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No Future

No Future

NO PRESENT: NEW ENCOUNTERS IN FRENCH AND ITALIAN THOUGHT

March 13-14, 2015

Villanova University

Keynote: Jason E. Smith

The negotiation between French and Italian activists and intellectuals in the latter part of the twentieth century (marked by 1968 in France and 1977 in Italy) opened a field of theoretical experimentation, the effects of which pose a challenge for contemporary politics. This encounter materialized through various collectives, traversing the neat intellectual and practical boundaries of the academy. Whether through the images of intellectuals in the streets or through radical activist groups extending from the Situationist International to Tiqqun, the laboratory of French and Italian thought poses a constellation of conceptual weapons that remain vital for any contestation with the state of things. These implements have been successful in intervening within contemporary struggles on the level of theory, practice, and the construction of history in the present.

Under the inheritance of this tradition, this conference invites submissions from the interstices and margins of recent French and Italian philosophy. Possible paper topics include feminist recapitulations of post-workerism, the theoretical legacy of biopolitics as it is taken up in Agamben and Esposito, and the ongoing challenges for theory and practice posed by social movements extending from Latin America to the Mediterranean in the wake of events such as Mohamed Bouazizi’s self-immolation.

Other topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Post-Althusserian philosophy
  • Decolonial challenges to eurocentric thought and strategies
  • Wages for Housework and care economies
  • Realism and contemporary cntologies
  • Re-interpretations of the Gramscian legacy
  • Philosophies of life and the problem of vitalism
  • Lacanian psychoanalysis and its heritage
  • French and Italian receptions of Spinoza, Hegel, and Marx
  • Affect theory and imagination in cultural productions (e.g. film and media)
  • Left Heideggarian reflections on community between Nancy and Agamben

 

The Philosophy Graduate Student Union at Villanova University welcomes graduate students and junior faculty to submit any of the following to be considered for our conference: paper abstracts of 250-350 words, papers of approximately 3000 words (including co-authored work) suitable for a 20 minute presentation, or proposed panels. Authors of accepted abstracts should send completed papers by March 1, 2015.

Please send submissions, prepared for blind review, by Dec. 21, 2014 to YUcont2015@gmail.com

This conference is committed to accommodating people with disabilities. Conference participants and attendees are encouraged to contact the above email address to discuss accommodations.

Villanova University (About): http://www1.villanova.edu/content/main/about.html

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.co.uk

 

Glenn Rikowski’s latest paper, Crises in Education, Crises of Education – can now be found at Academia: http://www.academia.edu/8953489/Crises_in_Education_Crises_of_Education

Heather Brown

Heather Brown

MARXISM AND FEMINISM: WAS MARX A ‘CLASS DETERMINIST’?

MARX ON GENDER AND THE FAMILY: A CRITICAL STUDY

Marx on Gender and the Family: A Critical Study
By Heather A. Brown
Haymarket Books, 2013
232 pp.

Review by Barry Healy

September 1, 2014 – Links International Journal of Socialist Renewal – http://links.org.au/node/4028

For the most part the Marxist movement has a had a troubled relationship with the women’s liberation movement. While some Marxists (such as those organised in Australia’s Socialist Alliance) have no problem with feminism, others have choked on the thought of a rebellious movement that does not fit neatly into their paradigm of a workers-led revolution.

It was not always so. Between 1917 and 1927, the heyday of the Russian Revolution, the Soviet government passed many laws to give equality between men and women. For example, abortion became free and legal and anti-homosexual laws were repealed.

After the degeneration of the revolution into Stalinism things became very different. As Leon Trotsky put it, the bureaucracy “began singing panegyrics to the family supper and the family laundry, that is, the household slavery of women”.

Capital punishment was restored for abortion, thus, Trotsky said, “returning women to the status of pack animals”.

In lock-step, the world’s self-described communist parties, the most powerful left segments of the working class, advanced reactionary ideas about women’s place in the world and the revolutionary movement. Women were to be auxiliaries to male revolutionaries, they said, and bountiful mothers within happy families.

Stalinism promised a sort of “trickle down” socialism. First the (male) workers would benefit, then others. Unfortunately, some Trotskyists, in their anxiety to be more “pro-worker” than the Stalinists adapted versions of that approach.

Was Marx a class determinist?

Given all that, various feminist thinkers have had an, at best, ambiguous relationship with Marxism. Some have woven elements of Marxism together with, say, psychoanalytical theory to overcome what they see as Karl Marx’s, at best, gender blindness. They erected an alternative theory of patriarchy, which stands timelessly above society, dictating the unfolding of history.

To what extent can this conflict be attributed to Karl Marx himself? Was his a dour vision of human liberation where stalwart, proletarian men would achieve socialism and, under their paternal gaze, women and others would then step forward to take control of their own destinies?

US socialist Heather Brown has performed a great service in this short, yet detailed survey of all of Marx’s writings on women and gender – including some that have never before been published in any language. Marx did not just analyse economics and history, she demonstrates, he interrogated all forms of literature (even police files) to tease out the threads of social oppression.

She asks if there is “the possibility of a Marxist feminism that does not lapse into economic determinism or privilege class over gender in analysing contemporary capitalist society?” She compares and contrasts Marx with a wide range of feminist writers, and says that there is enough in Marx indicating “the interdependent relationship between class and gender without fundamentally privileging either in his analysis”.

While Marx was a product of his Victorian times and never developed an explicitly unified theory on women’s liberation, she shows that throughout his life he thought about the matter. Based on this, Brown argues that “there are a number of potential starting points for a less deterministic and less gender-blind form of Marxism”.

The diverse — and surprising — nuggets that Brown has unearthed reveal that Marx’s thoughts have a refreshingly modern feel. She demonstrates that as he evolved as a thinker his insights became more penetrating. Moreover, he incorporated his ideas into his political activity.

Early writings

Marx was contemporary with other socialists who thought that women are naturally inferior to men. However, from his earliest writings, Marx dismissed the entire notion that “nature” is static. In his 1844 Economic and Philosophical Manuscripts he pointed out that nature and culture are dialectically linked and mutually condition each other.

More than that, the Manuscripts say that the position of women can be used as a measure of the development of a given society. He was not calling for men to liberate women, he was arguing that in going beyond capitalism our society will have to develop new relations that transcend alienation.

That the family form is not a “natural” social arrangement is further elucidated in The German Ideology (co-authored with Engels). The implication is that women’s oppression can be ended as society changes and women can enter more into the world of work.

Following another line of thought in The Holy Family, Marx criticises a novel by French writer Eugene Sue called Les Mysteres de Paris. Sue created a character called Fleur de Marie who is saved from her life of prostitution by a prince and enters a convent, where she dies shortly afterward.

Marx reacted sharply to Sue’s Catholic moralising about prostitution and sexuality in general. “Despite her situation”, Brown writes, “Marx does not see her a merely a powerless victim, but as possessing agency”.

Marx saw Fleur de Marie as an example of the yearning to be fully human and he slams the paternalistic prince for failing “to grasp the general condition of women in modern society as an inhuman one”.

As part of his journalism Marx translated into German writings by Jacques Peuchet on suicide. Peuchet was the French police archivist and his writings on unusual cases were very popular (inspiring, among other things, Alexander Dumas to write The Count of Monte Cristo).

Marx chose parts of Peuchet dealing with the suicide of middle-class women. Marx’s personal leanings come through via the parts he chose to delete and in subtle additions of his own comments.

These show Marx as far removed from a doctrinaire, class-bound theorist. Michel Lovy also reviews these writings in the March 2002 Monthly Review where he says Marx demonstrates an “understanding of the evils of modern bourgeois society, of the suffering that its patriarchal family structure inflicts on women, and of the broad and universal scope of socialism”.

Lovy points out that the most interesting part of this writing is that Marx focuses on women “driven to desperation and suicide by bourgeois society”. Peuchet’s accounts demonstrated to Marx that even members of the bourgeoisie are alienated.

Brown says Marx argues in these writings for total social transformation, because “economic levelling or redistribution are not enough to create a better society, so long as capitalist social relations remain in place”.

The family and its discontents

The alienation that drives some to suicide is to be found in the family sphere as well as the public, Marx says. But more than just pointing to the social causes of individual despair, Marx goes so far as to see suicide as a form of resistance in an oppressive society!

He was not recommending suicide, rather he was reading into it the signs of resistance as much as it was a symptom of misery.

Most tellingly, Marx writes that the French Revolution did not topple all tyrannies. “The evil which one blames on arbitrary forces exists in families, where it causes crises, analogous to those of revolutions”. He does not state it, but that analysis extends out into the future socialist revolution, contra Stalinism.

The bourgeois family is famously lambasted in The Communist Manifesto, where Marx and Frederick Engels mock bourgeois pretentions and argue that the very conditions that had produced the bourgeois family were disappearing among proletarians. Accordingly, the father’s role and power was diminished, opening up the opportunity for a different form of the family.

Brown points to a number of references to women in Capital, Marx’s magnum opus and in his earlier draft material for Capital. In particular, Marx discusses the way that capitalists delighted in drawing women and children into factories because, as specially oppressed people, they could be paid less.

However, Marx saw the dialectical aspects of this process. As women became proletarians they gained power in their private lives and moved out of the control of their fathers and male relatives. This process can be observed today, for example, in the international call centres that have been established in India.

Marx recognised all the pain and tribulations in this. The long hours and shift work undermined traditional family structures and many people suffered. However, women’s economic power led towards an egalitarian form of the family with men.

While not delving deeply into it, in Capital Marx critiques the notion of productive and unproductive labour under capitalism. For the bourgeoisie, only labour that gives them profit through the creation of surplus value is productive. But Marx says that is one-sided as the production of use values is important as well.

That opens up the question of women’s labour in the home, which is essential to the very existence of labour. Marx never took up the question of wages for housework but his ideas regarding women’s independence showed an evolution over time.

Development of Marx’s thinking

When writing about the Preston strikes in 1853-54, Marx was uncritical of the strikers’ demand for a family wage, which implies women as dependent appendages of men. By the 1860s however, he was arguing for equal status for women within the structures of the First International.

This reflected his general thinking about the equality of women. “From the beginning of the First International to the end of his life”, Brown writes, “Marx supported incorporating women in the workforce as equals”.

In 1858, Marx returned to the oppression of women in bourgeois families when he wrote about the case of an English aristocrat, Lady Bulwer-Lytton, who, following the breakdown of her marriage, was declared insane at the instigation of her estranged husband. As in his earlier ruminations about suicide, Marx is clearly describing the bourgeois family as a site of oppression of women.

Those pieces, which were written for the New York Herald Tribune, also contain traces of a critique of the use of labelling mental illness as a tool of social control.

After the heroic spirit shown by women in the Paris Commune Marx demonstrated a keener appreciation of the demands of women. In France the paternalistic ideas of Proudhon were still in evidence in the labour movement. But, in opposition, Marx wrote in 1880 that “the emancipation of the productive class is that of all human beings without distinction of sex or race”.

Marx’s notebooks from the final years of his life contain some of the most interesting developments of his thought. He was reading about the development of many societies, including Indonesia, native American groups, Russia, ancient Greece and India. In these notes are scattered thoughts about the role of women in the historical process.

After Marx’s death Engels discovered these notes, especially those on Henry Morgan’s Ancient Society, the pioneering work of anthropology. Using these, Engels produced The Origin of the Family, Private Property and the State, in which he argues that men and women had lived in equality in pre-class society. Engels, taking Morgan at face value and going further, describes the rise of class society as bringing about the “world historic defeat of the female sex”.

Brown, however, finds a more nuanced appraisal of Morgan in Marx. Marx did not accept Morgan uncritically, he compared and contrasted him with other writers. Also, his underlining and emphasises show that he was far less condescending towards women than Morgan.

Brown says that Engels “provides a deterministic assessment of the beginning of class and gender-conflict”. Engels emphasises the role of men’s need to transfer property rights to their children as central to the oppression of women, whereas, Brown says, for Marx women’s oppression involves far more than that.

Brown highlights Marx’s dialectical method in being vital in understanding gender and the family. She says that Marx did not apply ahistorical philosophical categories to reality, he empirically analysed the world and utilised categories that he discovered there.

“While Marx’s theory remains underdeveloped in terms of providing as account that includes gender as important to understanding capitalism”, Brown says, “his categories, nonetheless, lead in the direction of a systematic critique of patriarchy as it manifest itself in capitalism since he is able to separate out the historically-specific elements of patriarchy from a general form of women’s oppression, as it has existed throughout much of human history”.

This short, comprehensive handbook will no doubt provide the basis for a new wave of feminist engagement with Marxism and is a clarion call for all those who regard themselves as Marxists to re-evaluate their ideological conceptions.

Heather Brown allows us all to read Marx with new eyes.

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Match Women

Match Women

EAST LONDON SUFFRAGETTE FESTIVAL

1-10 August, with the main event taking place all day on Saturday 9 August 2014

What?

A festival of talks, workshops and entertainment celebrating Sylvia Pankhurst and the East London Suffragettes and exploring our festival themes:

  • Feminism and other equality campaigns
  • Protest, politics and activism
  • Hidden histories, especially women’s, working class and migrant voices
  • Celebrating East London today

Who?

The festival is being entirely organised by volunteers in partnership with local groups and business and with the support of the Feminist Review Trust and the East End Community Foundation.

The East London Suffragette Festival is an unincorporated voluntary association with a central committee. To contact us please emailwomensmayday@gmail.com

You can also find us on Facebook and Twitter.

Why?

  • Celebrate and raise awareness about the East London Federation of Suffragettes and the work of Sylvia Pankhurst
  • Build awareness and support for contemporary women’s rights and equality causes and campaigns
  • Promote East London’s vibrant history, culture, social business and activism
  • Raise money for and raise the profile of the wonderful Newham Action Against Domestic Violence
  • Bring communities together by celebrating shared local heritage
  • Have fun!

Get involved

We would love to hear from individuals, groups, businesses and venues who want to be involved or support the festival in some way.

Could you help us with:

  • volunteering at our events?
  • promoting the festival?
  • gifts in kind, from craft supplies to advertising space or printing?
  • sponsorship or funding?

If you’d like to be involved in any way please contact Sarah atwomensmayday@gmail.com.

Partners and friends

We’re excited to be working with:

Newham Bookshop

For Books’ Sake

Four Corners Film

The Sylvia Pankhurst Trust

East End Walks

Tower Hamlets Community Housing

Friends of Meath Gardens

Bow Idea Store

G KELLY, Roman Road Market

 

Information: http://eastlondonsuffragettes.tumblr.com/about

Programme: http://eastlondonsuffragettes.tumblr.com/programme

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Feminism

Feminism

REFLECTIONS ON DISPOSSESSION: CRITICAL FEMINISMS

24-25th October 2014

Senate and Court Room, Senate House, Malet Street, London, WC1E 7HU

Presenters and Interlocutors: Rafeef Ziadah, Sara Farris, Denise Ferreira da Silva, Davina Bhandar, Alyosha Goldstein, Nirmal Puwar, Eddie Bruce-Jones, Jon Goldberg-Hiller, Jordana Rosenberg, Brenna Bhandar, Nadine El-Enany, Leena Kumarappan, Sarah Lamble, Feyzi Ismail, Charmane Elliot, Leticia Sabsay and others

This two-day symposium explores the relationship between the material, cultural, psychic and symbolic dimensions and effects of dispossession. Building on a range of critical feminisms, the papers, collective discussions and keynote addresses will take forward and build on the rich and dynamic traditions of black, indigenous and post-colonial feminisms, queer theory and materialist feminisms. Themes include: migrant women workers and European nationalism; indigenous dispossession of land, labour and status in Canada, Hawai’i, and Palestine; sexual subjects and propriety; affect, emotion and the production of racial subjects; and much more…

Keynote Speakers: Avery Gordon and Patricia Tuitt

Registration essential

Waged 2 day ticket £30 (lunch included on 24th)

SOAS Staff, students and activists free

Book now at store.soas.ac.uk

First published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/reflections-on-dispossession-critical-feminisms-24-25th-october-2014-london

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Aesthetics

Aesthetics

BECOMING ECOFEMINISMS

CALL FOR PAPERS

PhaenEx: Journal of Existential and Phenomenological Theory and Culture

Vol.11-1 (2016)

PhaenEx: http://phaenex.uwindsor.ca/ojs/leddy/index.php/phaenex/index

PhaenEx is seeking contributions for its next special topics issue on Becoming Ecofeminisms. Ecofeminism has many versions and genealogies. In the context of new kinds of environmental crises, imaginaries, and discourses, how might we rethink and reinvigorate ecofeminisms— telling alternative genealogies of this movement (sometimes considered outdated and essentialist), highlighting current practices, and envisioning its bold futures. We are interested in ecofeminisms in both theory and practice.

Proposals and papers related (but not limited) to the following are welcome:

  • Ecofeminist intersections with current discourse and practice in queer, anti-colonial, anti-racist, critical disability, and critical animal studies
  • Genealogies of and differences within ecofeminisms
  • Critiques of ecofeminism / Ecofeminist critique
  • Contemporary revival of ecofeminist approaches
  • Links or tension between ecofeminism and posthumanism, new materialism, object-oriented ontologies, speculative realism, etc.
  • Ecofeminist reappraisal of relationships, affects, and communities (anarchist praxis, solidarity-based movements, grassroots initiatives, transformative justice, etc.)
  • Ecofeminism in relation to creative practices including eco-art, bio-art,ecopoetics, cli-fi, etc.
  • Ecofeminist engagements with the anthropocene, deep time, resilience, the geological turn, the oceanic turn, re-wilding, green futures, or other salient contemporary concepts.

Deadline for submissions: 1st August 2015.

All papers will be peer-reviewed.

Contact: Astrida Neimanis (astrida.neimanis@gmail.com) and Christiane Bailey (christianebailey@gmail.com)

 

PhaenEx: http://www.phaenex.uwindsor.ca

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Match Women

Match Women

MATCHWOMEN’S FESTIVAL

Saturday 5th July 2014

Mander Hall

Hamilton House, Mabledon Place

London

WC1H 9BD

11AM to 9PM

Nearest stations: Euston and King’s Cross

Website: http://www.matchfest.co.uk/

Facebook: www.facebook.com/matchwomen

 

The Legacy of the Matchwomen

In the summer of 1888, 1400 women walked out on strike over management bullying and appalling, hazardous working conditions. The women and girls working at Bryant & May’s match factory in London’s East End shocked the world, and ultimately changed it.

Working-class women at this time were supposed to be seen and not heard, especially if, like many matchwomen, they were of Irish heritage. Instead, the matchwomen paraded the streets of the East End, singing songs and telling the truth about their starvation wages and mistreatment by the firm.

They marched to Parliament, and their strength and solidarity won them better pay, safer conditions, and the right to form the largest union of women and girls in Britain.

They were an inspiration to other groups of workers up and down the country and throughout the world. The modern movement for workers’ rights had begun, and the matchwomen were at the forefront of it.

Last year’s first Matchwomen’s Festival marked the 125th anniversary of the Matchwomen’s Strike.

It was a brilliant day with around 700 visitors, including the late Bob Crow, and was one of Tony Benn’s last public engagements.

Since then, the importance of the matchwomen to British history has been acknowledged in Parliament with a debate devoted to them, and Labour MPs recommending that the book about them, Striking a Light, should be on the school syllabus. Minister Ed Vaizey replied that Michael Gove would read it: so far, no word on whether Mr Gove enjoyed it, but we wait with baited breath.

MPs also wanted to see a properly-worded blue plaque acknowledging the women’s courage at the old factory site, which Vaizey supported. Watch this space, or indeed, that space if you live nearby.

This year’s festival is smaller, but still perfectly formed. We have some wonderful speakers, songs from Tina McKevitt, and spoken word from Faisal Ali.

We’re excited to have the inspiring Sara Khan on the importance of making links with Muslim women, Sukhwant Dhaliwal on the work and history of Women Against Fundamentalism, eminent trade union and human rights barrister John Hendy QC, and the TUC’s Scarlet Harris.

Kate Connelly will speak on her book about the astonishing life of Sylvia Pankhurst,

Terry McCarthy will speak about the matchwomen-inspired London Dock Strike of 1889, on which he is an authority. Actor and director Kate Hardie will talk about her film Shoot Me, and Alex Wall will talk about working with people with eating disorders, and how they can affect us all.

Heather Wakefield and Caroline Raine have excellent records on organising trade union women, and will update us on the latest issues and disputes and how we can support them.

Louise Raw is the author of Striking a Light and speaks and writes on the Matchwomen, women, unions and history.  Diana Johnson MP was instrumental in bringing the Matchwomen’s legacy to the attention of parliament.

 

Special Guest:

Eam Rin

We welcome to the festival a very special guest. Eam is at the forefront of the dangerous struggle for workers’ rights in Cambodia, which has left 5 people dead this year alone. A garment sewer for 14 years and secretary of the Cambodian Democratic Union, Eam is visiting the UK to talk about the current brutal government crackdown on freedom of association.

 

The Line-up: http://www.matchfest.co.uk/matchfest-line-up.html

Tickets are £2 each for the whole day through Eventbrite, plus a small booking fee.

Booking: http://www.matchfest.co.uk/tickets.html

Bryant & May

Bryant & May

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Occupy London

Occupy London

CRITICAL PERSPECTIVES ON INTERSECTIONALITY

CHICAGO EVENT WITH INTERNATIONAL PARTICIPATION
Critical Perspectives on Intersectionality: Addressing Struggles over Race, Gender, Class, and Ecology
The social theory of intersectionality has gained prominence among and activists and academics as a way to address the question of inclusion and social solidarity that was often overlooked by the traditional Left focus on the working class. Does “intersectionality” deliver on its promise to theorize radical social change in an inclusive way? Does it offer a real alternative to capitalism?  How might intersectionality be understood in the context of contemporary struggles?
In this discussion, panelists will be engaging these questions from various critical perspectives focused on race, gender, class, and ecological struggles.

Speakers:
Lenore Daniels, “The Marginalization of Black Radicalism in the Obama Era” (activist and writer on Cultural Theory, Race and Gender)
Sarah Mason, “From Occupy to Marx: Ecology, Labor, and the New Society” (former activist, Occupy Los Angeles)
Kevin Anderson, “Karl Marx and Intersectionality” (author Marx at the Margins)
Sandra Rein, “The Gendered Subject at the Crossroads” (author Reading Raya Dunayevskaya)
David Black, “Philosophy, Ecology, and Anti-Capitalism” (author, Philosophical Roots of Anti-Capitalism)

Friday, July 25, 6:30 p.m.
Corboy Law Center
25 East Pearson St. Chicago
Room 208
Sponsored by the Loyola University Department of Philosophy
Co-sponsored by the International Marxist-Humanist Organization

See: http://www.internationalmarxisthumanist.org/

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Feminism

Feminism

GUTS: CANADIAN FEMINIST MAGAZINE

CALL FOR PAPERS

 

Next up? GUTS talks about sex in issue 3

Conceptions of bodies, sexuality, and desire have been rallying points for feminist activism, research, and advocacy in different historical moments. Looking back to the 1970s, advocates of the Canadian women’s movement made courageous and influential efforts to secure safe access to abortion clinics, to establish supportive women’s shelters and rape crisis centres, and to better understand women’s reproductive and sexual health. The effects of this movement on Canadian society are undeniable. Take, for example, the Abortion Caravan (1969-70), a national feminist protest that mobilized over 500 activists from all over the country to demand that the government amend its abortion policy. Although abortion was not removed from Canada’s criminal code until 1988, the Caravan brought women’s reproductive rights to the forefront of the country’s consciousness. Coinciding with the Western world’s sexual liberation movement, second wave feminism in Canada made space for conversations about women’s sexuality beyond the bedroom.

Despite clear advances made by early forms of feminist organizing and advocacy in Canada, female and queer bodies remain contested terrain in government social policy:provincially funded abortions are increasingly inaccessiblesex workers face anti-prostitution legislation, and women’s shelters, rape crisis centres, and women’s rights advocacy groups are invariably strapped for cash. All-too-frequent instances of sexual objectification of and violence against women today indicate that sex remains relevant to feminist analysis. And yet, despite the importance of sex to feminism in popular sex-positive discourses, women’s struggles are too often configured as isolated matters, rather than symptoms of a larger patriarchal structure.

For this issue, we set out to demystify sexuality while attending to the ways sexual liberation has evolved into a new brand of feminism that promotes sex as a means of achieving selfhood and financial independence. Pop-feminist discussions of sexuality are too often reduced to a crude consumerist notion of individuality, measured by one’s purchasing power and an ability to sleep with whomever one wants. Although sex positivism once provided a clear avenue toward instituting social and political change, its contemporary manifestation in today’s fabulous, independent, sexually liberated feminist icons only serves to conceal gendered and racialized forms of oppression that continue to inform our daily realities.

Our sex issue invites contributors to recover the politics of bodies, sexuality, and desire.

Potential topics for submissions might include:

  • Abortion and reproductive rights
  • Critiques of monogamy
  • Non-heteronormative sexuality and love
  • The romanticization of two-spirited sexuality
  • Asexuality
  • Polyamorous culture
  • Sex-work activism in Canada
  • The contemporary anti-porn movement
  • Feminist porn (does it exist?)
  • Rape culture, consent, and sexual violence
  • Violence against and the disappearance of Indigenous women
  • Online dating and post-physical relationships
  • Disability and sex
  • Beauty, consumerism, and self-marketing in a neoliberal economy
  • Erotic fanfiction and feminine forms of escape

 

Submission Guidelines:

GUTS accepts personal and journalistic essays; poetry and fiction; reviews of books, TV, music, and film; creative interviews and conversations. GUTS also accepts images and videos relevant to our theme.

Please submit a short proposal (150-300 words) describing your project no later than July 15, 2014 to submit@gutsmagazine.ca

Final submissions (500-4000 words) will be due on September 1, 2014.

For further information about the submission guidelines, please email us at submit@gutsmagazine.ca

Yours,

GUTS

GUTS: http://gutsmagazine.ca/

GUTS Call for Papers: http://gutsmagazine.ca/4502/call-submissions-issue-3/

Feminism

Feminism

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Sara Carpenter and Shahrzad Mojab

Sara Carpenter and Shahrzad Mojab

HOW CAPITALISM SURVIVES? A MARXIST-FEMINIST PERSPECTIVE

Call for Papers within the framework of the 11th Historical Materialism Annual Conference ‘How Capitalism Survives’ – 6-9 November 2014 – Vernon Square, Central London

The Historical Materialism Annual Conference in London has emerged as a pivotal site for critical, engaged, constructive, and provocative scholarship and activism internationally. This is a fitting place for focusing the (re)emergence of Marxist-Feminist historical materialist analysis. Now in our third year at HM, the 2014 Marxist-Feminist stream of the conference is seeking contributions that continue in the tradition of dynamic and original reflections of previous years, and also those that press the boundaries and take on the bold challenges posed by debates old and new.

The question ‘how capitalism survives?’ resonates strongly with a range of feminist critiques on the Left. In the 21st century this question invites us to revisit of the history of capitalism and patriarchy in their myriad entanglements as well as to analyse the daily (re)construction of a globally dominant socio-economic model that thrives on gendered and racial asymmetries.

The Marxist-Feminist stream this year wishes to deepen our understanding of the mechanisms that make the reproduction of capitalism possible in the very sites that constitute an ‘everyday life’ where exploitation and struggle are actualised or forestalled. We are also interested in analysing the continuities, discontinuities and mutations of the capitalism & patriarchy nexus from the age of empire all the way to contemporary neo-colonialisms. Such colonial projects may involve anything from territorially-based extraction of surplus value to the production of individual and collective subjectivities.

This year’s conference theme hopes to provide an opportunity to think in truly interdisciplinary fashion about how ‘we’ participate in sustaining capitalism as a reality of intersecting modalities of exploitation. To offer just one obvious example, today the exploitation of women by women has become indispensable to sustaining contemporary capitalism as a planetary biopolitics.

On the basis of the above, we invite papers that may address (but are not limited to) the following themes and/or questions, here presented in random order:

• Critical descriptions of capitalism across Marxism and feminism from feminism’s ‘first wave’ to the present
• Social reproduction and capitalist transformation: micro and macro-analyses
• Instances of success and failure in Marxist-Feminist struggles from the 19th to the 21st centuries
• In what particular ways does the ‘feminisation’ of labour help capitalism survive?
• Are new concepts and methodologies needed to understand women’s roles in capitalism’s ways of overcoming the recent crisis?
• How do the crises of capitalism help generate or overcome otherness (understood in gendered and/or racial terms)?
• Women and queer subjects’ roles in the rise of new capitalist economies and in the assumed decline of Western capitalism
• Homophobia and homonationalism before and after 9/11
• Moving borders, regenerating boundaries: states, bodies, temporality
• Ecosocialism, ecofeminism, ecology: narratives of change or scripts of subjugation?
• Revolution and reform in the theories of Marxist-feminism
• Racism, femonationalism, Islamophobia: the bigger picture
• Intersections of Marxism, feminism, critical race and postcolonial theories
• Sexual assault, rape and resistance
• Women in contemporary liberation struggles
• Marxist feminism and intersectionality theories
• Women’s art, film, music literature: subversion or reproduction of capitalist relations of production?
• Feminism and the reproduction of the capitalist art world
• Women in the communist/socialist tradition: Luxemburg, Zetkin, Kollontai, and others
• Welfare and the political economy of care
• Contemporary sexual politics: resistance to or empowerment of capitalism?
• Violence, fascism, Marxism and Feminism
• Separatism or participation? The case for the 21st century
• Feminism and the institutions of capitalism
• Gender, race and international migration
• Uniting forces: what would an interdisciplinary Marxist feminist theory look like?

Paper proposals should be max 200 words. When submitting your proposal, please indicate the theme to which your paper could contribute.

Please note that we welcome panel proposals. When you submit a panel proposal, please send an abstract of the general theme of the panel (max 300 words) together with the abstracts of the individual papers in the panel. For individual paper proposals, it is helpful to indicate the theme (above) to which your paper could contribute. This will help us to compose the panels. Panels and individual papers should be submitted by June 1st to: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/conferences/annual11/submit

Please be aware that the conference is self-funded; therefore we are unable to help with travel and accommodation costs.

Feminism

Feminism

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Feminism

Feminism

ROOMS OF OUR OWN

CONFERENCE ON WOMEN’S SPACES

Women’s Spaces and Feminist Politics: yesterday, today and tomorrow

You are invited to a one-day conference organized by London Women and Planning Forum, Rooms of our Own and Women’s Studies without Walls

FRIDAY 16th MAY 2014, 9.30 for 10.0 – 5.0pm
@ Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End Rd, E1 4NS 
Geography Department, First Floor, Room 126

This one-day conference will explore the role of women’s spaces in feminist politics, focusing on women’s centres and other women’s spaces in the past, present and future. During the 1970s there were autonomous women’s centres in most London boroughs and throughout the UK. They provided an exciting, safe and liberating environment for women to share thoughts and experiences and to campaign for change. Many of these centres were funded by local authority grants but as the grant-giving environment diminished most were forced to close. Some have survived by tendering for out-sourced council services such as domestic violence and rape counselling. Many have struggled against the conflation of feminist demands into a generalised equality agenda. During the past decade a new  generation of feminists has started to campaign against the objectification of women in the media, the expansion of pornography, sexism in the workplace and on the street, the lack of representation of women in public life and the sexualisation of young children. This new generation of feminists is largely organized via social media rather than in physical spaces. 

There will be four key sessions.

  1. Why “Women Only”?  Speakers on the history of women’s spaces, lesbian and separatist issues, cultural and religious diversity issues and requirements for women’s safety.
  2. Women’s Spaces past, present and future. A range of speakers looking at Women’s Centres that have closed, those that have survived and ideas for new forms for the future.
  3. Virtual women’s spaces. Speakers from organisations that organise almost exclusively online; benefits and problems.
  4. One hour discussion involving all the speakers and audience chaired by Woman’s Hour’s Jane Garvey, followed by a Networking session

We aim to organise another event following on from this Conference with the opportunity for much more discussion, networking and planning for the future.

Please go to Eventbrite to register: http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/womens-spaces-and-feminist-politics-yesterday-today-and-tomorrow-tickets-11140033139

£38 for waged +booking fee

£8.50 for unwaged +booking fee  (if this is difficult for you, please email us)

Includes tea/ coffee throughout the day and a vegetarian lunch.
Please let us know if you have particular access and /or dietary requirements
REGISTRATION DEADLINE: 6th May 2014
EMAIL CONTACT: womensspaces@gmail.com

Feminism

Feminism

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: http://independent.academic.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

Dud Capitalism

Dud Capitalism

POLITICAL WEEKEND: HOSTED BY REVOLUTIONARY SOCIALISM IN THE 21st CENTURY

Political weekend: hosted by rs21

Saturday, 29 March 2014 at 11:00 – Sunday, 30 March 2014 at 17:00 (GMT)

GoldsmithsCollege, University of London

New Cross, London, SE14 6NW, United Kingdom

Book online: http://bit.ly/rs21weekend

Timetable: http://rs21.org.uk/timetable/

A weekend of discussion and debate on what it means to be a revolutionary socialist today: organised around three key panel discussions and a number of workshops. The weekend is organised by rs21, a new grouping of revolutionary socialists in Britain. This is our first major public event and we welcome participation from anyone who is interested in similar issues and has been asking similar questions.

The Panel sessions:

• Neoliberal capitalism and the state of struggle

• Marxist approaches to racism, sexism and oppression

• Revolutionary organisation and the working class

We will also be hosting a Question Time with figures from the movement including Mark Steel, Sara Bennett and Mike Gonzalez titled “How do we organise to transform the world?”

Workshops include:

• Social reproduction: what it is and why it matters

• Protest movements and united fronts today

• Shifts in reformism and reformist consciousness

• What is revolutionary leadership?

• Marxism at the margins: intersectionality and identity

• Anti-politics: responses to austerity from Occupy to Russell Brand

• How should revolutionaries organise?

• Racism, new and old

• Neoliberalism’s impact on the working class

Speakers include:

• Mark Steel Independent columnist and comedian

• Nina Power author of One Dimensional Woman

• Mike Gonzalez author of upcoming book on Venezuela

• Mireia Gargallo from the Spanish squares movement

• Neil Davidson author of How Revolutionary Were the Bourgeois Revolutions?

• Lucia Pradella from the Historical Materialism journal

• Ian Birchall biographer of Tony Cliff

• Estelle Cooch former deputy editor of the Socialist Review

• Dan Swain author of Alienation: An Introduction to Marx’s Theory

• Sara Bennett from Unite the Union executive (pc)

• Jonny Jones former deputy editor International Socialism journal

• Amy Gilligan from the National Union of Students executive

• Colin Barker author of Marxism and Social Movements

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: http://independent.academic.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

Culture

Culture

ENERGY, ENVIRONMENT, CULTURE – CALL FOR PAPERS

The Institute on Culture and Society: The Banff Centre for the Arts — June 13-17, 2014

The Institute on Culture and Society (ICS) invites the submission of papers on topics related to Marxism, critical theory, and Marxist views of literature. Submissions are welcome from all humanities and social scientific perspectives. Full submission details can be found at the end of this call.

Supplementing an ongoing engagement with Marxism, ICS 2014 welcomes submissions on this year’s special topic: “Energy, Environment, Culture” (EEC). This topic aims to facilitate discussion that moves beyond standard disputes over energy politics in Canada in order to develop sophisticated knowledge about the global relations, ecological realities, social reproduction, and community impacts of energy.

From debates on harnessing wind and solar power to the environmental effects of the tar sands, energy and power have a complex and under theorized connection to culture, politics, and society. Energy is understood in economic terms as the name for an input into market activity that can take a variety of forms and which is necessary for steady-state growth. In environmental thought, too, energy serves as a placeholder for a range of activities, practices and objects with inconsistent theoretical and scientific content. In both cases, energy is seen as fundamental to social life, even if the depth of its significance to the operations of society, and its role in implementing and maintaining particular sets of relationships across diverse communities, is poorly understood. What insights can Marxism lend ecology? Further, what insights can a Marxist-Feminist political economy develop in ecological thought? Approaching these problematics from a humanities perspective, we suggest innovative workshop, panel, and paper proposals on any of the following:

Energy and Globalization
 – regional economies, energy distribution, and the political climate of international markets
– the transnational and global relationship between eastern, western and northern economies in Canada vis-à-vis Pacific and Southern American partners and cultures
– cultural symptoms of energy and globalization or internationalism
– cultural and environmental interactions in energy intensive regions
– the interregional and provincial flows created by energy infrastructures and cultural development

Energy and Ecology
– updates to the established approach to energetics
– “New Materialisms” and the renewed interest in non-human agency in ecological research
– redirections of familiar environment vs. economy binary
– the diverse materialisms that link economics, energy, and ecology

Ecology and Marxist Feminism
 – practical, community- driven knowledges about energy systems and sustainability
– primitive accumulation (as an ongoing process coterminous with capital accumulation), gender, and the environment
– the work of Mariarosa Dalla Costa, Maria Mies and Silvia Federici
– capitalism, gender, and ecology
– social reproduction and/as energy
– the new work on gender and reproduction coming out in the journals Endnotes and Lies

ICS is run in consecutive sessions to encourage a developing conversation and increase potential research outputs and collaboration. Toward this end, participants are strongly encouraged to stay for the entirety of the conference. Significant subsidies will be available to graduate students and the underemployed.

We welcome submissions of papers, panels, pecha kucha presentations, roundtables, reading groups, and more. Please submit proposals of no more than 400 words in length, including title and affiliation, to mlgics2014@gmail.com. Panel or roundtable proposals should be introduced by a 100 word rational. If geared towards a specific stream, submissions should indicate which stream it most strongly relates to.

All submissions must be received by the 14th of March, 2014.

Please let us know if you would be interested in having childcare arranged.

The Banff Centre is a world-renowned facility supporting the creation and performance of new works of visual art, music, dance, theatre, and writing.

ICS 2014 is sponsored by ARIEL, Mediations, Reviews in Cultural Theory, the Marxist Literary Group, The University of Alberta (U of A) Faculty of Arts, U of A English and Film Studies, U of A Kule Institute for Advanced Study, ConcordiaUniversity, St. Francis Xavier, YorkUniversity, and the Banff Centre.

 

The Banff Centre: http://www.banffcentre.ca/

 

**END**

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: https://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

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