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Daily Archives: March 27th, 2009

Ruth Rikowski News Updates

 

Ruth Rikowski has a new blog, Ruth Rikowski News Updates – which continues her old AOL blog.

 

You can see Ruth’s new blog at: http://ruthrikowskiupdates.blogspot.com/

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

G20 Meltdown and Professor Chris Knight

 

Professor Chris Knight, an anthropologist at the University of East London (UEL), was suspended from his duties by UEL yesterday for comments he made in relation to the forthcoming G20 Meltdown protests in London.

 

Newspaper reports on the issue can be viewed at:

 

Fiona Hamilton, ‘Anarchist professor Chris Knight suspended after G20 ‘treat’, The Times, 26rg March, online at:

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/politics/G20/article5982908.ece

 

Emma Jacobs, ‘Batten the hatches for G20 Meltdown’, Financial Times, 27th March, online at: http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/7fb57298-1a70-11de-9f91-0000779fd2ac.html

 

Michael Seamark, “‘If you want violence, you’ll get it,” threatens professor suspended ahead of G20 summit’, Daily Mail, 27th March, online at:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1165168/If-want-violence-youll-threatens-professor-suspended-ahead-G20-summit.html

 

Chris Knight’s we site: http://homepages.uel.ac.uk/C.Knight/

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MARXISM AND THE INTERPRETATION OF CULTURE

PROGRAMME FOR SUMMER TERM 2009

Friday 01 May
Edward Carpenter and the Socialist and Anarchist Movements of the late 19th and early 20th Centuries
Sheila Rowbotham (University of Manchester)

Friday 15 May
The Cinema of John Sayles: From Billy Zane to Brecht and Bahktin, and back again
Mark Bould (University of the West of England)
This seminar is in L103 in the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, 17 
Russell Square

Friday 29 May
Bourgeois Behaviours: Accumulation & Waste in 19th Century Newspaper Consumption
Tom Gretton (University College London)
This seminar will take place in NG15 in the North Block, Senate House

Friday 12 June
Jorg Immendorf’s Cafe Deutschland
Norbert Schneider (University of Karlsruhe)

All seminars start at 5.30pm, and are held in the Wolfson Room (unless otherwise indicated) at the Institute of Historical Research in Senate House, Malet St, London. The seminar closes at 7.30pm and retires to the bar.

Organisers: Matthew Beaumont, Warren Carter, Steve Edwards, Andrew Hemingway, Esther Leslie, & Frances Stracey

For further information, contact Andrew Hemingway, at: a.hemingway@ucl.ac.uk or Esther Leslie at: e.leslie@bbk.ac.uk

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Political Economy of Work

 

International Initiative for Promoting Political Economy (IIPPE)

 

Inaugural Day Conference of the ‘Political Economy of Work’ Working Group

 

University of Leeds, 5th May 2009

 

Programme

 

11:00 Reflections on the ‘International Initiative for Promoting Political Economy’

Ben Fine, SOAS

 

11:30 Towards a ‘Political Economy of Work’

Andrew Brown and David Spencer, LUBS / CERIC

 

Discussant: Damian Grimshaw, University of Manchester

                   

12:45 Lunch

 

1:30 – 4:00 Focus on Well-Being at Work

 

1:30 Labour, Nature and Dependence

John O’Neill, University of Manchester

 

2:30 Coffee

 

3:00 Job Quality in Europe

Francis Green, University of Kent

 

 

Cost:  £20 including lunch, tea and coffee.

 

To Register Contact:

Miss Gaynor Dodsworth (g.l.dodsworth@lubs.leeds.ac.uk) (0113 3436839)

 

This event is sponsored by the Centre for Employment Relations Innovation and Change

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Academic Labor and Law

Special Section of Workplace: A Journal for Academic Labor

 

Guest EditorJennifer Wingard

University of Houston

 

The historical connections between legislation, the courts, and the academy have been complex and multi-layered. This has been evident from early federal economic policies, such as the Morell Act and the GI Bill, through national and state legislation that protected student and faculty rights, such as the First Amendment and affirmative action clauses. These connections continue into our current moment of state and national efforts to define the work of the university, such as The Academic Bill of Rights and court cases regarding distance learning. The question, then, becomes whether and to what extent the impact of legislation and litigation reveals or masks the shifting mission of the academy. Have these shifts been primarily economic, with scarcities of funding leading many to want to legislate what is considered a university education, how it should be financed, and who should benefit from it? Are the shifts primarily ideological, with political interests working to change access, funding, and the intellectual project of higher education? Or are the shifts a combination of both political and economic influences? One thing does become clear from these discussions: at their core, the legal battles surrounding higher education are about the changing nature of the university –the use of managerial/corporate language; the desire to professionalize students rather than liberally educate them; the need to create transparent structures of evaluation for both students and faculty; and the attempt to define the types of knowledge produced and disseminated in the classroom. These are changes for which faculty, students, administrators, as well as citizens who feel they have a stake in higher education, seek legal redress. This special section of Workplace aims to explore the ways in which legislation and court cases impact the work of students, professors, contingent faculty, and graduate students in the university. Potential topics include but are not limited to:

 

Academic Freedom for students and/or faculty

* Horowitz’s Academic Bill of Rights

* Missouri’s Emily Booker Intellectual Diversity Act

* First Amendment court cases concerning faculty and student’s rights to freely express themselves in the classroom and on campuses

* Facebook/Myspace/Blog court cases

* Current legislative and budgetary “attacks” on area studies (i.e. Queer Studies in Georgia, Women’s Studies in Florida)

Affirmative Action

* The implementation of state and university diversity initiatives in the 1970s

* The current repeal of affirmative action law across the country

* Benefits, including Health Benefits, Domestic Partner Benefits

* How universities in states with same-sex marriage bans deal with domestic partner benefits

Collective Bargaining

* The recent rulings at NYU and Brown about the status of graduate students as employees

* State anti-unionization measures and how they impact contingent faculty

Copyright/Intellectual Property

* In Distance Learning

* In corporate sponsored science research

* In government sponsored research

Disability Rights and Higher Education

* How the ADA impacts the university

* Sexual Harassment and Consensual Relationships

* How diversity laws and sexual harassment policies impact the university

Tenure

* The Bennington Case

* Post 9/11 court cases

 

Contributions for Workplace should be 4000-6000 words in length and should conform to MLA style. If interested, please send an abstract via word attachment to Jennifer Wingard (jwingard@central.uh.edu) by Friday, May 22, 2009. Completed essays will be due via email by Monday, August 24, 2009.

 

E. Wayne Ross

Professor

Department of Curriculum and Pedagogy

University of British Columbia

2125 Main Mall

Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4

Canada

604-822-2830

wayne.ross@ubc.ca

 

http://www.ewayneross.net

 

Workplace: A Journal for Academic Labor: http://www.workplace-gsc.com

Cultural Logic: http://eserver.org/clogic

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski  

6th International Marx & Engels Colloquium 

Call for papers 

Center for Marxist Studies (Centro de Estudos Marxistas -Cemarx) at the University of Campinas (Unicamp) 
Campinas (SP), Brazil, November 2009 
 
The Institute of Humanities’ Center for Marxist Studies at the University of Campinas has begun the call for papers for the 6th INTERNATIONAL MARX & ENGELS COLLOQUIM. Papers should be submitted between March 2 and June 15, 2009. 
 
General Information
 
The 6th International Marx & Engels Colloquium accepts two types of papers: those which analyze, critique or develop Marxist theory as their research subject, and papers that utilize the Marxist theoretical framework in empirical or theoretical studies which fit into the event’s Thematic Groups. 
Researchers interested in submitting papers should indicate in which Thematic Group they fit. Occasionally, the Organizing Commission of the 6th International Marx & Engels Colloquium might reallocate papers from one group to another. 
The Colloquium ‘s Thematic Groups are as follows: 
 
TG 1 – The theoretical work of Marx 
A critical examination of the works of Marx and Engels, and the polemical debates these stimulated. 
 
TG 2 – Different Marxisms 
A critical examination of the classic works of Marxism from the 19th and 20th centuries. The different currents of Marxist thought and their transformations. The theoretical work of Brazilian and Latin American Marxists. The question of the renewing and modernizing of Marxism. 
 
TG 3 – Marxism and the humanities 
Examination of the presence of Marxism in Economics, Sociology, Political Science, Anthropology, History, in the area of International Relations, and Law. Examination of the Marxist critique of the humanities and the contributions of the humanities in the development of Marxism. Polemical theories and Marxist conceptual developments in these areas of study. The presence of Marxism in Brazilian and Latin American universities. 
 
TG 4 – Economics and politics in contemporary capitalism 
The Marxist approach to the economic, political and social transformations in capitalism at the end of the 20th and the beginning of the 21st centuries. New patterns of accumulation for capital, new imperialist phase, transformation of the State and capitalist democracy. The position of dominant and dependent countries. Brazil and Latin America.
 
TG 5 – Class relations in contemporary capitalism 
The Marxist approach to the transformations that have occurred within the class structure. Workers, the working class, “the new working class” and “the middle class”. The petite bourgeoisie. Peasants in current capitalism. The debate on the decline of class polarization at the end of the 20th and the beginning of the 21st centuries. The working classes and social movements. The new configuration of the bourgeoisie. Social classes in Brazil and Latin America. The Marxist concept of social class and class struggle in contemporary capitalism. 
 
TG 6 – Education, capitalism and socialism 
The relations between the education system and capitalism from a Marxist perspective: the training of the workforce; education and social classes; ideology and the educational process; education policy. Marxist analysis of education in Brazil and Latin America. The cultural apparatuses of capitalism (universities, research centers). The cultural centers created by the socialist movement. Analysis of the educational experiences conducted in societies that emerged from socialist revolutions in the 20 th century. Marxist theory and education. 
 
TG 7 – Culture, capitalism and socialism 
Capitalism and culture production: the new tendencies; plastic arts, literature and the culture industry. Marxist analysis of culture in Brazil and Latin America. Culture and socialism: the culture movements in societies, which emerged from the revolutions of the 20 th century. Marxism and culture production. 
 
TG 8 – Socialism in the 21st century 
Marxist analysis of 20th century revolutions. The communist and socialist heritage of the 19th and 20th centuries and the socialism of the 21st century. Marxism and socialism. The question of the renewing of socialism. The theory of transition to socialism. Workers and socialist transition. Strengths and obstacles for the reconstruction of the socialist movement in the 21st century. 
 
TG 9 – Labor and production in contemporary capitalism 
Social theory, labor and production. Theoretical concepts on production. Process and production: valorization process and labor process. Control and management of labor process. Class struggle in production. Casualization of labor and employment conditions and re-qualification of the workforce. Theories that affirm and reject the centrality of labor. The new forms of labor exploitation: immaterial labor, informal labor, casualized and informational. 
 
Submission of work 
 
Papers should be submitted between March 2 and June 15, 2009. Researchers should fill in the submission form at the Cemarx website
. They should also mail two printed copies of their paper, together with a copy of their submission form, to Cemarx. Participants should indicate on the outside of the envelope: 
a) The Thematic Group (TG) to which their paper is being submitted; 
b) Their full postal address and email. 
 
Requirements for the submission of work:

 

1. Papers 
The paper (in Spanish or Portuguese) should have between fifteen and twenty-four thousand characters (including spaces and footnotes), totaling no more than ten pages in times new roman size 12 font. Papers beyond this limit will not be considered. Included in the paper should be: the name of the event to which the paper is being submitted, a title, the author’s name and position (professor, post-graduate student, independent researcher), and the Thematic Group in which the author would like to participate. The content of the paper should clearly define the subject to be examined, the methodology used in the research, and present its theses and arguments in a way that clearly addresses the debate (theoretical, historiographical or political) within which the paper is inserted. Important! Papers should follow the referencing rules displayed on the Cemarx website. 
 
2. Table discussions 
A table discussion is made up of at least four papers in the ambit of a Thematic Group. A small number of proposals for table discussions will be accepted, privileging submissions by groups or centers of research, as well as scientific and cultural associations. The papers of table discussion participants, formatted in accord with the previous item, should be sent jointly, accompanied with a brief justification for the table discussion. It is the responsibility of the applicant institution to obtain the necessary resources to ensure the participation of table participants. 
 
3. Posters 
The 6th International Marx & Engels Colloquium is open to the participation of undergraduate students, to present papers of scientific initiation or graduation, whose subjects fit in one of the colloquium’s Thematic Groups. 
The research abstract (in Spanish or Portuguese) should have between three to five thousand characters (including spaces and footnotes) in times new roman size 12 font. Included should be: the paper’s title; the author’s name; and the undergraduate course in which he/she is enrolled. The abstract should present the subject of the research, its main ideas and findings. Instructions on poster requirements will be published on the Cemarx website. 
 
Selection announcement 
 
The period for the submission of papers closes on June 15, 2009.

Accepted papers will be posted on the Cemarx’s website – http://www.ifch.unicamp.br/cemarx/ according to the following schedule: 
a) July 30: papers; 
b) August 15: posters. 
The results will be announced four months before the beginning of the event as to allow all participants to ask for grants from financial bodies and universities, as Cemarx cannot finance the attendance of conference participants. 

 
Addresses and contact information
 
Submission of papers: 
Centro de Estudos Marxistas (Cemarx), IFCH-Unicamp 
Caixa Postal 6110 CEP 13083-970 Campinas (SP) Brazil 
(5519) 3521-1639

http://www.ifch.unicamp.br/cemarx/

cemark@unicamp.br

http://www.unicamp.br/unicamp/  

 
Information (from August 1, 2009 ): 
Secretaria de Eventos do IFCH-Unicamp (5519) 3521-1601 /
seceven@unicamp.br

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Working In, and Against, the Neo-Liberal State: Global Perspectives on K-12 Teacher Unions

 

Call for Papers

 

Special Issue for Workplace: A Journal for Academic Labor

(http://www.workplac e-gsc.com)

 

The neo-liberal restructuring of national education systems is a global phenomenon and represents a major threat to the possibility of a democratic, public education committed to meeting the needs of working class and oppressed groups.  Teacher unions, across the world, despite all the attacks on them, represent perhaps the most formidable obstacle to neo-liberal restructuring.  Teachers remain highly unionized and although they have suffered many setbacks in recent years, their collective organizations generally remain robust.

 

Despite the significance and importance of teacher unions they remain largely under-researched.  Mainstream academic literature on school sector education policy often ignores teacher unions, even in cases where scholars are critical of the market orientation of neo-liberal reforms.  Two recent exceptions to this tradition are the contributions of Compton and Weiner (2008) and Stevenson et al (2007).  The strength of Compton and Weiner’s excellent volume is the breadth of international perspectives. However, individual chapters are largely short ‘vignettes’, and the aim is to offer fairly brief and readable accounts, rather than detailed and scholarly analysis.  Stevenson et al offer a series of traditional scholarly articles, although the emphasis is largely on the Anglophone nations (UK, North America, Australasia) , and the collection fails to capture the full breadth required of an international perspective.  In both cases, and quite understandably, these contributions were not able to take account of the seismic developments in the world capitalist economy since Autumn 08 in particular. These developments have significant implications for the future of neo-liberalism, for the development of education policy in nation states and for the policies and practices of teacher unions. There is now a strong case for an analysis of teacher unionism that is detailed, scholarly, international and able to take account of current developments.

 

This special section of Workplace will focus on the ways in which teacher unions in the K-12 sector are challenging the neo-liberal restructuring of school education systems in a range of global contexts.  Neo-liberalism’ s reach is global. Its impact on the restructuring of public education systems shares many common characteristics wherever it manifests itself.  That said, it also plays out differently in different national and local contexts.  This collection of papers will seek to assess how teacher unions are challenging the trajectory of neo-liberal reform in a number of different national contexts.  By drawing on contributors from all the major world continents it will seek to highlight the points of contact and departure in the apparently different ways in which teacher unions interface with the neo-liberal agenda. It will also ensure that analyses seek to reflect recent developments in the global capitalist economy, and the extent to which this represents threat or opportunity for organized teacher movements.

 

Compton, M. and Weiner, L. (2008) The Global Assault on Teachers, Teaching and their Unions, London: Palgrave.

 

Stevenson, H. et al (2007) Changes in Teachers’ Work and the Challengs Facing Teacher Unions. International Electronic Journal of Leadership for Learning. Volume 11. http://www.ucalgary .ca/~iejll/

 

Submissions

Contributions to Workplace should be 4000-6000 words in length and should conform to MLA style.  If you are interested, please submit an abstract via Word attachment to Howard Stevenson (hstevenson@lincoln. ac.uk) by 31st July 2009. Completed articles will be due via email on 28th December 2009.  All papers will be blind peer-reviewed.

 

 

E. Wayne Ross

http://www.ewaynero ss.net

wayne.ross@mac. com

 

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Building a New Left for a New Era

Socialism 2009

Chicago – June 18-21

San Francisco – July 2-5

 

A weekend of revolutionary politics, debate, and entertainment

 

Register Online Today!

 

Basic early bird registration is just $75 before May 1.  We know times are tight, but if you can register at a solidarity level of $150, $300 or $500, your contribution will help assure the biggest audience possible for putting radical ideas into action.  Also, please consider making a contribution to the Scholarship Fund which will help cash-strapped workers and students attend.  So, drop what you’re doing and go to: 

http://www.socialismconference.org/

 

 

Why Socialism 2009?

 

The world economic crisis has shattered the free-market consensus that has dominated politics for the last generation. Meanwhile, the end of the conservative era and the election of the first African-American president have raised expectations among working people that long overdue change is at hand. With capitalism in crisis, even some in the corporate media are admitting that Karl Marx was right.

 

There has never been a better time for those who want see fundamental change to get together to debate, discuss and organize for a new society based on the needs of the many instead of on the whims of a few. In other words, there has never been a better time to organize a new socialist left to meet the challenge of this new era.

That’s the purpose that Socialism 2009—expanded to two sites this year—has set for itself. Gather with activists and scholars from all over to take part in dozens of discussions about changing the world: How can we stop the economic madness? How can we end racism? What kind of organization do we need? What would a future socialist society look like?

 

Yes we can organize for socialism in the 21st century!

 

Join Robert Brenner, Dennis Brutus, Anuradha Mittal, Dahr Jamail, David Zirin, Heather Rogers, Claudio Katz, Laura Flanders, Ahmed Shawki, Sherry Wolf, Sharon Smith, Paul LeBlanc, Anthony Arnove, Leo Zeilig, Alan Maass, Christian Parenti,  Marlene Martin, Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, James Green, Paul D’Amato, Jennifer Roesch, Ashley Smith, Lance Selfa, Michael Klare, Brian Jones, John Riddell, Joel Geier, Justin Akers-Chacón, Ian Angus, Adrienne Johnson, Sarah Knopp, Jesse Hagopian, Todd Chretien, Dr. Jess Ghannam and more!  Check back at 

http://www.socialismconference.org/

 for an updated list of speakers. 

 

“The young people at the conference took me back in time to when you were ready to stand for what was right. It lets you know that what you may have planted years ago will come to reality today. I feel great to have become a part of it.” –Dr. John Carlos, 1968 Olympic bronze medalist who raised the Black Power salute

 

“Socialism conferences are exciting gathering places for students and young activists, for revolutionary scholars, and fighters for social justice to share ideas and experiences that can help us understand and change the world. I’ve been to a couple – it’s not enough. I’m coming again.” –Paul LeBlanc, scholar and activist

 

http://www.socialismconference.org/

Sponsored by Center for Economic Research and Social Change, publisher of International Socialist Review and Haymarket Books, and the International Socialist Organization, publisher of Socialist Worker and Obrero Socialista newspapers.

 

For more information and to register, go to: , or call (773) 583-7884.

http://www.socialismconference.org/

 

 

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

http://www.socialismconference.org/

Marxism 2009 – A Festival of Resistance

 

CAPITALISM ISN’T WORKING…

COME AND DISCUSS THE ALTERNATIVE AT…

Marxism 2009 – a festival of resistance

Thursday 2nd – Monday 6th July 2009, central London

BOOK NOW TO GET £5 OFF YOU TICKET PRICE!

Online: http://www.marxismfestival.org.uk

Phone: 020 7819 1190

Over 1,000 people have already bought tickets for Marxism 2009. We are now entering the last full week of the £5 discount on Marxism tickets: get yours now at:  http://www.marxismfestival.org.uk or call us in the office on 020 7819 1190.

With the current £5 discount, prices are: Waged – £40, Unwaged – £27, HE student – £20, FE student – £10.

Remember, if you can’t afford to pay now but want to get the £5 discount you can register before 31st March and postdate your payment – just give us a call in the office: 020 7819 1190.

Highlights include:

* Alex Callinicos vs Slavoj Zizek – a debate on “What does it mean to be a revolutionary today?”

* David Harvey on Marx’s Capital and debating Chris Harman on “The crisis of neoliberalism”

* Tariq Ali on Pakistan’s deepening crisis

* Terry Eagleton on “Socialism and culture”

* Sheila Rowbotham discusses pioneering gay rights campaigner Edward Carpenter

* Gary Younge speaks on Obama’s rise to power

* Ghada Karmi participates in a course of meetings on Palestinian liberation

* Michael Billington and Sam West take part in a tribute to Harold Pinter

* Bernadette McAliskey speaks 40 years on from her election to parliament and the Battle of the Bogside

* John Bellamy Foster takes part in a course on “Marx and Darwin” and speaks on Marxist ecology

Other participants include: Tony Benn, Paul Gilroy, Eamonn McCann, Mark Serwotka, Sally Hunt, Jeremy Corbyn MP, Nick Broomfield, Michael Rosen, Istvan Meszaros, Roy Bailey and David Ferrard, Pat Devine, Danny Dorling, Zoe Williams, David Edgar, Haifa Zangana, Steven Rose, Ambalavaner Sivanandan, Ben Fine, Ron Oppenheim and Natalie Adler, Jeremy Dear, Ludi Simpson, Leo Zeilig, Graham Turner, Chris Searle, Adam Tooze, Costas Lapavitsas, Omar Puente… and many more!

Courses and meetings include: Capital for beginners * The Marxist method * The economic crisis – causes, consequences and questions * Resistance and recession in Britain * The culture of crisis * The International Socialist tradition * 1989 and the collapse of the Soviet block – before, during and after * Islam and Islamism * Lenin and Leninism * Trotsky * Revolution and beyond * Racism, segregation and multiculturalism * British society today * The fight against fascism * Women’s liberation * LGBT rights * The US – then and now * China – from Mao to markets * Imperialism today and the “war on terror” * Pakistan * Voices from the Middle East * Palestine’s fight for freedom * Latin America * Africa * Climate Change – saving the planet * Darwin and Marx – evolution revolution * Education * Students and the struggle * Capitalism and the media

 

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk