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Joanna Swann's New Book

LEARNING, TEACHING AND EDUCATION RESEARCH IN THE 21st CENTURY

Learning, Teaching and Education Research in the 21st Century: An Evolutionary Analysis of the Role of Teachers

By Joanna Swann

http://www.continuumbooks.com

Publication dates: 22 December 2011 in theUK; 23 February 2012 in theUSA

ISBN:  9781441163172 (paperback); 9781441161260 (hardcover)

Learning, Teaching and Education Research in the 21st Century: An Evolutionary Analysis of the Role of Teachers draws on Karl Popper’s evolutionary epistemology and challenges widespread assumptions about learning, teaching and research that are embedded in the practices of many teachers and in the design of most education institutions worldwide. Joanna Swann argues that to promote the growth of learning we need to encourage children and adolescents to exercise and develop their facility for creativity and criticality, and that we need to provide and maintain environments in which they can safely engage in self-initiated and self-directed exploratory activity. In accessible and engaging language, the author presents philosophical arguments that support the defence and development of non-authoritarian approaches to learning and teaching that can be used by individuals and groups working in or outside state-funded schools. In particular, she provides tried-and-tested guidelines for student-initiated curricula and a problem-based methodology for professional development and action research.

Joanna Swann is a Popperian philosopher of learning and method, known internationally for her innovative theoretical and practical explorations of the implications of evolutionary epistemology for teaching and education research. Formerly a Principal Lecturer at the University of Brighton, UK, she is now a freelance author.

 

Contents

Acknowledgements \ 1. The Purpose of this Book \ Part I: Learning \ 2. The Challenge of an Evolutionary Analysis of Learning \ 3. What Happens When We Learn \ 4. Addressing Some Problematic Ideas About Learning \ Part II: Encouraging Learning \ 5. What Promotes and What Inhibits Learning \ 6. Against the Intensive Use of Prescribed Curricula with Children and Adolescents \ 7. Developing Student-Initiated Curricula \ Part III: Developing Teaching \ 8. Research and the Development of Teaching \ 9. Developing a Popperian Science of School Teaching \ 10. Improving Our Practices as Teachers \ 11. Teaching for a Better World \ References \ Publisher Acknowledgements \ Index

 

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MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

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Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Education

LONDON INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON EDUCATION – LICE 2011

 CALL FOR PAPERS

*********************************************************
London International Conference on Education (LICE-2011)
November 7-10, 2011, London, UK
(http://www.liceducation.org)
*********************************************************

The London International Conference on Education (LICE) is an international refereed conference dedicated to the advancement of the theory and practices in education. The LICE promotes collaborative excellence between academicians and professionals from Education.

The aim of LICE is to provide an opportunity for academicians and professionals from various educational fields with cross-disciplinary interests to bridge the knowledge gap, promote research esteem and the evolution of pedagogy. The LICE-2011 invites research papers that encompass conceptual analysis, design implementation and performance evaluation. All accepted papers will appear in the proceedings and modified version of selected papers will be published in special issues peer reviewed journals.

The topics in LICE-2011 include but are not confined to the following areas:

*Academic Advising and Counselling
*Art Education
*Adult Education
*APD/Listening and Acoustics in Education Environment
*Business Education
*Counsellor Education
*Curriculum, Research and Development
*Distance Education
*Early Childhood Education
*Educational Administration
*Educational Foundations
*Educational Psychology
*Educational Technology
*Education Policy and Leadership
*Elementary Education
*E-Learning
*ESL/TESL
*Health Education
*Higher Education
*History
*Human Resource Development
*Indigenous Education
*ICT Education
*Kinesiology & Leisure Science
*K12
*Language Education
*Mathematics Education
*Multi-Virtual Environment
*Music Education
*Pedagogy
*Physical Education (PE)
*Research Assessment Exercise (RAE)
*Reading Education
*Religion and Education Studies
*Rural Education
*Science Education
*Secondary Education
*Second life Educators
*Social Studies Education
*Special Education
*Student Affairs
*Teacher Education
*Cross-disciplinary areas of Education
*E-Society
*Other Areas of Education

IMPORTANT DATES:

Extended Abstract (Work in Progress) Submission Date: July 15, 2011
Research Paper, Student Paper, Case Study, Report Submission Date: July 5, 2011
Proposal for Workshops: June 5, 2011
Notification of Workshop Acceptance/Rejection:  June 10, 2011  
Notification of Extended Abstract (Work in Progress) Acceptance/Rejection: July 25, 2011
Notification of Research Paper, Student Paper, Case Study, Report Acceptance /Rejection: July 20, 2011
Camera Ready Paper Due: August 31, 2011
Participant(s) Registration (Open):  May 25, 2011  
Early Bird Registration Deadline (Authors only):  May 25 to September 1, 2011
Late Bird Registration Deadline (Authors only):  September 2 to October 1, 2011  
Conference Dates:  November 07-10, 2011

For further information, please visit http://www.liceducation.org

 

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MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

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Education

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Education Crisis

HIGHER EDUCATION AS A PUBLIC GOOD: CRITICAL PERSPECTIVES

SRHE Higher Education Theory Group Seminar

Higher Education as a Public Good: Critical Perspectives

Monday 4 July –Tuesday 5 July 2011

New College, Oxford

The Society for Research into Higher Education Theory Group invites you to participate in a 2-day symposium examining issues underlying the concept of higher education as a public good. This is a topic much discussed in the light of recent policy developments in the UK and in many other countries. The seminar will explore its theoretical underpinnings from several disciplinary perspectives. There will be inputs from keynote speakers and participative discussions on the issues raised. The main speakers will each produce a short synopsis of their contribution for participants to consider in advance of the seminar. It is intended to prepare a book for publication based on the seminar proceedings.

Keynote Speakers:

Nick Barr: Professor of Public Economics. LSE London

Bob Cowen: Emeritus Professor of Education. IOE London

David Dill: Emeritus Professor of Public Policy. University of North Carolina

Jon Nixon: Honorary Professor.University of Sheffield

Paul Standish: Professor of Philosophy of Education. IOE London

Registration

This symposium will take place at New College Oxford and the fee of £125 (£155 for non members of SRHE) covers the cost of accommodation for one night in ensuite rooms and all meals, including dinner in the College on Monday evening. Rooms at the College are limited so delegates are advised to make an early registration to attend this symposium.

The closing date for bookings is 4 June 2011.

To attend this event please e-mail: Nicola Manches (nmanches@srhe.ac.uk) to reserve your place and arrange payment. Please address all enquiries about this or other SRHE events to Nicola Manches at the SRHE Offices.

Society for Research into Higher Education, 44 Bedford Row, London WC1R  4LL, Tel +44 (0) 20 7447 2525, Fax +44 (0) 20 7447 2526, http://www.srhe.ac.uk

***END***

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Utopia

SOCIAL JUSTICE AND THE UNIVERSITY

The Dept. of Sociology and the CSSJ at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, will be hosting a conference on Social Justice and the University, April 29-April 30 at the Baker Center.

Details at: http://web.utk.edu/~utsocdep/sjuconf/index.html

The Conference will use the idea of social justice to explore the challenges universities face in meeting the economic, social, and global pressures of the 21st century. With faculty, student, staff, and community participants, the Conference is designed to begin an ongoing discussion of how social justice can inform the responsibilities of higher education. The participants come from a variety of academic disciplines, including Education, Modern Foreign Languages & Literature, Law, Philosophy, Sociology, and Social Work, in addition to various community workers. Conference topics include Foundations and Variations on Social Justice, Social Justice and Globalization, Teaching Social Justice, and University and Communities.

The keynote speakers are:

John Gaventa, Professor and Research Fellow at the Institute for Development Studies in England. He is a member of the Participation, Power and Social Change team and Director of the Development Research Centre on Citizenship, Participation and Accountability. He has written widely on issues of power, participatory development and governance, civil society and social change.

Frances Fox Piven, Distinguished Professor, CUNY Graduate Center. Dr. Piven is an expert in urban politics, voting rights, and the development of the welfare state. Dr. Piven is one of the foremost political sociologists in the country, having written influential work on protest, the welfare state, and voting. Dr. Piven is also a past-president of the American Sociological Association. She is cofounder of Human SERVE (Service Employees Registration and Voter Education), an organization that worked to increase voter registration among underrepresented and low-income populations.

Erik Olin Wright, Vilas Distinguished Professor of Sociology, University of Wisconsin-Madison. Dr. Wright is the President Elect of the American Sociological Association and series editor of the Real Utopias Project. The Real Utopias Project focuses on egalitarian change through the fundamental redesign of basic social and economic institutions.

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

All that is Solid for Glenn Rikowski: http://rikowski.wordpress.com

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Heraclitus

POLICY FUTURES IN EDUCATION – VOLUME 9 NUMBER 1 (2011)

Now available at: http://www.wwwords.co.uk/pfie/content/pdfs/9/issue9_1.asp

POLICY FUTURES IN EDUCATION
Volume 9 Number 1 2011 

ISSN 1478-2103
SPECIAL ISSUE
The Council of Europe’s White Paper on Intercultural Dialogue
Editors: TINA BESLEY, MICHAEL A. PETERS & JIANG XAIOPING

ARTICLES 

Tina Besley & Michael A. Peters. Introduction. Interculturalism, Ethnocentrism and Dialogue

Michalinos Zembylas & Vivienne Bozalek. The Council of Europe’s White Paper on Intercultural Dialogue: an analysis using the ethic of care

Peter Murphy. The Paradox of Dialogue

J. Gregory Keller. Dialogue as Moral Paradigm: paths toward intercultural transformation

Francesca Gobbo. Ethnographic Research in Multicultural Educational Contexts as a Contribution to Intercultural Dialogue

Naomi Hodgson. Dialogue and Its Conditions: the construction of European citizenship

John Igbino. Intercultural Dialogue: cultural dialogues of equals or cultural dialogues of unequals?

Evelin G. Lindner, Linda M. Hartling & Ulrich Spalthoff. Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies: a global network advancing dignity through dialogue

James Arthur. Intercultural versus Interreligious Dialogue in a Pluralist Europe

Driss Habti. Reason and Revelation for an Averroist Pursuit of Convivencia and Intercultural Dialogue

Monica E. Mincu, Maurizio Allasia & Francesca Pia. Uneven Equity and Italian Interculturalism(s)

Danielle Zay. A Cooperative School Model to Promote Intercultural Dialogue between Citizens-to-Be

Nina L. Dulabaum. A Pedagogy for Global Understanding – intercultural dialogue: from theory to practice

Roxana Enache. Possible Orientations of the European Dimension in Romanian Educational Policy

Ineta Luka. Fostering Intercultural Dialogue in Tourism Studies

Robert K. Shaw. The Nature of Democratic Decision Making and the Democratic Panacea

Julie Allan. Responsibly Competent: teaching, ethics and diversity

Inna Semetsky. Becoming-Other: developing the ethics of integration
Access to the full texts of current articles is restricted to those who have a Personal subscription, or those whose institution has a Library subscription. However, all articles become free-to-view 18 months after publication.

PERSONAL SUBSCRIPTION (single user access). Subscription to the 2011 issues (this includes full access to ALL BACK NUMBERS) is available to individuals at a cost of US$54.00. Personal subscriptions also include automatic free access to ALL PAST ISSUES. If you wish to subscribe you may do so immediately at www.wwwords.co.uk/subscribePFIE.asp

LIBRARY SUBSCRIPTION (institution-wide access). If you are working within an institution that maintains a Library, please urge them to purchase a Library subscription so access is provided throughout your institution; full details for libraries can be found at www.symposium-journals.co.uk/prices.html

For all editorial matters, including articles offered for publication, please contact Professor Michael A. Peters (mpet001@illinois.edu).

In the event of problems concerning a subscription, or difficulty in gaining access to the journal articles, please contact the publishers at support@symposium-journals.co.uk

Glenn Rikowski and Ruth Rikowski have a number of articles in Policy Futures in Education. These are:

Rikowski, Ruth (2003) Value – the Life Blood of Capitalism: knowledge is the current key, Policy Futures in Education, Vol.1 No.1, pp.160-178: http://www.wwwords.co.uk/pdf/viewpdf.asp?j=pfie&vol=1&issue=1&year=2003&article=9_Rikowski_PFIE_1_1&id=195.93.21.68

Rikowski, Glenn (2004) Marx and the Education of the Future, Policy Futures in Education, Vol.2 Nos. 3 & 4, pp.565-577, online at: http://www.wwwords.co.uk/pdf/viewpdf.asp?j=pfie&vol=2&issue=3&year=2004&article=10_Rikowski_PFEO_2_3-4_web&id=195.93.21.71

Rikowski, Ruth (2006) A Marxist Analysis of the World Trade Organisation’s Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights, Policy Futures in Education, Vol.4 No.4: http://www.wwwords.co.uk/pdf/viewpdf.asp?j=pfie&vol=4&issue=4&year=2006&article=7_Rikowski_PFIE_4_4_web&id=205.188.117.66

Rikowski, Ruth (2008) Review Essay: ‘On Marx: An introduction to the revolutionary intellect of Karl Marx’, by Paula Allman, Policy Futures in Education, Vol.6 No.5, pp.653-661: http://www.wwwords.co.uk/pdf/validate.asp?j=pfie&vol=6&issue=5&year=2008&article=11_Rikowski_PFIE_6_5_web

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All that is Solid for Glenn Rikowski: http://rikowski.wordpress.com

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Sara Motta

Mike Cole

EDUCATION AND SOCIAL CHANGE IN LATIN AMERICA

A two day workshop organised in collaboration between:

MERD (Marxism and Education: Renewing Dialogues)
CSSGJ (Centre for the Study of Social and Global Justice, University of Nottingham)
CESJ (Centre for Education for Social Justice, Bishop Grosseteste University College, Lincoln)

To be held at the
University of Nottingham
1st – 2nd July 2011

The role of education is increasingly important in the construction of new forms of anti-capitalist politics in Latin America. This is evidenced by the centrality of popular education and other forms of struggle influenced by radical education philosophy and pedagogy, and by social movements in their construction of new forms of participatory politics and mass intellectuality. It is also evidenced in the creation of formal and informal educational programmes, practices and projects that develop varieties of critical pedagogy and popular education with both organised and non-organised marginalised and excluded communities.

Particularly, noticeable in this regard is the centrality of education in the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela and the move towards 21st Century socialism. At the heart of the politicisation of education are the questions of whose knowledge counts in the process of social transformation and political change and if the ways in which such transformative knowledge is created impact upon the struggle to develop worlds beyond capitalism in the 21st century.

This workshop invites papers which develop theoretically grounded empirical analysis about the politicisation of education in the continent.

Key questions to be addressed are:

How is education politicised in contemporary anti-capitalist struggles?

How has neoliberalism closed down as well as opened up terrains of educational struggle?

What differences are there between the role of education in 20th century socialism and 21st century socialism?

How does Marxism shape such practices of radical pedagogy and how do such practices transform Marxism?

How does the focus on popular education in new forms of popular politics influence and reflect the type of politics developed?

What is the role of autonomous education in social movements in the construction of anti-capitalism?

What is the relationship between formal ‘progressive’ educational programmes and the politics of knowledge and education in informal community/social movement settings?

What can we (outside of the region) learn from Chavez’s concept of Venezuela as a ‘giant school’ and other radical pedagogies and educational practices in Latin America?

What is the role of popular educators within formal schooling in these processes?

Selected papers will be published in an edited collection with Palgrave Macmillan in their Marxism and Education Series.

Contact Sara Motta at sara.motta@nottingham.ac.uk and Mike Cole at mike.cole@bishopg.ac.uk  if you are interested in helping organise the workshop or would like any further information.

Please submit your paper proposal by March 1st 2011

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The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Athens, The Academy

NEW DATE FOR ‘THE HUMANITIES AND THE IDEA OF THE UNIVERSITY’ – MIDDLESEX UNIVERSITY

NEW DATE for ‘The Humanities and the Idea of the University’, Philosophy Department, Middlesex University

The Middlesex workshop on the Humanities will now take place on TUESDAY 7 DECEMBER 2010, 11am-6pm, Saloon (M004), Ground Floor, Mansion Building, Middlesex University, Trent Park campus, Bramley Road, London N14 4YZ.

Schedule:

11am
Christian Kerslake
Introduction: Philosophy, the Humanities and the University

11.30
Andrew McGettigan
How will Willett’s ‘New Providers’ affect the Arts and Humanities? Independents, For-Profits and External Degrees in the Proposals for Higher Education

12.00
Dave Hill
Education and Resistance in/under Capitalism

12.30
Discussion

1.00
Break for Lunch

2.00
Johann Hoiby, Alfie Meadows, Maria-Louise Rosbech
Student Reflections

2.45
Andrew Goffey
Stupidity and the University

3.15
Matthew Charles
Philanthropy and the Image of the University

3.45
Discussion & Coffee

4.30
Mark Kelly
Resisting the Bureaucratisation of the University

5.00 
Marina Vishmidt
The Humanities and the Location of Value in the University

5.30
Discussion

* * * 
THE HUMANITIES AND THE IDEA OF THE UNIVERSITY

What are the Humanities, and what are they for? What is a university, and what is it for? Is it possible to stipulate that Humanities education is an essential component of what a university does, or should be doing? How can the links be reinforced between Humanities education and principles of universality and equality?

In her recent book Not for Profit: Why Democracy needs the Humanities (Princeton, 2010), Martha Nussbaum argues that “thirsty for national profit, nations, and their systems of education, are heedlessly discarding skills that are needed to keep democracies alive. If this trend continues, nations all over the world will soon be producing generations of useful machines, rather than complete citizens who can think for themselves”. She presents a case that Humanities education is essential to the cultivation of critical thinking, reflection and empathy with others. 

How, then, to effectively defend Humanities education? At this current juncture, is it possible to effectively defend the Humanities and higher education without also calling for an overall reform of the economy? 

In the past five years Middlesex University has abandoned teaching and research in two key Humanities subjects, History (closed in 2006) and Philosophy (admissions stopped in 2010). It appears to be on course to reduce all of its Humanities provision. This workshop will be a forum for lecturers and students to discuss the future of the Humanities at Middlesex and in the UK in general.

The workshop is co-organised by Andrew Goffey (a.goffey@mdx.ac.uk) and Christian Kerslake (c.kerslake@mdx.ac.uk).

Attendance is free, but please register at mdxhumanities@yahoo.co.uk.

Tube: Piccadilly line to Oakwood station, free bus to campus.

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The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

The Island

FORUM FOR PROMOTING 3-19 COMPREHENSIVE EDUCATION – VOLUME 52 NUMBER 3 (2010)

 

 

 

 

Just published online at: http://www.wwwords.co.uk/forum/content/pdfs/52/issue52_3.asp

FORUM: for promoting 3-19 comprehensive education
Volume 52 Number 3 2010     ISSN 0963-8253

Clyde Chitty. Editorial. Lies, Exaggerations and Half-truths

Susanne Wiborg. Learning Lessons from the Swedish Model

Melissa Benn. A Comprehensive Response to the Coalition: how should we approach current government policies on education?

Stewart Ranson. From Partnership to Community Governance

John White. The Coalition and the Curriculum

Martin Allen. Education’s ‘Credibility Crunch’: the upper secondary years

Roz Stevens. Ever Reducing Democracy? A Comparative View of the Legislative Events Surrounding the Introduction of New-style Academies in 2010 and Grant-maintained Schools in 1988

Colin Richards. What Has Been, What Is and What Might Be: the relevance of the critical writings of Edmond Holmes to contemporary primary education policy and practice

Paul Dash. Theorising African Caribbean Absences in Multicultural Art Education

Alison Peacock. The Cambridge Primary Review: a voice for the future

Jane Turner. Primary Science: are there any good reasons to be cheerful?

Carl Parsons. Achieving Zero Permanent Exclusions from School, Social Justice and Economy

 

BOOK REVIEWS
The Pendulum Swings: transforming school reform (Bernard Barker), reviewed by Clyde Chitty
Susan Isaacs: a life freeing the minds of children (Philip Graham), reviewed by Mary Jane Drummond
The Staff Room (Marcus Orths), reviewed by Patrick Yarker

Access to the full texts of articles is restricted to those who have a Personal subscription, or those whose institution has a Library subscription. However, all articles become free-to-view 18 months after first publication.

PERSONAL SUBSCRIPTION. Subscription to the 2010 issues (this includes access to all available past issues) is available to private individuals at a cost of US$70.00 (approximately £45.00). If you wish to subscribe you may do so immediately at www.wwwords.co.uk/subscribeFORUM.asp

LIBRARY SUBSCRIPTION (campus-wide access). If you are working within an institution that maintains a library, please urge your Librarian to take out a Library subscription so we can provide full access throughout your institution. Detailed information for libraries can be found at www.symposium-journals.co.uk/prices.html

For all editorial matters, including articles offered for publication, please contact the Editor, Professor Clyde Chitty, 19 Beaconsfield Road, Bickley, Bromley BR1 2BL, United Kingdom (clydechitty379@btinternet.com).

In the event of problems concerning a subscription, or difficulty in gaining access to the journal articles on the website, please contact the publishers at support@symposium-books.co.uk

 

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The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

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Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Philosophy

MIDDLESEX PHILOSOPHY SEMINAR SERIES 2010-11

This seminar series is open to the public. Seminars will mostly be held on Thursdays, at 6.30pm, but three (30 November, 25 January and 15 February) will be held on Tuesdays at 5.30pm.

Thursday 14 October
Alex Callinicos (Kings College London): ‘Slavoj Žižek and the Critique of Political Economy’

Thursday 28 October
Nina Power (Roehampton): ‘Intellectual Equality: Rancière and Education’

Wednesday 3 November
Workshop: ‘The Humanities and the Idea of the University’

Thursday 11 November
Susan James (Birkbeck): ‘Spinoza, Rembrandt and Suspicion’

Thursday 18 November
Sean Sayers (Kent): ‘Marx’s Concept of Communism’

Tuesday 30 November
Christopher Norris (Cardiff): ‘Aesthetic Ideology Revisited’

Thursday 9 December
Gary Lachman (London): ‘What is Cosmic Consciousness?’

Tuesday 25 January
Robin Le Poidevin (Leeds): ‘The Beginning of Time’

Thursday 3 February
Keith Ansell Pearson (Warwick): ‘Beyond Compassion: On Nietzsche’s Moral Therapy in Dawn’

Tuesday 15 February
Dylan Evans (University College Cork): ‘Is Lacanian Psychoanalysis Wrong, Or Not Even Wrong?’

Thursday 3 March
Marcus Boon (York University, Toronto): ‘The Politics of Just Intonation: Music, Mathematics and Philosophy after La Monte Young’

Thursday 17 March
Martin Liebscher (Institute of Germanic and Romance Studies, London): ‘Sigmund Freud and his Philosophical Mediators’

Thursday 31 March
David Lapoujade (Paris-I Panthéon-Sorbonne): Title to be announced.

Thursday 5 May
Workshop: ‘Hegel Now?’ Including Slavoj Žižek on ‘Is it still possible to be a Hegelian today?’ Further speakers to be confirmed.

All seminars will take place in the Saloon (M004), Mansion Building, Middlesex University, Trent Park campus, Bramley Road, London N14 4YZ. 
Tube: Piccadilly line to Oakwood station, free bus to campus.

Please note that the workshop on Wednesday 3 November, ‘The Humanities and the Idea of the University’, will take place between 11am and 6pm, in the Saloon, Mansion Building. The ‘Hegel Now?’ workshop on 5 May 2011 will take place from 2pm – 8.30pm (room to be announced).

In addition, this semester we will be running two short courses open to the general public. These will take place on Friday afternoons in the Green Room (M009), Mansion Building, between 4-6pm. From 15 October to 12 November,

Meade McCloughan will present a course on Marx’s Capital, and from 26 November to 10 December, Rosa Nogues will present an introduction to French feminist philosophy.

Please direct enquiries to c.kerslake@mdx.ac.uk

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon Profile: http://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

William Godwin

ANARCHIST PEDAGOGIES

CALL FOR CHAPTER PROPOSAL SUBMISSIONS

For a book entitled

Anarchist Pedagogies

Editor: Robert Haworth PhD

University of Wisconsin-La Crosse

Overview:

Anarchist movements have a long history of resisting traditional schooling and authoritative pedagogical practices, while at the same time, attempting to construct transformative educative processes. Examples include Francisco Ferrer’s (1913) work entitled, Origins of the Modern School and the creation of the Escuela Moderna schools in Spain, the Modernist Schools in the United States (Emma Goldman, Voltaraine de Cleyre, Alex Berkman and others) during the early 20th century as well as contemporary anarchists who are experimenting in participatory informal learning spaces. These examples are important to acknowledge within radical notions of teaching and learning being that they are experiences that enable activists and scholars to critically re-imagine education and build theories on “how” and “where” individuals experiment in constructing knowledge through differing learning spaces (Coté, Day & Peuter, 2007; de Leon, 2008, Malott, forthcoming).

Moreover, as totalizing efforts of the nation-state continue to develop standardized curriculum, efficiency models and data driven outcomes, anarchist pedagogies attempt to construct ongoing collective learning environments that can be described as ‘disciplined improvisation’ or ‘spontaneous’ in nature (Goldman, 1969; Haworth, forthcoming; Sawyer, 2003; Ward, 1972). Furthermore, these informal learning spaces create new ways of exposing illegitimate corporate and state power, as well as participating in the ‘coming communities’ (Day, 2007).

This edited book calls on international scholars (15 single authored or collectively authored chapters) in anarchist studies to critically reflect on historical and contemporary experimentations in anarchist pedagogies. Scholarly efforts will focus on what we have learned from past anarchist experiences and current transformative learning environments — where individuals are engaged in collective, participatory, voluntary and mutual efforts that contest global capitalist structures.

The edited collection responds to the need to reflect on anarchist pedagogies and will highlight three major themes. Authors in the first section will be encouraged to focus on historical discussions surrounding anarchism and education. The authors will give introspective critiques of historical practices, including theories of teaching and learning and alternatives to compulsory public schools. Authors in the second section will construct philosophical and theoretical frameworks evolving from contemporary anarchists, particularly through individuals participating in cooperatives, independent media collectives, infoshops, political zines, open source projects, DIY, direct action networks and other autonomous and cultural spaces.

Continued efforts to construct theoretical and philosophical discussions surrounding anarchism have also provided opportunities to build affinities and tensions with frameworks outside of anarchist writings (Cohn, 2007). The third section will encompass anarchist theories of teaching and learning. Authors will be asked to construct linkages and apprehensions to theories surrounding critical pedagogies and critical theory, autonomous Marxism, postmodernity and poststruturalism.

Proposed sections:

Forward:

Zack de la Rocha

1) Introduction

2) Section 1: Anarchism & Education: Historical experimentations

a. Anarchist perspectives on education

b. Modern Schools; Spain and the United States

c. Pedagogical practices: teacher/student relationship

d. Issues of the state and compulsory education

e. Connection and/or tensions between progressive education and social reconstruction

f. What have we learned?

3) Section 2: Anarchist Pedagogies in the “here and now”

a. Contesting power through multiple fronts: Movements against neoliberalism and learning through collective processes: Infoshops, cooperatives, autonomous spaces, zines, DIY

b. Teaching and learning in non-hierarchical, mutual and voluntary spaces — issues surrounding race, class, gender, LGBT

c. Technology: Issues surrounding the use of technology: open source, listservs, blogs & discussion boards

4) Section 3: Anarchism: Theoretical Frameworks on Teaching & Learning

a. Affinities: Anarchism & Critical pedagogies. Relationship to Postmodernism and Poststructuralism-Postanarchism

b. Informal learning spaces

c. De-schooling

d. Anarchism & the role of the university

e. Pedagogical practices

Audience:

Anarchist Pedagogies will draw upon and make connection to contemporary anarchist studies literature, particularly in education. The book will be important for scholars in anarchist studies, critical pedagogy, as well as undergraduate students and activists who are interested in building philosophical, theoretical, historical and contemporary discussions and imaginations beyond traditional forms of education.

Timeframe:

1) Proposals due by July 20th, 2010

2) Proposal confirmations: August 20th, 2010

3) Chapter drafts due by October 1st, 2010

4) Editor

5) Review of drafts: November, 2010

Editor will produce a comprehensive introductory and single authored chapter in one of the three sections. The forward will be written by an activist/scholar. Final editing and approval of the formatted version will be submitted December 30th, 2010. Publishing date will be set for early fall, 2011.

Contributors:

Process for submitting proposals:

Interested scholars, researchers, educators, activists and others should send to the editor, by July 20th, 2010, the following:

1) Names, positions, mailing addresses, fax and phone numbers, and email addresses of authors;

2) Title of proposed chapter;

3) Description, of no more than 300 words, of chapter, including type of research, approach, context, connection to the book, and other pertinent information;

4) Biographies of authors of no more than 200 words;

Biography of editor:

Robert Haworth is an Associate Professor in Multicultural Education at University of Wisconsin-La Crosse. He currently serves as the director for the Research Center for Cultural Diversity and Community Renewal. He teaches undergraduate and graduate courses surrounding diversity and education, globalization and neoliberalism. He has published multiple peer reviewed book chapters and presented internationally on anarchism and informal learning spaces, as well as critical social studies education. He co-founded Regeneration TV, along with other research collectives that are directly involved in contesting neoliberal policies at the university level. This is Robert Haworth’s first edited book.

Robert Haworth PhD—Associate Professor University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, haworth.robe@uwlax.edu, 608.385.0891

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John Dewey

PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION RESEARCH SEMINARS

Summer Term 2010

All seminars will take place in Room 828, Institute of Education, University of London, 20 Bedford Way, on Wednesday’s, 5.15pm – 7.30pm

PROGRAMME:

28 April: Julian Baggini, Editor, The Philosophers’ Magazine, Real Respect: Dealing with Shared and Contested Values

5 May: Paul Standish, Institute of Education, London, Calling Education to Account

12 May: Uffe Jensen, Department of Philosophy and History of Ideas, Aarhus University, Philosophy and the Education of Educators

19 May: John Cottingham, Department of Philosophy, University of Reading, Demandingness, Moral Development and Moral Philosophy

26 May: Alistair Miller, Institute of Education, London, Two rival aims of education: social justice and the good life

2 June: Christopher Winch, Department of Education, King’s College London, The role of Philosophy of Education in Teacher Education

9 June: Sean Sayers, School of European Culture and Languages University of Kent: MacIntyre, Modernity and the REF

16 June: Sanjay Seth, Department of Politics, Goldsmiths, University of London, Changing the Subject: Western Knowledge and the Question of Difference

23 June: Danièle Moyal-Sharrock, School of Humanities, University of Hertfordshire, Situating Memory: Wittgenstein and neuropsychology 

30 June: Adrian Moore, Department of Philosophy, University of Oxford, Bernard Williams’ Ethics and the Limits of Philosophy: Question and Answer session

All welcome

For further information please contact n.carr@ioe.ac.uk

Neal Carr, Post Graduate Research Degrees Administrator, Institute of Education, Room 806, 20 Bedford Way, London, WC1H 0AL; Tel: 0207 612 6820

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

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