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Monthly Archives: January 2010

Jacques Ranciere

THE EMANCIPATED SPECTATOR – JACQUES RANCIERE

NEW TITLE: THE EMANCIPATED SPECTATOR

JACQUES RANCIÈRE

Published 25 January 2010

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“Ranciere’s writings offer one of the few conceptualizations of how we are to continue to resist.”  Slavoj Zizek

“Ranciere is an heir to Foucault.”  Alain Badiou

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AUTHOR EVENTS IN LONDON:

3rd February 2010: ICA / Jacques Ranciere in conversation with Kodwo Eshun, Otolith Group / For more details and to book click here:: http://www.ica.org.uk/The%20Image%20in%20Question+23536.twl

4th February 2010: Whitechapel Gallery / Big Ideas: Jacques Ranciere in conversation with Adrian Rifkin and Andrea Phillips / For more details and to book click here: http://www.whitechapelgallery.org/shop/product/category_id/22/product_id/437?session_id=126278107878a96fc6fd05d128adaed940ce9e71eb1

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“Every spectator is already an actor in her story; every actor, every man of action, is the spectator of the same story.”

A ‘68er whose radical ardour remains undimmed, Jacques Ranciere is one of the most influential and compelling thinkers of our age in France since Foucault and Deleuze, lauded by both art theorists and artists.

Now this leading theorist of the art world returns with the follow-up to his acclaimed manifesto for contemporary art and film, THE FUTURE OF THE IMAGE which located art firmly in relation to politics.

Theorists of art and film commonly depict the modern audience as passive consumers. In response, both artists and thinkers have sought to transform the viewer of art or the spectator into someone involved in the drama before them – seeking to ‘emancipate’ the spectator and make them politically active.

For example, the influential curator of the Tate Britain’s recent exhibition ‘Altermodern’, Nicholas Bourriaud, has championed the notion of a more socially engaged art, where the public are encouraged to participate in an event or artwork. We have seen the influence of such ideas in such projects as Antony Gormley’s ‘One & Other’ that took place on the fourth plinth in Trafalgar Square.

Ranciere turns these ideas over and argues that “Being a spectator is not some passive condition that we should transform into activity. It is our normal situation.” For Ranciere, there is no privileged starting point in art but we should reassess the relations between seeing, doing, speaking: emancipation means blurring these boundaries.

Looking over the tradition of critical art and what the desire to insert art into life has achieved, Ranciere asks, ‘has the militant critique of the consumption of images and commodities has become, ironically, a sad confirmation of its omnipotence?’

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Praise for Jacques Ranciere

“His art lies in the rigor of his argument – its careful, precise unfolding – and at the same time not treating his reader, whether university professor or unemployed actress, as an imbecile.” Kristin Ross

“It’s clear that Jacques Ranciere is relighting the flame that was extinguished for many—that is why he serves as such a signal reference today.” Thomas Hirschhorn

“In the face of impossible attempts to proceed with progressive ideas within the terms of postmodernist discourse, Ranciere shows a way out of the malaise.” Liam Gillick

Praise for HATRED OF DEMOCRACY

“A piercing essay on the definitions and redefinitions of the term “democracy” … the present catastrophe in Iraq provides more than ample proof of Ranciere’s bold assertion that we need to rethink the relationship between democracy and power before setting in motion any more wars in the name of “freedom”.” Times Higher Educational Supplement

“This tastily sardonic essay is partly a scholarly sprint through the history of political philosophy, and partly a very enjoyable stream of insults directed at rival penseurs.” The Guardian

“Ranciere critiques the political stance in the west that pours scorn on mass protests and popular culture at home, yet promotes the spread of democracy by force throughout the world. … But Ranciere eschews polemic in order to show the confusion in our political discourse. He challenges what he sees as the widely held view that democratic life is synonymous with “the apolitical life of the indifferent consumer”.” New Statesman

Praise for THE FUTURE OF THE IMAGE

“A series of gratifyingly knotty and close discussions of 19th- and 20th-century literature, film and painting” The Guardian

“French philosopher Jacques Ranciere is a refreshing read for anyone concerned with what art has to do with politics and society.” J.J. Charlesworth, Art Review

“What we see here is Ranciere developing a unique voice as a political theorist.” Bookforum

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Jacques Ranciere is Emeritus Professor of Philosophy at the University of Paris-VIII.  His books include THE FUTURE OF THE IMAGE, HATRED OF DEMOCRACY, and ON THE SHORES OF POLITICS (all from Verso), THE POLITICS OF AESTHETICS, DISAGREEMENT, THE PHILOSOPHER AND HIS POOR, THE IGNORANT SCHOOLMASTER,SHORT VOYWAGES TO THE LAND OF THE PEOPLE and NIGHTS OF LABOR.

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The Emancipated Spectator Author: Jacques Ranciere / 25 January 2010 / 
Hardback /
978 1 84467 343 8 /£12.99 / $23.95/144 pages / Hardback

For more information visit http://www.versobooks.com/books/nopqrs/r-titles/ranciere_j_emancipated_spectator.shtml

To buy the book in the U.K:
http://www.bookdepository.co.uk/book/9781844673438/The-Emancipated-Spectator
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Emancipated-Spectator-Jacques-Ranci%C3%A8re/dp/184467343X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1264006364&sr=8-1

To buy the book in the U.S:
http://www.amazon.com/Emancipated-Spectator-Jacques-Ranci%C3%A8re/dp/184467343X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1264000587&sr=8-

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ALSO OUT NOW:

New in Paperback

HATRED OF DEMOCRACY

Published 7 December 2009

978-1-84467-386-5 / Paperback /$16.95 /£8.99 / 112 pages

In his new book, Jacques Ranciere examines how the West can no longer simply extol the virtues of democracy by contrasting it with the horrors of totalitarianism. As certain governments are exporting democracy by brute force, and a reactionary strand in mainstream political opinion is willing to abandon civil liberties and destroy collective values of equality, Ranciere explains how democracy—government by all—is the principle that de-legitimates any form of power based on the superiority of those who govern. Hence the fear, and consequently the hatred, of democracy amongst the new powers that be.  HATRED OF DEMOCRACY rediscovers the ever-new and subversive power of the democratic idea.

To buy the book in the U.K:
http://www.bookdepository.co.uk/book/9781844673865/Hatred-of-Democracy
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Hatred-Democracy-Jacques-Ranci%C3%A8re/dp/1844673863/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1264006391&sr=1-2

To buy the book in the U.S:
http://www.amazon.com/Hatred-Democracy-Jacques-Ranci%C3%A8re/dp/1844673863/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1264000236&sr=8-1

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THE FUTURE OF THE IMAGE

Published 23 February 2009

978-1-84467-297-4 / Paperback /$16.95 /£9.99 /152 pages

The leading theorist of the art-world – the adjective ‘Rancierian’ is already in use –returns with his bestselling manifesto on the relationship between art and politics, now in paperback.

To buy the book in the U.K.:
http://www.bookdepository.co.uk/book/9781844672974/The-Future-of-the-Image  
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Future-Image-Jacques-Ranciere/dp/1844672972/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1264006443&sr=1-1

To buy the book in the U.S:
http://www.amazon.com/Future-Image-2009-paperback/dp/1844672972/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1264000279&sr=1-1

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Cultural Marxism *

MARXISM IN CULTURE: PROGRAMME FOR SPRING TERM 2010

Friday 22 January
Discussion of the film Venezuela from Below
Gail Day (University of Leeds)

Friday 12 Febuary
Marxism and Cosmopolitanism
Gilbert Achcar (School of Oriental & African Studies)

Friday 5 March
Advertising and the Politics of Aesthetics
Michael Sayeau (University College London)

Friday 26 March
Shaftesbury’s Theory of Art: Substance and Identity
Richard Checketts (Royal College of Art)

All seminars start at 5.30pm, and are held in the Wolfson Room (unless otherwise indicated) at the Institute of Historical Research in Senate House, Malet Street, London. The seminar closes at 7.30pm and retires to the bar.

Organisers: Matthew Beaumont, Warren Carter, Gail Day, Steve Edwards, Maggie Gray, Owen Hatherley, Andrew Hemingway, Esther Leslie, David Mabb, Antigoni Memou, Nina Power, Pete Smith, & Alberto Toscano.

For further information, contact Andrew Hemingway, at: a.hemingway@ucl.ac.uk or Esther Leslie at: e.leslie@bbk.ac.uk

* Image from The Spearhead, article on The Menace of Cultural Marxism http://www.the-spearhead.com/2009/10/16/the-menace-of-cultural-marxism/

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Global Capitalism

GLOBALIZED CAPITAL: SUBJECTS, SPACES, AND CRITICAL RESPONSES

Call for Papers

17th Annual DePaul University
Philosophy Graduate Student Conference

EXTENDED SUBMISSION DEADLINE: January 29, 2010

Globalized Capital: Subjects, Spaces, and Critical Responses
April 9th & 10th, 2010

Keynote Speaker: Bruno Bosteels
Department of Romance Languages, Cornell University

Questioning capitalism is no easy enterprise. Discourses interrogating capitalism have mirrored the trajectory of capitalism itself, proliferating in a variety of directions and spawning new conceptual and historical problems with each new decade of confrontation. This conference aims to open up a space of convergence and dialogue for disparate trajectories of critical reflection and practical response. Its title aims to emphasize not only capitalism’s global character—its relentless expansion beyond various geographical, cultural, and political “limits”—but at the same time its particularized and often discontinuous local effects—the subjects, practices, and increasingly micro-managed spaces it carves out en route.

We would like to solicit papers dealing with a broad range of topics including, but not limited to:

* Legacies and Boundaries of Expansion: Inside, outside, and beyond the capitalist Nation-State

* Alterity, subalternity, and critiques from the margins.

* Postcolonialism, decolonization, and anti-colonial resistance.

* The metropolis and the collapse of the city/countryside dialectic. Historical and conceptual origins of capitalist economic thought

* Collectivities and Communes in Resistance: Communism

* From parties to groups, from crowds to constituent power

* Capitalism and Internationalism

* Partisanship and/or universalism

* Spaces of work and labors of thought: “immaterial labor,” intellectual culture, and the marketplace of ideas

* Subjects, Selfhood and Culture: Entrepreneurialist cultures of selfhood

* Consumerist ethics and the conscience market

* Neo-archaisms: the role of tradition and faith under capitalism

* Counter-conducts, indocility, and strategies for “de-individualizing” and “decapitalizing” the self

* Images, Representations, and Symbols: Ideology and “ideology critique”

* Narratives and mythologies of capitalism in cinema, art, architecture, and literature

* The semiotics of capital

* Power and Neoliberal Governmentality: Biopower and biopolitical economy

* Marxist critique in a paradigm of perpetual crisis management

* “Total Governance”: from managerial rationalities to the management of life itself

* Counter-insurgency, preventative war, and the securitization of liberty.

Authors should email their submissions to depaulgraduatestudents@gmail.com  
Papers should not exceed 3000 words and should contain a short abstract. As all papers are subject to anonymous review, papers should not include your name or any other identifying marks. Your paper title and personal information (name, institutional affiliation, and phone contact) should be included in the body of the email. For further information and updates on the conference, if you have any questions or problems regarding submissions, or in the event that you do not receive a confirmation email, please contact Neal Miller at zzerohourr@gmail.com

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Daniel Bensaid

DANIEL BENSAID – MEMORIAL MEETINGS

Activist-academics Gilbert Achcar, Stathis Kouvelakis and Alex Callinicos are among the speakers invited to address the memorial meeting for Daniel Bensaïd. The gathering on Tuesday 9 February will celebrate the life of France’s most famous Marxist intellectual, who played a global role in leading the Fourth International and influencing a wide range of other Marxists. The meeting will start at 7.30pm in the University of London Union on Malet Street, WC1H.

For more information about the memorial meetings, or to send messages to them, please email bensaid.memorial@ecosocialism.org

Paris meeting: Tribute in the Mutalité in Paris on Sunday 24th January from 2.30pm to 6pm.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Taiwan

Taiwan Journal of Sociology of Education

Vol. 9 No. 2, December 2009

Contents

Research Papers

The Model for the Transformation of Teacher Role: A Process with the Teacher Agency as a Pivot, Ding-Ying Guo (pp.1-36)

A Study on the Primary School Teachers Perception on Their Social Status and Professional Identity: A Case Study of Central Taiwan, Yen-Chao Huang, Fwu-Yuan Weng (pp.37-78)

Disentangle the Effects of Family Structure on Kids Dropping out of School: A Meta-Analytical Study, Simon Chang, Hung-Yu Lin (pp.79-113)

College Students’ Attitudes Toward LGBT Issues: An Investigation at a University of Education, Te-Sheng Chang, Tsai-Wei Wang (pp.115-150)

Taiwan Association for the Sociology of Education

Website: http://140.133.8.162/social/English/html/engindex.html

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Susan George

BREAKING OUT FROM CRISIS INTO A GREEN AND JUST WORLD

Susan George

‘THE GLOBALISATION LECTURES’
Organised by the Department of Development Studies, School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London
Convenor: Prof. Gilbert Achcar, 2009-2010

Wednesday 20 January, 6:30pm
SOAS, Brunei Gallery Lecture Theatre

Dr. Susan George is an internationally known scholar-activist and “alter-globalist”; the author of a dozen widely translated books; honorary president of ATTAC-France, an organisation that campaigns for international taxation and other alternatives to neoliberal globalisation. She is Board President of the Transnational Institute (TNI), an international fellowship of scholar-activists with headquarters in Amsterdam that carries out cutting-edge analysis on critical global issues, builds alliances with grassroots social movements and develops proposals for a more sustainable and just world.

Webpage: http://www.tni.org/users/susan-george

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Daniel Bensaid

DANIEL BENSAID – OBITUARY

Daniel Bensaïd obituary
French philosopher and leading figure in the events of 1968
   
By Tariq Ali

The Guardian, 14th January 2010

Online at: http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2010/jan/14/daniel-bensaid-obituary

The French philosopher Daniel Bensaïd, who has died aged 63 of cancer, was one of the most gifted Marxist intellectuals of his generation. In 1968, together with Daniel Cohn-Bendit, he helped to form the Mouvement du 22 Mars (the 22 March Movement), the organisation that helped to detonate the uprising that shook France in May and June of that year. Bensaïd was at his best explaining ideas to large crowds of students and workers. He could hold an audience spellbound, as I witnessed in his native Toulouse in 1969, when we shared a platform at a rally of 10,000 people to support Alain Krivine, one of the leaders of the uprising, in his presidential campaign, standing for the Ligue Communiste Révolutionnaire (LCR).

Bensaïd’s penetrating analysis was never presented in a patronising way, whatever the composition of the audience. His ideas derived from classical Marxism – Marx, Lenin, Trotsky, Rosa Luxemburg, as was typical in those days – but his way of looking at and presenting them was his own. His philosophical and political writings have a lyrical ring – at particularly tedious central committee meetings, he could often be seen immersed in Proust – and resist easy translation into English.

As a leader of the LCR and the Fourth International, to which it was affiliated, Bensaïd travelled a great deal to South America, especially Brazil, and played an important part in helping to organise the Workers Party (PT) currently in power there under President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva. An imprudent sexual encounter shortened Bensaïd’s life. He contracted Aids and, for the last 16 years, was dependent on the drugs that kept him going, with fatal side-effects: a cancer that finally killed him.

Physically, he became a shadow of his former self, but the intellect was not affected and he produced more than a dozen books on politics and philosophy. He wrote of his Jewishness and that of many other comrades and how this had never led him, or most of them, to follow the path of a blind and unthinking Zionism. He disliked identity politics and his last two books – Fragments Mécréants (An Unbeliever’s Discourse, 2005) and Eloge de la Politique Profane (In Praise of Secular Politics, 2008) – explained how this had become a substitute for serious critical thought.

He was France’s leading Marxist public intellectual, much in demand on talkshows and writing essays and reviews in Le Monde and Libération. At a time when a large section of the French intelligentsia had shifted its terrain and embraced neoliberalism, Bensaïd remained steadfast, but without a trace of dogma. Even in the 1960s he had avoided leftwing cliches and thought creatively, often questioning the verities of the far left.

He was schooled at the lycées Bellevue and Fermat in Toulouse, but the formative influence was that of his parents and their milieu. His father, Haim Bensaïd, was a Sephardic Jew from a poor family in Algeria and moved from Mascara to Oran, where he got a job as a waiter in a cafe, but soon discovered his real vocation. He trained as a boxer, becoming the welterweight champion of north Africa.

Daniel’s mother, Marthe Starck, was a strong and energetic Frenchwoman from a working-class family in Blois, central France. At 18 she moved to Oran. She met the boxer and fell in love. The French colons were shocked and tried hard to persuade her not to marry a Jew. She was bound to get VD and have abnormal children, they said.

With France occupied by the Germans and a bulk of the country’s elite in collaborationist mode with its capital at Vichy, the French colonial administration fell into line. As a Jew, Daniel’s father was arrested, but he managed to escape from the PoW camp, and rashly decided to go to Toulouse, where Marthe helped him obtain false papers. Armed with a new identity, he bought a bistro, Le Bar des Amis. Unlike his two brothers, who were killed during the occupation, he survived, thanks largely to his wife, who had an official Vichy certificate stating her “non-membership of the Jewish race”.

In his affecting memoir, Une Lente Impatience (2004), Daniel noted that these barbarities had taken place on French soil only a few decades prior to 1968. Le Bar des Amis, he wrote, was a cosmopolitan location frequented by Spanish refugees, Italian antifascists, former resistance fighters and a variety of workers, with the local Communist party branch holding its meetings there too. Given his mother’s fierce republican and Jacobin views (when a relative, after a French television programme on the British monarchy, expressed doubts about the guillotining of Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette, Marthe did not speak to her for 10 years), it would have been odd if young Bensaïd had become a monarchist.

Angered by the massacre of Algerians at the Métro Charonne in 1961 (ordered by Maurice Papon, chief of police and a former Nazi collaborator), he joined the Union of Communist Students, but soon became irritated by party orthodoxy and joined a left opposition within the union organised by Henri Weber (currently a Socialist party senator in the upper house) and Alain Krivine. The Cuban revolution and Che Guevara’s odyssey did the rest. The dissidents were expelled from the party in 1966.

That same year, Bensaïd was admitted to the Ecole Normale Supérieure in Saint-Cloud and moved to Paris. Here he helped found the Jeunesse Communiste Révolutionnaire (JCR), young dissidents inspired by Guevara and Trotsky, which later morphed into the LCR.

The last time I met him, a few years ago, in his favourite cafe in Paris’s Latin Quarter, he was in full flow. The disease had not sapped his will to live or to think. Politics was his lifeblood. We talked about social unrest in France and whether it would be enough to bring about serious change. He shrugged his shoulders. “Perhaps not in our lifetimes, but we carry on fighting. What else is there to do?”

Daniel Bensaïd, philosopher, born 25 March 1946; died 12 January 2010

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The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Civilisation

UNIVERSAL HISTORY

Anthropologies of The Present
Susan Buck-Morss: Universal History

Tuesday 19 January 18.30 ˆ 20.00
Tate Britain, Clore Auditorium

Tracing the sources of globalisation without the boundaries of nation or civilisation resurrects the project of universal history on new ground. In this talk Susan Buck-Morss argues it is to be excavated not across collective boundaries, but without them. The richest finds are on the edge of culture.

Susan Buck-Morss is Professor of Political Philosophy and Social Theory in the Department of Government at Cornell University, New York

Her latest book is Hegel, Haiti and Universal History (2009).

Book now
Tickets £8 (£6 concessions)
Price includes drinks afterwards

To book visit http://www.tate.org.uk/tickets
or call 020 7887 8888

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rosa Luxembourg

ROSA LUXEMBOURG’S POLITICAL ECONOMY

CALL FOR PAPERS

Rosa Luxemburg’s Political Economy: Contributions to Contemporary Political Theory and Practice

A Special Issue of Socialist Studies: Journal of the Society for Socialist Studies

Fall 2010

Since her assassination, Rosa Luxemburg has been treated as an icon while her political and theoretical work is largely forgotten, neglected, or rejected. Recently, though, David Harvey used her ideas on capitalist expansion to explain the new imperialism. Other elements of her work are promising for socialist studies and the left, today. Her analysis of mass strikes in Russia in 1905, for example, may cast new light on workers’ struggles in China. Luxemburg’s critical discussion of nations’ right to self-determination inform, or ought to inform, contemporary Latin American struggles against imperialist domination. Her writings on mass strikes, parties and trade unions, like her better-known writings on ‘social reform or revolution’, offer insights into the role of (weakly) organized labour in political change. Although Luxemburg didn’t engage much with women’s issues directly, her work and its reception nonetheless have an important gender dimension. In particular, feminist women scholars have been quicker to recognize Luxemburg’s contributions to socialist political economy than their male colleagues.

This call invites articles on Luxemburg’s political economy, assessing her contributions to socialist debates in light of current political challenges. Papers may consider the implications of her work for contemporary anti-imperialist struggle, the dynamics of worker organization and progressive political change, and feminist scholarship within the left, or any other topic concerning Luxemburg’s theoretical and political contributions to socialist political economy and political struggle.  In keeping with the Socialist Studies mandate, perspectives from all disciplines are welcome.

Deadline: May 30, 2010. Please see: http://www.socialiststudies.com for information about submissions (word count, format, etc.).

Contact Ingo Schmidt: ingos@athabascau.ca, special issue coordinator

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

A Crisis of Capital

THE ECONOMIC CRISIS READER

The Economic Crisis Reader
Edition:1st
Date of publication: November 2009
ISBN:978-1-878585-85-1
Pages:301
Price:$34.95
http://www.dollarsandsense.org/bookstore/crisis_toc.html

    • Introduction
    • 1. General Explanations
        • 1.1    Inequality, Power, and Ideology Arthur MacEwan
        • 1.3    Recession, Depression, Repression: What’s in a Name? John Miller
        • 1.3    That ’70s Crisis Alejandro Reuss
        • 1.4    Crisis and Neoliberal Capitalism David Kotz
        • 1.5    Capitalism Hits the Fan Richard D. Wolff
        • 1.6    We’re All Minskyites Now Robert Pollin
        • 1.7 The “Credit Tsunami” Steve Keen
        • 1.8 Profits, the Business Cycle, and the Current Crisis Paul Mattick
        • 1.9    The Greed Fallacy Arthur MacEwan
    • 2. Warning Signs
        • 2.1 Bubble Trouble Dean Baker
        • 2.2 A House of Cards Tamara Draut and Adria Scharf
        • 2.3    (Mis)Understanding a Banking Industry in Transition William K. Black
        • 2.4    America’s Growing Fringe Economy Howard Karger
        • 2.5    Financialization: A Primer Ramaa Vasudevan
        • 2.6    Private Equity Exposed Orlando Segura, Jr.
        • 2.7    Hedge Funds Arthur MacEwan
        • 2.8    The Fed and America’s Distorted Expansion Thomas I. Palley
        • 2.9    Who Cares If Bear Stearns Fails? Arthur MacEwan
        • 2.10 Can the Fed Handle a Systemic Crisis? Maybe.Jane D’Arista
    • 3. The Housing Crisis
        • 3.1    The Homeownership Myth Howard Karger
        • 3.2    Confidence Trick John Miller
        • 3.3    Renters in the Crosshairs Daniel Fireside
        • 3.4    How to Stop the Foreclosures? Fred Moseley
        • 3.5    The Fannie/Freddie Bailout Fred Moseley
        • 3.6    Who Gets Those Trillions? Arthur MacEwan
    • 4. The Financial Crisis
        • 4.1    From Tulips to Mortgage-Backed Securities Gerald Friedman
        • 4.2    Ponzi Schemes and Speculative Bubbles Arthur MacEwan
        • 4.3    Derivatives and Deregulation Marty Wolfson
        • 4.4    Dealing with a Rotten Tooth Arthur MacEwan
        • 4.5    Time for Permanent Nationalization! Fred Moseley
        • 4.6    Trust Your Gut William Greider
    • 5. Monetary Policy
        • 5.1    Pushing on Strings Gerald Friedman
        • 5.2    Bernanke’s Bad Teachers Gerald Friedman
        • 5.3    The Bailouts Revisited Marty Wolfson
        • 5.4    Focus on the Fed William Greider
        • 5.5    Keynes and the Limits of Monetary Policy Alejandro Reuss
    • 6. Fiscal Policy
        • 6.1 Stimulus Whining John Miller
        • 6.2    How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Deficit John Miller
        • 6.3    Responding to Revisionism Gerald Friedman
        • 6.4    Fiscal Policy and “Crowding Out” Alejandro Reuss
        • 6.5    Why Are Things Getting Worse and worse? Arthur MacEwan
        • 6.6    The Economic Crisis in the Sates Gerald Friedman
        • 6.7    State Budget Blues Marianne Hill
        • 6.8    Bail Out the Safety Net Randy Albelda
        • 6.9    Saving Energy Creates Jobs Heidi Garrett-Peltier
        • 6.10 A New WPA? Ryan A. Dodd
        • 6.11 Rebuilding the Auto Industry from the Wheels Up Alejandro Reuss
    • 7. The International crisis
        • 7.1    Putting the “Global” in the Global Economic Crisis Smriti Rao
        • 7.2    (Economic) Freedom’s Just Another Word for…Crisis-Prone John Miller
        • 7.3    The Specter of Capital Flight Marie Duggan
        • 7.4    Tax Havens and the Financial Crisis Rachel Keeler
        • 7.5    Beyond the World Creditors’ Cartel Dariush Sokolov
        • 7.6 No Bailout for AIDS Mara Kardas-Nelson
        • 7.7 Beijing Statement on the Global Economic Crisis
        • 7.8 Caracas Statement on the Global Economic Crisis

    • 8. Workers and the Crisis
        • 8.1    The Global Crisis and the World Labor Movement Dan LaBotz
        • 8.2    The Real Audacity of Hope Kari Lyderson and James Tracy
        • 8.3    Corporate America’s Counter-Stimulus Strategy Roger Bybee
        • 8.4    Worker Direct Action Grows in Wake of Financial Meltdown Immanuel Ness and Stacy Warner Maddern
        • 8.5    Gender and the Recession Heather Boushey
        • 8.6    The Real Unemployment Rate Hits a 68-Year High John Miller
        • 8.7    Unemployment Insurance: A Broken System Marianne Hill
        • 8.7    Should We Be Talking About Living Wages Now? Jeannette Wicks-Lim
    • Contributors

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Mountain Walk

CAPITALISM, CLASS AND CLIMATE CHANGE

International Socialism journal seminar: Gareth Dale and Jonathan Neale on Capitalism, Class and Climate Change

Gareth Dale, author of “Corporations and climate change” and several books on East Germany, and Jonathan Neale, author of Stop Global Warming: Change the World and secretary of the Campaign against Climate Change (pc), present the latest in our series of seminars.

In the wake of the fiasco at Copenhagen, Gareth and Jonathan will be presenting an in-depth discussion of climate change, ranging from the science behind it through to the role of the working class in preventing it. This seminar will be of real benefit to all those concerned about climate change, whether new to the subject or a longstanding campaigner.

7pm, Monday 25 January, King’s College Waterloo Campus: (F-WB Classroom 2.40, 2nd floor of the Franlkin-Wilking building) Map: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/about/campuses/waterloo.html

This seminar is free to attend and open to all. For more information phone 020 7819 1177 or email isj@swp.org.uk

As background for the discussion, you may want to read:

Gareth’s article from International Socialism 116, available online: http://www.isj.org.uk/?id=369

Jonathan’s recent articles on Copenhagen (http://www.swp.org.uk/23/12/2009/copenhagen-betrayal-jonathan-neale and http://www.swp.org.uk/23/12/2009/copenhagen-new-movement-jonathan-neale)

Jonathan’s book is available from Bookmarks for the reduced price of £10: http://www.bookmarksbookshop.co.uk/cgi/store/bookmark.cgi?review=new&isbn=9781905192373&cart_id=9137614.28572

International Socialism: http://www.isj.org.uk +44 (0)20 7819 1177

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Victor

COLD HANDS & QUARTER MOON

 
Introduced by Victor Rikowski
 
The band members:

Victor Rikowski – Guitar & Vocals

Alex Lowther-Harris – Guitar, Banjo, Accordion & Vocals

Louie Ashton-Butler – Vocals

Nicholas Frost – Violin

Jack Rennie – Bass Guitar

William J Roberts – Hand Percussion

In the autumn of 2008, Aaron Ledbury suggested to me that some kind of jam should take place between two musicians; namely, him and me. I knew he played the ukulele and he knew that I played the guitar and bass. A month or two later, Alex Lowther-Harris, who was a banjo, guitar & synthesiser extraordinaire, joined us. We began to do some general jamming, with me on the bass, Alex on banjo and Aaron on ukulele. It was around winter 2008/spring 2009 that we began to make it a regular thing. Sunday was our compulsory weekly jam. For the rest of the year we were trying to figure out what our band/music was about and what we wanted to get out of the whole thing. We recorded quite a few of our jam sessions on Dictaphone. We were working on a big repertoire of songs; songs without lyrics in a band without a singer. Most of the songs were a bunch of chords which Aaron would jam/improvise over occasionally, with Alex and me occasionally having our own time in the spotlight. In one song I played flute and Aaron played harmonica and Alex played guitar. We often swapped, switched and sometimes even modified our instruments. Our style was a kind-of bluegrass, jamming and, predominantly, blues style. But without any singer, lyrics or main melody for all of our songs we were stuck for where to go next. But we didn’t really care. We enjoyed playing music and having fun with it. Alex and Aaron wrote the songs/chords together and I wrote the baselines along with their ideas.

Late at night one day the three of us went down to the beach on the Menai Straight between Bangor and Anglesey. It was a stone beach with huge boulders and calm water. It was very dark and very cold but it was also very beautiful. We played for about half an hour before complaining about how cold our hands were. We carried on playing nonetheless. We then noticed that the moon was quarter full. It was in memory of that magical night that the band then became Cold Hands & Quarter Moon.

The academic year came to a close. Over the summer holidays I began writing songs again. I hadn’t written a song in years and it was nice to start again. I wrote them purely for my own enjoyment but when I came back to university and played a couple of them to Aaron he said he really liked them and that he wanted to work on them for the band. From then on the band had developed a whole new perspective. We were a band that did songs. The style of the songs maintained the original blues ethic, but also added in folk and even a few punk and country influences. The band line up began to change rapidly from then on. At the beginning of the year it was just me and Aaron in the band; me on guitar and vocals and Aaron on bass. Alex didn’t seem to like the new direction of the band, so then it was just me and Aaron.

However, Aaron and I both knew that we needed more musicians/singers in order to get the band to be how we wanted it to be. The next person to join the band was Nicholas Frost, who is a really good violinist and plays for the Bangor University Orchestra. He did a great job with the songs that we had. When Nick came to his first practice he brought along with him a guy known as Louie, who is a very good singer and recently (December 2009) performed a vocal solo in the Bangor University Winter Concert. I had been thinking for a week or two about finding myself another female singer but then suddenly it struck the band as obvious; why didn’t Louie join the band? We had a second singer.

Eventually Alex came back into the band playing banjo, guitar and, very brilliantly, the accordion. It was done: the band line-up was complete. Alex began to write songs too, and writing them very quickly. We began to practice regularly and for long hours of the day, much to our housemates’ annoyance. Just when we were getting pretty tight and ready to tour the pubs and open-mike’s of Bangor, disaster struck. Aaron was being thrown out of university because of his financial difficulties concerning last year’s rent. We had lost our bassist, the bassist who had learnt and written all the bass lines for the new songs by me and Alex along with the couple of cover songs we did.

We had to find a new bassist. Jack Rennie was the next person to join the band in autumn 2009 as the bassist. We began practicing again and re-learning the songs we had already done. Before too long we were performing songs in the pubs and open-mikes in Bangor. First we performed in the ‘Bell Vue’ (which was my personal favourite), and the next one we did was at ‘The Underground’ or ‘The Venue’ on Bangor High Street. The next was Open-Mike at ‘The Greek’. We did a session in the recording studio soon after that, which I was using as coursework for my music degree.

For quite some time I was thinking about having a drummer and Jack Rennie had an electric drum kit. I knew how rare/difficult it is for a band to get a drummer and so this was likely to be the only opportunity of having one but, having realized that it wouldn’t suit the aesthetics of the band, I stuck with what we had. But I still wanted some percussion in the band. I went down to the shop and bought some bongos, a tambourine and an egg shaker. Soon after this William Roberts wanted to join the band as our percussionist. So now we’ve settled for the six of us and look forward to recording more songs in the studio and performing more folk/blues/country songs in pubs and open-mike sessions.

Victor Rikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon

You can hear some of the band’s session on YouTube:

‘Brown Shoes’ composed by Alex Lowther-Harris: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S5ijUrtSOzQ

‘Traitor’ composed by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FRIP6SyI1X4 

‘Human Herbs’ composed by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk

‘Reverence’ composed by Alex Lowther-Harris: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hVLjpWJfHgo

‘Stagnant’ composed by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=StqTevvSQ_k

Posted here Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk