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Daily Archives: October 23rd, 2010

Battle of Ideas Festival, an annual event organised by the Institute of Ideas and taking place at the Royal College of Art, London on October 30-31. Over the course of a weekend over 2,000 people will be taking part in over 75 different debates involving hundreds of incisive and thought-provoking speakers.

Hilton reading Postone

 

This year’s festival includes strands of debates on medical ethics, social policy, scientific evidence and the battle for the past, and keynote debates on trust in an age of cynicism, whether the public is engaged or imagined, the economic and cultural future of the West, the promise and risks of engineering the future, the rights and wrongs of social justice, and what it means to be a liberal today, as well as many more discussions on current themes in the arts, science, health, parenting, education, design, fashion, international relations, religion and secularism, sport and everyday life.

Speakers include: David Aaronovitch columnist; Sarah Churchwell academic; Frank Furedi professor of sociology, University of Kent, Canterbury; Anil Gupta professor, Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad; John Harris professor of bioethics; Bettany Hughes broadcaster; Virginia Ironside agony aunt; Wendy Kaminer US-based writer on liberty; Irma Kurtz writer; Norman Lebrecht cultural commentator; Paul Mason broadcaster; Gáspár Miklos Tamás Hungarian philosopher and dissident; Brendan O’Neill editor, spiked; Tim Parks novelist; Fred Pearce author; Anthony Seldon author and master, Wellington College; Roger Scruton philosopher; Dr Richard Smith author; Tarun J Tejpal Indian journalist and novelist; Professor Sir Mark Walport director of the Wellcome Trust; David Willetts MP Science Minister; David Yelland former editor, The Sun; Peter York cultural commentator; and many more. Click here for a full list.

Martin Wolf, chief economics commentator at the Financial Times, said the Battle of Ideas is: ‘a unique opportunity to learn from vigorous exchanges among some of the world’s best-informed and most provocative people’ and the neuroscientist Professor Colin Blakemore called his experience, ‘adrenaline for the mind. A chance for intellectual fisticuffs with some of the best-known and most stimulating thinkers in the world.’

Visit: http://www.battleofideas.org.uk to view this year’s entire festival programme, including an expanded programme of national and international Satellite events, as well as carefully selected readings for each session, specially commissioned Battle in Print essays on selected themes, and videos of previous years’ sessions. The festival brochure can also be downloaded as a PDF document.

** School students aged 16-18 are able to attend a day of the festival for free (the second day costing only £10). There are also a limited number of HALF PRICE Student Champion tickets, allowing university students full access to the weekend festival for just £25. Click here to purchase discounted tickets.**

Tickets are available through online booking, or by phone: 0207 269 9220.

If you know anyone who you think would be interested in this, please do forward this email on to friends and colleagues.

Best wishes

Claire

BATTLE OF IDEAS FESTIVAL

Claire Fox: Director, Institute of Ideas, Signet House, 49-51 Farringdon Road, London EC1M 3JP, 020 7269 9220, 020 7269 9223 (direct): www.instituteofideas.com; www.battleofideas.org.uk; www.debatingmatters.com

END

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com
Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Athens, The Academy

ACCESS AND SUCCESS FOR ALL: HEA RESEARCH SEMINAR SERIES

 The Higher Education Academy –  Research Seminar Series 2010: Access and Success for All

The Higher Education Academy would like to invite you to participate in its Research Seminar Series 2010: Access and Success for All.

Three seminars are being held between now and the end of the year:

27 October – Belonging, Learning and Working: theory and practice in supporting students with disabilities and specific learning difficulties – University of Leicester. To book go to: http://www.go.le.ac.uk/hearesearchseminar2010

18 November – What works? Exploring personal tutoring for student success – University of Reading. To book email s.morey@reading.ac.uk

 2 December – The role of Personal Tutors and Student Advisers in Student Retention and Success – Anglia Ruskin University. To book email jacqui.mccary@anglia.ac.uk  

Full details about the Research Seminar Series can be found at: http://www.heacademy.ac.uk/ourwork/teachingandlearning/inclusion/alldisplay?type=resources&newid=ourwork/inclusion/2010_Research_Seminar_Series_overview&site=york        

Regards,

The Inclusion Team

Tel. +44 (0) 1904 717500

Fax. +44 (0) 1904 717505

Email: inclusion@heacademy.ac.uk

The Higher Education Academy, Innovation Way, York Science Park, Heslington, York, YO10 5BR

http://www.heacademy.ac.uk

END

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

A World To Win

‘WE’RE ALL MIDDLE CLASS NOW… AREN’T WE?’

Mon 1 Nov 2010, 18.30 – 20.00
Conference Centre, British Library
Price: £6 / £4 concessions

http://www.bl.uk/whatson/events/event113923.html

Commentators have been arguing about the role of class in determining life chances and life span for many years. In some ways the concept of class has become increasingly complex and fraught, until we see, for example, maps of the UK which show very different patterns of poverty, life and death.

This event will look at factors that shape our identities and lives, and ask how important class is.

The debate will be chaired by David Walker, Managing Director, Communications and Public Reporting, Audit Commissioner.

The speakers are:

Professor Fiona Devine, Head of School of Social Sciences, University of Manchester

Professor John Hills, Director, Centre for the Analysis of Social Exclusion, London School of Economics, and

Lee Elliot Major, Research Director, Sutton Trust

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY OF WORK AND EMPLOYABILITY

Announcing the publication of:

Dr Phoebe V. Moore, International Political Economy of Work and Employability, Palgrave Macmillan, September 2010

Global shifts to a knowledge-based economy have led to the semi-proletarianisation of labour and the emergence of a transnational precariat class. It has allowed for the propaganda of the emancipation of labour by way of membership in the creatives club. Workers and the rising unemployed are increasingly expected to become self-managing lifelong learners due to the impact of technological development. Dr Moore conducts a critical investigation of how employment and education policy in three different locations is informed by a dominant view of what should make a person ’employable’ , created by the elite, and then looks for new models for post-capitalist production such as peer to peer communities that can overcome this binding set of rules. The International Political Economy of Work and Employability provides the basis for research into the dramatic impact of global instability on workers such as is seen in the context of the recent recession. 

‘Phoebe Moore makes an important contribution to our understanding of the fundamental changes to International Political Economy over recent years. Her impressive analyses of education policy linked to “employability” as a means of producing forms of subjectivity that sustain neoliberal reforms even against their economic f ailures will be critical tools in the hands of scholars, researchers, organizers and activists. Her case studies underscore the convergences occasioned by neoliberal policies even in the contexts of diverse national and cultural experiences. This book makes a compelling case for bringing work, labour, and production “back in” to the study of International Political Economy.’- Matt Davies, Newcastle University, UK

‘This book provides one of the richest and most systematic comparisons of skills revolutions in three countries in the east and west. Phoebe Moore introduces brilliantly the International Political Economy of Work and Employability into the literature on employability and skills.’- Joohee Lee, Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, Ewha Womans University, Korea

Dr. Phoebe Moore 
Profile: http://www.espach.salford.ac.uk/page/Phoebe_Moore
Editor of Discussion Papers, International Political Economy Group http://bisa-ipeg.org/ipegpapers.htm
Editorial Board Capital and Class http://www.cseweb.org.uk/

END

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com
Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Red

ROUGE FORUM UPDATE: UPRISING IN FRANCE, VICTORY IN CHICAGO!!

A Message from Rich Gibson

Dear Friends

The Rouge Forum Blog is updated here; http://www.richgibson.com/blog/

For those headed to San Francisco for the Uprising Conference next weekend, please email as to where you will be, phone contacts, etc.

Good luck to us, every one.
Rich Gibson

Report from Anon in France (10-18):

I’m exhausted.

I’ve spent the last three days going from road block to road block, together with teachers, railroad workers, truckers, nurses, etc. So far, in our sector, we’ve managed the feat of keeping the Arnages oil depot totally closed since Friday 4 AM!

As a result, all the petrol stations in a radius of 70 kms are closed, completely out of gas. I slept 4 hours on Friday night, 6 hours on Saturday, 2 on Monday … Today, we got the main Teachers’ Union to call on all striking teachers to come and help block all the remaining fuel depots. The police can’t intervene, because the truckers have established road blocks on the major roads leading to the oil depot. What is incredible is that despite the fact that there is no more oil available, and therefore that people are blocked at home, a resounding 71% of the population approves of the strike (according to today’s opinion polls).

The movement is set to last at least another week. I spent the whole of Sunday night with transport (railway and truckers) workers playing cards and drinking beer. It was quite cold (2°C) around 4 AM, but the railroad workers brought several truck-loads of “palettes” (empty wooden containers) and we lit a might bonfire.

Striking workers from the neighbouring Renault factory brought firecrackers and we spent the wee hours of the morning lighting them. Workers are determined to fight until the bitter end. Workers who chose not to go on strike are being encouraged to donate part of their salary to the workers of the most “strategic” sectors, especially the Donges refinery.

Personally, this is my 6th day of Strike. An open-ended strike that might not be the best way of going about things, the consensus now being that “revolving” strikes (15% of the workforce on strike on a given day) would enable us to hold out longer. The support from “ordinary people” is astounding. When we block a freeway, drivers often honk to support us, give us money, hand us daily newspapers, even though we are effectively blocking them.

I’ve decided to stay on strike for a further three days but to spend more time with my family, which is also what the union is advocating. Some comrades have spent 4 days without going home and the union is worried this may cause trouble with spouses, who are forced to look after the kids, which would further undermine our resolve.

All 12 French oil refineries are on strike until next Friday. Many depots are blocked. Half the trains (including major ones) are not running. Truckers have blocked the roads leading to the main production areas, and factories cannot function because they lack raw material and pieces (they don’t have any stocks of materials stored because they believe storage costs money).

Anyway, the mood is indescribable. Workers from every sector are united and determined, and for the first time, many workers can chat with people employed in other industries knowing that they share a common goal.

The only problem is, it will be hard, very hard to go back to work. But thanks to the government, people are prepared to remain on strike until next week. Then we’ll see.

It’s a general strike and a lot of ordinary workers I’ve talked to are determined not to resume work until the retirement age is brought back to 60.

END

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com