruisch (German Historical Institute Moscow)

Vladimir Shishkin (Institute of History, Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk) WWI as a factor of Russian Revolution and Counterrevolution

Yulia Yurievna Khmelevskaya (Center for Cultural History Studies, South Ural State University, Chelyabinsk) A la Guerre com a la Guerre: the American Relief Administration and experience of the First World War in Fighting the famine in early Soviet Russia, 1921-1923

Dmitrij Simonov (Institute of History, Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk) Russia’s Military Potential in 1918

19:30 DINNER

Saturday, 26 March 2011

09:30 – 11:00   Panel 3: The Baltics and Finland
Chair:  Tomas Balkelis (University College Dublin)

Juha Siltala (Helsinki University) Terror in the Finnish Civil War

Aldis Minins (University of Latvia) Manifestations of the Civil War in Latvia, 1918-1920

Taavi Minnik (Talinn University) Terror and Repressions in Estonia, 1918-1919

11:00– 11:30 TEA / COFFE BREAK

11:30 -13:00  Panel 4: Poland
Chair: Julia Eichenberg (University College Dublin)

Frank Golczewski (University of Hamburg): The Wars after the War. The Fight for the Polish Eastern Border 1918-1920

Jan Snopko (Białystok University): The influence of the Russian revolution on the policy of Joseph Pilsudski and the fate of the Polish Legions (1917-1918)

Rüdiger Ritter (Free University Berlin): Germans and Poles fighting against regional identity: The Confrontations in Upper Silesia after World War I from the perspectives of participants, the regional, national, and international public

13:00– 13:30 LUNCH BREAK

13:00 – 14:30  Panel 5:  The Balkans
Chair: John Paul Newman (University College Dublin)

Mark Biondich (Carleton University) Preliminary title: The Balkans Revolution, War, and Political Violence

Alexander Korb (University of Leicester) “Terrorists interned” Ustasha nationalists, revisionist powers and the breakup of Yugoslavia

Uğur Ümit Üngör (University of Utrecht) A Ten-year War? Post-war Violence in the Ottoman-Russian Borderlands

Dmitar Tasic (Institute for Strategic Research, Department of Military History) Some Common Attributes of Political Violence in Albania, Yugoslavia, and Bulgaria

14:30 COFFEE / TEA BREAK

15:00 – 16:00  Rountable Discussion
Chair: Robert Gerwarth (University College Dublin)

For information about attendance, contact: christina.griessler@ucd.ie

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

ANARCHISM AND SYNDICALISM IN THE COLONIAL AND POSTCOLONIAL WORLD

Book Announcement: Anarchism and Syndicalism in the Colonial and Postcolonial World, 1870-1940
URL: http://labourhistory.net/news/i1012_6.php

“Anarchism and Syndicalism in the Colonial and Postcolonial World, 1870-1940: The Praxis of National Liberation, Internationalism, and Social Revolution”
Edited by Steven Hirsch and Lucien van der Walt
Preface by Benedict Anderson

Narratives of anarchist and syndicalist history during the era of the first globalization and imperialism (1870-1930) have overwhelmingly been constructed around a Western European tradition centered on discrete national cases. This parochial perspective typically ignores transnational connections and the contemporaneous existence of large and influential libertarian movements in Africa, Asia, Latin America, and Eastern Europe. Yet anarchism and syndicalism, from their very inception at the First International, were conceived and developed as international movements. By focusing on the neglected cases of the colonial and postcolonial world, this volume underscores the worldwide dimension of these movements and their centrality in anti-colonial and anti-imperialist struggles. Drawing on in-depth historical analyses of the ideology, structure, and praxis of anarchism / syndicalism, it also provides fresh perspectives and lessons for those interested in understanding their resurgence today.

“Table of contents”

List of Illustrations
Acknowledgments
List of Contributors

Preface, Benedict Anderson

Rethinking Anarchism and Syndicalism: the colonial and post-colonial experience, 1870-1940, Lucien van der Walt and Steven J. Hirsch

PART ONE: ANARCHISM AND SYNDICALISM IN THE COLONIAL WORLD

“Diverse in race, religion and nationality. but united in aspirations of civil progress”: the anarchist movement in Egypt 1860-1940, Anthony Gorman
Revolutionary syndicalism, communism and the national question in South African socialism, 1886-1928, Lucien van der Walt
Korean Anarchism before 1945: a regional and transnational approach, Dongyoun Hwang
Anarchism and the Question of Place: thoughts from the Chinese experience, Arif Dirlik
The Makhnovist Movement and the National Question in the Ukraine, 1917-1921, Aleksandr Shubin
Syndicalism, Industrial Unionism, and Nationalism in Ireland, Emmet O’Connor

PART TWO: ANARCHISM AND SYNDICALISM IN THE POSTCOLONIAL WORLD

Peruvian Anarcho-Syndicalism: adapting transnational influences and forging counterhegemonic Practices, 1905-1930, Steven J. Hirsch
Tropical Libertarians: anarchist movements and networks in the Caribbean, Southern United States, and Mexico, 1890s-1920s, Kirk Shaffer
Straddling the Nation and the Working World: anarchism and syndicalism on the docks and rivers of Argentina, 1900-1930, Geoffroy de Laforcade
Constructing Syndicalism and Anarchism Globally: the transnational making of the syndicalist movement in São Paulo, Brazil, 1895-1935, Edilene Toledo and Luigi Biondi
Final Reflections: the vicissitudes of anarchist and syndicalist trajectories, 1940 to the present, Steven J. Hirsch and Lucien van der Walt

More at http://www.brill.nl/default.aspx?partid=210&pid=28985

* Please note that this is the hard cover edition. Please consider ordering for your library. It is intended that a paperback follows at some point. 

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

A World To Win

STRIKES AND SOCIAL CONFLICTS IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY

International Conference
Lisbon, 17, 18, 19 March, 2011

The twentieth century has been confirmed as the century when the capital-labour conflict was most severe. The International Conference on Strikes and Social Conflicts in the Twentieth Century will host submissions on the strikes and social conflicts in the twentieth century and works on the theoretical discussion on the role of unions and political organizations. We also invite researchers to submit papers on methodology and the historiography of labour.

We welcome submissions on labour conflicts that occurred in factories, universities or public services, on rural and urban conflicts and also on conflicts that developed into civil wars or revolutions. National and international comparisons are also welcome.

After the Russian revolution the relative strengths of capital and labour were never again the same, with a period of revolution and counter-revolution that ended with World War II. Protagonist of the victory over fascism, the labour movement found itself neglected in the core countries under the impact of economic growth in the 1950s and the 1960s. But May 1968 quickly reversed the situation, with a following boom of labour studies during the 1970s. Nevertheless once the crisis of the 1970s was over, capital has regained the initiative, with the deterioration of labour laws, the crisis of trade unions and the subsequent despise in the academy for the study of social conflicts. The recent crisis, however, shows that workers, the ones who create value, are not obsolete. The social movements regain, in the last decade, a central role in the world.

The intensification of social conflicts in the last decade promoted a comeback to the academia of the studies on labour and the social movements. This conference aims to be part of this process: to retrieve, promote and disseminate the history of social conflicts during the twentieth century.

The Scientific Committee
Álvaro Bianchi (AEL)
Raquel Varela (IHC)
Sjaak van der Velden (IISH)
Serge Wolikow (MSH)
Xavier Domènech (CEDIF)

Conference Languages
Conference languages are Portuguese, English, French and Spanish (simultaneous translation Portuguese/English).

Preliminary Program

The Conference will have sessions in the mornings and afternoons. There will be conferences of invited speakers, among other, Marcel van der Linden, Fernando Rosas, Serge Wolikow, Beverly Silver, Kevin Murphy, Ricardo Antunes, Álvaro Bianchi, Dave Lyddon, Xavier Doménech.

During the conference there will be an excursion guided by Professor Fernando Rosas (Lisbon of the Revolutions); a debate about cinema and labour movement and a debate about Crisis and Social Change.

Contact information:

Instituto de História Contemporânea/ Faculdade de Ciências Sociais e Humanas (Universidade Nova de Lisboa), Av. de Berna, 26 C, 1069-061 Lisboa, Portugal. E-Mail: ihc@fcsh.unl.pt

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Revolt

REPETITION AND REVOLT

The Theory Reading Group at Cornell University invites submissions for its seventh annual interdisciplinary spring conference:

Repetition and Revolt

Featuring keynote speaker Rebecca Comay (University of Toronto)

Cornell University
Ithaca, New York
April 14-16, 2011

Wavering between the occurrence of the novel and the recurrence of the routine, the concept of revolution often divides along a line suggested by its etymology.  Thus, even as Copernicus upset the world system of his time, he did so by describing an orbit, a stable circle.  Put simply, this legacy reminds us that every proposed overturning might yield nothing more than a mere return, a tendency that threatens to undermine radical upheavals in domains ranging from the political to the aesthetic to the scientific.  As Robert Frost suggests, it may well be in the nature of “total revolution” to put “the same class up on top.”

This critical ambiguity can emerge whenever we attempt to account for the possibility of change or difference.  Does this division reveal something essential about revolution, or does it indicate a fault in the ways in which we think about revolution?  In what ways has contemporary thought attempted to reckon with or reconcile the competing meanings of this term?  How do philosophical and theoretical discourses account for change and difference, not only in the realms of politics, literature, art, and science, but also within philosophy and theory themselves?  What forms of critique, resistance, or action can we find in contemporary thought, and what do these forms disclose about the potential or limits of the concept of revolution?

Suggested topics:

* Paradigm shifts and epistemic breaks

* Theories of literary innovation

* Copernican revolution or Ptolemaic counterrevolution

* Theories of the event

* Aesthetics and politics

* The figure of the genius

* Repetition and difference

* Revolution and globalization

* The finite and the infinite

* Secularization, the post-secular, the new atheism

* The future of critique

* Collapse, catastrophe, and crisis

* Evolution and Darwinism

* Eternal return

* Utopia and dystopia

* Revolutionary violence and messianism

* Law and exception

* Theories of transgression

* Ruptures critical and diacritical

* Revolutions in media/social mediation

* Turns: political, linguistic, ethical, (anti)social, comic

Please limit the length of abstracts to no more than 250 words.

The deadline for submission of 250-word abstracts for 20-minute presentations is February 15, 2011.

Please include your name, e-mail address, and phone number.  Abstracts should be e-mailed to repetitionrevolt@gmail.com

Notices of acceptance will be sent no later than February 25, 2011.

For more information about the Cornell Theory Reading Group, visit: http://www.arts.cornell.edu/trg  

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com