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Daily Archives: February 4th, 2011

World Crisis

UNDERSTANDING THE GLOBAL FINANCIAL CRISIS

The Richmond University Colloquium in Public & International Affairs (RUCIPA)
This year’s theme is on: “Understanding the Global Financial Crisis”
Friday, 25 March 2011, 17 Young Street, London W8 5EH (Underground: High Street Kensington)

Programme

10.30am Registration

11.00 Welcome Address by Professor Alex Seago, Richmond University

11.15 Professor Bülent Gökay, Keele University, “Global fault-lines three years after: An analysis of the 2008 global economic crisis” (Chair: Dr. Preslava Stoeva, RU)

11.45 – 12.15 Discussion

12.15 – 13.45 Lunch

13.45 Professor Engelbert Stockhammer, Kingston University, “Neo-liberalism, income distribution and the causes of the crisis” (Chair: Professor Wolfgang Deckers, RU)

14.30 Professor Costas Lapavitsas, SOAS, “World crisis, world money: the Euro-crisis and Marxist monetary theory” (Chair: Dr. Sabine Spangenberg, RU)

15.15 – 16.00 Discussion

16.00 – 16.15 Coffee/Tea

16.15 Professor Robert Wade, LSE, “The future of global financial governance” (Chair: Dr. Mike Keating, RU)

17.00 – 17.15 Discussion

17.15 – 18.15 Round Table Discussion with Lapavitsas, Wade, Stockhammer and Gökay chaired by Prof Stephen Haseler, London Metropolitan University and Global Policy Institute

Further info from: Jelena.Pivovarova@Richmond.ac.uk, Tel: 0207-3688437

Supported by http://www.globalfaultlines.com and the Journal of Balkan and Near Eastern Studies (quarterly, Routledge)

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World Crisis

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE OF CRITICAL GEOGRAPHY

The variegated geographical contours of the urban crisis

Sara Gonzalez (University of Leeds), Stijn Oosterlynck (Universiteit Antwerpen), Ugo Rossi (Università di Cagliari) and Ramon Ribera Fumaz (Universitat Oberta de Catalunya)

As part of the Sixth International Conference of Critical Geography

Theme 2: URBAN CRISIS

Details at: http://www.iccg2011.org 

We call for contributions to a workshop where we will discuss how cities have been affected in different ways by the global financial crisis and what different reactions and policy responses are we seeing across the world. We are particularly interested in comparing and contrasting across different geographical locations to understand if and what general trends are emerging. Are we seeing the intensification of “unevenly evolving neoliberalization processes” (Brenner et al, 2010: 27) in urban spaces, glimpses of a post-neoliberal alternative or gradual return to business as usual? Are cities emerging as key arenas for (global) change or passive sites for implementation of policies? Can we appreciate different urban future scenarios?

Rather than a traditional paper based session we propose to have short presentations directly related to the questions above by participants bringing a particular geographical focus. In an interactive way we hope to start to draw the contours of how cities and capitalism itself are being remoulded in a geographically variegated way.

This session forms part of a wider research project funded by the Leverhulme Trust: http://www.geog.leeds.ac.uk/projects/network/index.html

Send queries / questions to: s.gonzalez@leeds.ac.uk

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Utopia

UTOPIA NOW! RADICAL IMAGINATION IN THE WAKE OF HISTORICAL FAILURE

Lecture by Stephen Duncombe
Monday February 14, 2011
Time: 08:30 PM
Location: de Balie (Salon), Kleine-Gartmanplantsoen 10, Amsterdam
Entrance: 5 Euro

Tickets available at the door or order in advance

A co-production of SKOR | Foundation Art and Public Domain and De Balie.

On February 14, the American sociologist and researcher Stephen Duncombe will give a lecture in De Balie in Amsterdam to mark the publication of Open 20, titled The Populist Imagination: On the Role of Myth, Storytelling and Imaginary in Politics.

His presentation explores the possibilities of a new democratic imaginary. Duncombe advocates a dreampolitik that could serve as a counterweight to the nostalgic fantasies that are currently being promoted by right-wing populist movements.

Stephen Duncombe is a professor at the Gallatin School, New York University, where he teaches the history and politics of media.

As a political activist he writes about the intersection between culture and politics. His published works include Dream: Re-imagining Progressive Politics in an Age of Fantasy (2006). Duncombe is co-director of the College of Tactical Culture and of the School for Creative Activism in New York.

This lecture is a prelude to the one-day symposium on Friday March 18, which deals with the roles played by imagination, storytelling and myth creation in politics today. Among the theoreticians, artists and graphic designers who will participate in this symposium are Rudi Laermans, Merijn Oudenampsen, Sarah Farris, Oliver Marchart, Aukje van Rooden, Steve Lambert and John Kraniaukas.

Open Cahier on Art and the Public Domain is iniated by SKOR | Foundation for Art and Public Domain and published in partnership with NAi Publishers. Open 20 was guest-edited by Merijn Oudenampsen and deals with imagination and myths in politics, in populism and beyond.

‘All power to the imagination!’, is a popular slogan identified with the 1968-generation. Now, right-wing populist movements such as the Italian Northern League Party (Lega Nord), the American Tea Party movement, the Dutch Party For Freedom (PVV, led by Geert Wilders) and many others are storming the political stage in Europe and the United States. These groups are using the political imagination to sharpen and fix identities, to appeal to an imaginary past, and to cultivate myths.

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Sara Motta

Mike Cole

EDUCATION AND SOCIAL CHANGE IN LATIN AMERICA

A two day workshop organised in collaboration between:

MERD (Marxism and Education: Renewing Dialogues)
CSSGJ (Centre for the Study of Social and Global Justice, University of Nottingham)
CESJ (Centre for Education for Social Justice, Bishop Grosseteste University College, Lincoln)

To be held at the
University of Nottingham
1st – 2nd July 2011

The role of education is increasingly important in the construction of new forms of anti-capitalist politics in Latin America. This is evidenced by the centrality of popular education and other forms of struggle influenced by radical education philosophy and pedagogy, and by social movements in their construction of new forms of participatory politics and mass intellectuality. It is also evidenced in the creation of formal and informal educational programmes, practices and projects that develop varieties of critical pedagogy and popular education with both organised and non-organised marginalised and excluded communities.

Particularly, noticeable in this regard is the centrality of education in the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela and the move towards 21st Century socialism. At the heart of the politicisation of education are the questions of whose knowledge counts in the process of social transformation and political change and if the ways in which such transformative knowledge is created impact upon the struggle to develop worlds beyond capitalism in the 21st century.

This workshop invites papers which develop theoretically grounded empirical analysis about the politicisation of education in the continent.

Key questions to be addressed are:

How is education politicised in contemporary anti-capitalist struggles?

How has neoliberalism closed down as well as opened up terrains of educational struggle?

What differences are there between the role of education in 20th century socialism and 21st century socialism?

How does Marxism shape such practices of radical pedagogy and how do such practices transform Marxism?

How does the focus on popular education in new forms of popular politics influence and reflect the type of politics developed?

What is the role of autonomous education in social movements in the construction of anti-capitalism?

What is the relationship between formal ‘progressive’ educational programmes and the politics of knowledge and education in informal community/social movement settings?

What can we (outside of the region) learn from Chavez’s concept of Venezuela as a ‘giant school’ and other radical pedagogies and educational practices in Latin America?

What is the role of popular educators within formal schooling in these processes?

Selected papers will be published in an edited collection with Palgrave Macmillan in their Marxism and Education Series.

Contact Sara Motta at sara.motta@nottingham.ac.uk and Mike Cole at mike.cole@bishopg.ac.uk  if you are interested in helping organise the workshop or would like any further information.

Please submit your paper proposal by March 1st 2011

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