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Daily Archives: March 5th, 2010

The Dialectic

CAPITALISM AND THE DIALECTIC: THE UNO-SEKINE APPROACH TO MARXIAN ECONOMY

JOHN R BELL

Capitalism & the Dialectic introduces the approach pioneered by Japanese economist, Kozo Uno and refined perhaps most dramatically by Thomas Sekine. This approach progressively increases its comprehension of capitalism by moving sequentially through three distinct levels of analysis. In the theory of pure capitalism, Uno and Sekine reproduce the logic that capital and its society-wide market employ in the attempt to reproduce material economic life. By adhering to Marx’s Hegelian dialectical method more consistently than did Marx, they are able to correct and complete Capital and to provide a convincing defence of value theory. The stages theory of capitalism’s historical development recognizes that in any historical society capital must also contend with more intractable use-values than the light cotton-type goods that are contemplated by pure theory (and that did indeed dominate British liberal capitalism). In theorizing each of the stages capitalism (mercantilism, liberalism, imperialism), the Uno-Sekine perspective recognizes that stage-specific economic policies must be advanced to tame use-value to the point that the market can operate effectively to reproduce economic life. Subsequent empirical studies are informed by these two levels of theory. The Uno-Sekine approach does not overlook the possibility that a society might still strive to be capitalist after use-value resistance has become so great that no bourgeois policy can provide the market with sufficient support to allow it to successfully regulate economic life.

Contents

Part 1 Dialectical Theory of Capitalism: Circulation
     1 Commodity,Value, Money and Capital Forms
Part II Dialectical Theory of Capitalism: Production
     2 Capitalist Production
     3 Circulation and Reproduction of Capital
Part III Dialectical Theory of Capitalism: Distribution
     4 Theory of Profit
     5 Business Cycles
     6 Rent, Commercial Credit
     7 Interest-Bearing Capital Closes the Dialectic
Part IV Capitalism and History
     8 Stages Theory of Capitalist Development
     9 Conclusion: Capitalists Beyond Capitalism

“This is a clear introduction to a ground-breaking but little-known approach to Marxian economics: the Uno-Sekine approach. … With this perceptive and thoughtful volume, John Bell renders a great service to the interested Western reader.” — Thomas Sekine, author of An Outline of the Dialectic of Capital (1997)

“Many thinkers have been influenced by the work of Japanese political economist Kozo Uno. Thomas Sekine’s two volume work, An Outline of the Dialectic of Capital, has done the most to reflect and enlarge Uno’s work. John Bell’s book is essential reading for anyone interested in understanding the core concepts and principles of this important 
school of thought.” – Robert Albritton, author of Economics Transformed (Pluto Press, 2007)

“Japanese political economist Kozo Uno made major interventions [on important questions of Marxist theory] … but due to language barriers these were passed over. John Bell’s book helps to fill an intellectual gap with an overview of Uno’s compelling reconstruction of Marx ‘s Capital.” – Richard Westra, author of Political Economy and Globalization (2009)

Publication date October 2009
ISBN hardcover 97807745329349
ISBN  paperback 9780745329338
h 9.25″ x 5.87″
Pluto Press   http://www.plutopress.com
Author’s site http://capitalismandthedialectic.com

John R Bell taught for over three decades at Seneca College. He was co-editor of New Socialisms (2004) and is currently working on a book on the subject of socialism. He co-authored, “The Disintegration of Capitalism: A Phase of Post of Ex-Capitalist Transition” with Tom Sekine, whom he is now asisting with the translation of Kozo Uno’s 
Economic Policies Under Capitalism.

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Social Capital

THEORIES OF SOCIAL CAPITAL

Theories of Social Capital: Researchers Behaving Badly

Ben Fine

Released March 15th 2010

PB / £ 27.50 / 9780745329963 / 230mm x 150mm / 288 pp

Ben Fine is the world’s most thorough and indefatigible critic of the abuse of the concept of capital that follows from adding “social” to it. … Here he … explore[s] the reasons behind the chaos this causes and the consequences of the penetration of notions of profit into every nook and cranny of our lives. A must-read for all irritated and irritable thinkers in social science. — Barbara Harriss-White, Oxford University

Tracing the evolution of social capital since his highly acclaimed contribution of 2001 (Social Capital Versus Social Theory), Ben Fine consolidates his position as the world’s leading critic of the concept.

Fine forcibly demonstrates how social capital has expanded across the social sciences only by degrading the different disciplines and topics that it touches: a McDonaldisation of social theory. The rise and fall of social capital at the World Bank is critically explained as is social capital’s growing presence in disciplines, such as management studies, and its relative absence in others, such as social history.

Writing with a sharp critical edge, Fine not only deconstructs the roller-coaster presence of social capital across the social sciences but also draws out lessons on how (and how not) to do research.

Ben Fine is Professor of Economics at the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London. He most recently co-authored From Economics Imperialism to Freakonomics: The Shifting Boundaries Between Economics and Other Social Sciences (2009) and serves on the Social Science Research Committee of the UK’s Food Standards Agency.

For further information, to request a review copy or to speak to the author please contact Jon Wheatley at jonw@plutobooks.com or on 0208 374 6424

345 ARCHWAY ROAD, LONDON, N6 5AA
TEL: 0208 3482724 FAX: 0208 348 9133 http://www.plutobooks.com

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Critical Hope

CHANGING THE CLIMATE: UTOPIA, DYSTOPIA AND CATASTROPHE

The Fourth Australian Conference on Utopia, Dystopia and Science Fiction

CALL FOR PAPERS

30th August – 1st September 2010
Monash University Conference Centre
30 Collins Street, Melbourne, Victoria 3000, Australia

A conference organised by the Centre for Comparative Literature and Cultural Studies at Monash University

WEBSITE: http://www.arts.monash.edu.au/cclcs/conferences/utopias/4/index.php

In December 2001 the University of Tasmania hosted a successful conference around the theme of Antipodean Utopias. In December 2005, Monash University hosted a second conference, around that of Imagining the Future, to mark the long-awaited publication of Fredric Jameson’s book Archaeologies of the Future. A third conference, Demanding the Impossible, followed in December 2007, again at Monash. Despite the apparent optimism of all three conference themes, dystopia remained a recurrent preoccupation in their discussions. This fourth conference will directly address the questions of dystopia and catastrophe with special reference to a problem that increasingly haunts our imaginings of the future, that of actual or possible environmental catastrophe. As Jameson himself wrote in The Seeds of Time: ‘It seems … easier for us today to imagine the thoroughgoing deterioration of the earth and of
nature than the breakdown of late capitalism; perhaps that is due to some weakness in our imaginations’.Hopefully, this conference will play some small part in changing that particular climate of opinion.

The conference invites papers from scholars, writers and others interested in the interplay between ecology and ecocriticism, utopia, dystopia and science fiction.

OPENING ADDRESS

The opening address will be given by Kate Rigby, Founding President of the Association for the Study of Literature and Environment, Australia-New Zealand, and author of Topographies of the Sacred: The Poetics of Place in European Romanticism (2004).

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

John Clute
Science fiction writer, Director of the Department of Story Future in the Centre for the Future at Slavonice and co-author of The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction (1993) and The Encyclopedia of Fantasy (1997).

Tom Moylan
Emeritus Professor and Founding Director of the Ralahine Center for Utopian Studies, University of Limerick, author of Demand the Impossible (1986) and Scraps of the Untainted Sky (2000) and co-editor of Dark Horizons (2003).

Kim Stanley Robinson
Distinguished science fiction writer, winner of two Hugo Awards and author of the Orange Country Trilogy, the Mars Trilogy, Antarctica, The Years of Rice and Salt and the Science in the Capital Trilogy.

Deborah Bird Rose
Professor of Social Inclusion, Macquarie University, author of Dingo Makes Us Human (2000), Reports from a Wild Country (2004) and Wild Dog Dreaming: Love and Extinction (in press).

Linda Williams
Associate Professor in Art History at RMIT University, curator of The Idea of the Animal exhibition (2004) and the HEAT: Art and Climate Change exhibition (2008).

The conference invites papers from scholars, writers and others interested in the interplay between ecology and ecocriticism, utopia, dystopia and science fiction.

CONFERENCE ABSTRACTS

Abstracts (approx. 100-150 words) should be sent by 30 June 2010 by e-mail to: Utopias@arts.monash.edu.au

or by post to: Utopias4 Conference, Centre for Comparative Literature and Cultural Studies, School of English, Communications and Performasnce Studies, Clayton campus, Monash University, Victoria 3800, Australia

REGISTRATION

The conference will take place over three days.

Full registration for the three days costs $A280, with a concessional price for students and the non-employed of $A140.

Registration for one day only costs $A110, with a concessional price of $A55. All prices are GST inclusive.

Registration is due by 31 July 2010.

Professor Andrew Milner
Centre for Comparative Literature and Cultural Studies
School of English, Communications and Performance Studies
Monash University
Melbourne
Victoria 3800
AUSTRALIA

Phone: (61) (3) 9905 2979
Fax: (61) (3) 9905 5593
Email: Andrew.Milner@arts.monash.edu.au
Homepage: http://www.arts.monash.edu.au/ecps/people/andrew-milner/

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Capitalist Crisis

RESEARCH ON MONEY AND FINANCE

Research on Money and Finance (RMF)  is a network of political economists with a focus on the rise of financialisation and the resulting intensification of crises. RMF aims to generate analytical work on the development of the contemporary monetary and the financial system.

RMF is pleased to announce the launch of its new website! http://www.researchonmoneyandfinance.org

The website contains details, including audio recordings, of the conference organised by RMF in November 2009 when an international group of progressive scholars from a diverse disciplinary background assembled to discuss the outcomes of the current global financial crisis. Participants in the conference, entitled “One Year on from the Panic of 2008: Whither Financialised Capitalism?”, included Gérard Duménil, Gary Dymski, Costas Lapavitsas, Malcolm Sawyer, Jan Toporowski, Paulo L dos Santos, Engelbert Stockhammer, Trevor Evans, Claude Serfati, Karel Williams, Andrew Leyshon and Shaun French, and Robin Blackburn. Streaming audio and MP3 downloads of the conference are available, as well as a selection of the conference papers, at: http://www.researchonmoneyandfinance.org/events/.

The site also contains the RMF discussion paper series, which has recently been updated with a contribution from Annina Kaltenbrunner & Juan Pablo Painceira on the effects of the financial crisis in Brazil. RMF discussion papers can be found at: http://www.researchonmoneyandfinance.org/discussion-papers/. RMF invites further discussion papers that may be in political economy, heterodox economics, and economic sociology. We welcome theoretical and empirical analysis without preference for particular topics. Our aim is to accumulate a body of work that provides insight into the development of contemporary capitalism.

Research on Money and Finance: http://www.researchonmoneyandfinance.org/

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Daniel Bensaid

VIDEOS FROM THE LONDON MEMORIAL MEETING FOR DANIEL BENSAID

You can see the videos here: http://ecosocialism.blip.tv/posts?view=archive&nsfw=dc

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Peter McLaren

ACADEMIC REPRESSION

http://www.akpress.org/2010/items/academicrepression

Academic Repression: Reflections from the Academic Industrial Complex

Peter McLaren (Editor), Steven Best (Editor), and Anthony J. Nocella II (Editor)

The extreme repressive attacks on Churchill, Finklstein, Fontan, Best, Massad, the “Dirty Thirty,” and many others represented in this book demonstrate the repressive logic of “US democracy,” whereby political elites, the mass media, and the education system establish and police the parameters of acceptable discourse. Churchill became America’s own Salman Rushdie terrorized by the fatwa of the right. Unprecedented for the media coverage given to a professor (in a mass media culture that virtually ignores substantive ideas in favor of spectacle and sensationalism) the Churchill affair was, however, just one of many cases of attacks on academic freedom that eerily evoke the tyranny of the McCarthy era where actors were blacklisted and professors were fired for having even liberal views or showing dissent against state repression. While there has been much research on political repression carried out by the Bush administration, FBI, and various law enforcement agencies, there has been little discussion on political 
repression in academia and how the shockwaves of 9/11 have reverberated throughout academia. This anthology brings together prominent academics who contribute original essays commissioned for this volume. The writers are known and respected figures in their respective fields, and many have experienced academic repression first-hand.

This volume aims to be a cogent intervention in debates over free speech, culture wars, and academic freedom. Given that the importance of free speech to academic life, and the crucial role universities play in the intellectual life of cultures as a whole, a volume addressing the political environment of universities in the current period promises to make a significant contribution.

Academic Repression: Reflections from the Academic Industrial Complex (AK Press), is a much needed book on a topic that has seen little attention. Since 9/11 the Bush Administration has ventured to every campus influencing and forcing change by administration to handover faculty, staff, and student work to be flagged as possible signs of threatening behavior. While there have been numerous books on academic freedom, that topic is outdated and something that arguably does not exist on U.S. campus soil anymore. This volume addresses not only overt attacks on critical or radical thinking, it also – following socioeconomic trends unfolding for decades – engages the broad structural determinants of academic culture. Slowly but surely, the university is being transformed from a space for free thinking, experimentation, and philosophical education in the broadest sense into a narrow, restrictive, utilitarian institution that serves the technical needs of corporations, government, science and technology, and the military. Thus, as emphasized by numerous contributors, the ultimate cause of repression is not the academy itself, but contemporary capitalist society as a whole, which strongly shapes the structure, function, and priorities of higher education. This volume shows that while universities are crucial sites of socialization in capitalist ideologies and utilitarian performance, they are not monolithic citadels or homogeneous systems of thought that grind out in assembly-line fashion each and every student into the service of capitalism. For just as universities can train tomorrow’s FBI and CIA agents, so they can breed the next generation of radicals, resisters, saboteurs, and revolutionaries.

The university is a contested political space for three reasons. First, it is home to a diversity of viewpoints, ranging from far-right to far-left, from Christian to Muslim, from white to black, Indian, or Chicano/a, from speciesist to animal liberationist, and from heterosexual to gay/lesbian. Second, despite broad and growing trends of repression, there are varying degrees of tolerance for the discussion of non-mainstream or radical ideas in classrooms and campus life. Third, however uncritical, conditioned, and conformist some students might be, they have the potential (often actualized) to discuss, debate, and think critically about issues such as US colonialism, slavery, sexism, and speciesism, and professors, staff, and students – consciously or unconsciously – cannot socialize all of them into their own worldviews and politics.

— Nocella, Best, and McLaren

About the Editors:
Anthony J. Nocella, II is completing his doctoral work at Syracuse University. He is a Visiting Scholar of SUNY Cortland’s Center for Ethics, Peace and Social Justice (CEPS) and is teaching classes in Sociology and Criminology at Le Moyne College.

Steven Best is Associate Professor of Humanities and Philosophy at the University of Texas, El Paso.

Peter McLaren is Professor of Education, Graduate School of Education and Information Studies, University of California, Los Angeles.

WHAT PEOPLE ARE SAYING ABOUT THE BOOK:

This courageous and chilling book reminds us that the Academy is always a context for intellectual exchange and political struggle. Don’t miss it! — Cornel West, Princeton University

This book takes us into the Corporate University, and it’s not a pretty sight. From firing critical thinkers to putting students in debt, the system is failing America. Time to take it back by fighting for free higher education. — Jim Hightower, populist speaker and editor of the “Hightower Lowdown”

The university should be a place of freedom not a battlefield where the military industrial complex is launching its most violent attack yet on the future of education. Nocella, Best, and McLaren shows us that education must be protected if we want peace and social justice for the world. Read now! — Cindy Sheehan, Peace Activist and Founder of “Gold Star Families for Peace”

To the litany of claims by academics that the university is a safe haven for intellectual and political dissent, this book offers a convincing counter-argument. Academic Repression is a long overdue collective study of the long and sorry history of violations of academic freedom, iconoclastic thought and political dissent in US institutions of higher education. The editors have assembled an impressive group of scholars who, often through personal experience as much as analytic acuity, have supplied us with commentary as much as documentation of the central thesis of the book. This book should be required reading in all of the social sciences, humanities and education courses. —
Stanley Aronowitz, author of “The Knowledge Factory: Dismantling the Corporate University and Creating True Higher Learning”

Absolutely and utterly indispensible as we chart a way forward and attempt to finally turn the page on an era best left in the dustbin of history. It’s a first round knock out. — Dave Zirin, author APHOS

For over half a century, matters of knowledge and education have been central to the political struggles shaping our world, and the university has been a primary battleground. This collection is a chilling and powerful survey of contemporary battles, their stakes and possibilities. We should all be scared, and we should all concerned enough to take a stand. — Dr. Lawrence Grossberg, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Using the tired canards of anti-semitism, terrorism and radicalism, rightwing zealots are carrying out a merciless campaign of ideological cleansing on American campuses, often with the shameful complicity of university administrators. Academic Repression takes you to the frontlines of this fierce battle for the mind, telling stories of
purges, institutional cowardice and resistance. Here at last is a strategic plan for how to fight back against the New McCarthyites. Read it twice and then throw the book at them. — Jeffrey St. Clair, author Born Under a Bad Sky, co-editor of CounterPunch

Freedom of speech in the academy is a cornerstone of democracy — fascism always creeps closely behind intellectual repression, and we are not immune from the virus. If you want to understand how rocky our freedoms are today, pick up this book, read it, and join the fight to end censorship in all of its imperialist forms. — Joshua Frank, co-author with Jeffrey St. Clair of the forthcoming Green Scare: The Government’s New War on Environmentalism

The powers-that-be are uncomfortable with academic freedom because when one investigates any political, social, economic or even scientific issue thoroughly, a leftwing analysis will tend to emerge. Thinking is dangerous for them. This book is full of the stories and observations of some of the greatest thinkers alive today. — David Rovics, Singer-Songwriter

The editors have drawn together a diverse and competent group of scholars to assess critically the climate of academic repression. This is an essential book for anyone with a deep concern for the future of the academy. It will help raise awareness of crucial issues that face the universities. We ignore this challenge at our peril. — Dr. Andrew Fitz-Gibbon, Director, Center for Ethics, Peace and Social Justice, SUNY Cortland

As the editors and contributors of this valuable collection make clear, American academia has long been a combat zone, and never more than today. Eternal vigilance, and constant struggle, remain the watchwords if the free expression of thought upon which a good society depends is to be realized. — Joel Kovel, author of “Overcoming Zionism: Creating a Single Democratic State in Israel/Palestine”

—————————————————

CONTRIBUTORS TO THE BOOK:

William Armaline

John Asimakopoulos

Bill Ayers

Liat Ben-Moshe

Michael Bérubé

Carl Boggs

Marc Bousquet

A. Peter Castro

Ward Churchill

Dana Cloud

Sumi E. Colligan

Maria E. Cotera

Christian Davenport

Victoria Fontan

Takis Fotopoulos

Henry Giroux

Adam Habib

Joy James

Robert Jensen

Richard Kahn

Caroline Kaltefleiter

Doug Kellner

Mark LeVine

Bill Martin

Peter McLaren

Micere M. Githae Mugo

Mechthild Nagel

Cary Nelson

Michael Parenti

Emma Perez

Mark Rupert

Rik Scarce

Deric Shannon

Stephen Sheehi

Amory Starr

Gregory Tropea

Ali Zaidi

Howard Zinn

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Wadham College

OXFORD RADICAL FORUM

http://oxfordradicalforum.wordpress.com/
http://oxfordradicalforum.net/

We are excited to announce the current programme [see below!] for the Oxford Radical Forum 2010, which will be taking place Friday – Sunday, 5 – 7 March.

Once again Wadham College will play host to a broad range of critical debates and discussions on the radical left, with leading speakers, commentars, activists and academics. As always the event is entirely FREE and we are also pleased to announce a Forum dinner on the Friday night, and an evening social on the Saturday night.

We hope to see many of you at Wadham over the course of the Forum and hope that you will join us in making this another successful and fruitful event.

Contact: oxfordradicalforum@googlemail.com

Getting to Wadham College: http://www.wadham.ox.ac.uk/images/files/wadhmaprev.pdf

“We view re-energising popular discussion and action on the left a necessity. Our belief in the need for an event in Oxford bringing together progressive politics stems both from a conviction in the continued and critical relevancy of Marxist and leftist ideas and theory and from the sad and persistent weakness of focused or organised progressive political organisation locally and nationally, despite such pressing conditions of political and economic crisis, and despite the very many who would under more favourable circumstances participate in such interventions. Therefore we are hosting again this forum which will continue to address these issues and draw in individuals from the two universities in Oxford, the city and beyond to consider critically ideas about social progress and transformation. Ultimately ORF seeks to contribute to a critical culture of left debate, theory and action, as well as to cement political and intellectual links between individuals and groups who will have a basis upon which to work in the future.”

CURRENT TIMETABLE

All venues will be around the Ho Chi Minh Quad in Wadham College. The exact room will be clearly inidcated on the day

FRI

2:30 – 3:45

:: DIRECT ACTION WORKSHOP

With the ‘Seeds For Change’ collective.

4:30 – 6:00

:: ENGLAND’S POSTIMPERIAL MELANCHOLIA

Paul Gilroy (author, There Aint no Black in the Union Jack; Anthony Giddens Prof., London School of Economics).

6:45 – 8:15

:: THE BLACK AND THE RED: MARXISM & ANARCHISM TODAY

Paul Blackledge (author, Reflections on the Marxist Theory of History; Leeds Metropolitan University); Ruth Kinna (author, William Morris: The Art of Socialism; editor, Anarchist Studies; Loughborough University).

8:30-…

:: FORUM DINNER

All Forum attendees welcome…

– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

SAT

11:00 – 12:15

:: THE MEANING OF RADICALISM AND CONSUMERISM TODAY

Kate Soper (author, The Politics and Pleasures of Consuming Differently; Londen Metropolitan University); Jeremy Gilbert (author, Anti-capitalism and Culture; University of East London).

1:15 – 2:30

:: THE COLONIAL PRESENT

Patricia Daley (author, Gender and Genocide in Burundi; Oxford University); Priyamvada Gopal (author, Literary Radicalism in India: Gender, Nationa and the Transition to Independence; Cambridge University).

3:00 – 4:15

:: DISASTER POLITICS IN HAITI AND RACE AND HUMANITARIANISM IN IMPERIAL DISCOURSE

Peter Hallward (author, Damming the Flood: Haiti, Aristide, and the Politics of Containment; Middlesex University); Richard Seymour (author, The Liberal Defense of Murder; blogs at ‘LENIN’S TOMB’).

4:45 – 6:00

:: ON IMMIGRATION AND FIGHTING FASCISM AND RACISM TODAY

Teresa Hayter (author Open Borders: The Case against Immigration Controls; Campaign to Close Campfield); speaker from Unite Against Fascism.

7:00 – 8:30

:: ONE MILLION CLIMATE JOBS – NOW!

Jonathan Neale (author, Stop Global Warming, Change the World; International Secretary, Campaign against Climate Change); former Vestas worker and occupier (TBC).

9:00 – 3:00 (a.m.!)

PERFORMANCE // SPOKEN WORD // GIG // DJs
@ “THE CELLAR”

An eclectic mixture of live music, spoken word and comedy, arts-performance, and – after midnight – serious dance music until late.

– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

SUN

11:00 – 12:15

:: ALTERNATIVE LIFESTYLES

Laurie Penny, + TBC.

1:15 – 2:30

:: MUSIC, UTOPIA AND REVOLUTION

Adam Harper (musician; dreamweaver).

3:00 – 4:15

:: MILITANT MODERNISM AND THE RUINS OF BRITISH UTOPIA

Owen Hatherly (author, Militant Modernism; architect).

4:45 – 6:00

:: INTERNATIONAL WOMENS DAY: LIBERATION NOW

Nina Power (author, One-Dimensional Woman; Roehampton University).

7:00 – 8:30

:: EUROPEAN POLITICS IN 2010

Stathis Kouvelakis (author, Philosophy and Revolution; editor, A Critical Companion to Contemporary Marxism; NPA member; Kings College London) on the current political conjuncture in France and the Nouveau Parti Anticapitaliste.

8:45 – …

DRINKS AND FAREWELLS

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Lost Generation?

LOST GENERATION?Originally from Ruth Rikowski News Updates Progression: http://ruthrikowskiupdates.blogspot.com/

Patrick Ainley, a friend and writing colleague of ours, has a new book coming out which he has co-written with Martin Allen. Here are the details:

Lost Generation? New Strategies for Youth and Education’ by Martin Allen and Patrick Ainley, Continuum: London, 2010
ISBN 9781441134707 (pbk)
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Lost-Generation-Strategies-Youth-Education/dp/1441134700/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1267391315&sr=8-1

The book looks at what has gone wrong in schools, colleges and universities and how this relates to the changing relationship between young people and educational qualifications. It goes right through from primary schools to postgraduate schools. Ainley and Allen argue that a new pedagogy is needed, along with a new educational politics, which will bring students and teachers together in new concepts of education and democracy.

Wes Streeting, President of National Union of Students says that the book is:
“A thought-provoking critique of the education system at a critical time for Britain’s “lost generation” of young people.”

To place an order, email orders@continuumbooks.com

This book builds on and develops Martin Allen and Patrick Ainley’s previous publication, which is:

‘Education Make You Fick, Innit?: What’s Gone Wrong with England’s Schools, Colleges and Universities and How to Start Putting it Right’, Tufnell Press: London, 2007. ISBN: 1872767672; 978-1872767673
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Education-Make-You-Fick-Innit/dp/1872767672/ref=sr_1_fkmr0_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1267435143&sr=8-2-fkmr0

I think that what this book is about is fairly self-evident from the title!

Ruth Rikowski

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Social Class

HOW CLASS WORKS: 2010 CONFERENCE UPDATE

Dear Friends and Colleagues 

I am happy to report that the full schedule for the How Class Works – 2010 conference is now posted at 

http://www.stonybrook.edu/workingclass/conference/2010/ 

together with registration and housing information.  The conference will be at SUNY Stony Brook June 3-5, 2010. 

The conference includes over 200 presentations exploring the many ways in which class dynamics shape our social, cultural, and political experiences.  It brings together graduate students and senior scholars, labor and community organizers and activists, to extend the knowledge and community of working class studies. 

Presenters are coming from Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Canada, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Iran, New Zealand, Portugal, Nigeria, South Africa, Sweden, Turkey, the UK, and the US.   

The opening plenary session will feature Larry Cohen, international president of Communications Workers of America: “Economic Crisis, Political Paralysis:  What’s the Working Class to Do?” Thursday June 3 at 7 p.m.  Other plenary sessions will address right wing populism, charter schools, and contingent academic labor. 

I invite you to check out the program and register for the conference.  Limited financial aid is available.  I hope to welcome you to Stony Brook in June. 

with best wishes 

Michael 

Michael Zweig 
Director, Center for Study of Working Class Life 
Department of Economics 
State University of New York 
Stony Brook, NY 11794-4384 
631.632.7536 
michael.zweig@stonybrook.edu 
http://www.workingclass.sunysb.edu

Original post here: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/2009/05/03/how-class-works-2010/

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Daniel Singer

THE DANIEL SINGER PRIZE

The Daniel Singer Millennium Prize Foundation congratulates Salvador Aguilar Solé, author of Socialism in the 21st Century World:  What to Learn from Failed Past Experiences, which won the 2009 Singer Prize. The $2,500 annual prize is a tribute to the outstanding writer, lecturer and thinker, who died in December 2000.

The Singer Foundation invites submissions to its 2010 competition. The prize will be awarded for an original essay of not more than 5,000 words, which explores the question:  “Given the devastating effects of the present crisis on working people, what proposals for radical reform can be raised which are both practical to the vast majority while moving us towards the goal of socialism” Essays may be submitted in English, Spanish or French.

The essays will be judged by an international panel of distinguished scholars and activists, and the winner will be announced in December 2010.

Essays can be sent either by post or e-mail to:  The Daniel Singer Millennium Prize Foundation, PO Box 2371, El Cerrito, CA 94530 USA; danielsingerfdn@gmail.com

Submissions must be received by July 31, 2010

Daniel Singer web site: http://www.danielsinger.org/

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Community

THE ECSTACY OF COMMUNITY AND THE FORECLOSURE OF THE POLITICAL FIELD

Dr Margret Grebowicz

Date: Wednesday 17th March

Time: 4pm – 5.30pm

Venue: Birt Acres Lecture Theatre, Bute Building

Host: JOMEC, Cardiff University

Contact: Paul Bowman, BowmanP@cf.ac.uk

Feminist critiques—and defences—of pornography have been around for decades.  But how does the advent of porn as an internet phenomenon change the way we think of the relationships between speech, freedom, and sex? Engaging with Baudrillard and Butler, I argue that cyberporn has important consequences for political ontology in general, which should reorient critics of pornography to focus on questions of community, sexual/political intelligibility, and the conditions of the possibility of social change.

Dr Margret Grebowicz (Goucher College, Baltimore) is spending 2009-10 as a Researcher at The University of Dundee. She is interested in social and political philosophy through a continental lens, with particular emphasis on gender and the production of knowledge and culture.  She is editor of Sci-Fi in the Mind’s Eye: Reading Science through Science Fiction (2007) and Gender After Lyotard (2007). Her most recent projects concern internet pornography, radical democratic theory, and animal studies—sometimes even in conjunction.  She is currently working on two books: one on Donna Haraway’s later work, and the other, a short book on internet pornography and American democracy. 

ALL WELCOME

Dr Paul Bowman

JOMEC, Cardiff University

http://cardiff.academia.edu/PaulBowman

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Radical Politics

SERIES ON COMMU(O)NISM: OPEN PROCESS, THE ORGANIZATIONAL SPIRIT OF THE INTERNET MODEL

Abstract: The desires and the sources of emancipatory potential of the commons for the cooperative and egalitarian global togetherness, for a new communism born through the new generation of tools and organizational practices, have temporarily been appropriated and hi-jacked by capitalism under the Open Source and to an extent Creative Commons movements. Through and with the Open Process methods of the founding Internet communities, we can make a significant step towards claiming it back. Commu(o)nism, we could call it, is a new emerging form of communism hacked with open process and new commons. The small (o) in the middle stands for open.

Tuesday 16th March, 14-16.00hrs
Room WB117 (Whitehead building, opposite Ian Gulland)
Goldsmiths College, University of London

Gabriella Coleman

”Old and New Net Wars over Free Speech, Freedom and Secrecy, or How to Understand the Hacker and Lulz battle against the Church of Scientology”

Abstract: Why have geeks been compelled to protest the Church of Scientology vehemently for nearly two decades? This talk starts with this question to present a cultural history and political analysis of one of the oldest Internet wars, often referred to as “Internet vs Scientology.” During the 1990s, this war was waged largely on USENET (a large scale messaging board system), while in recent times it has taken the form of “Project Chanology.” This project is orchestrated by a loosely defined group called “Anonymous” who has led a series of online attacks and real world protests, often using a variety of media, against Scientology. I argue that to understand the significance of these battles and protests, we must examine how the two groups stand in a culturally antipodal relation to each other. Through this analysis of cultural inversion, I will consider how long-standing liberal ideals take cultural root in the context of these battles, use these two cases to reveal important political transformations in Internet/hacker culture between the mid 1990s and today and finally will map the tension between pleasure/freedom (the “lulz”) and moral good (“free speech”) found among Anonymous in terms of the tension between liberal freedom and romantic-Nietzschean freedom/pleasure.

Bios:

Gabriella Coleman

Trained as a Cultural Anthropologist, Gabriella Coleman is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Media, Culture and Communication at NYU. She researches and teaches on the politics of digital media with a focus on various genealogies of hacking, including Free and Open Source Software, the hacker ungrounded , phone phreaking, trolling, and cryptography/encryption. Between 2001-2003 she conducted ethnographic research on computer hackers primarily in San Francisco and the Netherlands, as well as on the largest free software project, Debian. She is completing a book manuscript “Coding Freedom: Hacker Pleasure and the Ethics of Free and Open Source Software” and is starting a new project on peer to peer patient activism on the Internet.

Toni Prug

Toni Prug is currently a PhD student at the School of Business and Management at Queen Mary College, University of London. With ten years of software and network engineering and hacking behind him, he is working on organizational forms, hacking existing practices, ideologies and state-forms. Along with working with academic journals on implementing aspects of open process cooperation, he is working on a book, “The Objects of Communism”. His work can be followed at http://hackthestate.org/.

Centre for Cultural Studies, Goldsmiths, University of London: http://www.gold.ac.uk/cultural-studies/

Location: http://www.gold.ac.uk/find-us/

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski